Donate

TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, March 30, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, March 30, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#119] After Happily Ever After Emmy winning filmmaker Kate Schermerhorn's quirky, funny and movingpersonal quest for the secret to a happy marriage and for answers to some timely questions about an institution which might just be due for some review. This engaging doc features an eclectic mix of long married couples - from a couple who dress alike every day; to a pair of nudists and a newlywed pair of mothers, to a feisty English widow. A lively and world-renowned group of marriage experts - including psychologist John Gottman (who can predict divorce with 90% accuracy), marrriage historian Stephanie Coontz, and a Beverly Hills divorce attorney, ground the film in fact as they piece together the history and possible future and motivations for marriage. Along the way, Schermerhorn chronicles the joys and heartbreaks of her own marriage and finds that even the best advice can?t always guarantee a happily ever after. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    AfroPop: The Ultimate Cultural Exchange [#404] Calypso Rose: The Lioness of the Jungle Calypso Rose, the ambassador of Caribbean music, is a living legend, a charismatic character and the uncontested diva of calypso. Cameras follow Rose from Paris to her native Tobago, then to New York where she lives, and back to her ancestral homeland, Africa. Each place reveals another face and facet of the complex woman behind the public persona. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#301] Inside Common Core Classrooms We'll begin the new season of Teaching Channel Presents in classrooms where teachers are already integrating the Common Core. From adding and subtracting to fractions and functions, we'll follow students as they explore mathematical reasoning across grade levels. See how the standards change as students advance. And, we'll visit three lively English classes where the Common Core emphasis is on speaking and listening skills. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#312H] Public Schools for Sale? Public education has become big business. Privatizing schools could yield profits worth hundreds of billions. Diane Ravitch says that has to stop. As an assistant secretary of education under the first President Bush, she was an advocate of school choice and charter schools and supported the No Child Left Behind initiative of the second President Bush. But after careful investigation, she changed her mind, and has become, according to Salon.com, "the nation's highest profile opponent" of charter-based education.
    On this week's program, she tells Bill Moyers, "Privatizing public education is not a good project. [Instead] we should all do what we can to, first of all, address the most serious problem in America, which is the huge gaps of income, the huge inequalities gap in both wealth and income."
    She believes, "Where our public schools are in trouble it's because the community's in trouble. And instead of breaking up public schools and sending the kids off into the hands of some entrepreneurs, we should be addressing those problems, the needs and problems of the children."
    Public education, she says, "is one of the foundation stones of our democracy. So an attack on public education is an attack on democracy."
    Diane Ravitch is America's preeminent historian of public education. Her newest book is Reign of Error: The Hoax of the Privatization Movement and the Danger to America's Public Schools.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Asia Insight [#129] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5339H] Tensions remain high between Russia and the West in the wake of Moscow's annexation of Crimea. During meetings with European Union leaders this week, President Obama urged allied nations to step up their commitment to Ukraine and stand united against further Russian aggression. He also had some pointed words about Russia's standing in the world. Peter Baker of The New York Times will have the latest on efforts to de-escalate the crisis through diplomatic maneuvers, political pressure and additional economic sanctions.
    Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will report on the first-ever meeting between President Obama and Pope Francis - two of the world's most popular leaders - and the goal of their goodwill visit.
    The Supreme Court heard arguments this week in two cases challenging the contraception coverage provision of the Affordable Care Act. The lawsuits filed by arts and crafts chain Hobby Lobby and Conestoga Wood Specialties claims that for-profit businesses should be able to "opt out" from providing contraception coverage if it's contrary to their religious rights. Joan Biskupic of Reuters will explain why this case is about more than just religious convictions.
    The White House announced on Thursday that more than 6 million people have signed up for private health insurance plans under the Affordable Care Act. The surge in enrollments comes just days after the Obama administration extended the March 31 deadline for people to sign-up on the healthcare marketplace. Alex Wayne of Bloomberg News will report on the administration's recent push to get more people to sign up and why some Democrats have rolled out a series of policy proposals to improve the president's health care law.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3214H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#137H] * President Jimmy Carter on Russia and Ukraine * Mike Allen of Politico on the week in politics * Mindy Kaling discusses her tv show The Mindy Project * Director Sam Mendes on his Broadway revival of Cabaret * a look at the 2014 Whitney Biennial exhibition in New York City duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3213] Russians Invest Millions In Austria AUSTRIA: IN THE VALLEY OF THE RUBLE MILLIONAIRES - Austria is popular with wealthy Russians. The small town of Kitzbuhel is one of the places profiting from its rich guests. Now there are fears that sanctions will scare away the Russian elite. To Reinhold Mitterlehner, Austria's Economy Minister, it's long been clear that sanctions are an own goal for his country. In the high season in winter, charter flights from Russia land hourly at the small airports serving Salzburg and Innsbruck. Last year, 1.4 million Russians vacationed in Austria, most in popular ski resorts such as Kitzbuhel. Many Russian millionaires and even billionaires have bought property here. In doing so, they're combining business with pleasure, because Austria offers favorable tax conditions to well-heeled private investors.
    MACEDONIA: MONUMENTAL BATTLE - "Skopje 2014" is the name of an expensive government project that is increasingly dividing the country. From Alexander the Great to Mother Teresa, the city is home to increasing numbers of statues. When building began two years ago, "Skopje 2014" was meant to beautify the old town center. But it is now clear to everyone involved that it has much more to do with the issue of whose history is being immortalized in bronze and whose isn't. In a small country in which Macedonians, Turks, Albanians, Serbs and Roma live more alongside than with each other, each new statue leads to a heated dispute. The Albanians in particular feel they're inadequately represented in the sea of monuments, and a statue of Stefan Dusan, the self-proclaimed medieval Emperor of the Serbs, has infuriated the mainly Muslim Albanian minority.
    FRANCE: HIGH-FLYING HELMET CAMERAS - Michael Schumacher had one - and thousands of other skiers do as well: a micro-video camera mounted on a helmet. But the pursuit of impressive skiing pictures often leads skiers to take greater risks. In Europe's highest ski resort, Val Thorens, piste attendants have long been aware of a dangerous trend. More and more people are skiing in deep powder snow off-piste. What's new is that most amateur skiers intentionally go out when the risk of avalanche is at its greatest, simply because that's when they can get the best pictures of deep-powder skiing.
    SPAIN: BELATED JUSTICE FOR FRANCO'S VICTIMS? - To this day, Spain's legal system has not dealt with the crimes of the Franco era. A female Argentinian judge is now giving many victims new hope. Because of an amnesty, even torturers from the Franco era have been able to live unpunished in Spain. Protection from criminal prosecution was originally meant to facilitate the peaceful transition to democracy. Many victims, however, are demanding that the amnesty be lifted at last. A female judge from Buenos Aires is also seeking belated justice for these victims. Now Spain faces a flood of litigation: some two hundred lawsuits have been filed by Argentinian lawyers living in Madrid. They want to try perpetrators still living in Spain before courts in Argentina.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#119] After Happily Ever After Emmy winning filmmaker Kate Schermerhorn's quirky, funny and movingpersonal quest for the secret to a happy marriage and for answers to some timely questions about an institution which might just be due for some review. This engaging doc features an eclectic mix of long married couples - from a couple who dress alike every day; to a pair of nudists and a newlywed pair of mothers, to a feisty English widow. A lively and world-renowned group of marriage experts - including psychologist John Gottman (who can predict divorce with 90% accuracy), marrriage historian Stephanie Coontz, and a Beverly Hills divorce attorney, ground the film in fact as they piece together the history and possible future and motivations for marriage. Along the way, Schermerhorn chronicles the joys and heartbreaks of her own marriage and finds that even the best advice can?t always guarantee a happily ever after. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Focus On Europe [#3213] Russians Invest Millions In Austria AUSTRIA: IN THE VALLEY OF THE RUBLE MILLIONAIRES - Austria is popular with wealthy Russians. The small town of Kitzbuhel is one of the places profiting from its rich guests. Now there are fears that sanctions will scare away the Russian elite. To Reinhold Mitterlehner, Austria's Economy Minister, it's long been clear that sanctions are an own goal for his country. In the high season in winter, charter flights from Russia land hourly at the small airports serving Salzburg and Innsbruck. Last year, 1.4 million Russians vacationed in Austria, most in popular ski resorts such as Kitzbuhel. Many Russian millionaires and even billionaires have bought property here. In doing so, they're combining business with pleasure, because Austria offers favorable tax conditions to well-heeled private investors.
    MACEDONIA: MONUMENTAL BATTLE - "Skopje 2014" is the name of an expensive government project that is increasingly dividing the country. From Alexander the Great to Mother Teresa, the city is home to increasing numbers of statues. When building began two years ago, "Skopje 2014" was meant to beautify the old town center. But it is now clear to everyone involved that it has much more to do with the issue of whose history is being immortalized in bronze and whose isn't. In a small country in which Macedonians, Turks, Albanians, Serbs and Roma live more alongside than with each other, each new statue leads to a heated dispute. The Albanians in particular feel they're inadequately represented in the sea of monuments, and a statue of Stefan Dusan, the self-proclaimed medieval Emperor of the Serbs, has infuriated the mainly Muslim Albanian minority.
    FRANCE: HIGH-FLYING HELMET CAMERAS - Michael Schumacher had one - and thousands of other skiers do as well: a micro-video camera mounted on a helmet. But the pursuit of impressive skiing pictures often leads skiers to take greater risks. In Europe's highest ski resort, Val Thorens, piste attendants have long been aware of a dangerous trend. More and more people are skiing in deep powder snow off-piste. What's new is that most amateur skiers intentionally go out when the risk of avalanche is at its greatest, simply because that's when they can get the best pictures of deep-powder skiing.
    SPAIN: BELATED JUSTICE FOR FRANCO'S VICTIMS? - To this day, Spain's legal system has not dealt with the crimes of the Franco era. A female Argentinian judge is now giving many victims new hope. Because of an amnesty, even torturers from the Franco era have been able to live unpunished in Spain. Protection from criminal prosecution was originally meant to facilitate the peaceful transition to democracy. Many victims, however, are demanding that the amnesty be lifted at last. A female judge from Buenos Aires is also seeking belated justice for these victims. Now Spain faces a flood of litigation: some two hundred lawsuits have been filed by Argentinian lawyers living in Madrid. They want to try perpetrators still living in Spain before courts in Argentina.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 am
    QUEST [#506H] Millie Hughes-Fulford/Hog Wild In 1991, molecular biologist Millie Hughes-Fulford was the first woman to travel into space as a working scientist. QUEST learns how the experiments she's sending into orbit may one day help keep space travelers healthy. Plus, discover what California is doing to keep non-native wild pigs in check, and meet UC Santa Cruz marine biologist Dan Costa. duration 26:20   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Asia Biz Forecast [#452H] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1040] Great Value Investor: David Winters This week's WT features "Great Investor" David Winters of the Wintergreen Fund, who says there are excellent values to be found in global blue chips. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#304H] Financial advisor Ric Edelman joins the Army, for a limited tour of duty, to help train our troops financially. If you want to start a new business where do you get the seed money? A Future Finance expert says there is strength in numbers. And Jean Edelman looks at facing our fears. All that and much more on this edition of The Truth about Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Great Decisions In Foreign Policy [#507] China's Foreign Policy China is the dominant player in Asia, an economic powerhouse, political force, and growing military might increasingly willing to flex its muscles in order to advance regional interests. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3214H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5339H] Tensions remain high between Russia and the West in the wake of Moscow's annexation of Crimea. During meetings with European Union leaders this week, President Obama urged allied nations to step up their commitment to Ukraine and stand united against further Russian aggression. He also had some pointed words about Russia's standing in the world. Peter Baker of The New York Times will have the latest on efforts to de-escalate the crisis through diplomatic maneuvers, political pressure and additional economic sanctions.
    Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will report on the first-ever meeting between President Obama and Pope Francis - two of the world's most popular leaders - and the goal of their goodwill visit.
    The Supreme Court heard arguments this week in two cases challenging the contraception coverage provision of the Affordable Care Act. The lawsuits filed by arts and crafts chain Hobby Lobby and Conestoga Wood Specialties claims that for-profit businesses should be able to "opt out" from providing contraception coverage if it's contrary to their religious rights. Joan Biskupic of Reuters will explain why this case is about more than just religious convictions.
    The White House announced on Thursday that more than 6 million people have signed up for private health insurance plans under the Affordable Care Act. The surge in enrollments comes just days after the Obama administration extended the March 31 deadline for people to sign-up on the healthcare marketplace. Alex Wayne of Bloomberg News will report on the administration's recent push to get more people to sign up and why some Democrats have rolled out a series of policy proposals to improve the president's health care law.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#122H] State Sen. Yee Arrested, UCSF Chancellor Stepping Down and Push Dance Co. Explores Bayview Transformation
    State Sen. Leland Yee Arrested in FBI Sting
    An FBI probe erupted Wednesday with raids and the arrests of state Sen. Leland Yee of San Francisco, and Raymond "Shrimp Boy" Chow, on public corruption charges. The incident has sent shock waves throughout California. Friday the state Senate suspended Yee, along with two other Democratic senators embroiled in scandal, and Yee has dropped his bid to run for secretary of state.

    Guests:
    •Scott Detrow, KQED Sacramento bureau chief
    •Marisa Lagos, San Francisco Chronicle
    •Nathan Halverson, UC Berkeley Investigative Reporting Program

    Further Reporting:
    State Senate Votes to Suspend Yee, Calderon and Wright
    Money Talks: The FBI's Bribe Strategy in Yee, Calderon Cases
    A Reporter's Guide to the FBI Affidavit on State Sen. Leland Yee

    UCSF Chancellor Susan Desmond-Hellmann To Head Gates Foundation
    When Susan Desmond-Hellmann was chosen five years ago as the first female chancellor in the history of UC San Francisco, she was in charge of drug development at Genentech. She took over the $4 billion UCSF enterprise — including its schools of medicine, dentistry and nursing, along with cutting-edge research — at time of severe university budget cuts. Desmond-Hellman leaves UCSF at the end of this month to head up the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in Seattle. The outgoing chancellor sat down with Scott Shafer to talk about her UCSF tenure and future.

    Further Reporting:
    Desmond-Hellmann Steps Down as UCSF Chancellor Today

    Push Dance Company Explores Bayview Tranformation
    A new piece about the transformation of the Bayview-Hunters Point area in San Francisco by the Push Dance Company, known for its focus on social issues, premieres this weekend. While longtime residents have been waiting for years for the toxic cleanup of the former naval shipyard, the improvements could come with a cost. Some fear they may be pushed out of what has been a predominately African-American, working class neighborhood for nearly a century.

    Further Reporting:
    Point Shipyard Project Tells Bayview's Gentrification Story
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#312H] Public Schools for Sale? Public education has become big business. Privatizing schools could yield profits worth hundreds of billions. Diane Ravitch says that has to stop. As an assistant secretary of education under the first President Bush, she was an advocate of school choice and charter schools and supported the No Child Left Behind initiative of the second President Bush. But after careful investigation, she changed her mind, and has become, according to Salon.com, "the nation's highest profile opponent" of charter-based education.
    On this week's program, she tells Bill Moyers, "Privatizing public education is not a good project. [Instead] we should all do what we can to, first of all, address the most serious problem in America, which is the huge gaps of income, the huge inequalities gap in both wealth and income."
    She believes, "Where our public schools are in trouble it's because the community's in trouble. And instead of breaking up public schools and sending the kids off into the hands of some entrepreneurs, we should be addressing those problems, the needs and problems of the children."
    Public education, she says, "is one of the foundation stones of our democracy. So an attack on public education is an attack on democracy."
    Diane Ravitch is America's preeminent historian of public education. Her newest book is Reign of Error: The Hoax of the Privatization Movement and the Danger to America's Public Schools.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1730H] BI-VOCATIONAL PASTORS - To care for their families, and also lead their congregations, more and more ministers are working two jobs. Saul Gonzalez reports from Tennessee on pastors concerned that their secular jobs do not leave them time enough for full ministry to their congregations. Also, on the adjustment required of a wife when she learns that her husband, with a secular career, feels called to lead a church.
    BLIND BOYS OF ALABAMA - For 70 years, the Blind Boys of Alabama have been singing gospel music to inspire their audiences both with their music and their faith. Over the decades, the Blind Boys, still with some original members, have won five Grammys and been specially welcomed by the disabled. One of the members, Ricky McKinnie, says, "It's not about what you can't do. It's about what you do."
    FRANCISCAN MONASTERY OF THE HOLY LAND - Every Good Friday, in every Catholic parish in the country, a special collection is taken up for the Franciscans of the Holy Land. Correspondent Bill Baker reports that ever since the 14th Century the Franciscans have been assigned the task of caring for the holiest sites of Christianity, in and around Israel - 54 shrines and sanctuaries. The Franciscans have also created a monastery in Washington, DC where tourists can visit exact replicas of the most revered Holy Land sites.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 pm
    QUEST [#506H] Millie Hughes-Fulford/Hog Wild In 1991, molecular biologist Millie Hughes-Fulford was the first woman to travel into space as a working scientist. QUEST learns how the experiments she's sending into orbit may one day help keep space travelers healthy. Plus, discover what California is doing to keep non-native wild pigs in check, and meet UC Santa Cruz marine biologist Dan Costa. duration 26:20   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Miller Center's American Forum [#2101] Who Stole The American Dream? Pulitzer Prize winner Hedrick Smith, discusses his book, Who Stole the American Dream?, and how seismic changes in American politics and economics have transformed the country - for the worse. He discusses how deregulation and the New Economy disrupted the American notion of shared prosperity, and how the country lost the title of "Land of Opportunity." Smith is a legendary foreign correspondent and also the author of The Russians. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1222] Buenos Aires City Guide In this exciting capital city, Judith explores the bohemian barrio of San Telmo, visits the Recoleta Cemetery, takes in the scene at the Gaucho street fair and hits the tiles at one of Buenos Aires' trendiest tango clubs. Her adventures also include a ferry excursion across the Rio de la Plata to the picturesque Uruguayan village of Colonia and a trip to Mendoza, the Argentine region famous for its wine and breathtaking mountain scenery. duration 56:38   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Nature [#2806] Elsa's Legacy: The Born Free Story 2010 marked the 50th anniversary of the publication of "Born Free", a book and then a film that forever changed the way we think about wildlife. What has happened to lions since this story? And what has happened to the people featured in the film? What has "Born Free" taught us? duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    Nova [#4022H] Cold Case JFK For decades, the assassination of John F. Kennedy has fueled dark rumors of conspiracies and mishandled evidence. Now, 50 years later, Nova asks: Could modern investigators do better? We'll see how state-of-the art forensic tools would be applied to the investigation were it to happen today. At the same time, Nova takes a critical look at contemporary cases, like the murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman, to reveal how charges of evidence mishandling and human error can mar even scientifically sophisticated detective work. Will forensics ever be truly foolproof, or does modern technology just give a scientific sheen to a practice that will always be more art than science? duration 54:35   STEREO TVPG-V
  • 5:00 pm
    Secrets of the Dead [#1302] The Lost Diary of Dr. Livingstone To celebrate the 200th anniversary of Dr. David Livingstone's birth, new forensic techniques are being used to study the famed explorer's lost diary. It reveals he was witness to the brutal massacre of slaves at the hands of their traders. And the writings in this diary suggest he was a far different man than the legend that surrounds him. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-V (Secondary audio: none)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#160H] Included: NewsHour Weekend reports from Africa. Kenya is taking on the world's growing electronic waste, using e-waste recycling as a pathway for waste management and economic growth for the nation. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#122H] State Sen. Yee Arrested, UCSF Chancellor Stepping Down and Push Dance Co. Explores Bayview Transformation
    State Sen. Leland Yee Arrested in FBI Sting
    An FBI probe erupted Wednesday with raids and the arrests of state Sen. Leland Yee of San Francisco, and Raymond "Shrimp Boy" Chow, on public corruption charges. The incident has sent shock waves throughout California. Friday the state Senate suspended Yee, along with two other Democratic senators embroiled in scandal, and Yee has dropped his bid to run for secretary of state.

    Guests:
    •Scott Detrow, KQED Sacramento bureau chief
    •Marisa Lagos, San Francisco Chronicle
    •Nathan Halverson, UC Berkeley Investigative Reporting Program

    Further Reporting:
    State Senate Votes to Suspend Yee, Calderon and Wright
    Money Talks: The FBI's Bribe Strategy in Yee, Calderon Cases
    A Reporter's Guide to the FBI Affidavit on State Sen. Leland Yee

    UCSF Chancellor Susan Desmond-Hellmann To Head Gates Foundation
    When Susan Desmond-Hellmann was chosen five years ago as the first female chancellor in the history of UC San Francisco, she was in charge of drug development at Genentech. She took over the $4 billion UCSF enterprise — including its schools of medicine, dentistry and nursing, along with cutting-edge research — at time of severe university budget cuts. Desmond-Hellman leaves UCSF at the end of this month to head up the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in Seattle. The outgoing chancellor sat down with Scott Shafer to talk about her UCSF tenure and future.

    Further Reporting:
    Desmond-Hellmann Steps Down as UCSF Chancellor Today

    Push Dance Company Explores Bayview Tranformation
    A new piece about the transformation of the Bayview-Hunters Point area in San Francisco by the Push Dance Company, known for its focus on social issues, premieres this weekend. While longtime residents have been waiting for years for the toxic cleanup of the former naval shipyard, the improvements could come with a cost. Some fear they may be pushed out of what has been a predominately African-American, working class neighborhood for nearly a century.

    Further Reporting:
    Point Shipyard Project Tells Bayview's Gentrification Story
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#312H] Public Schools for Sale? Public education has become big business. Privatizing schools could yield profits worth hundreds of billions. Diane Ravitch says that has to stop. As an assistant secretary of education under the first President Bush, she was an advocate of school choice and charter schools and supported the No Child Left Behind initiative of the second President Bush. But after careful investigation, she changed her mind, and has become, according to Salon.com, "the nation's highest profile opponent" of charter-based education.
    On this week's program, she tells Bill Moyers, "Privatizing public education is not a good project. [Instead] we should all do what we can to, first of all, address the most serious problem in America, which is the huge gaps of income, the huge inequalities gap in both wealth and income."
    She believes, "Where our public schools are in trouble it's because the community's in trouble. And instead of breaking up public schools and sending the kids off into the hands of some entrepreneurs, we should be addressing those problems, the needs and problems of the children."
    Public education, she says, "is one of the foundation stones of our democracy. So an attack on public education is an attack on democracy."
    Diane Ravitch is America's preeminent historian of public education. Her newest book is Reign of Error: The Hoax of the Privatization Movement and the Danger to America's Public Schools.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    Local USA [#106] Defying Disabilities Three stories question the limits of any disability: the loving marriage of two intellectually-challenged individuals in New York City; a volunteer program that introduces unlikely candidates to surfing on the North Shore of Hawaii; and a blind North Carolina hiker sets out to climb the Appalachian Trail. duration 27:30   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    Independent Lens [#1513] All of Me: A Story of Love, Loss, and Last Resorts The "Girls" have been friends -- and morbidly obese -- for years. But now, having weight-loss surgery is about to upset everything they thought they knew about health, happiness, friendship and love. duration 56:46   STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3009H] What Plants Talk About This program integrates hard-core science with a light-hearted look at how plants behave, revealing a world where plants are as busy, responsive and complex as we are. From the stunning heights of the Great Basin Desert to the lush coastal rainforests of west coast Canada, scientist J.C. Cahill takes us on a journey into the "secret world of plants," revealing an astonishing landscape where plants eavesdrop on each other, talk to their allies, call in insect mercenaries and nurture their young. It is a world of pulsing activity, where plants communicate, co-operate and sometimes, wage all-out war. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Shark Island Whaler: The Real-Life Sequel to Moby Dick Two Brothers was a Nantucket whaleship that sank on the night of February 11, 1823, off the French Frigate Shoals. The ship's captain was George Pollard, Jr., former captain of the famous whaleship Essex. The wreck was discovered in 2008 (announced on February 11, 2011) by a team of marine archaeologists working on an expedition for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in the PapahAe? naumokuAe?kea Marine National Monument. duration 28:45   STEREO TVG
  • 10:30 pm
    Predator Legends Grizzlies, cougars and wolves - creatures full of metaphor and part of the spirit of the West - are featured in this program, which goes in search of the meaning these large predators hold for various people of the Pacific Northwest. The production was filmed in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming amid the sweeping landscape where these animals live. The camera captures images of the living legends and the people who know them. Nez Perce elder Horace Axtell says the animals are "in some sense, like brothers." He says it is about being connected: "All of these are connected in a way that old people used to live a long time ago." Doug Peacock, author of Grizzly Years and a Vietnam veteran, headed into the backcountry to heal himself and met North America's largest bears, bumping against grizzlies accidentally. "Only an experience that original, that primal, that powerful would have let me exorcise my own ghosts." Author Rick Bass says, "I don't think we'll ever know how much they're intertwined with the place." The wilderness landscape of the American West has shaped the American culture, he says, and the connection to the large animals of the wilderness is still out there "even if you don't feel it." duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#410] Storm of Emotions When Israel completed its withdrawal from the Sinai desert in 1982 following a peace agreement with Egypt, many people chose Gush Katif, a bloc of Israeli settlements in the Gaza Strip, as their new home. But when the Israeli government ordered the evacuation of Gaza in August 2005 as part of its disengagement plan, the decision resulted in massive political and social turmoil.
    This program documents the historic moment of this evacuation, one of the most complex and provocative missions to ever be undertaken by Israel's police forces. It focuses on the police forces as it accompanies police crews during the disengagement process and follows participants including a religious policeman, a policewoman, senior officers, and more. The settlers involved also use the presence of cameras and news correspondents to publicize their issues. The result is an emotional and intense documentary that conveys the full force of the evacuation and offers a portrait of one of Israel's most dramatic recent events.
    duration 1:25:10   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 am
    Living Courageously: The Spirit of Women This program celebrates the courage of women in times of crisis. It also features insights from actor and advocate Jane Seymour, and profiles 3 American women whose lives have been transformed by challenging - even devastating - circumstances. Alison Levine overcame a life-threatening heart condition to become an international mountain climber, lead the first US women's Everest expedition and head a foundation that helps Ugandan women find work as mountain guides. Once involved with drugs and alcohol, Francine Ward's near-fatal car accident transformed her; she earned her law degree and now coaches women on self-esteem issues and works with teenagers struggling with addiction. Photographer Sheila Hagler - the first member of her family to graduate from college - now works with at-risk teens in a rural Alabama community devastated by Hurricane Katrina. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
Sunday, March 30, 2014

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too