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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, March 23, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, March 23, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#215] Mothers of Bedford 80% of women in US prisons today are mothers of school-age children. Filmmaker Jenifer McShane spent 4 years visiting Bedford Hills and following the women and their families. A mother herself, Jenifer was drawn to the universal themes of motherhood and the staggering power of the mother-child relationship. In all walks of life, mother and child care for each other. As we watch the mothers inside Bedford trying to become their better selves, we see parts of our own selves - and that gives us all hope. duration 1:59:27   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#217] Teaching Math to the Core Teaching Math to the Core: Math Common Core State Standards emphasize analysis and problem solving: the how and why of every answer. We'll follow four phenomenal math teachers as they clearly show us how the Common Core can be implemented in classrooms. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#311H] Who's Buying Our Midterm Elections? The Supreme Court is poised to issue another big decision on campaign finance, one that could further open the floodgates to unfettered and anonymous contributions, just as the Citizens United case did 4 years ago. Bill Moyers talks with investigative journalists Kim Barker and Andy Kroll, who have made following the money - campaign money - their business.
    Three times as much money already has been raised for this year's midterm elections as 4 years ago, when the Citizens United decision was announced. "As soon as you get into office, you have to start raising money for the next election," Kim Barker tells Moyers. "It means you can't take a stand on an issue that might prove unpopular... It just sort of means that we're going to get more of the same, more of this gridlock, which benefits a lot of these same billionaires that are putting money into the system in the first place."
    Andy Kroll adds, "I had a conversation with a progressive senator who is not a fan of super PACs and at the time did not have his own sort of individual super PAC... And I said, 'What is this like when you're going to go up against an opponent who does have a super PAC and does have a motivated one percenter in his corner?' And he said, 'It's like going into a boxing ring. I'm wearing boxing gloves. And the other guy has an Uzi.'"
    Kim Barker has been with the independent, non-profit news organization ProPublica since 2010, the year of Citizens United. Andy Kroll works in the Washington bureau of Mother Jones magazine.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Asia This Week [#351] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5338H] * As tensions between Russia and Ukraine escalate over Crimea, President Obama stepped up pressure on Russia with a second wave of sanctions targeting President Vladimir Putin's chief of staff and 19 other high-level individuals on Thursday. Mr. Obama urged the Kremlin to respect Ukraine's new government and scale back its military presence in Crimea or risk further isolation from the international community.
    * Russia wasted no time retaliating against the US and European Union sanctions with its own restrictions banning some American lawmakers and senior White House officials from entering the country. David Sanger of The New York Times will explain how this high-stakes tug-of-war between Russia and the West is testing American foreign policy and the president as well as spotlighting the US role in the world. Michael Crowley of Time Magazine will have analysis of the broader implications of Putin's actions on other pressing diplomatic negotiations that include the US, Syria and Iran. * Democrats and Republicans are facing an interesting dilemma heading into the 2014 midterm elections. In an election year where Congress and President Obama are unpopular with voters, how do you rally the base? Dan Balz of The Washington Post and Beth Reinhard of The Wall Street Journal will look at the unique debates over political strategy going on amongst Democrats and Republicans with less than 8 months to go until election day.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3213H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#136H] * Michael McFaul on the crisis in Ukraine * Mike Allen of Politico on the week in politics * Google co-founder Larry Page at the 30th annual TED conference * A Doll's House with actors Hattie Morahan & Dominic Rowan * Larry Harvey, co-founder of Burning Man * and actor Tilda Swinton on her latest role in Only Lovers Left Alive duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3212] Putin's Power Play In Russia RUSSIA: POWER PLAY - First President, then prime Minister, now President again. Vladimir Putin has been in a position of power in Russia for more than a decade now. After the civil conflict in Ukraine and a referendum that took place in the Crimean Peninsula, western nations are more divided on a proper response than ever before. Putin's critics say the former KGB officer has fundamental problems with democracy, but his Russian support base loves him for making Russia more stable and respected on the international stage. But is Vladimir Putin obsessed with the belief that he has a historic mission? After Russia's illegal intervention in the Crimean Peninsula, the US and the EU have imposed sanctions, and have issued travel restrictions and barred bank accounts for some of the President's closest advisors.
    TURKEY: CHILD MARRIAGES - Forced marriage involving minors is on the rise in the southeast of Turkey. Since the outbreak of civil war in neighboring Syria, desperate families fleeing the conflict have been selling their daughters to Turkish men. The reported suicide of a 15-year-old girl and a high-ratings TV series on the issue have opened up a controversial debate. In some regions, one in two girls have become child brides. Since the minimum age for getting married in Turkey is 18, such marriages (even where performed by an imam), are illegal and punishable with a jail sentence. Outraged human rights activists point out that many of the girls end up at the mercy of pedophiles and rapists.
    ITALY: CONFESSIONS OF A MURDERER - According to ex-Mafioso Carmine Schiavone, the area around Naples is home to millions of tons of highly toxic waste that has been dumped illegally. Doctors are reporting growing cancer rates in the region, and the police have begun seizing contaminated produce. The former Mafia boss confirmed to the police that his clan dumped toxic waste over vast tracts of land, with fatal consequences. More than 20 years have passed since the practice began in the Campania region, which is a big producer of fruit and vegetables. According to the informant, the Mafia still contaminate soil by disposing of hazardous refuse in the countryside. He also claims that a large proportion of the waste comes from Germany.
    GERMANY: LIGHT GUERILLAS - If you get into their sights, you're suddenly in the limelight; a group of German light artists and activists hunt down controversial buildings and forgotten memorials at night. The light guerrillas find subjects all over Europe: television towers that are set to be privatized, industrial buildings that face ruin, and building projects that swallow millions in tax money. As soon as it gets dark, they arrange a meeting and light up a building with mobile floodlights for 5 to 10 minutes. Before the owners can react, the light guerrillas have disappeared into the night.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#215] Mothers of Bedford 80% of women in US prisons today are mothers of school-age children. Filmmaker Jenifer McShane spent 4 years visiting Bedford Hills and following the women and their families. A mother herself, Jenifer was drawn to the universal themes of motherhood and the staggering power of the mother-child relationship. In all walks of life, mother and child care for each other. As we watch the mothers inside Bedford trying to become their better selves, we see parts of our own selves - and that gives us all hope. duration 1:59:27   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    Asia Biz Forecast [#451] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1039] Great Income Investor: Edward Perks A reliable and decent source of income is hard to find, but this week's guest runs the Franklin Income Fund, which has been paying a monthly dividend since 1948. "Great Investor" Edward Perks reveals where he is finding the best income now. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#303H] Ric Edelman educates a young investor who thinks that stocks should be more exciting, and he schools an audience member about how "her friend" can get back on the right financial path. An internet entrepreneur offers us some simple instructions on how to protect our financial privacy in a world that's becoming more and more wired. Jean Edelman offers guidance on reducing every day stresses. Get ready for class in this edition of The Truth about Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Great Decisions In Foreign Policy [#506] Climate & Security The problem of rapid climate change is inextricably entwined with real world security challenges - from food security and water scarcity to increasingly devastating outcomes of weather events and disaster response. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3213H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5338H] * As tensions between Russia and Ukraine escalate over Crimea, President Obama stepped up pressure on Russia with a second wave of sanctions targeting President Vladimir Putin's chief of staff and 19 other high-level individuals on Thursday. Mr. Obama urged the Kremlin to respect Ukraine's new government and scale back its military presence in Crimea or risk further isolation from the international community.
    * Russia wasted no time retaliating against the US and European Union sanctions with its own restrictions banning some American lawmakers and senior White House officials from entering the country. David Sanger of The New York Times will explain how this high-stakes tug-of-war between Russia and the West is testing American foreign policy and the president as well as spotlighting the US role in the world. Michael Crowley of Time Magazine will have analysis of the broader implications of Putin's actions on other pressing diplomatic negotiations that include the US, Syria and Iran. * Democrats and Republicans are facing an interesting dilemma heading into the 2014 midterm elections. In an election year where Congress and President Obama are unpopular with voters, how do you rally the base? Dan Balz of The Washington Post and Beth Reinhard of The Wall Street Journal will look at the unique debates over political strategy going on amongst Democrats and Republicans with less than 8 months to go until election day.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#121H] The Debate Over E-cigarettes, The Highway to Hydrogen and Artist Wendy MacNaughton
    The Debate Over E-cigarettes
    The use of e-cigarettes is growing rapidly, but smoking them in public may soon be illegal in San Francisco and Santa Clara counties. The electronic devices provide nicotine, but produce vapor instead of smoke. Supporters say they are a less harmful alternative to cigarettes and can be a way to help people quit. Opponents are concerned about the rising use by teens and say they may contain harmful toxins. The FDA does not currently regulate e-cigarettes. Los Angeles and Sunnyvale are among the cities in California to restrict them.

    Guests:
    •Marisa Lagos, San Francisco Chronicle
    •Rachel Grana, UCSF Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education
    •Michael Mullins, Digital Ciggz/Smoke Free Alternative Trade Association

    Further Reporting:
    San Francisco Approves E-Cigarette Regulations
    Youth Radio: Do Vape Pens Trick Teens?

    The Highway to Hydrogen
    Although automakers have spent decades and billions of dollars to develop hydrogen fuel cell cars, only a few hundred of them are on the nation's roads. With new refueling stations in development and new models recently unveiled, are these zero-emission vehicles finally ready to roll in greater numbers?

    Further Reporting:
    QUEST TV: Highway to Hydrogen

    Artist Wendy MacNaughton
    Artist and illustrator Wendy MacNaughton has been sketching, observing and informally interviewing Bay Area residents for years. A fifth generation San Franciscan, she asks if San Francisco could talk, what would it say? That's the question at the heart of her new illustrated guide, "Meanwhile in San Francisco: The City in Its Own Words."

    Further Reporting:
    Meanwhile in San Francisco, Wendy Macnaughton Illustrates the City's Truth
    KQED Art School: In the Studio with Wendy Macnaughton
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#311H] Who's Buying Our Midterm Elections? The Supreme Court is poised to issue another big decision on campaign finance, one that could further open the floodgates to unfettered and anonymous contributions, just as the Citizens United case did 4 years ago. Bill Moyers talks with investigative journalists Kim Barker and Andy Kroll, who have made following the money - campaign money - their business.
    Three times as much money already has been raised for this year's midterm elections as 4 years ago, when the Citizens United decision was announced. "As soon as you get into office, you have to start raising money for the next election," Kim Barker tells Moyers. "It means you can't take a stand on an issue that might prove unpopular... It just sort of means that we're going to get more of the same, more of this gridlock, which benefits a lot of these same billionaires that are putting money into the system in the first place."
    Andy Kroll adds, "I had a conversation with a progressive senator who is not a fan of super PACs and at the time did not have his own sort of individual super PAC... And I said, 'What is this like when you're going to go up against an opponent who does have a super PAC and does have a motivated one percenter in his corner?' And he said, 'It's like going into a boxing ring. I'm wearing boxing gloves. And the other guy has an Uzi.'"
    Kim Barker has been with the independent, non-profit news organization ProPublica since 2010, the year of Citizens United. Andy Kroll works in the Washington bureau of Mother Jones magazine.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1729] THE CONTRACEPTION MANDATE - On Tuesday, The Supreme Court hears arguments in the deeply divisive "Hobby Lobby" case. The religious owners of the craft chain, and other plaintiffs, say the Affordable Care Act, Obamacare, violates their religious freedom by requiring them to buy certain kinds of contraception insurance for their employees. The government says it has a "compelling interest" in requiring such coverage. Tim O'Brien summarizes the arguments and discusses the case's implications. What limits should there be, if any, on persons, including owners of corporations, claiming a religious exemption from Federal law?
    WOMEN LEADING THE OBSERVANCE OF PURIM - The Jewish celebration of Purim - reading aloud the complex and heroic account in the Book of Esther of Esther's willingness to risk her life to save ancient Jews from annihilation by the King of Persia. Traditionally, among Orthodox Jews, the story was read aloud by men, but now Orthodox women are leading Purim services, too. Kim Lawton tells the story.
    "THE STORY OF THE JEWS" - In a 5-part series beginning on PBS stations next week, noted historian Simon Schama explores 3000 years of Jewish history. What sustained Jews through anti-Semitism and persecution? In the TV series and in a companion book also entitled "The Story of the Jews" Schama says, "The problem of the Jews was that they were a nation without a home."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 pm
    Changing Seas [#301H] Alien Invaders In the waters of the western Atlantic and Caribbean, a voracious alien predator has taken hold. Native to the Indo-Pacific, the invasive lionfish is a major threat to biodiversity and the health of already stressed coral reef ecosystems. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Miller Center's American Forum [#2011] duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1221] Southern Mexico Ian participates in the unique Day of the Dead festival in Pazcuaro. After reveling late into the night, he goes to the old colonial town of Guanajuato, where he spends time with some Mexican cowboys and enjoys delicious Mexican food. From there Ian goes to Acapulco, where he takes in the glitzy nightlife before watching the famous cliff divers. Continuing his search for the perfect beach, he heads to Puerto Escondido for the annual surfing festival. He then travels to the Mayan ruins of Palenque, before visiting the Zapatista stronghold of San Cristobal and ending his journey with an amazing trek through the Lancondon jungle. duration 56:42   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Nature [#2709H] Moment of Impact: Hunters & Herds When animals of astounding ability connect with each other and the world around them there is a "moment of impact." The world is filled with these unique moments created by animals whose abilities and behaviors are incredible to behold, like the violent collision of cheetah with gazelle, the blink-of-an-eye strike of a deadly cobra and the amazing dexterity of an elephant's trunk as it feeds, fights or reaches out with affection. But how do these creatures accomplish such extraordinary feats? Live action footage only reveals part of the answer. Using the latest technologies, HD camera lenses and computer graphics, this two-part series will take us inside the animal to present an innovative and revolutionary look at the bioengineering of "how animals work." duration 56:16   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    Nature [#2710] Moment of Impact: Jungle Conclusion. When animals of astounding ability connect with each other and the world around them there is a "moment of impact." The world is filled with these unique moments created by animals whose abilities and behaviors are incredible to behold, like the violent collision of cheetah with gazelle, the blink-of-an-eye strike of a deadly cobra and the amazing dexterity of an elephant's trunk as it feeds, fights or reaches out with affection. But how do these creatures accomplish such extraordinary feats? Live action footage only reveals part of the answer. Using the latest technologies, HD camera lenses and computer graphics, this two-part series will take us inside the animal to present an innovative and revolutionary look at the bioengineering of "how animals work." duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nature [#2610] Frogs: The Thin Green Line It is the greatest mass extinction since the dinosaurs. Population by population, species by species, amphibians are vanishing off the face of the Earth. Despite international alarm and scientists scrambling for answers, the steady hemorrhaging of amphibians continues like a leaky faucet that cannot be fixed or a wound that will not heal. Large-scale die-offs of frogs around the world have prompted scientists to take desperate measures to try to save those they can. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#158H] Included: A population drain has been taking place in the Great Plains for decades. The NewsHour travels to Kansas to find out about a state plan that offers incentives to attract new residents to rural Kansas. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#121H] The Debate Over E-cigarettes, The Highway to Hydrogen and Artist Wendy MacNaughton
    The Debate Over E-cigarettes
    The use of e-cigarettes is growing rapidly, but smoking them in public may soon be illegal in San Francisco and Santa Clara counties. The electronic devices provide nicotine, but produce vapor instead of smoke. Supporters say they are a less harmful alternative to cigarettes and can be a way to help people quit. Opponents are concerned about the rising use by teens and say they may contain harmful toxins. The FDA does not currently regulate e-cigarettes. Los Angeles and Sunnyvale are among the cities in California to restrict them.

    Guests:
    •Marisa Lagos, San Francisco Chronicle
    •Rachel Grana, UCSF Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education
    •Michael Mullins, Digital Ciggz/Smoke Free Alternative Trade Association

    Further Reporting:
    San Francisco Approves E-Cigarette Regulations
    Youth Radio: Do Vape Pens Trick Teens?

    The Highway to Hydrogen
    Although automakers have spent decades and billions of dollars to develop hydrogen fuel cell cars, only a few hundred of them are on the nation's roads. With new refueling stations in development and new models recently unveiled, are these zero-emission vehicles finally ready to roll in greater numbers?

    Further Reporting:
    QUEST TV: Highway to Hydrogen

    Artist Wendy MacNaughton
    Artist and illustrator Wendy MacNaughton has been sketching, observing and informally interviewing Bay Area residents for years. A fifth generation San Franciscan, she asks if San Francisco could talk, what would it say? That's the question at the heart of her new illustrated guide, "Meanwhile in San Francisco: The City in Its Own Words."

    Further Reporting:
    Meanwhile in San Francisco, Wendy Macnaughton Illustrates the City's Truth
    KQED Art School: In the Studio with Wendy Macnaughton
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#311H] Who's Buying Our Midterm Elections? The Supreme Court is poised to issue another big decision on campaign finance, one that could further open the floodgates to unfettered and anonymous contributions, just as the Citizens United case did 4 years ago. Bill Moyers talks with investigative journalists Kim Barker and Andy Kroll, who have made following the money - campaign money - their business.
    Three times as much money already has been raised for this year's midterm elections as 4 years ago, when the Citizens United decision was announced. "As soon as you get into office, you have to start raising money for the next election," Kim Barker tells Moyers. "It means you can't take a stand on an issue that might prove unpopular... It just sort of means that we're going to get more of the same, more of this gridlock, which benefits a lot of these same billionaires that are putting money into the system in the first place."
    Andy Kroll adds, "I had a conversation with a progressive senator who is not a fan of super PACs and at the time did not have his own sort of individual super PAC... And I said, 'What is this like when you're going to go up against an opponent who does have a super PAC and does have a motivated one percenter in his corner?' And he said, 'It's like going into a boxing ring. I'm wearing boxing gloves. And the other guy has an Uzi.'"
    Kim Barker has been with the independent, non-profit news organization ProPublica since 2010, the year of Citizens United. Andy Kroll works in the Washington bureau of Mother Jones magazine.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    Local USA [#105] Native American Culture Three stories about the modern Native American culture: A look at how climate change is effecting a Pacific Northwest tribe known as the "Salmon People" and how science can help find a solution; the Lincoln, Nebraska rock star artist who's creating sculptures, linking the past to the present; and the fight an Oklahoma tribe tries to revive their fading language. duration 26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    Secrets of the Dead [#1301] JFK: One PM Central Standard Time Fifty years after the tragic shooting of President John F. Kennedy, this episode chronicles minute-by-minute the assassination as it was revealed in the CBS newsroom from the moment the President was shot until Walter Cronkite's emotional pronouncement of his death, one hour and eight minutes later. The drama of "One P.M. Central Standard Time" -- the episode title is taken from the time President Kennedy was declared dead at Parkland Hospital -- is played out amidst the chaos in Dallas, in the hospital, and in the CBS newsroom in New York. Included in the program will be moving memories from men and women who were there on the day -- in Dallas and New York. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2610] Frogs: The Thin Green Line It is the greatest mass extinction since the dinosaurs. Population by population, species by species, amphibians are vanishing off the face of the Earth. Despite international alarm and scientists scrambling for answers, the steady hemorrhaging of amphibians continues like a leaky faucet that cannot be fixed or a wound that will not heal. Large-scale die-offs of frogs around the world have prompted scientists to take desperate measures to try to save those they can. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    The Cardboard Bernini Olympia Stone's documentary examines the work and life of artist James Grashow as he builds a giant cardboard fountain inspired by the work of the famous baroque sculptor Gian Lorenzo Bernini. James Grashow is an artist who has built-among many other things - giant 15 foot tall fighting men, a city, and an ocean - using paper mache, fabric, chicken wire and cardboard. More recently, he has begun making sculptures entirely out of corrugated cardboard and twist ties. Several years ago, while visiting the home of his art dealer, Allan Stone (who was the filmmaker's father), he stumbled across some of his giant fighting men that had been put outside due to lack of space. They were disintegrating. Although it was deeply painful and shocking for Jimmy to see his work like that, it was also surprisingly beautiful. Jimmy felt that he was seeing the full arc of his artistic enterprise before him - including its end. So, Grashow challenged himself to embrace the "back end" of his process, and decided to build a giant cardboard "fountain" - a Grashow "Bernini."
    From its conception, Jimmy intended this work to be put outside to disintegrate. Work on the fountain began in 2007 and was completed in 2010. Jimmy's "corrugated fountain" premiered indoors on June 11, 2010 at the Taubman Museum of Art in Roanoke, Virginia, to great acclaim. After shows in New York City and Pittsburgh, Jimmy finally installed the fountain outdoors at the Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art in Ridgefield, CT on April 1, 2012. It was there for a total of six weeks, after which time Jimmy took his degraded cardboard masterpiece to the dumpster: "Ashes to ashes, mush to mush."
    The film is an intimate glimpse of an artist at work on what he considers might be his "final epic." We follow Jimmy as he asks what is the point of art and creation? What is the connection between creation and destruction? And, ultimately, what is the point of our lives in the face of our mortality?
    duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#409] Belarusian Waltz Belarus has been called "Europe's last dictatorship." Since 1994, Alexander Lukashenko has ruled the ex-Soviet republic with a despotic hand, jailing the opposition, shutting down the press, and refusing to investigate the assassinations of dissidents. He has virtually silenced his critics - but not one lone performance artist who stages public stunts mocking the dictator's pretensions. Belarusian Waltz is the story of Alexander Pushkin, whose audacious, comical exploits find him facing the hostility of the police and the consternation of his family. An offbeat tale of post-modern street theater meeting 1930s-style authoritarianism, the film offers a surprising window into the soul of the Belarusian people. duration 53:30   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Global Voices [#518] Chahinaz: What Rights for Women? Chahinaz, a 20-year-old student in Algeria, has mixed feelings about the Western world and its values, but she admires the freedom of Western women. Through her curiosity and voyage of self-discovery, Chahinaz begins to wonder what life is like for women in other Muslim countries and around the world and why things are slow to change in Algeria. duration 54:27   STEREO
Sunday, March 23, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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