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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, March 9, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, March 9, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#203] The Medicine Game This program shares the remarkable journey of two brothers from the Onondaga Nation driven by a single goal; to beat the odds and play lacrosse for national powerhouse Syracuse University. The obstacles in their way are frequent and daunting. In their darkest hour, and with their dreams crumbling around them, the boys must look to their family and to their Native teachings for guidance and stability. It is their search for identity that transitions this film from a playful coming of age story, into an important study of modern Native American life. It follows their story over the next six years as they struggle to rebuild their friendship, rescue a fading childhood dream, and gain a more resolute understanding of their identity and culture, both as athletes and the next generation of the Onondaga people. duration 1:26:39   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Living Courageously: The Spirit of Women This program celebrates the courage of women in times of crisis. It also features insights from actor and advocate Jane Seymour, and profiles 3 American women whose lives have been transformed by challenging - even devastating - circumstances. Alison Levine overcame a life-threatening heart condition to become an international mountain climber, lead the first US women's Everest expedition and head a foundation that helps Ugandan women find work as mountain guides. Once involved with drugs and alcohol, Francine Ward's near-fatal car accident transformed her; she earned her law degree and now coaches women on self-esteem issues and works with teenagers struggling with addiction. Photographer Sheila Hagler - the first member of her family to graduate from college - now works with at-risk teens in a rural Alabama community devastated by Hurricane Katrina. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#202] Bullying at School Bullying at School: A look at three innovative approaches to tackling the serious issue of bullying. Visit three schools where parents, teachers and students are implementing bullying prevention programs that are making a big difference in students' lives. duration 57:15   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#309H] The Dog Whistle Politics of Race, Part 2 This week, more from author and legal scholar Ian Haney Lopez as he talks further with Bill about dog whistle politics - code words that use race to turn Americans against each other. Politicians manipulate deep prejudice to rouse hostility against minorities and the government, and summon support for policies that make economic inequality even worse.
    According to Haney Lopez, "This use of race has allowed an extreme faction of conservatives, those most dedicated to the power of big money, to the power of corporations to not only hijack American democracy, but to hijack the Republican Party."
    He reviews the use of the dog whistle in recent political history, from the "Southern strategy" developed by Republicans in the 60s and Democratic President Bill Clinton's welfare reform and anti-crime policies, to the tea party movement - which he says has legitimate issues but has "accepted the conservative line that was happened in their lives is really the fault of minorities" - and current attacks on President Obama's Affordable Care Act: "The subtext is, 'Here comes a black man who exemplifies the way in which the Federal government is now by and for minorities.'"
    "Dog whistling" is going to evolve, Haney Lopez says "in a way that brings in certain portions of the Latino population, certain portions of the Asian population, that's what it's likely to do. Unless we start addressing this within minority communities, but also in terms of national politics, we should expect these sorts of racial provocations to continue to define our politics for the next decade, 2 decades, 3 decades."
    Ian Haney Lopez, a professor of law at the University of California, Berkeley, is a senior fellow at the policy analysis and advocacy group, Demos.
    duration 24:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Asia This Week [#349] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5336H] * President Obama has ramped up pressure on Russia to de-escalate the growing tensions in Ukraine by signing an executive order that imposes visa restrictions and other sanctions against Moscow. On Thursday the president also denounced a referendum by the Crimean parliament to break away from Ukraine to join the Russian Federation calling the move a violation of international law. The Crimea region has been at the center of a tense power struggle between the new Ukrainian government and Russian President Vladamir Putin since the fall of former Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych last month. Peter Baker of The New York Times and Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times have the latest on US efforts to broker a diplomatic solution to resolve the Ukraine crisis and analysis of why it's important to America's interests.
    * A parade of 2016 White House hopefuls - Ted Cruz, Chris Christie, Rand Paul and Marco Rubio - are among the GOP luminaries who will be testing their stump speeches at this week's Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Maryland. The gathering is also an opportunity for Republicans to work on framing their message and policy priorities heading into this year's midterm elections. GOP party leaders are also expected to work on addressing the intra-party divide between establishment conservatives and tea party members. Gloria Borger of CNN reports on the Republican's priorities heading into the fall midterms and which aspiring presidential contender may have the strongest message to rally the base and be the next GOP nominee.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3211H] TOPICS: Ukraine Crisis; Budget Battle; CPAC Pow-Wow. PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Eleanor Clift, The Daily Beast; Mort Zuckerman, US New & World Report; Susan Ferrechio, The Washington Examiner. duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#134] * The crisis in Ukraine with Robert Gates, Henry Kissinger & Tom Donilon * Mike Allen of Politico on the week in politics * Annette Bening on her latest film The Face of Love * Wes Anderson on directing The Grand Budapest Hotel * Nancy Gibbs, Time Managing Editor and Senior Editor Jonathan Woods discuss The Top of America duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 am
    European Journal [#3210] Ukraine: Tug-Of-War In Crimea UKRAINE: TUG-OF-WAR IN CRIMEA - In Ukraine and Crimea, fear is growing that the country may soon be divided. The Crimean Tatars are particularly concerned about the prospect of the peninsula falling into Russian hands. The Crimean Tatars once ruled the entire region. The Turkic ethnic group first came to the peninsula in the 15th century. In 1944, they were deported by Stalin to central Asia. Today there are about 250,000 Crimean Tatars in the Autonomous Republic of Crimea in the south of Ukraine. The majority of the population there is of Russian descent. Now many Crimean Tatars fear they may once again become subject to persecution and expulsion.
    BELGIUM: TAKING ON TRAFFIC - Brussels ranks as the city with the worst traffic delays in the world, ahead of even Los Angeles, Milan and London. Now the authorities are considering introducing a road toll to reduce congestion. The Brussels chamber of commerce estimates that traffic jams in Belgium's capital cost the city 500 million euros a year. A test with 1200 drivers has been launched to see if an electronic road toll could help. Much of the traffic congestion is caused by commuters who work in Brussels but live outside the city.
    BRITAIN: A NEWSPAPER DEFIES THE INTELLIGENCE SERVICE - The Guardian has been under pressure ever since it began reporting about the scale of US and British spy programs. The British newspaper has even been threatened with closure. The Guardian has taken on a very powerful opponent. Over the past months, the newspaper has been publishing stories based on information revealed by Edward Snowdon. Among the disclosures is that British intelligence is able to monitor all private online activity in Europe. Though the newspaper has been the target of threats and intimidation, it continues to publish new revelations.
    GREECE: FISHING WITH LIGHT AND SPEARS (SERIES EUROPE BY NIGHT) - The residents of the Greek island of Milos are concerned that their tradition of spear-fishing at night using lamps to attract the fish may be banned. Every year between February and May, fishermen from the island of Milos go out to catch fish using the "pyrofani" spear-fishing method, which entails lighting the surface of the sea with bright lamps to attract fish. Because fish stock have declined near the island, the plan is that only professional fishermen will be able to obtain permits to fish by this method. Amateur fishermen on Milos are incensed.
    ITALY: "THE WRECKER" IN THE DRIVER'S SEAT - The hopes of the entire country are resting on Matteo Renzi, Italy's new prime minister. Renzi calls himself "the wrecker" because he wants to do away with entrenched structures. "Subito" - or "immediately" - is one of Matteo Renzi's favorite words. Italy's new prime minister is resolved to undertake reforms - immediately. He's promised radical transformation, with one reform each month. At just 39 years of age, Renzi is also Italy's youngest ever prime minster. There's already concern that he may have bitten off more than he can chew. Critics also say that his cabinet is short on national and international experience.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#203] The Medicine Game This program shares the remarkable journey of two brothers from the Onondaga Nation driven by a single goal; to beat the odds and play lacrosse for national powerhouse Syracuse University. The obstacles in their way are frequent and daunting. In their darkest hour, and with their dreams crumbling around them, the boys must look to their family and to their Native teachings for guidance and stability. It is their search for identity that transitions this film from a playful coming of age story, into an important study of modern Native American life. It follows their story over the next six years as they struggle to rebuild their friendship, rescue a fading childhood dream, and gain a more resolute understanding of their identity and culture, both as athletes and the next generation of the Onondaga people. duration 1:26:39   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Changing Seas [#503H] Creatures of the Deep In the cold, deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico, little-known animals spend their entire lives far removed from our human world. Until now, little research has been conducted on these creatures of the deep, keeping much of their lives a mystery. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Asia Biz Forecast [#449] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1037] Global Real Estate WT explores investment opportunities in global real estate. Jason Wolf of top-performing Third Avenue Real Estate Value Fund and award-winning wealth manager Gregg Fisher explain why they are buying properties overseas. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#301H] Join financial advisor Ric Edelman as he answers a vital viewer question: "How do I beat inflation?" Also Ric talks with astronaut Dan Barry about ways investors can profit on the final frontier, and Jean Edelman explains how a little humor can go a long way. All that and much more on this edition of The Truth about Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Great Decisions In Foreign Policy [#504] Islamic Extremism In Africa After a decade of fighting Western forces in Iraq and Afghanistan, militant Islamic groups have headed to Africa establishing a new base of operations for "global jihad." America is left with a dilemma-how to encourage the fledgling democracies while quashing the dangerous radicals they harbor. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3211H] TOPICS: Ukraine Crisis; Budget Battle; CPAC Pow-Wow. PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Eleanor Clift, The Daily Beast; Mort Zuckerman, US New & World Report; Susan Ferrechio, The Washington Examiner. duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5336H] * President Obama has ramped up pressure on Russia to de-escalate the growing tensions in Ukraine by signing an executive order that imposes visa restrictions and other sanctions against Moscow. On Thursday the president also denounced a referendum by the Crimean parliament to break away from Ukraine to join the Russian Federation calling the move a violation of international law. The Crimea region has been at the center of a tense power struggle between the new Ukrainian government and Russian President Vladamir Putin since the fall of former Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych last month. Peter Baker of The New York Times and Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times have the latest on US efforts to broker a diplomatic solution to resolve the Ukraine crisis and analysis of why it's important to America's interests.
    * A parade of 2016 White House hopefuls - Ted Cruz, Chris Christie, Rand Paul and Marco Rubio - are among the GOP luminaries who will be testing their stump speeches at this week's Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Maryland. The gathering is also an opportunity for Republicans to work on framing their message and policy priorities heading into this year's midterm elections. GOP party leaders are also expected to work on addressing the intra-party divide between establishment conservatives and tea party members. Gloria Borger of CNN reports on the Republican's priorities heading into the fall midterms and which aspiring presidential contender may have the strongest message to rally the base and be the next GOP nominee.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#119H] Democratic Party Convention Opens, Big Brother on Pause in Oakland and Silicon Valley Thirsty for Recycled Water
    Democratic Party Convention Opens
    Democrats gather for their state convention in Los Angeles this weekend. The party holds both U.S. Senate seats and every statewide office from governor on down, in contrast with the Republican Party, which is attempting to rebrand itself in California. Still, there's plenty for Democrats to be concerned about, starting with a series of recent political scandals that cost them their two-thirds majority in the state Senate. Scott Shafer leads a discussion about what's at stake and the challenges ahead for the party.

    Guests:
    Scott Detrow, KQED Sacramento bureau chief
    Chris Lehane, Democratic Strategist, Fabiani and Lehane

    Big Brother on Pause in Oakland
    After a fierce debate over privacy, the Oakland City Council voted this week to scale back deployment of a controversial program for citywide surveillance. The Domain Awareness Center will now monitor only the city's airport and the port. At the heart of the debate is whether the use of new technologies — from street and police cameras to the new wearable computing device "Google Glass" — constitutes an invasion of privacy. Thuy Vu leads a discussion.

    Guests:
    Aarti Shahani, KQED News reporter
    Ali Winston, freelance journalist

    Further Reporting:
    Oakland Approves Scaled-Back Version of Disputed Surveillance Center
    Forum: Oakland Shrinks Scope of Controversial Surveillance Center

    Silicon Valley Thirsty for Recycled Water
    As Northern California's drought continues, the recent rain brought more hope than relief. Last week, Gov. Jerry Brown signed legislation that could provide millions for water conservation efforts and to expand the use of recycled water statewide. Silicon Valley has a head start on that front, with a new $70 million facility, set to open in June, that can purify up to eight million gallons of treated sewage water a day. KQED Science editor Craig Miller reports.

    Further Reporting:
    San Jose's New Plant Transforms Sewage Into 'Really Clean' Water
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#309H] The Dog Whistle Politics of Race, Part 2 This week, more from author and legal scholar Ian Haney Lopez as he talks further with Bill about dog whistle politics - code words that use race to turn Americans against each other. Politicians manipulate deep prejudice to rouse hostility against minorities and the government, and summon support for policies that make economic inequality even worse.
    According to Haney Lopez, "This use of race has allowed an extreme faction of conservatives, those most dedicated to the power of big money, to the power of corporations to not only hijack American democracy, but to hijack the Republican Party."
    He reviews the use of the dog whistle in recent political history, from the "Southern strategy" developed by Republicans in the 60s and Democratic President Bill Clinton's welfare reform and anti-crime policies, to the tea party movement - which he says has legitimate issues but has "accepted the conservative line that was happened in their lives is really the fault of minorities" - and current attacks on President Obama's Affordable Care Act: "The subtext is, 'Here comes a black man who exemplifies the way in which the Federal government is now by and for minorities.'"
    "Dog whistling" is going to evolve, Haney Lopez says "in a way that brings in certain portions of the Latino population, certain portions of the Asian population, that's what it's likely to do. Unless we start addressing this within minority communities, but also in terms of national politics, we should expect these sorts of racial provocations to continue to define our politics for the next decade, 2 decades, 3 decades."
    Ian Haney Lopez, a professor of law at the University of California, Berkeley, is a senior fellow at the policy analysis and advocacy group, Demos.
    duration 24:30   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1727] PREDICTING VIOLENCE - Adrian Raine, chair of the Criminology Department at the University of Pennsylvania, has studied the brain scans of violent killers for the last 35 years. In his controversial book, The Anatomy of Violence: The Biological Roots of Crime, Raine proposes that brain scans can be used not only to predict violence but prevent it. But, as Lucky Severson reports, Raine's research raises ethical issues. Paul Wolpe, the director of Emory University's Center for Ethics, says he "cannot think of anything more dangerous" than Raine's policy recommendations. (Originally aired November 1, 2013)
    NYC RELIGIONS - New York has been called the most secular city in America, but a project called "A Journey Through NYC Religions" is attempting to disprove that. The group is documenting every religious site in the five boroughs, street by street, alleyway by alleyway. Since 2010, they've visited more than 6,500 houses of worship. Kim Lawton talks with project founder Tony Carnes and follows along on their journey. (Originally aired February 22, 2013)
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 pm
    Changing Seas [#503H] Creatures of the Deep In the cold, deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico, little-known animals spend their entire lives far removed from our human world. Until now, little research has been conducted on these creatures of the deep, keeping much of their lives a mystery. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Miller Center's American Forum [#2009] duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1219] Globe Trekker Food Hour: Lebanon The rich soil and varied history of Lebanon have resulted in a world-class cuisine. Merrilees Parker travels to the capital of Beirut and then in to the countryside of Lebanon to learn more about its people, their culture and their cuisine. duration 56:05   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Nature [#2701] Cloud: Challenge of the Stallions The returning saga of Cloud, the wild, white stallion finds us back in the Arrowhead Mountains of Montana. Cloud is now a confident band stallion in his prime. As he rules the mountains, gathering mares and expanding his reign, the story turns to his two sons. Bolder is his by birth -- beautiful and golden, the success of his father and grandfather flowing in his veins. Flint, sired by another stallion, is the colt Cloud raised. Now, Bolder has gathered some mares of his own while Flint has joined a group of bachelor stallions, young guns roaming the mountains. Who will rise to challenge the mighty Cloud? Will nature or nurture produce the next great stallion of the Arrowheads? duration 55:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 4:00 pm
    Nova [#3710H] Mt. St. Helens Back from the Dead When Mount St. Helens erupted in 1980, every living thing in the blast zone was buried beneath 300 feet of avalanche debris, covered with steaming mud and, finally, topped with a superheated layer of frothy rock from deep within the earth. It seemed as though Mount St. Helens might remain a wasteland forever. When biologist Charlie Crisafulli first flew over the disaster zone, finding no sign of life, little did he realize that his own life would be forever changed. Crisafulli has remained at the site for 27 years, documenting the dramatic return of plant and animal life to the barren landscape and pioneering a new understanding of the interaction between geologic forces and the life surrounding the mountain. Nova brings viewers on a journey of a landscape brought back from the dead. duration 55:01   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 5:00 pm
    Life On Fire [#102H] Volcano Doctors Whether the Philippines, Papua New Guinea, Colombia, Chile, Italy or Iceland, each of these countries is home to active volcanoes that are a threat to the populations settled at their feet. Every day, lava, ash, gas, bombs and avalanches are likely to slide down the gaping mouths of the rock giants. To avoid disasters, volcanologists are asked to anticipate and warn. They are asked to be prophets and to know how to analyze the volcanoes' slightest tremors. Around the world, these volcano doctors use their tools and knowledge to try to protect those who live beneath the Earth's fire. duration 55:46   STEREO TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#154H] Included: Can music education give inner-city children an academic head start? NewsHour Weekend profiles the Harmony Project, a program for inner-city kids in Los Angeles that has partnered with a neurobiologist to study the impact of regularly practicing music on the learning skills of poor children. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#119H] Democratic Party Convention Opens, Big Brother on Pause in Oakland and Silicon Valley Thirsty for Recycled Water
    Democratic Party Convention Opens
    Democrats gather for their state convention in Los Angeles this weekend. The party holds both U.S. Senate seats and every statewide office from governor on down, in contrast with the Republican Party, which is attempting to rebrand itself in California. Still, there's plenty for Democrats to be concerned about, starting with a series of recent political scandals that cost them their two-thirds majority in the state Senate. Scott Shafer leads a discussion about what's at stake and the challenges ahead for the party.

    Guests:
    Scott Detrow, KQED Sacramento bureau chief
    Chris Lehane, Democratic Strategist, Fabiani and Lehane

    Big Brother on Pause in Oakland
    After a fierce debate over privacy, the Oakland City Council voted this week to scale back deployment of a controversial program for citywide surveillance. The Domain Awareness Center will now monitor only the city's airport and the port. At the heart of the debate is whether the use of new technologies — from street and police cameras to the new wearable computing device "Google Glass" — constitutes an invasion of privacy. Thuy Vu leads a discussion.

    Guests:
    Aarti Shahani, KQED News reporter
    Ali Winston, freelance journalist

    Further Reporting:
    Oakland Approves Scaled-Back Version of Disputed Surveillance Center
    Forum: Oakland Shrinks Scope of Controversial Surveillance Center

    Silicon Valley Thirsty for Recycled Water
    As Northern California's drought continues, the recent rain brought more hope than relief. Last week, Gov. Jerry Brown signed legislation that could provide millions for water conservation efforts and to expand the use of recycled water statewide. Silicon Valley has a head start on that front, with a new $70 million facility, set to open in June, that can purify up to eight million gallons of treated sewage water a day. KQED Science editor Craig Miller reports.

    Further Reporting:
    San Jose's New Plant Transforms Sewage Into 'Really Clean' Water
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#309H] The Dog Whistle Politics of Race, Part 2 This week, more from author and legal scholar Ian Haney Lopez as he talks further with Bill about dog whistle politics - code words that use race to turn Americans against each other. Politicians manipulate deep prejudice to rouse hostility against minorities and the government, and summon support for policies that make economic inequality even worse.
    According to Haney Lopez, "This use of race has allowed an extreme faction of conservatives, those most dedicated to the power of big money, to the power of corporations to not only hijack American democracy, but to hijack the Republican Party."
    He reviews the use of the dog whistle in recent political history, from the "Southern strategy" developed by Republicans in the 60s and Democratic President Bill Clinton's welfare reform and anti-crime policies, to the tea party movement - which he says has legitimate issues but has "accepted the conservative line that was happened in their lives is really the fault of minorities" - and current attacks on President Obama's Affordable Care Act: "The subtext is, 'Here comes a black man who exemplifies the way in which the Federal government is now by and for minorities.'"
    "Dog whistling" is going to evolve, Haney Lopez says "in a way that brings in certain portions of the Latino population, certain portions of the Asian population, that's what it's likely to do. Unless we start addressing this within minority communities, but also in terms of national politics, we should expect these sorts of racial provocations to continue to define our politics for the next decade, 2 decades, 3 decades."
    Ian Haney Lopez, a professor of law at the University of California, Berkeley, is a senior fellow at the policy analysis and advocacy group, Demos.
    duration 24:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    Local USA [#104] Head Trauma at War Traumatic brain injuries, or TBI, has received increasing attention especially among athletes and soldiers returning from combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. We examine the links between TBI and post-traumatic stress disorder, and the damage they can do, through the story of retired Army sergeant Andrew Reeves of Colchester, Vermont. duration 26:52   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    Women, War & Peace [#101H] I Came to Testify This episode tells the moving story of how a group of 16 women who had been imprisoned and raped by Serb-led forces in the Bosnian town of Foca broke history's great silence and stepped forward to take the witness stand in an international court of law. Their remarkable courage resulted in a triumphant verdict that led to new international laws about sexual violence in war. Matt Damon, who narrates the film, has taped a behind-the-scenes-video talking about why the themes of this series matter to men, too. duration 55:46   STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2701] Cloud: Challenge of the Stallions The returning saga of Cloud, the wild, white stallion finds us back in the Arrowhead Mountains of Montana. Cloud is now a confident band stallion in his prime. As he rules the mountains, gathering mares and expanding his reign, the story turns to his two sons. Bolder is his by birth -- beautiful and golden, the success of his father and grandfather flowing in his veins. Flint, sired by another stallion, is the colt Cloud raised. Now, Bolder has gathered some mares of his own while Flint has joined a group of bachelor stallions, young guns roaming the mountains. Who will rise to challenge the mighty Cloud? Will nature or nurture produce the next great stallion of the Arrowheads? duration 55:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 10:00 pm
    African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross [#106B] A More Perfect Union (1968-2013) After 1968, African Americans set out to build a bright new future on the foundation of the civil rights movement's victories, but a growing class disparity threatened to split the black community in two. As hundreds of African Americans won political office across the country and the black middle class made unprecedented progress, larger economic and political forces isolated the black urban poor in the inner cities, vulnerable to new social ills and an epidemic of incarceration. Yet African Americans of all backgrounds came together to support Illinois Senator Barack Obama in his historic campaign for the presidency of the United States. When he won in 2008, many hoped that America had finally transcended race and racism. By the time of his second victory, it was clear that many issues, including true racial equality, remain to be resolved. Now we ask: How will African Americans help redefine the United States in the years to come? duration 1:15:00   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#407] Iranian Kidney Bargain Sale In Iran, there is a thriving trade in kidneys, which poor people line up to sell at less than $3,000. With an official kidney referral agency as the backdrop, Iranian Kidney Bargain Sale follows young Iranians through the organ trade process: from their first encounter to surgery and kidney removal. Iran is the only country in the world where kidney trading is legal. Every 10 minutes, a young person wishing to sell their kidney reports to the reception of one of the official kidney referral agencies. duration 54:33   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Global Voices [#514] I Was Worth 50 Sheep Following a long practiced tradition in Afghanistan, 10-year-old Sabere was sold to a man in his fifties. For the next six years she was both slave and wife, miscarrying four times. Now at sixteen, she is fighting for her freedom. duration 52:57   STEREO
Sunday, March 9, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED DT9s Over the Air: beginning Wed 7/09

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) The PSIP Info part of our Over the Air (OTA) signal for KQED DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3 dropped out of our overall signal early Wednesday 7/09. Once PSIP was restored most OTA receivers moved our signal back to the correct channel locations. However, for some viewers, it appears as if they have lost […]

    • KQED FM 88.1 translator off air Tues 6/03

      The Martinez translator for KQED-FM will be off the air all day Tuesday June 3rd. We are rebuilding the 25 year old site with all new antennas and cabling. This should only affect people listening on 88.1MHz in the Martinez/Benicia area.

    • KQET planned overnight outage: early Tues 5/13

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET’s Over The Air (OTA) signal will shut down late May 12/early Tues 5/13 shortly after midnight to allow for extensive electrical maintenance work at the transmitter. Engineers will do their best to complete the work by 6am Tuesday morning. This will affect OTA viewers of the DT25 channels, and signal providers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

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Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

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KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

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KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too