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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, February 22, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, February 22, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10870] * Ukraine unrest * State of the states * Rikers Island * Shields & Brooks * Russians: The People Behind the Power duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#33038] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, Barnes & Noble gets a takeover offer from a private equity firm and shares soar. Is Barnes & Noble entering a new chapter and how might it play out? And, taxpayers have recouped all of the bailout money they gave to Fannie Mae & Freddie Mac. Did the bailouts keep the system from collapsing? duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3144] Tavis talks with prolific singer-songwriter-producer Kenneth "Babyface" Edmonds and sultry singer Toni Braxton. With 16 Grammys between the two of them, Edmonds and Braxton reflect on their history, including their latest collaboration. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    America Revealed [#103] Electric Nation Our modern electric power grid has been called the biggest and most complex machine in the world -- delivering electricity to over 300 million Americans over 200,000 miles of high tension transmission lines. But even though the grid touches almost every aspect of our lives, it's a system we know very little about. In this episode, Yul Kwon will travel around the country to understand its intricacies, its vulnerabilities and the remarkable ingenuity required to keep the electricity on every day of the year. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1725H] DETROIT'S BANKRUPTCY AND WORKER PENSIONS - Detroit owes a total of $ 18 billion to banks, investors and 23,000 present and former city workers. How much will workers' pensions likely be cut? Should pensioners be treated differently than banks and bondholders? Lucky Severson reports from Detroit on the anguished debate there over what would be fair.
    THE DALAI LAMA'S "SECULAR ETHICS" - The Dalai Lama is in the US teaching what he calls "secular ethics." Kate Olson reports on the Dalai Lama's recent visit to Emory University in Atlanta, where he spoke of the compassion that he says, can make possible a world-wide ethic that everyone could embrace - religious or not.
    PROMOTING RACIAL RECONCILIATION - A Belief and Practice segment on the leaders of the predominantly white Episcopal Church in Louisiana who are urging their parishioners to repent and ask forgiveness for racism toward Louisiana's large black community.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1035] Financial Thought Leaders: Robert Shiller Are traditional index funds the best way to invest in the market? WT explores some alternatives with Research Affiliates' "Financial Thought Leader" Robert Arnott. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2250H] * Distressing Women in Media Report * Sochi Olympics - Snowboarding Too Extreme? * WVa Mountaintop Removal Advocacy
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC); Republican Strategist Rina Shah; Kim Gandy, CEO National Network to End Domestic Violence; Former Bush White House Aide Mercy Viana Schlapp; Ohio Valley Environmental Coalition's Janet Keating.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#218] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Grand Coulee Dam: American Experience Grand Coulee was more than a dam; it was a proclamation. In the wake of the Great Depression, America turned from private enterprise to public works - not simply to provide jobs, but to restore faith. The ultimate expression of Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal, Grand Coulee played a central role in transforming the Northwest; it was the largest hydroelectric power producing facility in the world when it was completed in March 1941. After WWII, a vast irrigation project made possible by the dam helped turn the barren deserts of central Washington into rich farmland. But the dam prevented access to one of the greatest salmon rivers in the world. Deprived of the salmon - their most important resource - the native people who lived along the Columbia witnessed a profound cultural decline. Featuring the men and women who lived and worked at Grand Coulee and the native people whose lives were changed, as well as historians and engineers, this film explores how the tension between technological achievement and environmental impact hangs over the project's legacy. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    The Rise and Fall of Penn Station: American Experience In 1910, the Pennsylvania Railroad accomplished the enormous engineering feat of building tunnels under New York City's Hudson and East Rivers, knitting together the entire eastern half of the United States. The tunnels terminated in what was one of the greatest architectural achievements of its time, Pennsylvania Station. Designed by renowned architect Charles McKim, and inspired by the Roman baths of Caracalla, Pennsylvania Station covered nearly eight acres and housed one of the largest public spaces in the world. Neither Cassatt nor McKim lived to see their masterpiece completed, but many of the 100,000 attendees of Penn Station's grand opening proclaimed it to be one of the wonders of the world. But 53 years after the station's opening, the financially-strapped Pennsylvania Railroad announced it had sold the air rights above Penn Station, and would tear down what had once been its crowning jewel to build Madison Square Garden, a high rise office building and sports complex. On the rainy morning of October 28, 1963, the demolition began; it took three years to dismantle Alexander Cassatt's monumental station. In the wake of the destruction of Penn Station, New York City established the Landmarks Preservation Commission. Grand Central Terminal, designated a historic landmark in 1967, was spared a similar fate. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1725H] DETROIT'S BANKRUPTCY AND WORKER PENSIONS - Detroit owes a total of $ 18 billion to banks, investors and 23,000 present and former city workers. How much will workers' pensions likely be cut? Should pensioners be treated differently than banks and bondholders? Lucky Severson reports from Detroit on the anguished debate there over what would be fair.
    THE DALAI LAMA'S "SECULAR ETHICS" - The Dalai Lama is in the US teaching what he calls "secular ethics." Kate Olson reports on the Dalai Lama's recent visit to Emory University in Atlanta, where he spoke of the compassion that he says, can make possible a world-wide ethic that everyone could embrace - religious or not.
    PROMOTING RACIAL RECONCILIATION - A Belief and Practice segment on the leaders of the predominantly white Episcopal Church in Louisiana who are urging their parishioners to repent and ask forgiveness for racism toward Louisiana's large black community.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#307H] The Deep State Hiding In Plain Sight Former Capitol Hill insider Mike Lofgren talks with Bill Moyers about "Anatomy of the Deep State," an essay he has written exclusively for the Moyers website, BillMoyers.com. Mike Lofgren was a numbers man, a congressional staff member for 28 years with the powerful House and Senate Budget committees. Over the years, as he crunched the numbers, he realized they didn't add up. Instead, they led him to what he calls America's Deep State - a phrase he borrowed from British spy novelist John Le Carre - a government just beneath the surface where elected and unelected figures collude to protect and serve powerful vested interests. "It is the big story of our time," Lofgren tells Moyers. "It is, I would say, the red thread that runs through the history of the last 3 decades. It's how we had deregulation, financialization of the economy, the Wall Street bust, the erosion of our civil liberties, and perpetual war."
    In his essay, Lofgren describes the Deep State as "a hybrid association of elements of government and parts of top-level finance and industry that is effectively able to govern the US without reference to the consent of the governed." But, as he says to Moyers in their conversation, the power and wealth generated by this Deep State "does not trickle down. Our inequality is as great or greater than any time since the 1920s. Nevertheless, corporate profits are at record highs, while unemployment remains very high and tens of millions of people are on food stamps. That isn't a natural evolution. Something made it happen. " That something, Lofgren says, is the Deep State.
    Now retired from congressional politics, Mike Lofgren is author of the book, "The Party Is Over: How Republicans Went Crazy, Democrats Became Useless and the Middle Class Got Shafted."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#235] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    Great Decisions In Foreign Policy [#502] Israel and America Ties with America are being tested by the shifting tides of the Arab Spring, the potential of a nuclear Iran, unrest in Syria and Egypt and Israel's own recent decision to give the U.S. the cold shoulder regarding a two-state solution with Palestine. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5334H] * Violent protests between police in Ukraine and anti-government demonstrators escalated on Thursday after a truce between the president and opposition leaders fell apart. President Obama urged Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych to withdraw forces from downtown Kiev in an attempt to restore peace and order. The European Union imposed sanctions and called for the Ukraine government to begin negotiations with opponents. David Sanger of The New York Times will examine what's at stake in Ukraine and how the unrest is affecting US-Russia relations.
    * The debate over raising the minimum wage turned into a political firestorm this week after the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released its estimates on the cost of raising the federal minimum from $7.25 an hour to $10. 10. According to the CBO, a higher minimum wage would boost the incomes of most low-wage workers but could cost nearly half a million jobs. Is it worth the trade off? We'll get answers and analysis from Greg Ip of The Economist.
    * The 2014 election season is in full swing and the money being spent by independent political action groups could set new records. Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report will take a closer look at how these independent groups are changing the election landscape and influencing the choices some candidates make when deciding campaign advertising strategies.
    * Plus, we begin our first in a series of 2014 Races to Watch reports with Jeanne Cummings of Bloomberg News reporting on the primary challenge Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell is facing from tea party candidate Matt Bevin in Kentucky.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#117H] Juvenile Detention Scrutinized, Richmond Public Housing Neglect and Coming Out in Pro Sports
    Juvenile Detention Scrutinized in Contra Costa County
    In a highly unusual move, attorneys for the federal Department of Justice and Department of Education weighed in on a lawsuit challenging the way Contra Costa County treats youths in juvenile hall. The lawsuit charges that teens with disabilities are kept in solitary confinement for up to 23 hours a day and are illegally denied special education and rehabilitation services. The allegations have led to finger pointing amid a larger debate about such practices.

    Guests:
    Jill Tucker, San Francisco Chronicle education reporter
    Tom Vacar, KTVU consumer editor
    Daffodil Altan, Center for Investigative Reporting producer

    Massive Neglect Revealed in Richmond Public Housing
    Richmond's public housing agency has been named among the "worst of the worst" by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Residents in some of the city's five public housing projects complain of dangerous conditions, from high crime rates to rampant infestations of rats, mice and cockroaches. Officials at the Richmond Housing Authority cite ongoing budget cuts, while critics say mismanagement and neglect are to blame. This special report is part of a series produced in collaboration with the Center for Investigative Reporting and the San Francisco Chronicle.

    Further Reporting:
    Richmond Officials Take Action Amid Outcry Over Public Housing Conditions
    Financial Abuse, Mismanagement Leave Richmond Housing Agency Near Takeover
    Richmond Public Housing Residents Say They're Plagued With Filth, Vermin, Mold and Raw Sewage

    Coming Out in Pro Sports — An Interview with Rick Welts
    University of Missouri football star Michael Sam ignited a national conversation two weeks ago by announcing that he's gay. If Sam is drafted by the NFL in May, he would become the first openly gay player on a pro football team. Here in the Bay Area, Golden State Warriors president Rick Welts understands what Sam is facing on a personal level — Welts himself shook up the world of professional sports three years ago when he came out as gay. Newsroom correspondent Scott Shafer talks with Welts about his experience as the highest ranking openly gay executive in men's sports.

    Further Reporting: Golden State Warriors' Openly Gay Exec: 'What's the Big Deal With Gays in Pro Sports?'
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17052Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2250H] * Distressing Women in Media Report * Sochi Olympics - Snowboarding Too Extreme? * WVa Mountaintop Removal Advocacy
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC); Republican Strategist Rina Shah; Kim Gandy, CEO National Network to End Domestic Violence; Former Bush White House Aide Mercy Viana Schlapp; Ohio Valley Environmental Coalition's Janet Keating.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3209H] TOPICS: Chaos in Ukraine; Minimum wage hike - job blessing or job killer? PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Eleanor Clift, The Daily Beast; Mort Zuckerman, US New & World Report; Rich Lowry, National Review. duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#132] * Zbigniew Brzezinski on the unrest in the Ukraine * Mike Allen on the week in politics * Facbook purchases WhatsApp with Henry Blodget *Bill Carter on Jimmy Fallon's first week as host of the Tonight Show * Bradley Cooper on American Hustle duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#307H] The Deep State Hiding In Plain Sight Former Capitol Hill insider Mike Lofgren talks with Bill Moyers about "Anatomy of the Deep State," an essay he has written exclusively for the Moyers website, BillMoyers.com. Mike Lofgren was a numbers man, a congressional staff member for 28 years with the powerful House and Senate Budget committees. Over the years, as he crunched the numbers, he realized they didn't add up. Instead, they led him to what he calls America's Deep State - a phrase he borrowed from British spy novelist John Le Carre - a government just beneath the surface where elected and unelected figures collude to protect and serve powerful vested interests. "It is the big story of our time," Lofgren tells Moyers. "It is, I would say, the red thread that runs through the history of the last 3 decades. It's how we had deregulation, financialization of the economy, the Wall Street bust, the erosion of our civil liberties, and perpetual war."
    In his essay, Lofgren describes the Deep State as "a hybrid association of elements of government and parts of top-level finance and industry that is effectively able to govern the US without reference to the consent of the governed." But, as he says to Moyers in their conversation, the power and wealth generated by this Deep State "does not trickle down. Our inequality is as great or greater than any time since the 1920s. Nevertheless, corporate profits are at record highs, while unemployment remains very high and tens of millions of people are on food stamps. That isn't a natural evolution. Something made it happen. " That something, Lofgren says, is the Deep State.
    Now retired from congressional politics, Mike Lofgren is author of the book, "The Party Is Over: How Republicans Went Crazy, Democrats Became Useless and the Middle Class Got Shafted."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1725H] DETROIT'S BANKRUPTCY AND WORKER PENSIONS - Detroit owes a total of $ 18 billion to banks, investors and 23,000 present and former city workers. How much will workers' pensions likely be cut? Should pensioners be treated differently than banks and bondholders? Lucky Severson reports from Detroit on the anguished debate there over what would be fair.
    THE DALAI LAMA'S "SECULAR ETHICS" - The Dalai Lama is in the US teaching what he calls "secular ethics." Kate Olson reports on the Dalai Lama's recent visit to Emory University in Atlanta, where he spoke of the compassion that he says, can make possible a world-wide ethic that everyone could embrace - religious or not.
    PROMOTING RACIAL RECONCILIATION - A Belief and Practice segment on the leaders of the predominantly white Episcopal Church in Louisiana who are urging their parishioners to repent and ask forgiveness for racism toward Louisiana's large black community.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#312] Hog Wild/Amateur Astronomers Wild pigs are overrunning the Bay Area's parks and open spaces and QUEST meets the amateur stargazers in the Bay Area who are making important observations about the cosmos. duration 26:22   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#308] duration 25:41   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    For Love of Liberty: The Story of America's Black Patriots [#101] The first man to die in the cause that would become the American Revolution was black. Crispus Attucks, and others like him made the ultimate sacrifice to insure that their people would one day enjoy the right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Four generations later most African Americans were still slaves. Yet black men were willing to fight and die to save a nation that wouldn't even allow them the right to vote. As the country grew west, Buffalo Soldiers were there to keep the peace and at the Battle of San Juan Hill, Teddy Roosevelt's Roughriders owed their lives to the men of the 10th Cavalry. In the War to End all Wars, the Harlem Hellfighters spent more time in front line trenches than any other American unit, yet a white navel officer refused to allow black combat veterans to board his ship. In America, racism was rampant and during World War Two, the United States military was no different. duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 4:00 pm
    For Love of Liberty: The Story of America's Black Patriots [#102] As WWII rages more than 1,200,000 African Americans fight for victory. Despite the heroic actions of countless black soldiers and sailors, none are awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. It takes a war in Korea before the military recognizes black men and women to be the equal of their white counterparts and a war in Vietnam before African Americans begin to receive that same respect at home. As the 20th century comes to a close, the US Armed Forces are under the command of a black general who leads the nation to its greatest military achievement since the Second World War. When terrorists attack the homeland, America once again finds itself at war in a distant land. For African Americans back home, the struggle for equality is far from over, yet in 2009 the nation inaugurates its first Black Commander In Chief. duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#149H] Included: 1.7 million Americans have lost their emergency unemployment benefits since Congress did not approve an extension in late December. NewsHour Weekend travels to Georgia to explore what one woman is doing to survive without the federal life line she's come to count on in these hard times. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5334H] * Violent protests between police in Ukraine and anti-government demonstrators escalated on Thursday after a truce between the president and opposition leaders fell apart. President Obama urged Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych to withdraw forces from downtown Kiev in an attempt to restore peace and order. The European Union imposed sanctions and called for the Ukraine government to begin negotiations with opponents. David Sanger of The New York Times will examine what's at stake in Ukraine and how the unrest is affecting US-Russia relations.
    * The debate over raising the minimum wage turned into a political firestorm this week after the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released its estimates on the cost of raising the federal minimum from $7.25 an hour to $10. 10. According to the CBO, a higher minimum wage would boost the incomes of most low-wage workers but could cost nearly half a million jobs. Is it worth the trade off? We'll get answers and analysis from Greg Ip of The Economist.
    * The 2014 election season is in full swing and the money being spent by independent political action groups could set new records. Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report will take a closer look at how these independent groups are changing the election landscape and influencing the choices some candidates make when deciding campaign advertising strategies.
    * Plus, we begin our first in a series of 2014 Races to Watch reports with Jeanne Cummings of Bloomberg News reporting on the primary challenge Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell is facing from tea party candidate Matt Bevin in Kentucky.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#117H] Juvenile Detention Scrutinized, Richmond Public Housing Neglect and Coming Out in Pro Sports
    Juvenile Detention Scrutinized in Contra Costa County
    In a highly unusual move, attorneys for the federal Department of Justice and Department of Education weighed in on a lawsuit challenging the way Contra Costa County treats youths in juvenile hall. The lawsuit charges that teens with disabilities are kept in solitary confinement for up to 23 hours a day and are illegally denied special education and rehabilitation services. The allegations have led to finger pointing amid a larger debate about such practices.

    Guests:
    Jill Tucker, San Francisco Chronicle education reporter
    Tom Vacar, KTVU consumer editor
    Daffodil Altan, Center for Investigative Reporting producer

    Massive Neglect Revealed in Richmond Public Housing
    Richmond's public housing agency has been named among the "worst of the worst" by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Residents in some of the city's five public housing projects complain of dangerous conditions, from high crime rates to rampant infestations of rats, mice and cockroaches. Officials at the Richmond Housing Authority cite ongoing budget cuts, while critics say mismanagement and neglect are to blame. This special report is part of a series produced in collaboration with the Center for Investigative Reporting and the San Francisco Chronicle.

    Further Reporting:
    Richmond Officials Take Action Amid Outcry Over Public Housing Conditions
    Financial Abuse, Mismanagement Leave Richmond Housing Agency Near Takeover
    Richmond Public Housing Residents Say They're Plagued With Filth, Vermin, Mold and Raw Sewage

    Coming Out in Pro Sports — An Interview with Rick Welts
    University of Missouri football star Michael Sam ignited a national conversation two weeks ago by announcing that he's gay. If Sam is drafted by the NFL in May, he would become the first openly gay player on a pro football team. Here in the Bay Area, Golden State Warriors president Rick Welts understands what Sam is facing on a personal level — Welts himself shook up the world of professional sports three years ago when he came out as gay. Newsroom correspondent Scott Shafer talks with Welts about his experience as the highest ranking openly gay executive in men's sports.

    Further Reporting: Golden State Warriors' Openly Gay Exec: 'What's the Big Deal With Gays in Pro Sports?'
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#312] Hog Wild/Amateur Astronomers Wild pigs are overrunning the Bay Area's parks and open spaces and QUEST meets the amateur stargazers in the Bay Area who are making important observations about the cosmos. duration 26:22   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1217] Greek Islands Megan celebrates Greek independence on Hydra, walks in St. John's footsteps on Patmos, samples the nightlife on Mykonos, visits Apollo's birthplace on Delos, explores the Minoan city of Akrotiri on Santorini, hikes the Samaria Gorge on Crete and discovers the tiny island of Gavdos, where legend has it that Odysseus fell under Calypso's spell for seven years. duration 57:06   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3106] Honey Badgers: Masters of Mayhem "Honey badger is bad ass." Those words and corresponding video became a YouTube sensation with 51 million hits. This relentless little creature is one the most fearless animals in the world, renowned for its ability to confront grown lions, castrate charging buffalo, and shrug off the toxic defenses of stinging bees, scorpions, and snakes. Little is known about its behavior in the wild or why it is so aggressive. This film follows three badger specialists in South Africa who take on these masters of mayhem in ways that must be seen to be believed. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3914H] Mystery of Easter Island A remote, bleak speck of rock in the middle of the Pacific, Easter Island, or Rapa Nui, has mystified the world ever since the first Europeans arrived in 1722. How and why did the ancient islanders build and move nearly 900 giant statues or moai, weighing up to 86 tons? And how did they transform a presumed paradise into a treeless wasteland, bringing ruin upon their island and themselves? Nova explores controversial recent claims that challenge decades of previous thinking about the islanders, who have been accused of everything from ecocide to cannibalism. Among the radical new theories is that the islanders used ropes to "walk" the statues upright, like moving a fridge. With the help of an accurate 15-ton replica statue, a Nova team sets out to test this high-risk, seemingly unlikely theory. duration 55:16   STEREO TVPG
  • 11:00 pm
    Super Skyscrapers [#103H] The Vertical City Shanghai Tower isn't just a skyscraper -- it's a vertical city, a collection of businesses, services and hotels all in one place, fitting a population the size of Monaco into a footprint the size of a football field. Within its walls, residents can literally work, rest, play and relax in public parks, looking up through 12 stories of clear space; not just one, however, but eight of them, stacked on top of each other, all the way to the 120th floor. When complete, the structure will dominate Shanghai's skyline, towering over its neighbors as a testament to China's economic success and the ambitions of the city's wealthy elite. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#205] Code of the West At a time when the world is rethinking its drug policies large and small, one state rises to the forefront. Once a pioneer in legalizing medical marijuana, the state of Montana may now become the first to repeal its medical marijuana law. Set against the sweeping vistas of the Rockies, the steamy lamplight of marijuana grow houses, and the bustling halls of the State Capitol, this program follows the political process of marijuana policy reform and the recent federal crackdown on medical marijuana growers across the country. Chronicling the opinions and reactions of patients, growers, politicians, activists, and community members on both sides of the issue, the story paints an image of what happens when federal and state governments clash with communities in the crossfire, and the individuals involved who ultimately pay the price. duration 1:29:36   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, February 22, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

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KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

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Comcast 10 and 710
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KQED Life
Comcast 189
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KQED World
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Digital 9.3

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v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

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KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too