Donate

TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, February 16, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, February 16, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#212] The Prep School Negro Andre Robert Lee and his sister grew up in the ghettos of Philadelphia. Their mother struggled to support them by putting strings in the waistbands of track pants and swimsuits in a local factory. When Andre was 14 years old, he received what his family believed to be a golden ticket, a full scholarship to attend one of the most prestigious prep schools in the country. Elite education was Andre's way up and out, but at what price? Yes, the exorbitant tuition was covered, but this new world cost him and his family much more than anyone could have anticipated.
    In this program, Andre takes a journey back in time to revisit the events of his adolescence while also spending time with current day prep school students of color and their classmates to see how much has really changed inside the ivory tower. What he discovers along the way is the poignant and unapologetic truth about who really pays the consequences for yesterday's accelerated desegregation and today's racial naivete.
    duration 1:25:52   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Education of Harvey Gantt Even after the Supreme Court decided the landmark case Brown v. Board of Education in 1954, South Carolina's General Assembly passed numerous acts designed to maintain segregation in the state's schools, parks and other public facilities. In his 1959 inaugural address, newly elected Governor Fritz Hollings declared he would not integrate South Carolina schools. In fact, South Carolina held firm to its segregationist stance through 1962, despite every other state integrating at least one of its colleges and universities. When South Carolina's institutions of higher learning finally opened their doors to African Americans in 1963, they did so in a systematic, nonviolent manner. Unlike Mississippi, Georgia and Alabama, where desegregation efforts met with hostility and even bloodshed, South Carolina integrated its public colleges and universities peacefully. On January 28, 1963, a young black man from Charleston named Harvey Gantt enrolled at Clemson College, making him the first African American accepted to a white school in South Carolina. The absence of drama surrounding Gantt's enrollment the result of nearly two years of detailed preparation and planning on the part of college administrators, state politicians and business leaders made headlines at the time, but soon it faded from the public consciousness. Narrated by Tony-winning actor Phylicia Rashad, THE EDUCATION OF HARVEY GANTT tells this pivotal, yet largely forgotten, story of desegregation. Interviews with Gantt, distinguished scholars and civil rights veterans, and archival footage and reenactment illuminate the events leading up to Gantt's enrollment, the unfolding of entrance day and the impact of Clemson's integration on the state and the nation. In recounting this chapter of American civil rights history, the documentary illustrates how a determined young man, his family and his legal champions brought about permanent change. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#218] Reading Like A Historian Reading Like A Historian: A detailed look at a cutting-edge history curriculum that turns away from textbooks. We'll join young "Historians in Training" as they examine original documents and engage in lively discussions to discover the complexities of history. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#306H] Putting Political Corruption On Ice This week, two Americans fighting the good fight against greed and corruption.
    * First, David Simon, former crime reporter and creator of the TV series The Wire and Treme, talks with Bill Moyers about the triumph of capital over democracy. "if it's just about generating mass wealth, then you know, what are we saying?" he asks Moyers. "What are we saying about the human condition? What are saying about our society's condition?
    Simon believes that to find a solution, "You have to do it legislatively. [But] how do you do that when your legislative aspect has been completely purchased by the very capital that's being amassed?" One possibility? "If I could concentrate and focus on one thing and hope that by breaking the cycle you might start to walk the nightmare back, it would be campaign finance reform."
    * Enter constitutional scholar and activist Lawrence Lessig, who last month led a 2-week trek through the winter cold from north to south down 185 miles of streets and roads in New Hampshire - traditionally, the site of the nation's first presidential primary. The march was to raise awareness of the need for campaign finance reform. Lessig's movement, NH Rebellion, is encouraging voters to ask all the presidential candidates who soon will be haunting New Hampshire: How are you going to end the system of corruption in Washington?
    "We've been looking for a long time for the kind of action that people had to pay attention to, they had to look at, they had to see, they had to think about," Lessig said. "We're hopeful that if people see people trudging through the sleet and the rain and the snow in New Hampshire in January, they'll stop and say, 'Why? Why would you do that? What's the purpose? What's the issue?' And as they think about it they'll be reminded that they, too, care about this issue."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Asia This Week [#346] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5333H] While snow storms and weather delays seemed to be the big story along the Atlantic coast this week, there was plenty of news being made in the nation's capital.
    * On Capitol Hill, Congress passed a "clean" debt ceiling bill and approved a measure to restore pension benefits to military retirees. Republicans hoping to avoid more bad press like during the 2013 government shutdown and with an eye on the 2014 midterm election, retreated from their original strategy to link any hike in the debt-limit to measures designed to curb the Affordable Care Act or approve the Keystone XL pipeline. The House passed the extension with mostly Democratic votes and GOP lawmakers in the Senate were forced to overcome a filibuster threat and political maneuvers by tea party favorite Sen. Ted Cruz (TX).
    * The Obama administration announced another delay in the implementation of a portion of the Affordable Care Act giving some small businesses an extra year to comply with the mandate that requires employers provide health insurance for employees. And just-released health care enrollment numbers indicate the new law seems to have overcome the initial rocky rollout and is gaining traction with Americans.
    Joining Gwen Ifill for a special reporters roundtable on the politics of the debt ceiling debate, GOP positioning ahead of the 2014 midterm elections, and the White House's continuing problems with the Affordable Care Act: Molly Ball of The Atlantic, Alexis Simendinger of RealClearPolitics, and Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3208H] TOPICS: BONJOUR, PRESIDENT HOLLANDE!; RAND PAUL'S WRIT. PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Eleanor Clift, The Daily Beast; Mort Zuckerman, US New & World Report; Guy Taylor, The Washington Times. duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#131] * Jack Lew, Secretary of the Treasury * Mike Allen on the week in politics * Photgrapher Bruce Weber * Beau Willimon on season 2 of House of Cards * Actor Bill Murray * a look at the film Winter's Tale with actor Colin Farrell duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3207] Ukraine: Protestors' Right to Rise Up UKRAINE: REINFORCEMENTS FROM LVIV - Many of the opponents of the government currently demonstrating in Kiev come from western Ukraine. A great deal of the support comes from Lviv. The mayor of Lviv is especially proud of his city. Every day dozens of demonstrators travel in buses to the occupied Maidan Nezalezhnosti, Independence Square, in Kiev. In the university city of Lviv, people are especially disappointed with President Viktor Yanukovych's turn towards Russia. EU flags can be seen waving from cars and apartments everywhere as a sign of protest.
    SPAIN: PRINCESS IN COURT - In the face of a corruption scandal, Spain's Princess Cristina has had to appear in court over accusations of tax fraud and money-laundering. The popularity of Spain's royal family is at a new low. Although the family is supposed to be on holiday, Princess Cristina was called to appear for questioning before the court in Palma de Mallorca. It's the first time that a Spanish royal has been summoned to appear in criminal proceedings since the restoration of the monarchy. The investigation in Palma de Mallorca is linked to a corruption case against Cristina's husband, Inaki Urdangarin, which has been going on for years.
    ROMANIA: BEHIND THE SMUGGLERS' SMOKESCREEN (EUROPE BY NIGHT SERIES) - No sooner does the sun set in Europe than its nocturnal life awakens. Police hunt smugglers on Romania's border to Ukraine, and European Journal starts its new series: Europe by Night - Dealings After Dark. Cigarette smuggling leaves a dent of ten billion euros in the budgets of EU member states. The trafficking is especially rife on the EU's outer borders. In scarcely any region in the world are cigarettes as cheap as they are in Eastern Europe. Because that's been the case for years, a veritable smugglers' paradise has developed. So every night, Romanian customs officials lie in wait with thermal imaging cameras on the border to Ukraine. But it's not just the customs officials who are getting more professional; so are the smugglers. They even use hang gliders to fly tons of cigarettes to the EU.
    BELGIUM: EXPELLING EU CITIZENS - A Belgian politician wants to protect her country's social welfare system from what she sees as an influx of immigrants taking advantage of it. She says unemployed EU citizens should not be a burden on state coffers. The right of EU citizens to work in all member states is a basic pillar of the European Union. Every EU citizen can stay in another EU country for three months to look for work. Those who find it receive the right to remain in the country indefinitely. Those who don't are threatened with expulsion. It's a regulation Belgium is making use of more frequently. In 2013 it expelled more EU citizens than ever before.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#212] The Prep School Negro Andre Robert Lee and his sister grew up in the ghettos of Philadelphia. Their mother struggled to support them by putting strings in the waistbands of track pants and swimsuits in a local factory. When Andre was 14 years old, he received what his family believed to be a golden ticket, a full scholarship to attend one of the most prestigious prep schools in the country. Elite education was Andre's way up and out, but at what price? Yes, the exorbitant tuition was covered, but this new world cost him and his family much more than anyone could have anticipated.
    In this program, Andre takes a journey back in time to revisit the events of his adolescence while also spending time with current day prep school students of color and their classmates to see how much has really changed inside the ivory tower. What he discovers along the way is the poignant and unapologetic truth about who really pays the consequences for yesterday's accelerated desegregation and today's racial naivete.
    duration 1:25:52   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    QUEST [#320] California's Galapagos/Maya Skies Visit the Farallon Islands, a uniquely valuable part of the Bay Area's precious natural heritage long important to marine wildlife. And engineers re-create detailed virtual records of the world's monuments, starting with the Mexican ruins of Chichen Itza. duration 26:20   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Asia Biz Forecast [#446] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1034] Investing In Muni Bonds WT focuses on the rising appeal of municipal bonds. Despite some negative headlines, top fund managers Robert Amodeo of Western Asset Management and Robert DiMella of MacKay Municipal Managers say there are opportunities to be had in munis. duration 27:26   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#324H] Financial Planner Ric Edelman talks with one investor about the best place to put real estate profits. Plus, where's the best place to invest these days? And Jean Edelman will explain the importance of tuning in to your "inner voice". All that and much more on this edition of The Truth About Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Great Decisions In Foreign Policy [#501] Defense on a Budget Can America sustain its primacy in the international system with ever increasing security challenges while defense spending is limited by fiscal austerity? duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3208H] TOPICS: BONJOUR, PRESIDENT HOLLANDE!; RAND PAUL'S WRIT. PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Eleanor Clift, The Daily Beast; Mort Zuckerman, US New & World Report; Guy Taylor, The Washington Times. duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5333H] While snow storms and weather delays seemed to be the big story along the Atlantic coast this week, there was plenty of news being made in the nation's capital.
    * On Capitol Hill, Congress passed a "clean" debt ceiling bill and approved a measure to restore pension benefits to military retirees. Republicans hoping to avoid more bad press like during the 2013 government shutdown and with an eye on the 2014 midterm election, retreated from their original strategy to link any hike in the debt-limit to measures designed to curb the Affordable Care Act or approve the Keystone XL pipeline. The House passed the extension with mostly Democratic votes and GOP lawmakers in the Senate were forced to overcome a filibuster threat and political maneuvers by tea party favorite Sen. Ted Cruz (TX).
    * The Obama administration announced another delay in the implementation of a portion of the Affordable Care Act giving some small businesses an extra year to comply with the mandate that requires employers provide health insurance for employees. And just-released health care enrollment numbers indicate the new law seems to have overcome the initial rocky rollout and is gaining traction with Americans.
    Joining Gwen Ifill for a special reporters roundtable on the politics of the debt ceiling debate, GOP positioning ahead of the 2014 midterm elections, and the White House's continuing problems with the Affordable Care Act: Molly Ball of The Atlantic, Alexis Simendinger of RealClearPolitics, and Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#116H] A Dry Run For Coho Salmon, Concerns Over Pedestrian Safety and the Tenth Anniversary of Same-Sex Marriage
    Drought Update
    President Obama visits California's Central Valley where he is expected to pledge $183 million in federal aid to help California farmers who lost livestock due to drought conditions. KQED Newsroom senior correspondent Scott Shafer provides analysis.

    Further Reporting: Why Recent Rains Didn't Make a Bigger Dent in the Drought

    A Dry Run for Coho Salmon
    California's worst drought on record is taking a toll not only on fields and farms but also on iconic native species, including the endangered Central California Coast coho salmon. Low water levels have prevented many adult coho from reaching their spawning grounds in Lagunitas Creek in Marin County. Last week's rains brought a measure of relief, raising water levels enough to allow some salmon through. But as KQED reporter Dan Brekke found in talking with a fish biologist at the Marin Municipal Water District, the relief may be temporary.

    Further Reporting: Marin's Salmon, the Drought, and Us

    Concerns Over Pedestrian Safety After a Spike in Fatalities
    A spike in fatal pedestrian traffic accidents around the Bay Area has renewed attention on both street design and driver behavior. A fatal crash this week on San Francisco's Van Ness Street brings this year's tally up to three for the city. And last year was a particular deadly year for San Jose, where 26 pedestrian fatalities were logged — the highest in nearly two decades. What's behind the spike and what can be done to calm traffic?

    Guests:
    Chris Hwang, Walk Oakland Bike Oakland board president
    Nicole Schneider, Walk San Francisco executive director

    Further Reporting: Arrest Made in San Francisco's Latest Pedestrian Fatality

    Tenth Anniversary of Same Sex Marriage — An Interview with Kate Kendell
    It's been ten years since then-Mayor Gavin Newsom allowed marriage licenses for gay couples at City Hall in San Francisco. Same sex marriage has been on a long and winding journey since then — from a voter proposition to ban gay marriage to a U.S. Supreme Court decision that struck down part of the Defense of Marriage Act. Now seventeen states and the District of Columbia allow same sex marriage, and public opinion is rapidly changing. Scott Shafer hears from the National Center for Lesbian Rights Executive Director Kate Kendell about her work on this civil rights issue and where it's heading next.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#306H] Putting Political Corruption On Ice This week, two Americans fighting the good fight against greed and corruption.
    * First, David Simon, former crime reporter and creator of the TV series The Wire and Treme, talks with Bill Moyers about the triumph of capital over democracy. "if it's just about generating mass wealth, then you know, what are we saying?" he asks Moyers. "What are we saying about the human condition? What are saying about our society's condition?
    Simon believes that to find a solution, "You have to do it legislatively. [But] how do you do that when your legislative aspect has been completely purchased by the very capital that's being amassed?" One possibility? "If I could concentrate and focus on one thing and hope that by breaking the cycle you might start to walk the nightmare back, it would be campaign finance reform."
    * Enter constitutional scholar and activist Lawrence Lessig, who last month led a 2-week trek through the winter cold from north to south down 185 miles of streets and roads in New Hampshire - traditionally, the site of the nation's first presidential primary. The march was to raise awareness of the need for campaign finance reform. Lessig's movement, NH Rebellion, is encouraging voters to ask all the presidential candidates who soon will be haunting New Hampshire: How are you going to end the system of corruption in Washington?
    "We've been looking for a long time for the kind of action that people had to pay attention to, they had to look at, they had to see, they had to think about," Lessig said. "We're hopeful that if people see people trudging through the sleet and the rain and the snow in New Hampshire in January, they'll stop and say, 'Why? Why would you do that? What's the purpose? What's the issue?' And as they think about it they'll be reminded that they, too, care about this issue."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1724] THE ETHICS OF WHISTLE-BLOWING - Edward Snowden remains in Moscow avoiding prosecution in the US for making public a vast amount of classified data revealing the extent of the National Security Agency's surveillance operations, around the world and in the US. Lucky Severson reports on the ongoing debate about the morality of his actions: Was what Snowden did wrong because it hurts national security? Or was he right to make public what he saw as the government's massive invasion of privacy?
    JORDAN, THE OTHER HOLY LAND - Jordan's King Abdullah is in the US this week for a summit with President Obama on the Middle East peace process and the Syrian refugee crisis. Jordan is predominantly Muslim but has long had a vibrant Christian presence. In recent years, the number of Christians there has dropped dramatically, just as it has in many other parts of the Middle East. Kim Lawton reports from Jordan on the situation for Jordanian Christians, who say that like their neighbors Israel and the West Bank, they too should be considered part of the Holy Land.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 pm
    QUEST [#320] California's Galapagos/Maya Skies Visit the Farallon Islands, a uniquely valuable part of the Bay Area's precious natural heritage long important to marine wildlife. And engineers re-create detailed virtual records of the world's monuments, starting with the Mexican ruins of Chichen Itza. duration 26:20   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Miller Center's American Forum [#2006] JFK and the Anger of the 1960s In their new book, "Dallas 1963", Bill Minutaglio And Steven L. Davis offer a fresh new understanding of the social and political climate in the US in the weeks and months leading to John F. Kennedy's assassination. They explore the forces that led many people to warn President Kennedy to avoid Dallas on his fateful trip to Texas. Minutaglio and Davis lead us through intimate glimpses of the Kennedy family and the machinations of the Kennedy White House, to a group of political activists in Dallas who fanned flames of anger at JFK - and who some later blamed for the president's death. A professor at the University of Texas at Austin, Minutaglio has worked at the Dallas Morning News, Houston Chronicle, and San Antonio Express-News. He has written books about George W. Bush, Molly Ivins, Alberto Gonzales, and America's greatest industrial disaster. Davis is the author of two highly praised books on Texas and is a curator at Texas State University, which holds the literary papers of Cormac McCarthy and many other writers. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1216] Scotland Megan journeys to Glasgow, where she visits the Macintosh Museum and takes a bagpipe lesson. Next she travels to Stirling, site of a major victory by William "Braveheart" Wallace, Scotland's national hero. Megan samples the whiskey on the island of Islay, explores the mountainous region of Oben, goes fishing off the Isle of Skye, tours the battlefield of Culloden and pursues the myth of the Loch Ness Monster. She then travels to Strathdon for the Clanloddoch Highland games, witnesses an Orkadian wedding in Skara Brae, hits the links at St. Andrews and revels in the performances at the Edinburgh Festival. duration 56:43   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Nature [#2902H] The Animal House Animals build homes for reasons very similar to our own, but they've been doing it for much longer. From a small depression in the sand to an elaborate, multi-chambered tunnel - animal structures can be simple or architectural marvels. In each case, the goal is the same - protection from predators and a nearby source of food. These structures, whether a nest, a burrow or a mound, are also the site of great dramas and extraordinary behaviors. From master builders like termites and beavers, to master decorators like the bowerbird, which places colorful flowers at the entrance to its nest, "The Animal House" will be a global look at the "homelife of wildlife." duration 56:16   SRND51 TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    Nova [#4105H] Great Cathedral Mystery The Duomo in Florence is a towering masterpiece of Renaissance ingenuity and an enduring source of mystery. A team of US master bricklayers help build a unique experimental "mini-Duomo" using period tools and techniques. Will it stay intact during the final precarious stages of closing over the top of the dome? duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 pm
    Super Skyscrapers [#102H] Building The Future Commonly known as "the cheese grater," the Leadenhall Building is the pinnacle of London's avant-garde architecture. Designed as a tapered tower with a steel exoskeleton, it's the tallest skyscraper in the City of London and the most innovative. The teams behind the Leadenhall project had to radically rethink every aspect of the traditional building model. This program follows the monumental challenges that come with erecting this super skyscraper: it will be constructed off-site, delivered to location, and stacked and bolted together like a giant Lego set. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#148H] Included: In just 30 years, Mexico has become one of the fattest countries in the world. With obesity levels rivaling the US, Mexico has launched a rigorous public health campaign - and has begun experimenting with taxes on sugary drinks and high-calorie snack foods. Martin Fletcher investigates how well that strategy is working - and what lessons US policymakers may learn from their Mexican counterparts. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#116H] A Dry Run For Coho Salmon, Concerns Over Pedestrian Safety and the Tenth Anniversary of Same-Sex Marriage
    Drought Update
    President Obama visits California's Central Valley where he is expected to pledge $183 million in federal aid to help California farmers who lost livestock due to drought conditions. KQED Newsroom senior correspondent Scott Shafer provides analysis.

    Further Reporting: Why Recent Rains Didn't Make a Bigger Dent in the Drought

    A Dry Run for Coho Salmon
    California's worst drought on record is taking a toll not only on fields and farms but also on iconic native species, including the endangered Central California Coast coho salmon. Low water levels have prevented many adult coho from reaching their spawning grounds in Lagunitas Creek in Marin County. Last week's rains brought a measure of relief, raising water levels enough to allow some salmon through. But as KQED reporter Dan Brekke found in talking with a fish biologist at the Marin Municipal Water District, the relief may be temporary.

    Further Reporting: Marin's Salmon, the Drought, and Us

    Concerns Over Pedestrian Safety After a Spike in Fatalities
    A spike in fatal pedestrian traffic accidents around the Bay Area has renewed attention on both street design and driver behavior. A fatal crash this week on San Francisco's Van Ness Street brings this year's tally up to three for the city. And last year was a particular deadly year for San Jose, where 26 pedestrian fatalities were logged — the highest in nearly two decades. What's behind the spike and what can be done to calm traffic?

    Guests:
    Chris Hwang, Walk Oakland Bike Oakland board president
    Nicole Schneider, Walk San Francisco executive director

    Further Reporting: Arrest Made in San Francisco's Latest Pedestrian Fatality

    Tenth Anniversary of Same Sex Marriage — An Interview with Kate Kendell
    It's been ten years since then-Mayor Gavin Newsom allowed marriage licenses for gay couples at City Hall in San Francisco. Same sex marriage has been on a long and winding journey since then — from a voter proposition to ban gay marriage to a U.S. Supreme Court decision that struck down part of the Defense of Marriage Act. Now seventeen states and the District of Columbia allow same sex marriage, and public opinion is rapidly changing. Scott Shafer hears from the National Center for Lesbian Rights Executive Director Kate Kendell about her work on this civil rights issue and where it's heading next.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#306H] Putting Political Corruption On Ice This week, two Americans fighting the good fight against greed and corruption.
    * First, David Simon, former crime reporter and creator of the TV series The Wire and Treme, talks with Bill Moyers about the triumph of capital over democracy. "if it's just about generating mass wealth, then you know, what are we saying?" he asks Moyers. "What are we saying about the human condition? What are saying about our society's condition?
    Simon believes that to find a solution, "You have to do it legislatively. [But] how do you do that when your legislative aspect has been completely purchased by the very capital that's being amassed?" One possibility? "If I could concentrate and focus on one thing and hope that by breaking the cycle you might start to walk the nightmare back, it would be campaign finance reform."
    * Enter constitutional scholar and activist Lawrence Lessig, who last month led a 2-week trek through the winter cold from north to south down 185 miles of streets and roads in New Hampshire - traditionally, the site of the nation's first presidential primary. The march was to raise awareness of the need for campaign finance reform. Lessig's movement, NH Rebellion, is encouraging voters to ask all the presidential candidates who soon will be haunting New Hampshire: How are you going to end the system of corruption in Washington?
    "We've been looking for a long time for the kind of action that people had to pay attention to, they had to look at, they had to see, they had to think about," Lessig said. "We're hopeful that if people see people trudging through the sleet and the rain and the snow in New Hampshire in January, they'll stop and say, 'Why? Why would you do that? What's the purpose? What's the issue?' And as they think about it they'll be reminded that they, too, care about this issue."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    Local USA [#105] Native American Culture Three stories about the modern Native American culture: A look at how climate change is effecting a Pacific Northwest tribe known as the "Salmon People" and how science can help find a solution; the Lincoln, Nebraska rock star artist who's creating sculptures, linking the past to the present; and the fight an Oklahoma tribe tries to revive their fading language. duration 26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    POV [#2601] Homegoings Through the eyes of funeral director Isaiah Owens, the beauty and grace of African American funerals are brought to life. Filmed at Owens Funeral Home in New York City's historic Harlem neighborhood, "Homegoings" takes an up-close look at the rarely seen world of undertaking in the black community, where funeral rites draw on a rich palette of tradition, history and celebration. Combining cinema verite with intimate interviews and archival photographs, the film paints a portrait of the dearly departed, their grieving families and a man who sends loved ones "home." duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2902H] The Animal House Animals build homes for reasons very similar to our own, but they've been doing it for much longer. From a small depression in the sand to an elaborate, multi-chambered tunnel - animal structures can be simple or architectural marvels. In each case, the goal is the same - protection from predators and a nearby source of food. These structures, whether a nest, a burrow or a mound, are also the site of great dramas and extraordinary behaviors. From master builders like termites and beavers, to master decorators like the bowerbird, which places colorful flowers at the entrance to its nest, "The Animal House" will be a global look at the "homelife of wildlife." duration 56:16   SRND51 TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross [#103] Into The Fire (1861-1896) Into the Fire examines the most tumultuous and consequential period in African American history: the Civil War and the end of slavery, and Reconstruction's thrilling but tragically brief "moment in the sun." From the beginning, African Americans were agents of their own liberation, forcing the Union to confront the issue of slavery by fleeing the plantations and taking up arms to serve with honor in the United States Colored Troops. After Emancipation, African Americans sought to realize the promise of freedom-rebuilding families shattered by slavery; demanding economic, political and civil rights; even winning elected office. Just a few years later, however, an intransigent South mounted a swift and vicious campaign of terror to restore white supremacy and roll back African American rights. Yet the achievements of Reconstruction would remain very much alive in the collective memory of the African American community. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#404] Young Yakuza Meet the Japanese Mafia's latest son: a 20 year old named Naoki, part of a surging, decade-long wave of juvenile delinquency in Japan. As Naoki rejects school, jobs and family, his desperate mother decides to take one last chance to save him - by handing him over to the Mafia for one year and letting him choose his own path. duration 1:21:29   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 am
    Looking Over Jordan: African Americans and the War The Civil War began as a means of preserving the Union. However, to nearly four million African Americans, it held a much more personal promise. As Northern armies swept south, self-emancipated slaves sought refuge behind Union lines. Determined to claim basic human rights, these former slaves-turned-soldiers fought valiantly for the Union and many sacrificed their lives for the cause.
    This documentary chronicles the black experience in the South before, during and after the war. The informative documentary features interviews with Civil War scholars, historical re-enactments, and primary readings from abolitionist Frederick Douglass, US Secretary of State William Seward, Louis B. Hughes' autobiography Thirty Years a Slave, and the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863. Among other topics, the doc covers the marked rise of slavery between 1790 and 1860, the role of religion and music in the slave narrative, the influx of freed black slaves into the Union army, heroics at the Battle of Nashville in December 1864, both Confiscation Acts, and the creation of the Bureau of Freedman, Refugees and Abandoned Land to aid freed slaves in the early Reconstruction era.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
Sunday, February 16, 2014

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too