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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, February 9, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, February 9, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#204] The New Public This program follows the lives of the ambitious educators and lively students of Bed Stuy's new Brooklyn Community Arts and Media High School (BCAM) over the course of the founding year, with the filmmakers returning three years later to again document the senior year of that first graduating class. Beginning in August 2006, just days before BCAM will open its doors for the first time. Dr. James O'Brien, former D.J. and point guard turned first-time principal, and his faculty of eight, take to the streets in Bed Stuy, Brooklyn to recruit students. Their enthusiasm is infectious and enticing: strong support for the individual student, a rigorous academic curriculum and unconventional arts electives taught by local artists. While at first running smoothly, as months go by, conflicts arise, and by the end of freshman year, the school's idealistic vision is addressing some issues, but aggravating others. Flash-forward to September 2010, the first day of senior year, the school is complete with 4 grades and 450 students, with a faculty that has grown from 8 to 50. Of the 104 students in their founding class, almost half have transferred or dropped out, leaving a senior class of 60 and only 30 on track to graduate. BCAM has made major adjustments, most notably, more disciplinary structure and no arts electives for seniors. What happens in the 4 years is both compelling and frustrating, and it's what makes The New Public a critical document of the complexities, frustrations and personal dramas that put public education at the center of national debate. What makes a kid or a school succeed are a series of complicated, interconnected dynamics, including, a re-evaluation of how we define success. duration 1:56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#204] Common Core State Standards The Common Core State Standards: Watch teachers break new ground putting the Common Core Standards into practice in Math and English Language Arts. The emphasis of these lessons is on deeper thinking, analyzing, and problem solving to better prepare students for success in college and future careers. duration 57:50   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#305H] Bill McKibben to Obama: Say No to Big Oil This week, Bill Moyers talks with Bill McKibben, the author and environmental activist who has dedicated his life to saving the planet from environmental collapse. Moyers' conversation with McKibben comes a few days after the State Department issued a long-awaited environmental impact statement on the Keystone XL pipeline that has both supporters and opponents hopeful the Administration's final decision will go their way. McKibben came to New York City to attend a rally opposing the pipeline and visited our studio to explain why urging the president to stop it is crucial to preserving the planet.
    McKibben is the Schumann Distinguished Professor in Residence at Middlebury College in Vermont, and has written a dozen books about the environment, from his first, The End of Nature, published 25 years ago, to his most recent, Oil and Honey. In 2008, he grew impatient with the pace of public awareness and change and in the tradition of the muckrakers of old, he decided to combine his writing with activism and founded the grassroots climate campaign 350.org. McKibben's cover story for Rolling Stone Magazine on "Global Warming's Terrifying New Math" reverberated around the world and inspired students across the country to challenge their colleges and universities to divest from stock in companies that produce or burn oil, gas and coal.
    "Most people understand that we're in a serious fix," McKibben tells Moyers, "The problem is that we all feel powerless in its face. And we are powerless one by one. There's nothing you can do as individuals that will really slow down this juggernaut. Look, you can say the same thing about the challenges faced by people in the civil rights or the abolition movement, or the gay rights movement or the women's movement. In each case, a movement arose; if we can build a movement, then we have a chance."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Asia This Week [#345] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5332H] * A report by the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office has sparked the latest political battle over the Affordable Care Act. The CBO forecasts more than 2 million full-time workers will choose to reduce their hours or leave their jobs over the next 10 years in order to remain eligible for federal healthcare subsidies. Democrats believe the ACA law will allow Americans to make choices about their lives, retirement and healthcare that don't hinge on having a full-time job. Republicans insist the law serves as a disincentive for people to work and in the long-run will hurt the economy. We'll take a closer look at the CBO report and examine the continuing healthcare debate with Janet Hook of The Wall Street Journal.
    * After record highs just weeks ago, the stock market has been on a steady downtown since the start of the new year making investors jittery. Friday the January jobs report will be released amid some worries the economic recovery has stalled. We'll get analysis from Jim Tankersley of The Washington Post and some insight on the impact of the recent bad weather on the early economic indicators of 2014. < br>* In the past 2 weeks the Pentagon has launched 2 separate investigations into possible misconduct among the ranks of the Army and Navy. Helene Cooper of The New York Times will have details of the probe into alleged cheating on written exams by senior Navy officers and the Army investigation into recruitment fraud among enlistees during the height of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.
    * Plus, Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will take a closer look at the election 2014 battle lines and will explain why Democrats and Republicans are shifting their strategies ahead of this fall's congressional election.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3207H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#130H] * Ian Bremmer on the Sochi Winter Olympics * Neil Degrasse Tyson, Director of the Hayden Planetarium * George Clooney discusses his new film Monuments Men * Sandra Bullock on Gravity * an appreciation of Philip Seymour Hoffman duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3206] Russia: Scorched Earth Switzerland: Initiative against immigration - Switzerland is about to hold a vote on immigration caps. If quotas for immigrants are set, this would also affect many EU residents and could threaten existing agreements with the European Union. The initiative was started by the Swiss People's Party. The far-right, populist party wants to limit immigration to people who meet their preferred social, professional and financial criteria. Although Germans are not the sole target of this campaign, they are often cited as a negative example. In Zurich, signs of antipathy toward Germans are not uncommon. Only a minority supports the initiative, but there are many undecided voters. Britain: The Controversy over "Benefits Street" - In Britain, a television show called "Benefits Street" has caused a furor. The show focuses on James Turner Street in Birmingham, depicting its residents as "welfare scroungers". Many say that is unfair and the show is unbalanced. Channel 4, which made the show, says it aims to show what life is like for people at the bottom of the social ladder. Critics say it deliberately set out to show the poor in the worst possible light. The residents of James Turner Street feel betrayed, saying the film team had claimed they were making a serious documentary. The show has added fuel to the ongoing debate about social welfare and immigration in Britain. Russia: Scorched Earth - The Winter Olympic Games are about to kick off in Sochi. But 150 years ago the slopes where the athletes are to compete was the site of a brutal war of conquest, when Russian troops drove the hundreds of thousands of Circassians from their homeland. Members of the Circassian community say that the athletes will be skiing on mass graves. The Circassians who still live in Russia are hoping to use the games to attract attention to the fate of their ancestors. But most Circassians live abroad. Belgium: A boon for families - The birth rate in Germany is low, but in neighboring Belgium it's booming. According to a study by the Max Planck Institute, the Belgian side of the German-Belgian border region has a large number of families with many children. But just across the border, the birth rate is stagnating, even though the German side shares many cultural features and enjoys a similar standard of living. The difference is that Belgium set up an affordable, full-time daycare system three decades ago. Many young German families wish they had the same access to daycare, but the public support available to childcare in Germany lags far behind that of its neighbor. duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#204] The New Public This program follows the lives of the ambitious educators and lively students of Bed Stuy's new Brooklyn Community Arts and Media High School (BCAM) over the course of the founding year, with the filmmakers returning three years later to again document the senior year of that first graduating class. Beginning in August 2006, just days before BCAM will open its doors for the first time. Dr. James O'Brien, former D.J. and point guard turned first-time principal, and his faculty of eight, take to the streets in Bed Stuy, Brooklyn to recruit students. Their enthusiasm is infectious and enticing: strong support for the individual student, a rigorous academic curriculum and unconventional arts electives taught by local artists. While at first running smoothly, as months go by, conflicts arise, and by the end of freshman year, the school's idealistic vision is addressing some issues, but aggravating others. Flash-forward to September 2010, the first day of senior year, the school is complete with 4 grades and 450 students, with a faculty that has grown from 8 to 50. Of the 104 students in their founding class, almost half have transferred or dropped out, leaving a senior class of 60 and only 30 on track to graduate. BCAM has made major adjustments, most notably, more disciplinary structure and no arts electives for seniors. What happens in the 4 years is both compelling and frustrating, and it's what makes The New Public a critical document of the complexities, frustrations and personal dramas that put public education at the center of national debate. What makes a kid or a school succeed are a series of complicated, interconnected dynamics, including, a re-evaluation of how we define success. duration 1:56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    Asia Biz Forecast [#445] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1033] Emerging Market Opportunities WT explores opportunities in emerging markets. Investors are fleeing them, but this week's guests, Teresa Kong of Matthews Asia and Peter Marber of Loomis Sayles, say not all emerging markets are the same. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#323H] Ric Edelman offers some dollars-and-sense advice on whether it's better to buy one stock or an index fund. Plus, how changes to the tax law impact your charitable giving? And Jean Edelman explains how to eat an elephant. All that and more on this edition of The Truth About Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Ideas Exchange [#107H] Yogesh Mehta and Nick Wheeler Dubai-based businessman Yogesh Mehta, CEO of chemical distribution company Petrochem to London, UK, meets Nick Wheeler, the founder and CEO of British shirt company, Charles Tyrwhitt. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3207H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5332H] * A report by the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office has sparked the latest political battle over the Affordable Care Act. The CBO forecasts more than 2 million full-time workers will choose to reduce their hours or leave their jobs over the next 10 years in order to remain eligible for federal healthcare subsidies. Democrats believe the ACA law will allow Americans to make choices about their lives, retirement and healthcare that don't hinge on having a full-time job. Republicans insist the law serves as a disincentive for people to work and in the long-run will hurt the economy. We'll take a closer look at the CBO report and examine the continuing healthcare debate with Janet Hook of The Wall Street Journal.
    * After record highs just weeks ago, the stock market has been on a steady downtown since the start of the new year making investors jittery. Friday the January jobs report will be released amid some worries the economic recovery has stalled. We'll get analysis from Jim Tankersley of The Washington Post and some insight on the impact of the recent bad weather on the early economic indicators of 2014. < br>* In the past 2 weeks the Pentagon has launched 2 separate investigations into possible misconduct among the ranks of the Army and Navy. Helene Cooper of The New York Times will have details of the probe into alleged cheating on written exams by senior Navy officers and the Army investigation into recruitment fraud among enlistees during the height of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.
    * Plus, Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will take a closer look at the election 2014 battle lines and will explain why Democrats and Republicans are shifting their strategies ahead of this fall's congressional election.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#115H] Flu Season Spikes, Toxic Stress in Children and San Jose State Tackles Racial Discrimination
    Flu-Season Deaths Spike in California
    Sneezes and sniffles -- it's that time of year. As of today, California's Department of Public Health reported 202 confirmed flu-related deaths among state residents under the age of 65. In comparison, there were only 106 confirmed flu-related deaths last flu season. Why are young adults getting hit harder with the current H1N1 flu strain, and what do these numbers mean from a public health perspective?

    Guests:
    Lisa Aliferis, KQED State of Health editor
    Dr. Erica Pan, Director of Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Alameda County Public Health Department

    Further Reporting: 5 Things You Should Know About This Year's Flu
    Additional Resource: AITC Immunization and Travel Clinic, SF Department of Public Health


    San Jose State Tackles Racial Discrimination
    The recent harassment of an African-American freshman at San Jose State University has prompted soul searching at the campus. An independent fact-finding report was published this week detailing the events and the university's response. The freshman student's roommates are charged with fastening a bike lock around his neck and displaying a Confederate flag in their dorm room, among other incidents. A special task force on racial discrimination has begun public hearings to develop recommendations for maintaining an inclusive campus climate. Thuy Vu talks with LaDoris Cordell, a retired Santa Clara County Superior Court Judge who chairs the task force.

    Toxic Stress in Children — Interview with Dr. Nadine Burke Harris
    Regular exposure to stress can have a lasting impact on the health of children. From what she sees at her clinic in Bayview-Hunter's Point, Dr. Nadine Burke Harris has come to believe that childhood stress can lead to physical changes and illness in adulthood. In fact, stress can take years off an individual's life. Scott Shafer talks with Dr. Burke Harris, CEO of the Center for Youth Wellness, to discuss her ground-breaking work counteracting the effects of what she calls "toxic stress."

    Further Reporting: S.F. Pediatrician on How 'Toxic Stress' Affects Children?s Health, Education
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#305H] Bill McKibben to Obama: Say No to Big Oil This week, Bill Moyers talks with Bill McKibben, the author and environmental activist who has dedicated his life to saving the planet from environmental collapse. Moyers' conversation with McKibben comes a few days after the State Department issued a long-awaited environmental impact statement on the Keystone XL pipeline that has both supporters and opponents hopeful the Administration's final decision will go their way. McKibben came to New York City to attend a rally opposing the pipeline and visited our studio to explain why urging the president to stop it is crucial to preserving the planet.
    McKibben is the Schumann Distinguished Professor in Residence at Middlebury College in Vermont, and has written a dozen books about the environment, from his first, The End of Nature, published 25 years ago, to his most recent, Oil and Honey. In 2008, he grew impatient with the pace of public awareness and change and in the tradition of the muckrakers of old, he decided to combine his writing with activism and founded the grassroots climate campaign 350.org. McKibben's cover story for Rolling Stone Magazine on "Global Warming's Terrifying New Math" reverberated around the world and inspired students across the country to challenge their colleges and universities to divest from stock in companies that produce or burn oil, gas and coal.
    "Most people understand that we're in a serious fix," McKibben tells Moyers, "The problem is that we all feel powerless in its face. And we are powerless one by one. There's nothing you can do as individuals that will really slow down this juggernaut. Look, you can say the same thing about the challenges faced by people in the civil rights or the abolition movement, or the gay rights movement or the women's movement. In each case, a movement arose; if we can build a movement, then we have a chance."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1723] COPING WITH THE PAIN OF BEREAVEMENT - Correspondent Bob Faw speaks with a psychologist, a bishop and the grieving themselves about learning to live with the loss of a loved one. Ritual, trust, memory and time help comfort the mourning.
    INDIA'S SACRED COWS - Hindu traditions in India insist that cows are sacred. So, as Fred de Sam Lazaro reports, Indians still share their most modern cities with many thousands of cows they protect in the streets and take care of until they die.
    THE FRANCISCANS OF THE HOLY LAND - Franciscan monks look after Christianity's 54 holiest sites in the Middle East. Not only are they custodians, teachers and builders in the Holy Land - as correspondent Bill Baker reports - the Franciscans have also made exact replicas of the Middle East holy sites in Washington, DC, where 2000 visitors a month come to visit.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 pm
    QUEST [#313] Decoding Synthetic Biology/Wetlands Time Machine Find out what leading synthetic biologists are building with biological tools, and QUEST discovers how historical ecologists are recreating San Francisco Bay wetlands that existed decades ago. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Miller Center's American Forum [#2005] JFK and the Vietnam Escalation Marc Selverstone is Chair of the Presidential Recordings Program at the Miller Center. He joined the Miller Center in November 2000 after receiving his PhD in US Foreign Relations from Ohio University. His interests include US foreign relations post-1945, the culture of the Cold War, and the Vietnam War. He is author of "Constructing the Monolith: The United States, Great Britain, and International Communism, 1945-1950", which won the Stuart L. Bernath Book Prize from the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations in 2010. He is presently at work on "The Kennedy Withdrawal: Camelot and the American Commitment to Vietnam". duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1215] Globe Trekker Food Hour: Spice Trails Merrilees Parker, Padma Lakshmi, Tyler Florence and Peter Gordon travel the world to see how control of the spice trails has made great cities and destroyed ancient civilizations. Our guides travel from the Molucca Islands of Indonesia, the original home of cloves and nutmeg, to the Indian province of Kerala, with its native pepper and cardamom. Leaving behind Sri Lanka's sublime cinnamon, they cross the oceans on Arab dhows, Chinese treasure junks and Portuguese caravels, in search of the world's flavor. Other stops along the trail include Venice, Beirut, Cairo, China, Spain and the Caribbean. Viewers will discover the secret spice blends that define the great cuisines of the world, including Jamaican jerk seasoning, Indian garam masala, Chinese 5-spice powder and Middle Eastern harissa. duration 57:32   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Nature [#3004#] An Original DUCKumentary Working with "Hummingbirds" producer Ann Prum, Nature features another popular, beautiful and fascinating bird - the duck. The story follows a wood duck family and discovers how a male and female create a bond, migrate together across thousands of miles, nurture and protect a brood of chicks and come full circle as they head to their wintering grounds. But our stars are just one of some 150 species of ducks. They come in all shapes and sizes and abilities - some are dabblers popping in and out of the surface of a glass lake and others swim with powerful webbed feet underwater. They fly through the air on short, stubby wings, traveling in large, energy-efficient formations over thousands of miles. Some are noisy and gregarious, others shy and elusive. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    Nova [#4104H] Roman Catacomb Mystery Beneath the streets of Rome lies an ancient city of the dead known as the Catacombs -- a labyrinth of tunnels, hundreds of miles long, lined with tombs. Now, Nova goes inside a previously-unknown complex within the tunnel system: a mysterious mass grave, locked away for nearly 2000 years. Nova's forensic investigation opens up fascinating new insights into the daily life and health of Roman citizens at the heyday of its mighty empire. duration 54:16   STEREO TVPG
  • 5:00 pm
    Super Skyscrapers [#101H] One World Trade Center One World Trade Center, the tallest building in the western hemisphere and a famous modern landmark, is engineered to be the safest and strongest skyscraper ever built. This episode follows the final year of exterior construction, culminating with the milestone of reaching the symbolic height of 1,776 feet. For head of construction Steve Plate, as well as scientists, engineers, ironworkers and curtain wall installers, this is a construction job suffused with the history of the site and a sense of duty to rebuild from the ashes of Ground Zero. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#146H] Included: For decades, there was a concern that India was suffering from a "brain drain," where the best and the brightest fled the country for opportunities in the US and other Western countries. But today many, including those who were educated and worked in the US, have decided to return home. Hari Sreenivasan reports from Bangalore and Mumbai on Indian high-tech entrepreneurs who are building companies to serve the enormous potential market in India and the world. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#115H] Flu Season Spikes, Toxic Stress in Children and San Jose State Tackles Racial Discrimination
    Flu-Season Deaths Spike in California
    Sneezes and sniffles -- it's that time of year. As of today, California's Department of Public Health reported 202 confirmed flu-related deaths among state residents under the age of 65. In comparison, there were only 106 confirmed flu-related deaths last flu season. Why are young adults getting hit harder with the current H1N1 flu strain, and what do these numbers mean from a public health perspective?

    Guests:
    Lisa Aliferis, KQED State of Health editor
    Dr. Erica Pan, Director of Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Alameda County Public Health Department

    Further Reporting: 5 Things You Should Know About This Year's Flu
    Additional Resource: AITC Immunization and Travel Clinic, SF Department of Public Health


    San Jose State Tackles Racial Discrimination
    The recent harassment of an African-American freshman at San Jose State University has prompted soul searching at the campus. An independent fact-finding report was published this week detailing the events and the university's response. The freshman student's roommates are charged with fastening a bike lock around his neck and displaying a Confederate flag in their dorm room, among other incidents. A special task force on racial discrimination has begun public hearings to develop recommendations for maintaining an inclusive campus climate. Thuy Vu talks with LaDoris Cordell, a retired Santa Clara County Superior Court Judge who chairs the task force.

    Toxic Stress in Children — Interview with Dr. Nadine Burke Harris
    Regular exposure to stress can have a lasting impact on the health of children. From what she sees at her clinic in Bayview-Hunter's Point, Dr. Nadine Burke Harris has come to believe that childhood stress can lead to physical changes and illness in adulthood. In fact, stress can take years off an individual's life. Scott Shafer talks with Dr. Burke Harris, CEO of the Center for Youth Wellness, to discuss her ground-breaking work counteracting the effects of what she calls "toxic stress."

    Further Reporting: S.F. Pediatrician on How 'Toxic Stress' Affects Children?s Health, Education
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#305H] Bill McKibben to Obama: Say No to Big Oil This week, Bill Moyers talks with Bill McKibben, the author and environmental activist who has dedicated his life to saving the planet from environmental collapse. Moyers' conversation with McKibben comes a few days after the State Department issued a long-awaited environmental impact statement on the Keystone XL pipeline that has both supporters and opponents hopeful the Administration's final decision will go their way. McKibben came to New York City to attend a rally opposing the pipeline and visited our studio to explain why urging the president to stop it is crucial to preserving the planet.
    McKibben is the Schumann Distinguished Professor in Residence at Middlebury College in Vermont, and has written a dozen books about the environment, from his first, The End of Nature, published 25 years ago, to his most recent, Oil and Honey. In 2008, he grew impatient with the pace of public awareness and change and in the tradition of the muckrakers of old, he decided to combine his writing with activism and founded the grassroots climate campaign 350.org. McKibben's cover story for Rolling Stone Magazine on "Global Warming's Terrifying New Math" reverberated around the world and inspired students across the country to challenge their colleges and universities to divest from stock in companies that produce or burn oil, gas and coal.
    "Most people understand that we're in a serious fix," McKibben tells Moyers, "The problem is that we all feel powerless in its face. And we are powerless one by one. There's nothing you can do as individuals that will really slow down this juggernaut. Look, you can say the same thing about the challenges faced by people in the civil rights or the abolition movement, or the gay rights movement or the women's movement. In each case, a movement arose; if we can build a movement, then we have a chance."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    Local USA [#102] Sense of Place Finding a sense of place and purpose in four stories: a young girl seeks solace and safety in her favorite hiding place; a family of native descent returns to the land of their forefathers to learn about the past and connect with the present; a whimsical artist who has worked for 35 years creating a visual feast of one of his favorite places; a silent film star tours the world he knows; and a lifelong Chicagoan sees his town in a whole new way thanks to a theatre group from the other side of the world. duration 26:59   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    Independent Lens [#1405] Soul Food Junkies Baffled by his dad's reluctance to change his traditional soul food diet in the face of a health crisis, filmmaker Byron Hurt sets out to learn more about this culinary tradition and it's relevance to black cultural identity. The African American love affair with soul food is deep-rooted, complex, and in some tragic cases, deadly. This film puts this culinary tradition under the microscope to examine both its benefits and consequences. Hurt looks at the socioeconomics of predominantly black neighborhoods, where it can be difficult to find healthy options and wonders if soul food has become an addiction in his community. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-L (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3004#] An Original DUCKumentary Working with "Hummingbirds" producer Ann Prum, Nature features another popular, beautiful and fascinating bird - the duck. The story follows a wood duck family and discovers how a male and female create a bond, migrate together across thousands of miles, nurture and protect a brood of chicks and come full circle as they head to their wintering grounds. But our stars are just one of some 150 species of ducks. They come in all shapes and sizes and abilities - some are dabblers popping in and out of the surface of a glass lake and others swim with powerful webbed feet underwater. They fly through the air on short, stubby wings, traveling in large, energy-efficient formations over thousands of miles. Some are noisy and gregarious, others shy and elusive. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross [#102B] The Age of Slavery (1800-1860) The Age of Slavery illustrates how black lives changed dramatically in the aftermath of the American Revolution. For free black people in places like Philadelphia, these years were a time of tremendous opportunity. But for most African Americans, this era represented a new nadir. King Cotton fueled the rapid expansion of slavery into new territories, and a Second Middle Passage forcibly relocated African Americans from the Upper South into the Deep South. Yet as slavery intensified, so did resistance. From individual acts to mass rebellions, African Americans demonstrated their determination to undermine and ultimately eradicate slavery in every state in the nation. Courageous individuals, such as Harriet Tubman, Richard Allen and Frederick Douglass, played a crucial role in forcing the issue of slavery to the forefront of national politics, helping to create the momentum that would eventually bring the country to war. duration 1:12:02   STEREO TVPG-V (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#403] 4 4 violinists in 4 different corners of the globe perform one of the world's most beloved pieces: Vivaldi's "The Four Seasons." This musical journey travels from springtime in Tokyo and summer in Australia to winter in Finland and autumn in New York, combining stunning visuals and cultural experiences with performances by an international array of musicians. duration 53:44   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Global Voices [#526] Land Rush How do you feed the world? 75% of Mali's population are farmers, but rich, land-hungry nations like China and Saudi Arabia are leasing Mali's land in order to turn large areas into agribusiness farms. Many Malian peasants do not welcome these efforts, seeing them as yet another manifestation of imperialism. As Mali experiences a military coup, the developers are scared off ? but can Mali's farmers combat food shortages and escape poverty on their own terms? duration 56:46   STEREO
Sunday, February 9, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED all channels, planned overnight maintenance: early Fri 12/19 midnight-6am

      (this includes all DT9, DT54 and DT25 channels, along with all paid services) We will be doing upgrade and maintenance work in our Master Control area during the overnight hours of late Thurs/early Fri 12/19. Work will begin shortly after midnight early Friday, which may last until 6am, though we hope to finish earlier. This […]

    • KQED Plus OTA ? Optimistically planned maintenance: Fri 12/05 mid-morning

      (DT54.1 thru 54.5) Assuming that the weather and road conditions permit, we plan to do a bit of maintenance on our KQEH transmitter the morning of Friday 12/05… hopefully 10am-11am-ish, but could be a bit later. Most of the work should not affect the outgoing signal, but there will need to be a cable swap […]

    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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