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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, February 8, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, February 8, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10860] * New jobs numbers * Ukraine * AIDS cure * Syria * Shields & Brooks * Ancient footprint duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#33028H] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, fewer jobs were created in January than expected. So why are some experts saying the report is actually better than it seems? And, our Market Monitor guest tonight is recommending stocks with big potential for growth. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3134] Tavis talks with two of the featured singers in the Oscar-nominated documentary, 20 Feet from Stardom, Merry Clayton and Darlene Love. In the first part of an enlightening 2-part conversation, the two renowned backing singers-turned-solo headliners reflect on being back in the spotlight. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    America Revealed [#101] Food Machine Over the past century, an American industrial revolution has given rise to the biggest, most productive food machine the world has ever known. In this episode, host Yul Kwon explores how this machine feeds nearly 300 million Americans every day. He discovers engineering marvels we've created by putting nature to work and takes a look at the costs of our insatiable appetite on our health and environment. For the first time in human history, less than 2% of the population can feed the other 98%. How does this all work? Who are the men and women who keep us fed 365 days a year? Kwon embarks on a trip across the country to find out. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1723] COPING WITH THE PAIN OF BEREAVEMENT - Correspondent Bob Faw speaks with a psychologist, a bishop and the grieving themselves about learning to live with the loss of a loved one. Ritual, trust, memory and time help comfort the mourning.
    INDIA'S SACRED COWS - Hindu traditions in India insist that cows are sacred. So, as Fred de Sam Lazaro reports, Indians still share their most modern cities with many thousands of cows they protect in the streets and take care of until they die.
    THE FRANCISCANS OF THE HOLY LAND - Franciscan monks look after Christianity's 54 holiest sites in the Middle East. Not only are they custodians, teachers and builders in the Holy Land - as correspondent Bill Baker reports - the Franciscans have also made exact replicas of the Middle East holy sites in Washington, DC, where 2000 visitors a month come to visit.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1033] Emerging Market Opportunities WT explores opportunities in emerging markets. Investors are fleeing them, but this week's guests, Teresa Kong of Matthews Asia and Peter Marber of Loomis Sayles, say not all emerging markets are the same. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2248H] * Sochi Olympics and LGBT Rights * UN Demands Vatican Investigate Abuse * EEOC Chair Chai Feldblum
    Panelists: IWF's Hadley Heath, Progressive Commentator Anushay Hossain, Democratic Strategist Hillary Rosen, Red Alert Politics Editor Francesca Chambers
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asia Insight [#122] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    The Amish Shunned: American Experience Filmed over the course of 12 months, this film follows seven former members of the Amish community as they reflect on their decisions to leave one of the most closed and tightly-knit communities in the United States. Estranged from family, the ex-Amish find themselves struggling to understand and make their way in modern America. Interwoven through the stories are the voices of Amish men and women who remain staunchly loyal to their traditions and faith. They explain the importance of obedience, the strong ties that bind their communities together and the pain they endure when a loved one falls away. duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1723] COPING WITH THE PAIN OF BEREAVEMENT - Correspondent Bob Faw speaks with a psychologist, a bishop and the grieving themselves about learning to live with the loss of a loved one. Ritual, trust, memory and time help comfort the mourning.
    INDIA'S SACRED COWS - Hindu traditions in India insist that cows are sacred. So, as Fred de Sam Lazaro reports, Indians still share their most modern cities with many thousands of cows they protect in the streets and take care of until they die.
    THE FRANCISCANS OF THE HOLY LAND - Franciscan monks look after Christianity's 54 holiest sites in the Middle East. Not only are they custodians, teachers and builders in the Holy Land - as correspondent Bill Baker reports - the Franciscans have also made exact replicas of the Middle East holy sites in Washington, DC, where 2000 visitors a month come to visit.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#305H] Bill McKibben to Obama: Say No to Big Oil This week, Bill Moyers talks with Bill McKibben, the author and environmental activist who has dedicated his life to saving the planet from environmental collapse. Moyers' conversation with McKibben comes a few days after the State Department issued a long-awaited environmental impact statement on the Keystone XL pipeline that has both supporters and opponents hopeful the Administration's final decision will go their way. McKibben came to New York City to attend a rally opposing the pipeline and visited our studio to explain why urging the president to stop it is crucial to preserving the planet.
    McKibben is the Schumann Distinguished Professor in Residence at Middlebury College in Vermont, and has written a dozen books about the environment, from his first, The End of Nature, published 25 years ago, to his most recent, Oil and Honey. In 2008, he grew impatient with the pace of public awareness and change and in the tradition of the muckrakers of old, he decided to combine his writing with activism and founded the grassroots climate campaign 350.org. McKibben's cover story for Rolling Stone Magazine on "Global Warming's Terrifying New Math" reverberated around the world and inspired students across the country to challenge their colleges and universities to divest from stock in companies that produce or burn oil, gas and coal.
    "Most people understand that we're in a serious fix," McKibben tells Moyers, "The problem is that we all feel powerless in its face. And we are powerless one by one. There's nothing you can do as individuals that will really slow down this juggernaut. Look, you can say the same thing about the challenges faced by people in the civil rights or the abolition movement, or the gay rights movement or the women's movement. In each case, a movement arose; if we can build a movement, then we have a chance."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#233] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    Ideas Exchange [#107H] Yogesh Mehta and Nick Wheeler Dubai-based businessman Yogesh Mehta, CEO of chemical distribution company Petrochem to London, UK, meets Nick Wheeler, the founder and CEO of British shirt company, Charles Tyrwhitt. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5332H] * A report by the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office has sparked the latest political battle over the Affordable Care Act. The CBO forecasts more than 2 million full-time workers will choose to reduce their hours or leave their jobs over the next 10 years in order to remain eligible for federal healthcare subsidies. Democrats believe the ACA law will allow Americans to make choices about their lives, retirement and healthcare that don't hinge on having a full-time job. Republicans insist the law serves as a disincentive for people to work and in the long-run will hurt the economy. We'll take a closer look at the CBO report and examine the continuing healthcare debate with Janet Hook of The Wall Street Journal.
    * After record highs just weeks ago, the stock market has been on a steady downtown since the start of the new year making investors jittery. Friday the January jobs report will be released amid some worries the economic recovery has stalled. We'll get analysis from Jim Tankersley of The Washington Post and some insight on the impact of the recent bad weather on the early economic indicators of 2014. < br>* In the past 2 weeks the Pentagon has launched 2 separate investigations into possible misconduct among the ranks of the Army and Navy. Helene Cooper of The New York Times will have details of the probe into alleged cheating on written exams by senior Navy officers and the Army investigation into recruitment fraud among enlistees during the height of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.
    * Plus, Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will take a closer look at the election 2014 battle lines and will explain why Democrats and Republicans are shifting their strategies ahead of this fall's congressional election.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#115H] Flu Season Spikes, Toxic Stress in Children and San Jose State Tackles Racial Discrimination
    Flu-Season Deaths Spike in California
    Sneezes and sniffles -- it's that time of year. As of today, California's Department of Public Health reported 202 confirmed flu-related deaths among state residents under the age of 65. In comparison, there were only 106 confirmed flu-related deaths last flu season. Why are young adults getting hit harder with the current H1N1 flu strain, and what do these numbers mean from a public health perspective?

    Guests:
    Lisa Aliferis, KQED State of Health editor
    Dr. Erica Pan, Director of Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Alameda County Public Health Department

    Further Reporting: 5 Things You Should Know About This Year's Flu
    Additional Resource: AITC Immunization and Travel Clinic, SF Department of Public Health


    San Jose State Tackles Racial Discrimination
    The recent harassment of an African-American freshman at San Jose State University has prompted soul searching at the campus. An independent fact-finding report was published this week detailing the events and the university's response. The freshman student's roommates are charged with fastening a bike lock around his neck and displaying a Confederate flag in their dorm room, among other incidents. A special task force on racial discrimination has begun public hearings to develop recommendations for maintaining an inclusive campus climate. Thuy Vu talks with LaDoris Cordell, a retired Santa Clara County Superior Court Judge who chairs the task force.

    Toxic Stress in Children — Interview with Dr. Nadine Burke Harris
    Regular exposure to stress can have a lasting impact on the health of children. From what she sees at her clinic in Bayview-Hunter's Point, Dr. Nadine Burke Harris has come to believe that childhood stress can lead to physical changes and illness in adulthood. In fact, stress can take years off an individual's life. Scott Shafer talks with Dr. Burke Harris, CEO of the Center for Youth Wellness, to discuss her ground-breaking work counteracting the effects of what she calls "toxic stress."

    Further Reporting: S.F. Pediatrician on How 'Toxic Stress' Affects Children?s Health, Education
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17038Z] duration 28:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2248H] * Sochi Olympics and LGBT Rights * UN Demands Vatican Investigate Abuse * EEOC Chair Chai Feldblum
    Panelists: IWF's Hadley Heath, Progressive Commentator Anushay Hossain, Democratic Strategist Hillary Rosen, Red Alert Politics Editor Francesca Chambers
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3207H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#130H] * Ian Bremmer on the Sochi Winter Olympics * Neil Degrasse Tyson, Director of the Hayden Planetarium * George Clooney discusses his new film Monuments Men * Sandra Bullock on Gravity * an appreciation of Philip Seymour Hoffman duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#305H] Bill McKibben to Obama: Say No to Big Oil This week, Bill Moyers talks with Bill McKibben, the author and environmental activist who has dedicated his life to saving the planet from environmental collapse. Moyers' conversation with McKibben comes a few days after the State Department issued a long-awaited environmental impact statement on the Keystone XL pipeline that has both supporters and opponents hopeful the Administration's final decision will go their way. McKibben came to New York City to attend a rally opposing the pipeline and visited our studio to explain why urging the president to stop it is crucial to preserving the planet.
    McKibben is the Schumann Distinguished Professor in Residence at Middlebury College in Vermont, and has written a dozen books about the environment, from his first, The End of Nature, published 25 years ago, to his most recent, Oil and Honey. In 2008, he grew impatient with the pace of public awareness and change and in the tradition of the muckrakers of old, he decided to combine his writing with activism and founded the grassroots climate campaign 350.org. McKibben's cover story for Rolling Stone Magazine on "Global Warming's Terrifying New Math" reverberated around the world and inspired students across the country to challenge their colleges and universities to divest from stock in companies that produce or burn oil, gas and coal.
    "Most people understand that we're in a serious fix," McKibben tells Moyers, "The problem is that we all feel powerless in its face. And we are powerless one by one. There's nothing you can do as individuals that will really slow down this juggernaut. Look, you can say the same thing about the challenges faced by people in the civil rights or the abolition movement, or the gay rights movement or the women's movement. In each case, a movement arose; if we can build a movement, then we have a chance."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1723] COPING WITH THE PAIN OF BEREAVEMENT - Correspondent Bob Faw speaks with a psychologist, a bishop and the grieving themselves about learning to live with the loss of a loved one. Ritual, trust, memory and time help comfort the mourning.
    INDIA'S SACRED COWS - Hindu traditions in India insist that cows are sacred. So, as Fred de Sam Lazaro reports, Indians still share their most modern cities with many thousands of cows they protect in the streets and take care of until they die.
    THE FRANCISCANS OF THE HOLY LAND - Franciscan monks look after Christianity's 54 holiest sites in the Middle East. Not only are they custodians, teachers and builders in the Holy Land - as correspondent Bill Baker reports - the Franciscans have also made exact replicas of the Middle East holy sites in Washington, DC, where 2000 visitors a month come to visit.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#313] Decoding Synthetic Biology/Wetlands Time Machine Find out what leading synthetic biologists are building with biological tools, and QUEST discovers how historical ecologists are recreating San Francisco Bay wetlands that existed decades ago. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#306] duration 25:41   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Independent Lens [#1313] Daisy Bates: First Lady of Little Rock As a black woman who was a feminist before the term was invented, Daisy Bates refused to accept her assigned place in society. This documentary tells the story of her life and public support of nine black students to attend the all-white Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, which culminated in a constitutional crisis -- pitting a president against a governor and a community against itself. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-VL (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 pm
    Clinton 12 This program captures a pivotal moment in the American civil rights movement. On August 27, 1956, a dozen black teenagers walked into an all-white high school in Clinton, Tenn. and changed history. It brings to life the events of that school year and the bombing of the high school in 1958. Narrated by award-winning actor James Earl Jones, it highlights the courage of the black students who were subjected to racially motivated violence, harassment and protests by white supremacists. The film also shows the determination of one small, predominately white, Southern town to uphold the law and confront bigotry and fear. duration 56:50   STEREO TVG
  • 4:00 pm
    Frontline [#1716H] The Long Walk of Nelson Mandela Frontline profiles the most widely known and revered political leader in the world - Nelson Mandela. Credited with the reversal of apartheid in a South Africa controlled by two generations of stern Afrikaner leaders who enforced the ideology of racial separation, Mandela stands as an all-embracing giant who brought about his nation's extraordinary peaceful transformation to democracy. In this in-depth film biography of Mandela, the broadcast tells the story of his life through interviews with intimates from his most trusted associates to his jailers on Robben Island, the prison where he was held for 27 years. This program offers an insider's account of his extraordinary will to lead and of the great risk and personal sacrifice he endured to achieve democracy and equality for the people of his nation. duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#145H] Included: A wave of bankruptcies is moving across the country as cities try to manage crushing debt from pension obligations. NewsHour Weekend reports from Vallejo, California with a cautionary tale for cities that are looking to bankruptcy as the solution. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5332H] * A report by the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office has sparked the latest political battle over the Affordable Care Act. The CBO forecasts more than 2 million full-time workers will choose to reduce their hours or leave their jobs over the next 10 years in order to remain eligible for federal healthcare subsidies. Democrats believe the ACA law will allow Americans to make choices about their lives, retirement and healthcare that don't hinge on having a full-time job. Republicans insist the law serves as a disincentive for people to work and in the long-run will hurt the economy. We'll take a closer look at the CBO report and examine the continuing healthcare debate with Janet Hook of The Wall Street Journal.
    * After record highs just weeks ago, the stock market has been on a steady downtown since the start of the new year making investors jittery. Friday the January jobs report will be released amid some worries the economic recovery has stalled. We'll get analysis from Jim Tankersley of The Washington Post and some insight on the impact of the recent bad weather on the early economic indicators of 2014. < br>* In the past 2 weeks the Pentagon has launched 2 separate investigations into possible misconduct among the ranks of the Army and Navy. Helene Cooper of The New York Times will have details of the probe into alleged cheating on written exams by senior Navy officers and the Army investigation into recruitment fraud among enlistees during the height of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.
    * Plus, Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will take a closer look at the election 2014 battle lines and will explain why Democrats and Republicans are shifting their strategies ahead of this fall's congressional election.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#115H] Flu Season Spikes, Toxic Stress in Children and San Jose State Tackles Racial Discrimination
    Flu-Season Deaths Spike in California
    Sneezes and sniffles -- it's that time of year. As of today, California's Department of Public Health reported 202 confirmed flu-related deaths among state residents under the age of 65. In comparison, there were only 106 confirmed flu-related deaths last flu season. Why are young adults getting hit harder with the current H1N1 flu strain, and what do these numbers mean from a public health perspective?

    Guests:
    Lisa Aliferis, KQED State of Health editor
    Dr. Erica Pan, Director of Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Alameda County Public Health Department

    Further Reporting: 5 Things You Should Know About This Year's Flu
    Additional Resource: AITC Immunization and Travel Clinic, SF Department of Public Health


    San Jose State Tackles Racial Discrimination
    The recent harassment of an African-American freshman at San Jose State University has prompted soul searching at the campus. An independent fact-finding report was published this week detailing the events and the university's response. The freshman student's roommates are charged with fastening a bike lock around his neck and displaying a Confederate flag in their dorm room, among other incidents. A special task force on racial discrimination has begun public hearings to develop recommendations for maintaining an inclusive campus climate. Thuy Vu talks with LaDoris Cordell, a retired Santa Clara County Superior Court Judge who chairs the task force.

    Toxic Stress in Children — Interview with Dr. Nadine Burke Harris
    Regular exposure to stress can have a lasting impact on the health of children. From what she sees at her clinic in Bayview-Hunter's Point, Dr. Nadine Burke Harris has come to believe that childhood stress can lead to physical changes and illness in adulthood. In fact, stress can take years off an individual's life. Scott Shafer talks with Dr. Burke Harris, CEO of the Center for Youth Wellness, to discuss her ground-breaking work counteracting the effects of what she calls "toxic stress."

    Further Reporting: S.F. Pediatrician on How 'Toxic Stress' Affects Children?s Health, Education
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#313] Decoding Synthetic Biology/Wetlands Time Machine Find out what leading synthetic biologists are building with biological tools, and QUEST discovers how historical ecologists are recreating San Francisco Bay wetlands that existed decades ago. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1215] Globe Trekker Food Hour: Spice Trails Merrilees Parker, Padma Lakshmi, Tyler Florence and Peter Gordon travel the world to see how control of the spice trails has made great cities and destroyed ancient civilizations. Our guides travel from the Molucca Islands of Indonesia, the original home of cloves and nutmeg, to the Indian province of Kerala, with its native pepper and cardamom. Leaving behind Sri Lanka's sublime cinnamon, they cross the oceans on Arab dhows, Chinese treasure junks and Portuguese caravels, in search of the world's flavor. Other stops along the trail include Venice, Beirut, Cairo, China, Spain and the Caribbean. Viewers will discover the secret spice blends that define the great cuisines of the world, including Jamaican jerk seasoning, Indian garam masala, Chinese 5-spice powder and Middle Eastern harissa. duration 57:32   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3004H] An Original DUCKumentary Working with "Hummingbirds" producer Ann Prum, Nature features another popular, beautiful and fascinating bird - the duck. The story follows a wood duck family and discovers how a male and female create a bond, migrate together across thousands of miles, nurture and protect a brood of chicks and come full circle as they head to their wintering grounds. But our stars are just one of some 150 species of ducks. They come in all shapes and sizes and abilities - some are dabblers popping in and out of the surface of a glass lake and others swim with powerful webbed feet underwater. They fly through the air on short, stubby wings, traveling in large, energy-efficient formations over thousands of miles. Some are noisy and gregarious, others shy and elusive. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4104H] Roman Catacomb Mystery Beneath the streets of Rome lies an ancient city of the dead known as the Catacombs -- a labyrinth of tunnels, hundreds of miles long, lined with tombs. Now, Nova goes inside a previously-unknown complex within the tunnel system: a mysterious mass grave, locked away for nearly 2000 years. Nova's forensic investigation opens up fascinating new insights into the daily life and health of Roman citizens at the heyday of its mighty empire. duration 54:16   STEREO TVPG
  • 11:00 pm
    Super Skyscrapers [#101H] One World Trade Center One World Trade Center, the tallest building in the western hemisphere and a famous modern landmark, is engineered to be the safest and strongest skyscraper ever built. This episode follows the final year of exterior construction, culminating with the milestone of reaching the symbolic height of 1,776 feet. For head of construction Steve Plate, as well as scientists, engineers, ironworkers and curtain wall installers, this is a construction job suffused with the history of the site and a sense of duty to rebuild from the ashes of Ground Zero. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#204] The New Public This program follows the lives of the ambitious educators and lively students of Bed Stuy's new Brooklyn Community Arts and Media High School (BCAM) over the course of the founding year, with the filmmakers returning three years later to again document the senior year of that first graduating class. Beginning in August 2006, just days before BCAM will open its doors for the first time. Dr. James O'Brien, former D.J. and point guard turned first-time principal, and his faculty of eight, take to the streets in Bed Stuy, Brooklyn to recruit students. Their enthusiasm is infectious and enticing: strong support for the individual student, a rigorous academic curriculum and unconventional arts electives taught by local artists. While at first running smoothly, as months go by, conflicts arise, and by the end of freshman year, the school's idealistic vision is addressing some issues, but aggravating others. Flash-forward to September 2010, the first day of senior year, the school is complete with 4 grades and 450 students, with a faculty that has grown from 8 to 50. Of the 104 students in their founding class, almost half have transferred or dropped out, leaving a senior class of 60 and only 30 on track to graduate. BCAM has made major adjustments, most notably, more disciplinary structure and no arts electives for seniors. What happens in the 4 years is both compelling and frustrating, and it's what makes The New Public a critical document of the complexities, frustrations and personal dramas that put public education at the center of national debate. What makes a kid or a school succeed are a series of complicated, interconnected dynamics, including, a re-evaluation of how we define success. duration 1:56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, February 8, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED DT9s Over the Air: beginning Wed 7/09

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) The PSIP Info part of our Over the Air (OTA) signal for KQED DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3 dropped out of our overall signal early Wednesday 7/09. Once PSIP was restored most OTA receivers moved our signal back to the correct channel locations. However, for some viewers, it appears as if they have lost […]

    • KQED FM 88.1 translator off air Tues 6/03

      The Martinez translator for KQED-FM will be off the air all day Tuesday June 3rd. We are rebuilding the 25 year old site with all new antennas and cabling. This should only affect people listening on 88.1MHz in the Martinez/Benicia area.

    • KQET planned overnight outage: early Tues 5/13

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET’s Over The Air (OTA) signal will shut down late May 12/early Tues 5/13 shortly after midnight to allow for extensive electrical maintenance work at the transmitter. Engineers will do their best to complete the work by 6am Tuesday morning. This will affect OTA viewers of the DT25 channels, and signal providers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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