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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, February 2, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, February 2, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#209] The Pruitt-Igoe Myth This program tells the story of the transformation of the American city in the decades after World War II, through the lens of the infamous Pruitt-Igoe housing development and the St. Louis residents who called it home. At the film's historical center is an analysis of the massive impact of the national urban renewal program of the 1950s and 1960s, which prompted the process of mass suburbanization and emptied American cities of their residents, businesses, and industries. Those left behind in the city faced a destitute, rapidly de-industrializing St. Louis, parceled out to downtown interests and increasingly segregated by class and race. The residents of Pruitt-Igoe were among the hardest hit. Their gripping stories of survival, adaptation, and success are at the emotional heart of the film. duration 1:29:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Independent Lens [#1404H] Solar Mamas Welcome to India's Barefoot College, founded by Bunker Roy to provide rural women living in poverty with an education that empowers them to make their communities self-reliant and sustainable. Rafea -- a 30-year-old Jordanian mother of four -- is traveling outside of her village for the first time to attend Barefoot's solar engineering program. Once there, she will join women like her from Guatemala, Kenya, Burkina Faso and Colombia to learn concrete skills to change their communities. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#309] Elementary School Basics Follow along for a full hour with eager-to-learn elementary school students. From doing the "Monster Match" for English, to Decimal Games in Math, to exploring ecosystems in Science, these lessons are inviting and visual. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#304H] David Simon: My Country Is A Horror Show! David Simon, journalist and creator of the TV series The Wire and Treme, talks with Bill Moyers about the divide between the rich and poor and the crisis of capitalism in America. Just days after President Barack Obama's annual State of the Union address, it's a reality check from someone who artfully uses television drama to report on the state of America from an entirely different perspective - the bottom up.
    It was a speech Simon made last November at the Festival of Dangerous Ideas in Sydney, Australia, that inspired Moyers to ask him to make this week's appearance. His remarks at the Sydney Opera House, titled "There Are Now Two Americas. My Country Is a Horror Show," went viral and reverberated through cyberspace.
    "America is a country that is now utterly divided when it comes to its society, its economy, its politics," Simon said. "That may be the ultimate tragedy of capitalism in our time, that it has achieved its dominance without regard to a social compact, without being connected to any other metric for human progress... And that notion that capital is the metric, that profit is the metric by which we're going to measure the health of our society is one of the fundamental mistakes of the last 30 years."
    "Are we all in this together or are we all not?" Either we realize that everyone must pull together so that no one is left behind, Simon concluded, "Or we're going to keep going the way we're going, at which point there's going to be enough people standing on the outside of this mess that somebody's going to pick up a brick, because you know when people get to the end there's always the brick. I hope we go for the first option but I'm losing faith."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Asia This Week [#344] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5331H] Looking to re-energize his sluggish second term, President Obama called 2014 a 'year of action' in his State of the Union address on Tuesday. He urged Congress to be part of the action to help middle-class families, but vowed to sidestep their partisan politics through the use of executive orders to boost the economy and address income inequality.
    President Obama hit the road this week in a series of campaign-style events across America to reiterate his action agenda including a measure to raise the federal minimum wage and by signing an order to establish a savings program for employees without retirement plans.
    Even before the national address, House Speaker John Boehner warned the president not to act unilaterally. Boehner promised that the House GOP would monitor the president's actions and if they believe Mr. Obama is overreaching, he added "There are options that are available to us."
    Meanwhile House Republicans gathered in Maryland this week for their annual retreat to discuss how to rebuild America and let voters know they aren't only the opposition party, but also the alternative party.
    With just three years left in office, low approval ratings and determined opposition from Republicans, can Mr. Obama advance his modest priorities even if he can't crack through the divisions in Congress?
    Gwen Ifill will lead a roundtable discussion on the promises, politics and possible pitfalls of the president's 2014 action agenda with:
    John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News,
    Susan Davis of USA Today,
    Christi Parsons of Tribune Newspapers, and < br>Todd Purdum of Politico and Vanity Fair .
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3206H] State of the Union, As Obama Sees It; Ukraine on the Edge. PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Eleanor Clift, The Daily Beast; Mort Zuckerman, US New & World Report; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner. duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#129H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    European Journal [#3205] Ukraine: Rich Remain Ruling Party Poland: The last death march - A small group of elderly Poles has paid tribute to the victims of the last death marches from Auschwitz by walking the same route. It took them three days to cover the 77 kilometers. In mid-January, 1945, shortly before the Red Army arrived, the Nazis ordered the evacuation of the Auschwitz concentration camp. About fifty-six thousand inmates were forced to head on foot towards the town of Wodzislaw ?laski. Fifteen thousand died on the way. From Wodzislaw, the survivors were taken by train to camps in Germany. Jan Stolarz initiated this commemorative walk three years ago and takes part every year. Along the route there are numerous graves, monuments and memorial plaques. Ukraine: Winning the Oligarchs' Favor - Whoever wants to win the struggle for power in Ukraine will have to have country's rich business magnates on board. So far, most of Ukraine's oligarchs have supported the government. It's an open secret in Ukraine that the government of President Viktor Yanukovych is closely linked to influential barons of industry. That includes the Donetsk clan, of which the president was a leading member. It was created by multi-billionaire Rinat Akhmetov, the wealthiest man in Ukraine. But there are also oligarchs who have now shown sympathy with the opposition demonstrators. France: La Reunion: Shark attack - The French holiday island La Reunion is in a state of alarm because of shark attacks. In the past two years alone there have been five deadly shark attacks on the island in the Indian ocean. Now the island administration wants to "remove" about 80 sharks. They are to be killed. The plan has triggered a heated debate, with environmentalists on the one side and the tourist industry and many local residents on the other. Bull sharks up to 3.5 meters in length, a species that is considered responsible for many attacks on humans around the world, are not allowed to be sold as food on La Reunion. It's suspected that's the reason their numbers have increased considerably. Italy: Children of the 'Ndrangheta - Teenagers in Italy who come from Mafia families scarcely ever manage to avoid a criminal career. A juvenile court judge has now resolved to change that. For two years, Roberto di Bella has been head of the juvenile court in Reggio Calabria, the center of the 'Ndrangheta criminal organization. He has developed a method to help children from 'Ndrangheta families escape the vicious cycle of criminality. He removes criminal or dangerous teenagers from their families and sends them to care homes or host families. At present 15 teenagers are living with host families, far from their criminal parents. duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#209] The Pruitt-Igoe Myth This program tells the story of the transformation of the American city in the decades after World War II, through the lens of the infamous Pruitt-Igoe housing development and the St. Louis residents who called it home. At the film's historical center is an analysis of the massive impact of the national urban renewal program of the 1950s and 1960s, which prompted the process of mass suburbanization and emptied American cities of their residents, businesses, and industries. Those left behind in the city faced a destitute, rapidly de-industrializing St. Louis, parceled out to downtown interests and increasingly segregated by class and race. The residents of Pruitt-Igoe were among the hardest hit. Their gripping stories of survival, adaptation, and success are at the emotional heart of the film. duration 1:29:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    European Journal [#3205] Ukraine: Rich Remain Ruling Party Poland: The last death march - A small group of elderly Poles has paid tribute to the victims of the last death marches from Auschwitz by walking the same route. It took them three days to cover the 77 kilometers. In mid-January, 1945, shortly before the Red Army arrived, the Nazis ordered the evacuation of the Auschwitz concentration camp. About fifty-six thousand inmates were forced to head on foot towards the town of Wodzislaw ?laski. Fifteen thousand died on the way. From Wodzislaw, the survivors were taken by train to camps in Germany. Jan Stolarz initiated this commemorative walk three years ago and takes part every year. Along the route there are numerous graves, monuments and memorial plaques. Ukraine: Winning the Oligarchs' Favor - Whoever wants to win the struggle for power in Ukraine will have to have country's rich business magnates on board. So far, most of Ukraine's oligarchs have supported the government. It's an open secret in Ukraine that the government of President Viktor Yanukovych is closely linked to influential barons of industry. That includes the Donetsk clan, of which the president was a leading member. It was created by multi-billionaire Rinat Akhmetov, the wealthiest man in Ukraine. But there are also oligarchs who have now shown sympathy with the opposition demonstrators. France: La Reunion: Shark attack - The French holiday island La Reunion is in a state of alarm because of shark attacks. In the past two years alone there have been five deadly shark attacks on the island in the Indian ocean. Now the island administration wants to "remove" about 80 sharks. They are to be killed. The plan has triggered a heated debate, with environmentalists on the one side and the tourist industry and many local residents on the other. Bull sharks up to 3.5 meters in length, a species that is considered responsible for many attacks on humans around the world, are not allowed to be sold as food on La Reunion. It's suspected that's the reason their numbers have increased considerably. Italy: Children of the 'Ndrangheta - Teenagers in Italy who come from Mafia families scarcely ever manage to avoid a criminal career. A juvenile court judge has now resolved to change that. For two years, Roberto di Bella has been head of the juvenile court in Reggio Calabria, the center of the 'Ndrangheta criminal organization. He has developed a method to help children from 'Ndrangheta families escape the vicious cycle of criminality. He removes criminal or dangerous teenagers from their families and sends them to care homes or host families. At present 15 teenagers are living with host families, far from their criminal parents. duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 am
    QUEST [#603H] Deep Water Corals/Uganda Chimps Travel thousands of feet below the ocean's surface to explore fragile deep sea corals off the California coast. Meet Bay Area engineers creating detailed virtual records of the world's great monuments, including their realistic recreation of the Mexican ruins of Chichen Itza. Plus, discover the Oakland Zoo's efforts to protect chimpanzees from illegal poaching in Uganda. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Asia Biz Forecast [#444] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1032] Fund Manager of the Year Daniel O'keefe WT features a rare interview with the 2013 and 2008 Morningstar International Stock Fund Manager of the Year. Portfolio Manager Daniel O'Keefe explains how his Artisan International Value and Artisan Global Value funds trounce the competition and the market in both bull and bear markets. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#322H] Financial Planner Ric Edelman explains the best way to pay for your children's college tuition. Plus, if you are underwater on a property, would you be better off walking away than drowning with it? And as we create more and more technological marvels how do we make sure they're used for good and not evil? All that and more on this edition of The Truth About Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Ideas Exchange [#106H] Carlos Ghosn and Vineet Nayar In Paris, Carlos Ghosn, CEO of Renault-Nissan, meets Vineet Nayar, CEO of Indian tech company HCL. They sit down to talk about their business practices and compare their very different management techniques. duration 26:20   TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3206H] State of the Union, As Obama Sees It; Ukraine on the Edge. PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Eleanor Clift, The Daily Beast; Mort Zuckerman, US New & World Report; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner. duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5331H] Looking to re-energize his sluggish second term, President Obama called 2014 a 'year of action' in his State of the Union address on Tuesday. He urged Congress to be part of the action to help middle-class families, but vowed to sidestep their partisan politics through the use of executive orders to boost the economy and address income inequality.
    President Obama hit the road this week in a series of campaign-style events across America to reiterate his action agenda including a measure to raise the federal minimum wage and by signing an order to establish a savings program for employees without retirement plans.
    Even before the national address, House Speaker John Boehner warned the president not to act unilaterally. Boehner promised that the House GOP would monitor the president's actions and if they believe Mr. Obama is overreaching, he added "There are options that are available to us."
    Meanwhile House Republicans gathered in Maryland this week for their annual retreat to discuss how to rebuild America and let voters know they aren't only the opposition party, but also the alternative party.
    With just three years left in office, low approval ratings and determined opposition from Republicans, can Mr. Obama advance his modest priorities even if he can't crack through the divisions in Congress?
    Gwen Ifill will lead a roundtable discussion on the promises, politics and possible pitfalls of the president's 2014 action agenda with:
    John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News,
    Susan Davis of USA Today,
    Christi Parsons of Tribune Newspapers, and < br>Todd Purdum of Politico and Vanity Fair .
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#114H] The Struggle Over Income Inequality, Napolitano Leads US Olympic Delegation and River Restoration Under Fire
    The Struggle Over Income Inequality
    President Obama made income inequality the cornerstone of his sixth State of the Union address this week, talking about ways to lift the middle class. But low-income families and individuals may face another hurdle. Annual cuts of $800 million to the federal food stamp program are expected as part of the new farm bill, which passed the House this week and moves on to the Senate on Monday.

    Guests:
    Tom Vacar, KTVU
    Joe Garofoli, San Francisco Chronicle
    Aimee Allison, senior vice president at PowerPAC

    Janet Napolitano Leads U.S. Olympic Delegation
    Next week University of California President Janet Napolitano will lead the U.S. delegation to the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. As former Secretary of Homeland Security, Napolitano is well suited to the job, given heightened concerns about terrorism at the Games and Russia's decision to grant asylum to NSA leaker Edward Snowden. The two countries are also at odds over Russia's harsh stance against LGBT rights, and the 10-member delegation that Napolitano is leading has three openly gay athletes, including tennis great Billie Jean King and ice skater Brian Boitano. Scott Shafer sat down with Napolitano to discuss the Olympics and her day job as head of UC.

    Further Reporting:
    Napolitano Taking UC Values to Sochi Olympics

    With Drought, River Restoration Under Fire
    Drought legislation introduced by Republican Rep. Devin Nunes of Tulare proposes pumping more water for farmlands from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. The bill also calls for a halt to the restoration of the San Joaquin River, which requires increased water flows to reintroduce chinook salmon cut off from stretches of the river for more than 50 years. Spencer Michels reports from the San Joaquin Valley on the restoration of California's second-longest river.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#304H] David Simon: My Country Is A Horror Show! David Simon, journalist and creator of the TV series The Wire and Treme, talks with Bill Moyers about the divide between the rich and poor and the crisis of capitalism in America. Just days after President Barack Obama's annual State of the Union address, it's a reality check from someone who artfully uses television drama to report on the state of America from an entirely different perspective - the bottom up.
    It was a speech Simon made last November at the Festival of Dangerous Ideas in Sydney, Australia, that inspired Moyers to ask him to make this week's appearance. His remarks at the Sydney Opera House, titled "There Are Now Two Americas. My Country Is a Horror Show," went viral and reverberated through cyberspace.
    "America is a country that is now utterly divided when it comes to its society, its economy, its politics," Simon said. "That may be the ultimate tragedy of capitalism in our time, that it has achieved its dominance without regard to a social compact, without being connected to any other metric for human progress... And that notion that capital is the metric, that profit is the metric by which we're going to measure the health of our society is one of the fundamental mistakes of the last 30 years."
    "Are we all in this together or are we all not?" Either we realize that everyone must pull together so that no one is left behind, Simon concluded, "Or we're going to keep going the way we're going, at which point there's going to be enough people standing on the outside of this mess that somebody's going to pick up a brick, because you know when people get to the end there's always the brick. I hope we go for the first option but I'm losing faith."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1722] LIVING WAGES IN THE OVERSEAS GARMENT INDUSTRY - The world's garment industry is so competitive, factory owners typically say they cannot afford to pay their workers anything above the usually pitiful third-world countries' minimum wage. But one successful American garment maker is conducting what could be an expensive experiment. He is betting that if his customers know the Dominican Republic workers who make his sportswear are well paid, they will continue to buy his line, even if it ends up costing more. Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from the Dominican Republic and the University of Notre Dame.
    KENTUCKY NUNS VERSUS THE BLUEGRASS PIPELINE - When an energy company wanted to build an underground pipeline through central Kentucky to help carry toxic by-products of fracking to the Gulf coast, an order of aging Catholic nuns, the Sisters of Loretto, fought back. The nuns feared a pipeline accident could poison the land they have farmed for 200 years, so - as Judy Valente reports - the Sisters mounted a vigorous public campaign to divert it. And they succeeded.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 pm
    QUEST [#603H] Deep Water Corals/Uganda Chimps Travel thousands of feet below the ocean's surface to explore fragile deep sea corals off the California coast. Meet Bay Area engineers creating detailed virtual records of the world's great monuments, including their realistic recreation of the Mexican ruins of Chichen Itza. Plus, discover the Oakland Zoo's efforts to protect chimpanzees from illegal poaching in Uganda. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Miller Center's American Forum [#2004] JFK and the Breakthrough for Civil Rights In "The March on Washington: Jobs, Freedom, and the Forgotten History of Civil Rights", William P. Jones argues that the enormous role of the American labor movement in triggering the epic march in August 1963 must be rescued from the shadow of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s legendary "I Have a Dream" speech. The opening event of the day was a speech delivered by the march's leader, trade unionist A. Philip Randolph, who first called for a march on Washington in 1941 to press for equal opportunity in employment and the armed forces. Randolph's egalitarian vision of economic and social citizenship is the strong thread running throughout the full history of the March on Washington movement. Jones's history delivers a new understanding of this emblematic event and the broader civil rights movement it propelled. A professor of history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Jones is a specialist in civil rights and labor history and contributes to The Nation and other publications. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1214] Mid-Atlantic States Brianna begins her travels in New Jersey with a visit to Atlantic City and Wildwoods on a 1950s themed weekend. Next it's on to Delaware, with stops in Lewes and Annapolis, followed by crabbing on the Chesapeake Bay. Brianna journeys through the Brandywine Valley, which stretches through Delaware and Pennsylvania, on her way to Philadelphia for a taste of the famous cheesesteaks and a look at the Art Museum. She continues west through Amish country, takes in the new Flight 93 memorial in Shanksville and checks out the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh. Brianna makes her way to Virginia, where she encounters a replica of Stonehenge made entirely from Styrofoam and concludes her trip at Monticello, the home of Thomas Jefferson. duration 55:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Nature [#3105#] The Funkiest Monkeys 25 years ago, filmmaker Colin Stafford-Johnson travelled to Sulawesi in Indonesia and fell in love with crested black macaques. These feisty monkeys are beach bums with punk hairstyles, expressive faces, copper colored eyes and some very unusual habits, making them some of the most charismatic of all monkeys. They only exist on this one island. Learning that their numbers have dropped dramatically, he makes a return visit to find out why and to see if he can help. Teaming up with a local expert and making a film about them and their plight allows him to share their story with the local schools and communities in the hope that a new understanding of the wonderful creatures in their midst will make them want to help, as well. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    Nova [#4103H] Ghosts of Murdered Kings Nova follows archaeologists and forensic experts in Ireland's County Tipperary in their methodical hunt for clues to the identity and the circumstances of various violent deaths of bog body victims. A new theory emerges that they are those of ritually murdered kings, gruesomely slain to assure the fertility of land and people. duration 56:46   STEREO TV14
  • 5:00 pm
    Hawking Stephen Hawking is one of the most recognizable people on the planet, a superstar of the scientific world. But although Hawking is an iconic figure, who is the man behind the image? In this film Hawking gives us a rare insight onto his life, both past and present. This is a man whose mind soars beyond the ordinary but who is trapped inside a body he can barely move. This documentary presents the story of one of the most remarkable minds of the modern age. duration 55:31   STEREO TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#144H] Included: a profile of an innovative probation program in Hawaii that has been so successful in reforming offenders and keeping them out of prison, it's now being copied in courtrooms across the nation. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#114H] The Struggle Over Income Inequality, Napolitano Leads US Olympic Delegation and River Restoration Under Fire
    The Struggle Over Income Inequality
    President Obama made income inequality the cornerstone of his sixth State of the Union address this week, talking about ways to lift the middle class. But low-income families and individuals may face another hurdle. Annual cuts of $800 million to the federal food stamp program are expected as part of the new farm bill, which passed the House this week and moves on to the Senate on Monday.

    Guests:
    Tom Vacar, KTVU
    Joe Garofoli, San Francisco Chronicle
    Aimee Allison, senior vice president at PowerPAC

    Janet Napolitano Leads U.S. Olympic Delegation
    Next week University of California President Janet Napolitano will lead the U.S. delegation to the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. As former Secretary of Homeland Security, Napolitano is well suited to the job, given heightened concerns about terrorism at the Games and Russia's decision to grant asylum to NSA leaker Edward Snowden. The two countries are also at odds over Russia's harsh stance against LGBT rights, and the 10-member delegation that Napolitano is leading has three openly gay athletes, including tennis great Billie Jean King and ice skater Brian Boitano. Scott Shafer sat down with Napolitano to discuss the Olympics and her day job as head of UC.

    Further Reporting:
    Napolitano Taking UC Values to Sochi Olympics

    With Drought, River Restoration Under Fire
    Drought legislation introduced by Republican Rep. Devin Nunes of Tulare proposes pumping more water for farmlands from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. The bill also calls for a halt to the restoration of the San Joaquin River, which requires increased water flows to reintroduce chinook salmon cut off from stretches of the river for more than 50 years. Spencer Michels reports from the San Joaquin Valley on the restoration of California's second-longest river.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#304H] David Simon: My Country Is A Horror Show! David Simon, journalist and creator of the TV series The Wire and Treme, talks with Bill Moyers about the divide between the rich and poor and the crisis of capitalism in America. Just days after President Barack Obama's annual State of the Union address, it's a reality check from someone who artfully uses television drama to report on the state of America from an entirely different perspective - the bottom up.
    It was a speech Simon made last November at the Festival of Dangerous Ideas in Sydney, Australia, that inspired Moyers to ask him to make this week's appearance. His remarks at the Sydney Opera House, titled "There Are Now Two Americas. My Country Is a Horror Show," went viral and reverberated through cyberspace.
    "America is a country that is now utterly divided when it comes to its society, its economy, its politics," Simon said. "That may be the ultimate tragedy of capitalism in our time, that it has achieved its dominance without regard to a social compact, without being connected to any other metric for human progress... And that notion that capital is the metric, that profit is the metric by which we're going to measure the health of our society is one of the fundamental mistakes of the last 30 years."
    "Are we all in this together or are we all not?" Either we realize that everyone must pull together so that no one is left behind, Simon concluded, "Or we're going to keep going the way we're going, at which point there's going to be enough people standing on the outside of this mess that somebody's going to pick up a brick, because you know when people get to the end there's always the brick. I hope we go for the first option but I'm losing faith."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    Local USA [#102] Sense of Place Finding a sense of place and purpose in four stories: a young girl seeks solace and safety in her favorite hiding place; a family of native descent returns to the land of their forefathers to learn about the past and connect with the present; a whimsical artist who has worked for 35 years creating a visual feast of one of his favorite places; a silent film star tours the world he knows; and a lifelong Chicagoan sees his town in a whole new way thanks to a theatre group from the other side of the world. duration 26:59   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    Independent Lens [#1501] The Graduates This two-part special examines the many roots of the Latino dropout crisis through the eyes of six inspiring young students who are part of an ongoing effort to increase graduation rates for a growing Latino population. These student profiles offer a first-hand perspective on the challenges facing many Latino high school students, including over-crowded schools, crime-ridden neighborhoods, teen pregnancy and pressure to contribute to the family finances. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3105#] The Funkiest Monkeys 25 years ago, filmmaker Colin Stafford-Johnson travelled to Sulawesi in Indonesia and fell in love with crested black macaques. These feisty monkeys are beach bums with punk hairstyles, expressive faces, copper colored eyes and some very unusual habits, making them some of the most charismatic of all monkeys. They only exist on this one island. Learning that their numbers have dropped dramatically, he makes a return visit to find out why and to see if he can help. Teaming up with a local expert and making a film about them and their plight allows him to share their story with the local schools and communities in the hope that a new understanding of the wonderful creatures in their midst will make them want to help, as well. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross [#101B] The Black Atlantic (1500-1800) The Black Atlantic explores the truly global experiences that created the African American people. Beginning a full century before the first documented '20-and-odd' slaves arrived at Jamestown, Virginia, the episode portrays the earliest Africans, both slave and free, who arrived on these shores. But the Trans-Atlantic slave trade would soon become a vast empire connecting three continents. Through stories of individuals caught in its web, like a ten-year-old girl named Priscilla who was transported from Sierra Leone to South Carolina in the mid-18th century, we trace the emergence of plantation slavery in the American South. The late 18th century saw a global explosion of freedom movements, and The Black Atlantic examines what that Era of Revolutions-American, French and Haitian-would mean for African Americans, and for slavery in America. duration 1:07:22   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#402] Please Vote for Me In the city of Wuhan in central China, three eight-year-old elementary school students campaign for the coveted position of class monitor. This is the first election for a class leader to be held in China. The candidates hold debates, campaign tirelessly and show their intellectual and artistic skills, until one is voted the winner. duration 54:55   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Global Voices [#525] Poor Us: The Animated History of Poverty Do we know what poverty is? The poor may always have been with us, but attitudes towards them have changed. Beginning in the Neolithic Age, Ben Lewis's film takes us through the changing world of poverty. You go to sleep, you dream, you become poor through the ages. And when you awake, what can you say about poverty now? There are still very poor people, to be sure, but the new poverty has more to do with inequality? duration 53:34   STEREO
Sunday, February 2, 2014

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    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too