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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus. Read more about this transition on our FAQ page.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, October 13, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, October 13, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#205] Code of the West At a time when the world is rethinking its drug policies large and small, one state rises to the forefront. Once a pioneer in legalizing medical marijuana, the state of Montana may now become the first to repeal its medical marijuana law. Set against the sweeping vistas of the Rockies, the steamy lamplight of marijuana grow houses, and the bustling halls of the State Capitol, this program follows the political process of marijuana policy reform and the recent federal crackdown on medical marijuana growers across the country. Chronicling the opinions and reactions of patients, growers, politicians, activists, and community members on both sides of the issue, the story paints an image of what happens when federal and state governments clash with communities in the crossfire, and the individuals involved who ultimately pay the price. duration 1:29:36   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Death of the Old West As the sun began to set on frontier life, a vigilante act ripped apart a young Oklahoma community and brought shame to citizens struggling to distance themselves from backwater violence. In the early morning hours of April 19, 1909, a group of Ada residents - many of them community leaders - avenged the murder of a popular local rancher and former US Deputy Marshall A. A. "Gus" Bobbitt by lynching the four suspects. The mob effectively drove the outlaw element out of town, but in the process perpetrated a terrible miscarriage of justice. (To date, no person has ever been identified or prosecuted in connection with the killings.) This program marks the 100th anniversary of the event by examining the hanging and the fallout that still fascinates historians and stirs emotions among local residents. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#304] Digital Citizens & Improving Practice In our first half hour, we'll see how students are becoming "Super Digital Citizens" as they learn how to use the Internet responsibly - then, we'll switch gears and too see new ways teachers are working to improve their practice. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#240H] Citizens United: The Sequel * This week, as the government shutdown continues, the Supreme Court began its new term and justices heard arguments in McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission. The case has been billed as the successor to the court's Citizens United decision in 2010 that gave corporations, unions, and the wealthy the opportunity to pour vast and often anonymous amounts of cash into political campaigns. The new case challenges caps on how much individual donors can give to candidates and political parties and could raise the amount to more than $3.25 million.
    Bill Moyers talks with Yale Law School election and constitutional law professor Heather Gerken who warns that McCutcheon has the potential to be even worse than Citizens United. Political parties pay attention to the people with money, and as the non-partisan Sunlight Foundation reports, most of the funding for congressional and presidential campaigns comes from the top one percent of the one percent of the rich - "the elite class that serves as gatekeepers of public office in the United States."
    * Bill also speaks with historian Joyce Appleby who has a talent for making tales of the past into page-turning books that read like novels. They include Inheriting the Revolution, about the sons and daughters who took their founding fathers' revolt against the British crown and made America of it; The Relentless Revolution: A History of Capitalism; and her newest - out this weekend - Shores of Knowledge: New World Discoveries and the Scientific Imagination. It's the story of what sent European explorers to the Americas in pursuit of treasure and knowledge, and how they shaped our modern world. Bill describes it as "a captivating account of curiosity."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5315H] * Finally, signs of progress in the negotiations to end the government shutdown and raise the nation's debt limit. At the White House this week President Obama has been meeting with lawmakers from both parties in hopes of reaching a compromise deal. On Thursday House Speaker John Boehner offered a short-term debt limit increase but only if President Obama agrees to new negotiations on budget matters and spending cuts. There was no mention of dismantling healthcare reform under this Republican proposal, but the partial government shutdown would continue. Revelations that the shutdown included withholding death benefits to families of fallen troops highlighted the outrage from Americans.
    * If Congress fails to raise the borrowing limit by October 17, the Treasury Department will run out of revenue and the US will default. We will examine the political and economic consequences of the government shutdown and the real and immediate impact should the US default with Alexis Simendinger of RealClearPolitics and Jim Tankersley of The Washington Post.
    * Jackie Calmes of The New York Times will discuss the historic nomination of Janet Yellen to head the Federal Reserve succeeding Ben Bernanke. If confirmed, Yellen would be the first woman to chair the Fed making her one of the most powerful women in America..
    * Joan Biskupic of Reuters will examine the latest challenge to campaign finance before the Supreme Court that questions whether limits on individual contributions violate the First Amendment.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3142H] Topics: Janet Yellen to Head the Fed?; Are the Washington Redskins Due for a Name Change? Panelists: Paul Glastris, Washington Monthly; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner. duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose: The Week [#113] * Niall Ferguson on the economy * Director Steve McQueen and actors Michael Fassbender & Chiwetel Ejiofor on their film "12 Years a Slave" * Margaret Atwood on her new book, "MaddAddam" * Sting performs "Practical Arrangement" duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2526H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#205] Code of the West At a time when the world is rethinking its drug policies large and small, one state rises to the forefront. Once a pioneer in legalizing medical marijuana, the state of Montana may now become the first to repeal its medical marijuana law. Set against the sweeping vistas of the Rockies, the steamy lamplight of marijuana grow houses, and the bustling halls of the State Capitol, this program follows the political process of marijuana policy reform and the recent federal crackdown on medical marijuana growers across the country. Chronicling the opinions and reactions of patients, growers, politicians, activists, and community members on both sides of the issue, the story paints an image of what happens when federal and state governments clash with communities in the crossfire, and the individuals involved who ultimately pay the price. duration 1:29:36   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    QUEST [#109H] Video Games for All & Underwater Flight * Can someone who's quadriplegic or hearing impaired play a video game? Quest takes you to the international Game Developers Conference celebrated recently in San Francisco, where a group of gamers used colorful tactics to convince mainstream developers to make video games that are accessible for everyone.
    * It's not James Bond - it's Graham Hawkes, record holder for the deepest underwater solo dive and inventor of Deep Flight, a winged submersible that may revolutionize underwater travel.
    * The California Highway Patrol is putting away their old radar guns and embracing new laser beam guns, clocking cars with much more precision than before. Quest finds out how they work.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1706] SOLITARY CONFINEMENT - The debate over locking up some prisoners by themselves. In the US there are an estimated 80,000 prisoners now locked up in small cells, 23 hours a day, sometimes for more than 40 years. Lucky Severson reports on those who say solitary is unChristian and does more harm than good. Against them are corrections officers and others who insist solitary is necessary to protect guards and other prisoners from the most violent. Severson also interviews Bobby Dellelo, who spent 5 years in solitary and talks about the anger and rage it provoked and Mississippi's Corrections Director Christopher Epps who removed two-thirds of Mississippi's prisoners in solitary and saw violence go down 40%.
    JAMES LEE BURKE - Bob Faw profiles the best-selling crime novelist whose work combines the worst of life with classic themes - the search for salvation, the mystery of evil. Burke tells Faw, "Every artist has this notion that he sees the truth about the world in an exquisite, perfect fashion and he's compelled to tell others of this vision. He will have no peace until he does so."
    THE HAJJ FOR CHILDREN - As millions of Muslims complete their annual pilgrimage to Mecca, Muslim children in the US learn the meanings of the many Hajj rituals. (Originally aired October 26, 2012)
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1016] Seismic Investment Shift! This week's WT reveals a seismic shift for investors. Influential economist and strategist David Rosenberg (Chief Economist and Strategist, Gluskin Sheff) explains why he now believes the era of low inflation is over and the changes it will bring to the economy and markets. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#306H] Financial advisor Ric Edelman says; "Not yet" to a couple who is just about to say "I do". And rental property can be a good investment, but is that the case for our men and women in uniform? Ric's advice is right on target. Are you sick of your commute? Wouldn't it be great to kick back and let your car drive itself? Ric talks to Singularity University expert Brad Templeton about the future. And Jean Edelman shows us the benefits of giving back in The Other Side of Money. All that and more in this edition of The Truth about Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2526H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3142H] Topics: Janet Yellen to Head the Fed?; Are the Washington Redskins Due for a Name Change? Panelists: Paul Glastris, Washington Monthly; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner. duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5315H] * Finally, signs of progress in the negotiations to end the government shutdown and raise the nation's debt limit. At the White House this week President Obama has been meeting with lawmakers from both parties in hopes of reaching a compromise deal. On Thursday House Speaker John Boehner offered a short-term debt limit increase but only if President Obama agrees to new negotiations on budget matters and spending cuts. There was no mention of dismantling healthcare reform under this Republican proposal, but the partial government shutdown would continue. Revelations that the shutdown included withholding death benefits to families of fallen troops highlighted the outrage from Americans.
    * If Congress fails to raise the borrowing limit by October 17, the Treasury Department will run out of revenue and the US will default. We will examine the political and economic consequences of the government shutdown and the real and immediate impact should the US default with Alexis Simendinger of RealClearPolitics and Jim Tankersley of The Washington Post.
    * Jackie Calmes of The New York Times will discuss the historic nomination of Janet Yellen to head the Federal Reserve succeeding Ben Bernanke. If confirmed, Yellen would be the first woman to chair the Fed making her one of the most powerful women in America..
    * Joan Biskupic of Reuters will examine the latest challenge to campaign finance before the Supreme Court that questions whether limits on individual contributions violate the First Amendment.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    Hunger in the Valley of Plenty California's San Joaquin Valley is one of the most productive farm regions on the planet. Yet the people who work and live near those farms can't always access that bounty. duration 27:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#240H] Citizens United: The Sequel * This week, as the government shutdown continues, the Supreme Court began its new term and justices heard arguments in McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission. The case has been billed as the successor to the court's Citizens United decision in 2010 that gave corporations, unions, and the wealthy the opportunity to pour vast and often anonymous amounts of cash into political campaigns. The new case challenges caps on how much individual donors can give to candidates and political parties and could raise the amount to more than $3.25 million.
    Bill Moyers talks with Yale Law School election and constitutional law professor Heather Gerken who warns that McCutcheon has the potential to be even worse than Citizens United. Political parties pay attention to the people with money, and as the non-partisan Sunlight Foundation reports, most of the funding for congressional and presidential campaigns comes from the top one percent of the one percent of the rich - "the elite class that serves as gatekeepers of public office in the United States."
    * Bill also speaks with historian Joyce Appleby who has a talent for making tales of the past into page-turning books that read like novels. They include Inheriting the Revolution, about the sons and daughters who took their founding fathers' revolt against the British crown and made America of it; The Relentless Revolution: A History of Capitalism; and her newest - out this weekend - Shores of Knowledge: New World Discoveries and the Scientific Imagination. It's the story of what sent European explorers to the Americas in pursuit of treasure and knowledge, and how they shaped our modern world. Bill describes it as "a captivating account of curiosity."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    QUEST [#109H] Video Games for All & Underwater Flight * Can someone who's quadriplegic or hearing impaired play a video game? Quest takes you to the international Game Developers Conference celebrated recently in San Francisco, where a group of gamers used colorful tactics to convince mainstream developers to make video games that are accessible for everyone.
    * It's not James Bond - it's Graham Hawkes, record holder for the deepest underwater solo dive and inventor of Deep Flight, a winged submersible that may revolutionize underwater travel.
    * The California Highway Patrol is putting away their old radar guns and embracing new laser beam guns, clocking cars with much more precision than before. Quest finds out how they work.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Genealogy Roadshow [#103H] San Francisco, CA Bay Area drama unfolds at San Francisco's Old Mint as the GENEALOGY ROADSHOW team reveals stories tying citizens to the 1906 earthquake, notorious gangsters, war heroes and two brutal murders. A woman who suspects family ties to the Gold Rush learns that a 19th-century workplace murder claimed the life of an ancestor. An Irish-American woman discovers how a devastating earthquake brought her grandparents together. One family's ancestry mirrors American history, with familial ties to both the Revolutionary and Civil Wars. A Chinese-American woman finds out the truth about her family's ties to Chinatown gangster "Big Jim" Chin, and family heirlooms connect a man to the sole survivor of the 1860 Wiyot Massacre. duration 54:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 2:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1215] Globe Trekker Food Hour: Spice Trails Merrilees Parker, Padma Lakshmi, Tyler Florence and Peter Gordon travel the world to see how control of the spice trails has made great cities and destroyed ancient civilizations. Our guides travel from the Molucca Islands of Indonesia, the original home of cloves and nutmeg, to the Indian province of Kerala, with its native pepper and cardamom. Leaving behind Sri Lanka's sublime cinnamon, they cross the oceans on Arab dhows, Chinese treasure junks and Portuguese caravels, in search of the world's flavor. Other stops along the trail include Venice, Beirut, Cairo, China, Spain and the Caribbean. Viewers will discover the secret spice blends that define the great cuisines of the world, including Jamaican jerk seasoning, Indian garam masala, Chinese 5-spice powder and Middle Eastern harissa. duration 57:32   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Nature [#3007H] Attenborough's Life Stories, Our Fragile Planet This mini-series focuses on three fields that David Attenborough feels have been transformed most profoundly: filmmaking, science and the environment. Richly illustrated with the sequences he has spent 60 years capturing (re-mastered for the first time in HD), with new interviews in which he revisits the content, stories and locations that were featured in his landmark series and packed with the personal anecdotes of the BBC's most accomplished raconteur, this series will be a synopsis of a unique half-century. duration 55:46   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    Nova [#4017H] Megastorm Aftermath One year after Hurricane Sandy's deadly strike, Nova follows up on its 2012 film "Inside the Megastorm" with a fresh investigation of the critical questions raised by this historic storm: Was Sandy a freak combination of weather systems? Or are hurricanes increasing in intensity due to a changing climate? What can we do to prepare ourselves for the next Sandy and what progress has been made toward making our urban infrastructure more resilient? Much of Sandy's wrecking power was due to an extreme storm surge that left large swaths of New York and New Jersey underwater. And with sea levels on the rise, flooding will only become more frequent. What is the role of global warming in driving these rising seas and what will it take to make cities like New York more resilient? Nova travels around the world to see how other low-lying urban areas are combining extraordinary engineering with natural landscape restoration and a smarter, more flexible power grid to prepare for an uncertain future. At the same time, Nova meets the climate scientists who are racing to understand how a warming world will affect extreme - but unpredictable - weather phenomena like hurricanes and tornadoes. To many, Sandy was a wake-up call: one year later, are we still listening? And how will we answer? duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 5:00 pm
    Secrets of the Dead [#1201] The Man Who Saved The World This program follows the drama and debate that surrounded the most critical point in the Cold War, and perhaps human history. While politicians desperately sought a solution to the stand-off, nobody was aware what was happening beneath the waves but the men on the B-59. The crew could only watch as their superiors entered a battle of wills that would determine the fate of humanity. The story of what happened that fateful day remained hidden for decades, only emerging in Russia in recent years. Now these events will be known to the world. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#112H] Included: a report about By My Side Birth Support, a NYC program that provides doula services free to women living in low-income, largely African-American neighborhoods where there are high infant and maternal mortality rates. Doulas aren't doctors or midwives but serve as support and information for expectant mothers. Can they make a difference? That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Hunger in the Valley of Plenty California's San Joaquin Valley is one of the most productive farm regions on the planet. Yet the people who work and live near those farms can't always access that bounty. duration 27:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 7:00 pm
    Aspen Institute Presents [#203] Solving The Economic Puzzle One day the employment rate and stock market are up, and the next they are down. On the third episode of The Aspen Institute Presents, Solving the Economic Puzzle focuses on the creation of jobs in conventional and creative ways in the abstract and not-so-abstract concept of economy. Host Hari Sreenivasan of PBS NewsHour attends the conversation on The Challenge of Building American Jobs with professor Austan Goolsbee, former U.S. Secretary of Labor Elaine L. Chao, "Behind the Kitchen Door" author Saru Jayaraman, editor-in-chief Kevin J. Delaney of Quartz and American Action Forum's president Douglas Holtz-Eakin. Also, Walter Isaacson of The Aspen Institute speaks with Kickstarter founder Perry Chen in Kickstarter and the Economics of Creativity to discuss the project, and its effects on the creative field and "starving artists." duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#240H] Citizens United: The Sequel * This week, as the government shutdown continues, the Supreme Court began its new term and justices heard arguments in McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission. The case has been billed as the successor to the court's Citizens United decision in 2010 that gave corporations, unions, and the wealthy the opportunity to pour vast and often anonymous amounts of cash into political campaigns. The new case challenges caps on how much individual donors can give to candidates and political parties and could raise the amount to more than $3.25 million.
    Bill Moyers talks with Yale Law School election and constitutional law professor Heather Gerken who warns that McCutcheon has the potential to be even worse than Citizens United. Political parties pay attention to the people with money, and as the non-partisan Sunlight Foundation reports, most of the funding for congressional and presidential campaigns comes from the top one percent of the one percent of the rich - "the elite class that serves as gatekeepers of public office in the United States."
    * Bill also speaks with historian Joyce Appleby who has a talent for making tales of the past into page-turning books that read like novels. They include Inheriting the Revolution, about the sons and daughters who took their founding fathers' revolt against the British crown and made America of it; The Relentless Revolution: A History of Capitalism; and her newest - out this weekend - Shores of Knowledge: New World Discoveries and the Scientific Imagination. It's the story of what sent European explorers to the Americas in pursuit of treasure and knowledge, and how they shaped our modern world. Bill describes it as "a captivating account of curiosity."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    America Reframed [#205] Code of the West At a time when the world is rethinking its drug policies large and small, one state rises to the forefront. Once a pioneer in legalizing medical marijuana, the state of Montana may now become the first to repeal its medical marijuana law. Set against the sweeping vistas of the Rockies, the steamy lamplight of marijuana grow houses, and the bustling halls of the State Capitol, this program follows the political process of marijuana policy reform and the recent federal crackdown on medical marijuana growers across the country. Chronicling the opinions and reactions of patients, growers, politicians, activists, and community members on both sides of the issue, the story paints an image of what happens when federal and state governments clash with communities in the crossfire, and the individuals involved who ultimately pay the price. duration 1:29:36   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 pm
    Hunger in the Valley of Plenty California's San Joaquin Valley is one of the most productive farm regions on the planet. Yet the people who work and live near those farms can't always access that bounty. duration 27:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#602] Garbage Dreams The world's largest garbage village is just outside Cairo. The "Zabaleen" (Arabic for "garbage people") recycle 80 percent of the trash they collect, but now multinational corporations threaten their livelihood. duration 56:46   STEREO
  • 12:00 am
    Global Voices [#302] Sentenced Home Raised as Americans in inner city projects near Seattle, three young Cambodian refugees each made a rash decision as a teenager that irrevocably shaped their destiny. Years later, facing deportation back to Cambodia, they find themselves caught between a tragic past and an uncertain future by a system that doesn't offer any second chances. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-L (Secondary audio: none)
Sunday, October 13, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • DT9s: Sutro Tower testing, early Tues 4/22 1am-5am

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED (and 3 other local Bay Area stations) will be doing full-load testing on new equipment at Sutro Tower early Tues 4/22 between 1am & 5am. If all goes as planned the KQED transmitter will go off twice during the early part of this period for between 15 and 30 seconds each […]

    • KQED DT9 planned, very short outages, Tues 4/15 (& possibly Wed 4/16)

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED DT9′s Over the Air (OTA) signal from Sutro Tower will experience a few extremely brief outages on Tuesday 4/15 between 10am and 5pm (and possibly on Wed 4/16 if the work cannot be completed in 1 day). Each outage should be measurable in seconds (not minutes). This work will not affect […]

    • KQET DT25 Planned Outage: early Tues 4/15 (btwn 5am-6am)

      (DT 25.1, 25.2, 25.3) At some point between 5am and 6am early Tuesday 4/15, KQET’s signal from the transmitter on Fremont Peak northeast of Monterey will shut down for a short period of time to allow AT&T to do work on our fiber interface. The outage should be relatively short, but its precise start time […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too