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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

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KQED World: Saturday, October 5, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, October 5, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10770H] Fourth Day of a Shutdown * A Virtual Currency * Brooks and Dionne * Twitter Public Launch duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32218Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, as the rhetoric in Washington gets louder, what should investors prepare for next week? And, even though the jobs report wasn't released today, entrepreneurs were still hard at work. So NBR will introduce you to a woman who started a business in her kitchen and became a big player in the baby food industry. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3004] Tavis talks with Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter Gregory Porter about his latest CD. Described as having "the next great voice in jazz," Porter reflects on his rise as a major talent. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Life On Fire [#101] Icelandic Volcanoes The 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajokull volcano in Iceland provoked economic chaos by paralyzing a major air traffic network for days. This eruption, however, was mild. Much more powerful volcanoes in Iceland are ready to wake up. Through spectacular aerial footage of this country, which is an accumulation of lava and ash, a maze of craters and faults, the episode tries to discern which volcano could wake up next and what the consequences of a major eruption are likely to be. Europe has come to realize that a colossal power sleeps beneath Iceland, while Icelanders for centuries have learned to live amongst their volcanoes. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1705] THE SUPREME COURT AND LEGISLATIVE PRAYER - As the US Supreme Court starts its new term, one of the cases it will hear concerns the constitutionality of prayers opening public government meetings. As Tim O'Brien reports, although chaplains may offer invocations at the opening of legislative sessions, a Federal appeals court has ruled that the prayers that have opened the meetings of the Greece, New York town board violate the law because one type of prayer - in this case, overtly Christian - dominates all others. How the Court rules could determine the boundaries of separation between church and state.
    PAKISTAN POLIO CAMPAIGN - Polio, a scourge that once killed millions around the world has been all but wiped out because of the polio vaccine. But in 3 countries, including Pakistan, it remains endemic. Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Karachi Pakistan on that nation's efforts, with the help of Muslim imams and other leaders, to convince its public to be vaccinated and that vaccine programs are not spy operations or other kinds of plots and are encouraged by and consistent with Islam.
    REACTION TO POPE FRANCIS - The widespread adulation of Pope Francis is assessed by a panel of expert observers for an overflow crowd at Georgetown University. Six months since his election, the panel discusses what has been the influence of Francis on US Catholics and the US government?
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1015] Great Investors Exclusive: Richard Freeman Great Investor Richard Freeman has co-managed the ClearBridge Aggressive Growth Fund since its inception 30 years ago. Twice nominated for Morningstar's Domestic Fund Manager of the Year award, Freeman has been fascinated by the stock market since the age of 13, when he started watching the ticker at a local brokerage firm after school. His admitted obsession with stocks has paid off. ClearBridge Aggressive Growth has delivered market and peer beating results over the decades and is now ranked in the top percentiles for the last one, three and five year periods. In this WT exclusive, Freeman describes his unusual highly concentrated, low turnover approach to investing. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2230H] * NY New Anti-Trafficking Policy * Government Shutdown * Women and the GOP * Wonder Women: Barnard President Debora Spar
    Panelists: RH Reality Check Editor at Large Erin Matson, Heritage Foundation's Genevieve Wood, Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), Former Bush White House Aide Mercy Viana Schlapp
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#210] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Visa Dream This program tells the touching story of one family's experience gaining entry into the United States. Representatives from the US Consulate demystify the visa process and illuminate the reasons why they approve some applications - and deny others. The film's main characters are Ramon and Aurora Chavez, an elderly couple living in Jalisco, Mexico, who have not seen their children in 16 years. They are a family divided, connected only by photo albums and phone calls.
    The daughters may not visit Mexico because they do not possess the necessary documents; going there would mean forever leaving behind their spouses, children, homes and lives. One daughter tearfully explains the hardships many immigrant families endure as a result of this prolonged separation. Ramon, the patriarch of the family, would rather live in Mexico but he longs to reunite with his family, who live 2500 miles away in Los Angeles. In order to visit, they must secure a tourist visa, an expensive and difficult proposition.
    Previous attempts proved unsuccessful but the Chavezes decide to try again after years of postponement. A camera crew follows them step-by-step through the application process, which begins at the US Consulate two hours away in Guadalajara.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 am
    American Masters [#2304] Cachao: Uno Mas The Grammy winning bassist Israel "Cachao" Lopez died in Coral Gables, Florida, in March 2008, at almost 90 years of age. A maestro of legendary status on the world stage and ultimately considered one of the greatest Afro-Cuban musicians of all time, he had made his home in the United States for the past four decades. However, he continued playing the Havana clubs and dance halls with his brother Orestes. Together, they revolutionized the heart of Cuban music -- their spontaneous improvisations and innovations established the basis of, and the influence of, contemporary Latin jazz and salsa, rock 'n roll and rhythm and blues. The basis of this film is a sold-out 2005 concert at Bimbo's 365 Club, a famous San Francisco nightclub. Cachaos's life and work are palpable. "Cachao: Uno Mas" is produced and narrated by actor Andy Garcia, a friend and ardent fan, who helped reinvigorate Cachao's career in the 1990s -- and who appears in this film playing the bongos. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#239H] Wendell Berry: Poet & Prophet Wendell Berry, a quiet and humble man, has become an outspoken advocate for revolution. He urges immediate action as he mourns how America has turned its back on the land and rejected Jeffersonian principles of respect for the environment and sustainable agriculture. Berry warns, "People who own the world outright for profit will have to be stopped; by influence, by power, by us." In a rare television interview, this visionary, author - and farmer - discusses a sensible, but no-compromise plan to save the Earth.
    This week, Bill Moyers profiles this passionate advocate, a man of the land and one of America's most influential writers, whose prolific career includes more than forty books of poetry, novels, short stories, and essays. This one-on-one conversation was taped at Kentucky's St. Catharine College during a two-day celebrating Wendell Berry's life and ideas and marking the 35th anniversary of the publication of his landmark book, The Unsettling of America.
    Berry, described by environmental activist Bill McKibben as "a prophet of responsibility, " lives and works on the Kentucky farm where his family has tilled the soil for 200 years. He's a man of action as well as words. In 2011, he joined a four-day sit-in at the Kentucky governor's office to protest mountaintop mining, a brutally destructive method of extracting coal. Moyers explores Berry's views on civil disobedience as well as his strong opposition to agribusiness and massive industrial farms, as well as his support for sustainable farming and the local food movement.
    "It's mighty hard right now to think of anything that's precious that isn't endangered," Berry tells Moyers. "There are no sacred and unsacred places; there are only sacred and desecrated places. My belief is that the world and our life in it are conditional gifts. We have the world to live in on the condition that we will take good care of it. And to take good care of it we have to know it. And to know it and to be willing to take care of it, we have to love it."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#215] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2525H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5314H] Democrats and Republicans don't agree on how to end the government shutdown but leaders from both parties seem to be suggesting the standoff could last for weeks and grow into an even bigger crisis - the possible default by the Treasury if Congress fails to raise the nation's debt ceiling. House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) insists President Obama owns the shutdown because he is unwilling to negotiate over delaying or defunding the Affordable Care Act as part of a deal to reopen the government. President Barack Obama blames the shutdown on Tea Party Republicans and their ideological opposition to the 2010 healthcare law which was later upheld by the Supreme Court.
    Meanwhile the new online health insurance exchanges at the heart of the standoff on Capitol Hill opened for business on Tuesday. Despite some technical glitches, the White House says more than 6-million people have logged in during the first two days of open enrollment.
    While the political blame game continues in Washington, federal facilities have been shutdown and an estimated 800,000 federal government workers nationwide have been put on furlough.
    What will it take to bridge partisan differences to breakthrough the political deadlock? Will the president's declaration that he won't negotiate over the debt ceiling limit his options in coming up with a compromise? And even with a deal, has the Republican Party been damaged by the very public divisions and fissures among conservatives? Gwen Ifill examines the debate with Dan Balz of The Washington Post, John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News, Molly Ball of The Atlantic, and John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    Conversation with Michael Krasny The host of KQED Public Radio's "Forum" sits down with Dave Iverson to discuss his career and share some of his favorite stories. duration 24:01   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17277Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2230H] * NY New Anti-Trafficking Policy * Government Shutdown * Women and the GOP * Wonder Women: Barnard President Debora Spar
    Panelists: RH Reality Check Editor at Large Erin Matson, Heritage Foundation's Genevieve Wood, Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), Former Bush White House Aide Mercy Viana Schlapp
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3141H] Topics: Government Shutdown - Who takes the Rap?; Netanyahu takes on Rouhani. Panelists: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#112H] * Benjamin Netanyahu, Israeli Prime Minister
    * Sir Alex Ferguson reflects on his career as manager of Manchester United Football Club
    * Mike Allen on politics
    * The cast of the play "The Glass Menagerie"
    * we remember author Tom Clancy who died earlier this week.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#239H] Wendell Berry: Poet & Prophet Wendell Berry, a quiet and humble man, has become an outspoken advocate for revolution. He urges immediate action as he mourns how America has turned its back on the land and rejected Jeffersonian principles of respect for the environment and sustainable agriculture. Berry warns, "People who own the world outright for profit will have to be stopped; by influence, by power, by us." In a rare television interview, this visionary, author - and farmer - discusses a sensible, but no-compromise plan to save the Earth.
    This week, Bill Moyers profiles this passionate advocate, a man of the land and one of America's most influential writers, whose prolific career includes more than forty books of poetry, novels, short stories, and essays. This one-on-one conversation was taped at Kentucky's St. Catharine College during a two-day celebrating Wendell Berry's life and ideas and marking the 35th anniversary of the publication of his landmark book, The Unsettling of America.
    Berry, described by environmental activist Bill McKibben as "a prophet of responsibility, " lives and works on the Kentucky farm where his family has tilled the soil for 200 years. He's a man of action as well as words. In 2011, he joined a four-day sit-in at the Kentucky governor's office to protest mountaintop mining, a brutally destructive method of extracting coal. Moyers explores Berry's views on civil disobedience as well as his strong opposition to agribusiness and massive industrial farms, as well as his support for sustainable farming and the local food movement.
    "It's mighty hard right now to think of anything that's precious that isn't endangered," Berry tells Moyers. "There are no sacred and unsacred places; there are only sacred and desecrated places. My belief is that the world and our life in it are conditional gifts. We have the world to live in on the condition that we will take good care of it. And to take good care of it we have to know it. And to know it and to be willing to take care of it, we have to love it."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#106H] Nanotechnology Takes Off and Journey into Darkness * From Lawrence Berkeley National Labs to Silicon Valley, researchers are manipulating particles at the atomic level, ushering in potential cures for cancer, clothes that don't stain, and solar panels as thick as a sheet of paper.
    * How do you prepare someone who is becoming blind? Quest follows seeing adults through their physical and psychological training as they learn to live in a world without sight.
    * Though you may not believe it, the Bay Area was home to the last whale hunting fleet in the United States - only a generation ago. Quest investigates how Richmond, California was part of a historic moment, and what remains today.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#241] duration 25:40   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    History Detectives [#1002H] Wes Cowan hunts for the identity of a man whose name is engraved on a rare matched set of Civil War-era pistols, still in the original case. Tukufu Zuberi tracks down the story behind an old 78rpm, distributed by K.K.K. Records, containing songs titled "The Bright Fiery Cross" and "The Jolly Old Klansman." And Eduardo Pagan tries to prove that James Jamerson, a bass player whose bass line drove the Motown sound, owned a battered Ampeg B-15 amp that the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame will display - but only if inductee Jamerson really owned it. duration 54:16   STEREO TVPG-V
  • 3:00 pm
    Right to Risk: A 15 Day Journey Through Arizona's Grand Canyon This documentary accompanies eight individuals with disabilities and their guides as they face the daunting challenges of rafting down 225 miles of the Colorado River and wilderness of Grand Canyon. Through interviews shot during the trip, the men and women, all of whom live with significant disabilities including blindness, cerebral palsy, paraplegia, quadriplegia, spina bifida and multiple sclerosis, share their insights to overcome prejudice and negative attitudes, maintain their dignity and assert themselves. During their life-affirming journey, they reflect on their adventure and affirm that it is every individual's right to choose what they are willing to do and risk in pursuit of their dreams. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    Seeds of Resiliency This program introduces diverse individuals who have survived tragedies and traumas, and overcome mental and physical challenges, and now use their experiences to affect change and help others. Each thrives today because they refused to give up their struggle, even when all hope seemed lost. These compelling, uplifting and inspirational portraits attest to the strength of the human spirit and the power of positive thinking and action. Profiles include: a professional wheelchair athlete, Holocaust survivors, a homeless counselor, refugees from war-torn countries and a terminally ill cancer advocate. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Bridge Between Silence and Sound This documentary, narrated by Mario Cuomo, focuses on hearing loss and the Cochlear Implant, a cutting-edge, but controversial technology that gives the deaf and hard of hearing the ability to hear sounds. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#109H] Included: the new health care law has given one little known agency the power to mandate insurance companies to provide certain preventive services. Find out what the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) might have to say about your next visit to the doctor. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5314H] Democrats and Republicans don't agree on how to end the government shutdown but leaders from both parties seem to be suggesting the standoff could last for weeks and grow into an even bigger crisis - the possible default by the Treasury if Congress fails to raise the nation's debt ceiling. House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) insists President Obama owns the shutdown because he is unwilling to negotiate over delaying or defunding the Affordable Care Act as part of a deal to reopen the government. President Barack Obama blames the shutdown on Tea Party Republicans and their ideological opposition to the 2010 healthcare law which was later upheld by the Supreme Court.
    Meanwhile the new online health insurance exchanges at the heart of the standoff on Capitol Hill opened for business on Tuesday. Despite some technical glitches, the White House says more than 6-million people have logged in during the first two days of open enrollment.
    While the political blame game continues in Washington, federal facilities have been shutdown and an estimated 800,000 federal government workers nationwide have been put on furlough.
    What will it take to bridge partisan differences to breakthrough the political deadlock? Will the president's declaration that he won't negotiate over the debt ceiling limit his options in coming up with a compromise? And even with a deal, has the Republican Party been damaged by the very public divisions and fissures among conservatives? Gwen Ifill examines the debate with Dan Balz of The Washington Post, John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News, Molly Ball of The Atlantic, and John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    Conversation with Michael Krasny The host of KQED Public Radio's "Forum" sits down with Dave Iverson to discuss his career and share some of his favorite stories. duration 24:01   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#106H] Nanotechnology Takes Off and Journey into Darkness * From Lawrence Berkeley National Labs to Silicon Valley, researchers are manipulating particles at the atomic level, ushering in potential cures for cancer, clothes that don't stain, and solar panels as thick as a sheet of paper.
    * How do you prepare someone who is becoming blind? Quest follows seeing adults through their physical and psychological training as they learn to live in a world without sight.
    * Though you may not believe it, the Bay Area was home to the last whale hunting fleet in the United States - only a generation ago. Quest investigates how Richmond, California was part of a historic moment, and what remains today.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1213] Food Hour: Vietnam Megan starts her culinary tour of Vietnam in the Mekong Delta. Her first stop is Ho Chi Minh City where she visits the Pho Binh noodle shop, which also served as a resistance headquarters during the Vietnam War. Next it's off to Hue in central Vietnam where Megan samples the region's "Imperial" cuisine and then travels to Hanoi. She treks further north to Bac Ha, attends a traditional banquet hosted by the Flower H'mong tribe and ends her journey with a seafood feast in the scenic Ha Long Bay. duration 57:04   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3005H] Attenborough's Life Stories: Life On Camera This mini-series focuses on three fields that David Attenborough feels have been transformed most profoundly: filmmaking, science and the environment. Richly illustrated with the sequences he has spent 60 years capturing (re-mastered for the first time in HD), with new interviews in which he revisits the content, stories and locations that were featured in his landmark series and packed with the personal anecdotes of the BBC's most accomplished raconteur, this series will be a synopsis of a unique half-century. duration 56:16   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3715H] Secrets of Stonehenge Every year, a million visitors are drawn to the Salisbury Plain, in southern England, to gaze upon a mysterious circle of stones. Stonehenge may be the best-known and most mysterious relic of prehistory. During the 20th century, excavations revealed that the structure was built in stages and that it dates back some 5000 years, to the late Stone Age. The meaning of the monument, however, was anyone's guess - until recently. Now investigations inside and around Stonehenge have kicked off a dramatic new era of discovery and debate. Who built Stonehenge? What was its purpose? How did prehistoric people quarry, transport, sculpt and erect the giant stones? A new generation of researchers is tackling these questions, finding important clues in the landscape surrounding Stonehenge - one of the densest concentrations of prehistoric structures in the world. The story of Stonehenge is being rewritten. duration 56:16   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 11:00 pm
    Nova [#3916#] Inside The Megastorm Was Hurricane Sandy a freak combination of weather systems? Or are hurricanes increasing in intensity due to a warming climate? How did this perfect storm make search and rescue so dangerous? This episode takes viewers moment by moment through Hurricane Sandy, its impacts, and the future of storm protection. Through first person accounts from those who survived, and from experts and scientists, it gives scientific context to a new breed of storms. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#204] The New Public This program follows the lives of the ambitious educators and lively students of Bed Stuy's new Brooklyn Community Arts and Media High School (BCAM) over the course of the founding year, with the filmmakers returning three years later to again document the senior year of that first graduating class. Beginning in August 2006, just days before BCAM will open its doors for the first time. Dr. James O'Brien, former D.J. and point guard turned first-time principal, and his faculty of eight, take to the streets in Bed Stuy, Brooklyn to recruit students. Their enthusiasm is infectious and enticing: strong support for the individual student, a rigorous academic curriculum and unconventional arts electives taught by local artists. While at first running smoothly, as months go by, conflicts arise, and by the end of freshman year, the school's idealistic vision is addressing some issues, but aggravating others. Flash-forward to September 2010, the first day of senior year, the school is complete with 4 grades and 450 students, with a faculty that has grown from 8 to 50. Of the 104 students in their founding class, almost half have transferred or dropped out, leaving a senior class of 60 and only 30 on track to graduate. BCAM has made major adjustments, most notably, more disciplinary structure and no arts electives for seniors. What happens in the 4 years is both compelling and frustrating, and it's what makes The New Public a critical document of the complexities, frustrations and personal dramas that put public education at the center of national debate. What makes a kid or a school succeed are a series of complicated, interconnected dynamics, including, a re-evaluation of how we define success. duration 1:56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, October 5, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

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Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

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KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

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KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

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KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too