Donate

TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus. Read more about this transition on our FAQ page.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, September 21, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, September 21, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10760] Budget * Power Plants * Coptic Christians * Brooks and Dionne duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32208] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, do government shutdowns ever save taxpayers money or do they just cost us in the long run? And, NBR will have details on the proposed new rules for the coal industry. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2994] Tavis talks with musician, screenwriter and best-selling memoirist and novelist James McBride.co-created. Highly successful in two careers, McBride unpacks his latest novel, The Good Lord Bird. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Inside Nature's Giants [#101] Sperm Whale Veterinary scientist Mark Evans and comparative anatomist Joy Reidenberg dissect a sperm whale's enormous organs to reveal the secrets of this 45-foot deep-sea giant, which stranded and died on Pegwell Bay, Kent, England. As the team ventures inside the whale, biologist Simon Watt tracks whales in the Azores with a modern-day Jonah, Malcolm Clarke, who shows him the huge number of squid beaks in a whale's stomach. Evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins, marveling at the gigantic teeth that have evolved in the lower jaw of a sperm whale, digs out his copy of the King James Bible for a reading about Leviathan from the Book of Job. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1703] METHODIST GAY MARRIAGE CONTROVERSY - As gay marriage ceremonies remain forbidden in the United Methodist Church, Betty Rollin speaks with Rev. Tom Ogletree, a United Methodist scholar and former Dean of the Yale Divinity School and the Drew Divinity School, in New Jersey. He faces a possible church trial for officiating at the marriage of his gay son. Rev. Ogletree says there is "no concept of homosexuality or sexual orientation at all" in scripture. But Rev. Rob Renfroe of the Woodland United Methodist Church, near Houston, insists "there is not any passage in scripture that is condoning or accepting of that practice."
    THE LINDISFARNE GOSPELS - Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Durham in Northeast England on the Lindisfarne Gospels, the first surviving translations of the four Christian gospels from Latin into old English, 1300 years ago - a landmark in Christianity's migration to the British Isles.
    CHAGALL'S JEWISH JESUS - Marc Chagall is well known for his whimsical paintings portraying Jewish shtetl life in Russia. What is less well known are his paintings of a crucified Jewish Jesus. Throughout his career, he painted over 100 of them, especially during the Holocaust. The Jewish Museum in New York, where we spoke with Senior Curator Susan Tumarkin Goodman, is having a special exhibit of these paintings.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1013] Bond Bets With interest rates rising and bond prices falling, is this any time to launch a bond fund? "Great Investor" Kathleen Gaffney says "yes" and explains what she is doing with the new Eaton Vance Bond Fund. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2228H] * The UN Aims to Meet Global Needs of Women * Wajdja: the Saudi Arabia movie making headlines
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), Red Alert Politics Editor Francesca Chambers, IWF Senior Policy Analyst Hadley Heath, United States Institute of Peace's Manal Omar.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#209] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Voces On PBS [#102H] Escaramuza: Riding from the Heart Las Azaleas are a gutsy team of women rodeo riders vying to represent the US at the National Charro Championships in Mexico - where "to be Charro is to be Mexican." Escaramuza, or skirmish, describes both the daredevil horseback ballets, ridden sidesaddle at top speed, and the intensity of the competition season. Neither life-altering challenges at home nor cartel violence across the border can keep Las Azaleas from their goal. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Voces On PBS [#103] Unfinished Spaces Fifty years after the Cuban Revolution, three architects resume their first project -- Cuba's National Art Schools -- left unfinished in 1965 when their creative visions came head to head with the political realities of the Revolution. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#237H] Inequality for All This week marks both the 5th anniversary of the fiscal meltdown that almost tanked the world economy and the 2nd anniversary of Occupy Wall Street, the movement that sparked heightened public awareness of income inequality. Yet the crisis is worse than ever - in the first 3 years of the recovery, 95% of the economic gains have gone only to the top 1% of Americans. And the share of working people in the US who define themselves as lower class is at its highest level in 4 decades.
    More and more are fighting back. According to Robert Reich, Bill Clinton's Secretary of Labor: "The core principle is that we want an economy that works for everyone, not just for a small elite. We want equal opportunity, not equality of outcome. We want to make sure that there's upward mobility again, in our society and in our economy."
    Reich joins Moyers this week to discuss a new film, Inequality for All, opening in theatres across the country next week. Directed by Jacob Kornbluth, the film aims to be a game-changer in our national discussion of income inequality. Reich, who Time magazine called one of the best cabinet secretaries of the 20th century, stars in this dynamic, witty, and entertaining new film. Reich, a professor at UC Berkeley, is the author of 13 books, including The Work of Nations, available in 22 languages; Aftershock and Supercapitalism, both best sellers; and his latest, Beyond Outrage: What Has Gone Wrong with Our Economy and our Democracy, and How to Fix It.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#213] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2523H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5312H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2444H] August 23, 2013 OAKLAND TRIES TO EVEN THE ODDS FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN BOYS
    In a collaboration between KQED and the San Francisco Chronicle series Even Odds, we offer an in-depth look at the daunting challenges faced by African American males in Oakland, and the city's attempt to address them. 3 years ago, the Oakland Unified School District faced an alarming statistic - more than half of its African American boys would not graduate. The troubling dropout rate had many factors at play: poverty, crime, high suspension rates and rising absenteeism. The district responded by opening the Office of African American Male Achievement. Its mission is to improve academic outcomes for black boys by pairing them with black men. While race-based, community mentorship is not new, for a public school system it was controversial. The early results are encouraging, but it remains to be seen whether this novel approach will actually work. The program begins with a documentary segment, followed by a panel discussion. Host: Joshua Johnson.
    Guests: Jill Tucker, San Francisco Chronicle; Tiago Robinson, Oakland High School; Pedro Noguera, New York University.
    duration 28:48   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17263Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2228H] * The UN Aims to Meet Global Needs of Women * Wajdja: the Saudi Arabia movie making headlines
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), Red Alert Politics Editor Francesca Chambers, IWF Senior Policy Analyst Hadley Heath, United States Institute of Peace's Manal Omar.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3139] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose: The Week [#109H] This week: Leon Panetta, former Secretary of Defense discusses Syria; Charlie recounts his trip to Syria to interview President Assad; US Open winner Rafael Nadal; and we look at the Whitney Museum's "Hopper Drawing," the first major museum exhibition to focus on the drawings of Edward Hopper. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#237H] Inequality for All This week marks both the 5th anniversary of the fiscal meltdown that almost tanked the world economy and the 2nd anniversary of Occupy Wall Street, the movement that sparked heightened public awareness of income inequality. Yet the crisis is worse than ever - in the first 3 years of the recovery, 95% of the economic gains have gone only to the top 1% of Americans. And the share of working people in the US who define themselves as lower class is at its highest level in 4 decades.
    More and more are fighting back. According to Robert Reich, Bill Clinton's Secretary of Labor: "The core principle is that we want an economy that works for everyone, not just for a small elite. We want equal opportunity, not equality of outcome. We want to make sure that there's upward mobility again, in our society and in our economy."
    Reich joins Moyers this week to discuss a new film, Inequality for All, opening in theatres across the country next week. Directed by Jacob Kornbluth, the film aims to be a game-changer in our national discussion of income inequality. Reich, who Time magazine called one of the best cabinet secretaries of the 20th century, stars in this dynamic, witty, and entertaining new film. Reich, a professor at UC Berkeley, is the author of 13 books, including The Work of Nations, available in 22 languages; Aftershock and Supercapitalism, both best sellers; and his latest, Beyond Outrage: What Has Gone Wrong with Our Economy and our Democracy, and How to Fix It.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#114H] Where Are The Bees?/Landslide Detectives * Where are the Bees? - California farmers depend on bees to pollinate the state's multi-million dollar fruit and nut crops, but recently, bee colonies have been rapidly disappearing. Quest follows the scientists that are racing to find the cause, plus discovers how you can help.
    * Landslide Detectives - With its rolling hills and winter storms, the Bay Area has been a landslide hotspot, putting houses and lives at risk. Meet the geologists working to understand and predict these natural disasters.
    * Story Time with Young Science Authors - What do kids age 5-8 think about science? Young authors from the KQED Reading Rainbow Young Writers and Illustrators Contest read their science-themed contest entries.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#239] duration 25:40   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    History Detectives [#808H] Hot Town Poster, Face Jug, Lost City of Gold This poster tells the story of a battle brewing. We see a clenched fist, what looks like a stern police officer, and the words: Hot Town - Pigs in the street. Who made this poster and why?
    Then, did the artist mean to scare someone with the grimace on this face jug? What's the story behind this peculiar pottery?
    And, if this inscription on a rock in Phoenix is authentic, Spanish explorers arrived in America much earlier than records show.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-V
  • 3:00 pm
    Voces On PBS [#101H] Tales of Masked Men This documentary explores "Lucha Libre" (Mexican wrestling) and its role in Latino communities in the United States and Mexico. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    Frontline [#3020] Dropout Nation What does it take to save a student? Every year, hundreds of thousands of teenagers in the United States quit high school without diplomas -- an epidemic so out of control that nobody knows the exact number. What is clear is that massive dropout rates cripple individual career prospects and cloud the country's future. At Houston's Sharpstown High, once a notorious "dropout factory," a high-stakes experiment is under way to rescue students from the edge. Frontline spent a semester immersed in Sharpstown to produce a portrait of four students in crisis and the teachers, counselors and principal waging a daily, personal struggle to get them to graduation. A troubling and inspiring journey through the maze of an inner-city high school, "Dropout Nation" investigates the causes, challenges and potential solutions of a national emergency. duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#105H] Included: a report on an unintended consequence of the popularity of fuel-efficient cars - less gas being sold - and therefore less federal gas tax being collected, which depletes the funds available to repair the nation's roads and bridges. Oregon has a controversial solution to the problem - by instituting a tax based on the miles you drive. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5312H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2444H] August 23, 2013 OAKLAND TRIES TO EVEN THE ODDS FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN BOYS
    In a collaboration between KQED and the San Francisco Chronicle series Even Odds, we offer an in-depth look at the daunting challenges faced by African American males in Oakland, and the city's attempt to address them. 3 years ago, the Oakland Unified School District faced an alarming statistic - more than half of its African American boys would not graduate. The troubling dropout rate had many factors at play: poverty, crime, high suspension rates and rising absenteeism. The district responded by opening the Office of African American Male Achievement. Its mission is to improve academic outcomes for black boys by pairing them with black men. While race-based, community mentorship is not new, for a public school system it was controversial. The early results are encouraging, but it remains to be seen whether this novel approach will actually work. The program begins with a documentary segment, followed by a panel discussion. Host: Joshua Johnson.
    Guests: Jill Tucker, San Francisco Chronicle; Tiago Robinson, Oakland High School; Pedro Noguera, New York University.
    duration 28:48   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#114H] Where Are The Bees?/Landslide Detectives * Where are the Bees? - California farmers depend on bees to pollinate the state's multi-million dollar fruit and nut crops, but recently, bee colonies have been rapidly disappearing. Quest follows the scientists that are racing to find the cause, plus discovers how you can help.
    * Landslide Detectives - With its rolling hills and winter storms, the Bay Area has been a landslide hotspot, putting houses and lives at risk. Meet the geologists working to understand and predict these natural disasters.
    * Story Time with Young Science Authors - What do kids age 5-8 think about science? Young authors from the KQED Reading Rainbow Young Writers and Illustrators Contest read their science-themed contest entries.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1205] Around The World - Pacific Journeys: Tonga to New Caledonia Zay's island-hopping escapades take him now to the independent Kingdom of Tonga and then on to multi-cultural Fiji, once home to cannibals and Indian plantation workers that were brought to the islands to harvest sugar cane. In Norfolk Island, we learn about its convict past while the hills of New Caledonia make a perfect setting for an island trek to the country's native inhabitants. Zay ends his journey in Noumea, where the Kanak people's culture is celebrated at the Tibijao Cultural Center, an architectural marvel that combines ancient knowledge with modern techniques. duration 56:42   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Earthflight, A Nature Special Presentation [#103H] Europe Cranes and geese rise over Venice, Dover, Edinburgh and the monkey-guarded Rock of Gibraltar. In Rome, the Loire Valley, Holland and Hungary, birds gather by the millions to breed and two by two to raise their families. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3911H] Why Ships Sink Are you safe aboard a modern cruise ship? Twenty million passengers embark on cruises each year, vacationing in deluxe "floating cities" that offer everything from swimming pools to shopping malls to ice skating rinks. And the ships just keep getting bigger: The average cruise ship has doubled in size in just the last ten years. Some engineers fear that these towering behemoths are dangerously unstable, and the recent tragedy of the Costa Concordia has raised new questions about their safety. Now, NOVA brings together marine engineering and safety experts to reconstruct the events that led up to famous cruise disasters, including the ill-fated Concordia, the Sea Diamond, and the Oceanos. Are we really safe at sea-or are we on the brink of a 21st century Titanic? duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 11:00 pm
    Life On Fire [#103] The Surprise Salmon In Alaska, the fresh water that feeds the rivers is snowmelt from North America's highest mountains and most active volcanoes. Time and again, they erupt and poison the rivers. Scientists have only just begun to piece together what might have happened nearly 2,000 years ago, when one race of salmon faced the death of their natal river and were forced back to the open ocean on an exceptional adventure. Navigating between the sulphurous waters, bears, sharks and eagles, the fish escaped the Earth's wrath to give birth to descendants that continue their pioneering journey to the heart of an active volcano. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#202] Radio Unnameable Legendary radio personality Bob Fass revolutionized late night FM radio by serving as a cultural hub for music, politics and audience participation for nearly 50 years. Long before today's innovations in social media, Fass utilized the airwaves for mobilization encouraging luminaries and ordinary listeners to talk openly and take the program in surprising directions. Fass and his committed group of friends, peers, and listeners proved time and time again through massive, planned meetups and other similar events that radio was not a solitary experience but rather a platform to unite communities of like-minded, or even just open-minded, individuals without the dependence on large scale corporate backing. Radio Unnameable is a visual and aural collage that pulls from Bob Fass's immense archive of audio from his program, film, photographs, and video that has been sitting dormant until now. Revealing the underexposed world of independent radio, the film illustrates the intimate relationship Fass and, by extension, WBAI formed with their listeners that were strong enough to maintain the station?s role as one of the most successful listener-sponsored programs in the United States. duration 1:56:45   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, September 21, 2013

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED DT9 planned, very short outages, Tues 4/15 (& possibly Wed 4/16)

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED DT9′s Over the Air (OTA) signal from Sutro Tower will experience a few extremely brief outages on Tuesday 4/15 between 10am and 5pm (and possibly on Wed 4/16 if the work cannot be completed in 1 day). Each outage should be measurable in seconds (not minutes). This work will not affect […]

    • KQET DT25 Planned Outage: early Tues 4/15 (btwn 5am-6am)

      (DT 25.1, 25.2, 25.3) At some point between 5am and 6am early Tuesday 4/15, KQET’s signal from the transmitter on Fremont Peak northeast of Monterey will shut down for a short period of time to allow AT&T to do work on our fiber interface. The outage should be relatively short, but its precise start time […]

    • Occasional sound issues, Comcast Cable, Black remote control

      Originally posted 6/19/2013: Some Comcast Basic Cable customers around the Bay Area have reported audio issues with KQED and KQED Plus, on channels 9 and 10. The problem is not related to KQED’s transmission but may be caused by the language setting on your Comcast remote control. If your Comcast remote control is black, please […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too