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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, September 14, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, September 14, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10755] Syria * Egypt * Latino Americans * Burning Man * * Shields and Brooks duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32203] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, a strong September showing for stocks so far this month. But with the Fed meeting, Syria and a budget fight looming, will fortunes change? And, why are stores pushing Christmas sales in September? duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2989] Tavis talks health with one of America's foremost cardiothoracic surgeons and host of The Dr. Oz Show, Dr. Mehmet Oz. The prominent health expert previews season 5 of his Emmy-winning syndicated TV show. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Naturally Obsessed: The Making of a Scientist Mixing humor and heartbreak, this program delves into the lab of charismatic professor Dr. Lawrence Shapiro, and follows 3 irrepressible graduate students as they pursue a Ph.D. degree and race to publish their scientific findings. Their challenge: to decipher the structure and mechanism of a tiny protein that controls the burning and storage of fat. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1702] THE SYRIA CONFLICT - Can diplomacy replace missile strikes in the crisis over chemical weapons in Syria? William Galston, Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, talks with Bob Abernethy and Kim Lawton about the moral choices now as the US decides how to proceed.
    BIRMINGHAM CHURCH BOMBING 50TH ANNIVERSARY - Less than 3 weeks after the 1963 March on Washington, on Sunday, September 15th, a Ku Klux Klan-planted bomb went off at Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham Alabama, just before the 11 am worship service began. 4 young girls were killed, and the entire nation was rocked by the tragedy. Kim Lawton looks at the impact of the bombing and how, 50 years later, the church hopes to be a witness of the past and a sign of hope for the future.
    KEVER AVOT - Rabbi David Wolpe, of Sinai Temple in Los Angeles, talks about the Jewish practice, Kever Avot. During the days between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur - a time of prayer, repentance and charity - many Jews visit the graves of their loved ones and ancestors. Rabbi Wolpe leads a community Kever Avot service at Mt. Sinai Hollywood Hills Memorial Park.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1012] Macro Matters This week's WT features a TV first with a new macro research team. Cornerstone Macro's top-ranked economist Nancy Lazar and investment strategist Francois Trahan on the big trends they see that will move markets. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2227H] Judicial Systems Fail Rape Victims * Secondhand Adoption Online * Behind the Headlines: the Benefits of Being an Only Child.
    Panelists: Voto Latino Executive Director Maria Teresa Kumar, Conservative Commentator Darlene Kennedy, National Network to End Domestic Violence President Kim Gandy, Republican Strategist Rina Shah.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#209] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    American Masters [#2604H] Billie Jean King The first sports figure ever featured by American Masters, this was a very deliberate choice about a very deliberate woman who has, indeed, been a major force in changing, and democratizing, our cultural landscape. To commemorate the 40th anniversaries of both the infamous Billie Jean King/Bobby Riggs tennis match - the Battle of the Sexes - and the launch of the Women's Tennis Association, this film looks back to the 12-year old southern California girl who played tennis on public courts, observed disparity and unfairness and, as she soared athletically, never stopped trying to remedy the situation.
    Her competitiveness on the circuit was matched by her egalitarian efforts on behalf of women and her commitment to prove consistently that in diversity there is strength - ultimately being awarded the Medal of Freedom by President Obama. King presents her own story with perspective added by Rosie Casals, Chris Evert, Venus Williams, Gloria Steinem, Elton John and Bobby Riggs' son.
    duration 1:26:46   SRND51 TVPG
  • MORNING
  • 6:30 am
    Barbara Morgan: No Limits From more than 11,000 applicants to the 1985 Teacher-in-Space program, McCall Elementary School teacher Barbara Morgan was chosen to be the backup to Christa McAuliffe. When McAuliffe was killed in the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger in 1986, Morgan's dream of flying in space was threatened. Using rare footage, as well as interviews with Morgan, her friends, colleagues, students and family, this program shows how Morgan became a full-fledged astronaut, overcoming additional, and sometimes tragic, challenges. On August 8, 2007, Morgan and her crewmates triumphantly launched in the shuttle Endeavour. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 7:30 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17256Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#212] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2522H] 1. The Syrian dilemma, Putin to the rescue?
    2. If Putin is faking, what then?
    3. Congress, the President and the crisis in Syria.
    4. Are the President and his Secretary of State on the same page rhetorically?
    5. The continuing drive to defund Obamacare and the threat of a government shutdown.
    6. The surprising finish to the New York Democratic Mayoral Primary.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5311H] It has been a whirlwind week for developments surrounding President Obama's attempts to take action against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad for alleged chemical weapons attacks in that 2-year civil war. What looked like a potential military strike at the beginning of the week now seems to have turned into a diplomatic dance involving Syria, Russia, the US and the United Nations. All this comes after a full court press by President Obama to garner support for military action; Assad's hour-long interview on PBS; and Russia President Vladimir Putin chastising the US in a New York Times Op-Ed.
    Joining Gwen Ifill for perspective and analysis are: Peter Baker of The New York Times, Martha Raddatz of ABC News, Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post, and James Kitfield of National Journal.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2443H] September 13, 2013 Host: Thuy Vu.
    News Panel:
    LEGISLATIVE ROUNDUP - Lawmakers in Sacramento spent the week scrambling to get through about 400 bills before the end of the legislative session on Friday. Among the most notable is the governor's $315 million plan to ease prison crowding due to a federal court order. Also on the table were bills increasing the minimum wage, expanding immigrant rights, reducing penalties for drug possession and tighter restrictions on guns. The closely watched bill to regulate fracking was criticized by environmental groups, who say it doesn't go far enough.
    NSA SECRECY CHALLENGED - Amidst continuing concerns about their role in NSA surveillance programs, internet giants including Google and Microsoft are challenging the secrecy that surrounds the surveillance orders they receive. Yahoo and Facebook have joined Google and Microsoft in filing lawsuits at the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, seeking permission to disclose more information about their participation in the NSA's data gathering efforts.
    ELDER ABUSE - An investigation of the California Department of Public Health reveals that the agency is failing to pursue cases of alleged abuse against some of the state's most vulnerable people, including elderly patients receiving in-home care or living in nursing homes. Instead, the agency is quietly and quickly closing cases after only minimal investigation.
    Guests: Scott Detrow, KQED News; Michelle Quinn, Politico, and Mina Kim, KQED News
    BAY AREA FALL ARTS PREVIEW - The Bay Area fall arts calendar is jam-packed with anniversaries, big name acts, and world premieres. KQED reporter Cy Musiker, host of "The Do-List," reveals his top picks for the best in music, dance, theatre and more.
    duration 28:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17256Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2227H] Judicial Systems Fail Rape Victims * Secondhand Adoption Online * Behind the Headlines: the Benefits of Being an Only Child.
    Panelists: Voto Latino Executive Director Maria Teresa Kumar, Conservative Commentator Darlene Kennedy, National Network to End Domestic Violence President Kim Gandy, Republican Strategist Rina Shah.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3138] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#108H] * Al Hunt, David Ignatius, Jackie Calmes and Mark Halperin discuss Syria * Hari Sreenivasan, anchor of PBS's new Weekend NewsHour * Filmmaker Shane Salerno on J.D. Salinger * An appreciation of journalist David Frost who died earlier this week * and we look inside Donald Judd's home & studio duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#236H] The Collision of Sports and Politics On occasion, a sports story breaks free from the sports section - as highlighted by this week's Time magazine cover story, "It's Time to Pay College Athletes". These headlines are less about the latest star or the final score and more about culture, politics, and who we hope to be as Americans. Should we build flashy new arenas in bankrupt cities? Do we cheer from the stands or cringe as we watch our children butt heads on the football field, risking a future of potential brain trauma?
    This week Dave Zirin, sports editor for The Nation - the magazine's first sports editor in the publication's 148 year history - joins Bill Moyers to talk about the collision of sports and politics. As Zirin points out, "there's always so much happening in the world of sports, and there's always so many different ways in which sports, not just reflects our lives, but actually shapes our lives - shapes our understanding of things like racism, sexism, homophobia. It shapes our understanding of our country, of corporations and what's happening to our cities. In so many different ways, sports stories are stories of American life in the 21st century."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#304H] The Physics of Baseball/World's Most Powerful Microscope When it comes to curve balls and line drives, it all comes down to a physics lesson. And check out the world's most powerful microscope in Berkeley, which is seeking out images of individual atoms. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#238] duration 25:40   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Global Voices [#320] Maquilapolis Women workers in Tijuana's assembly factories tell their stories as they work to carve out lives of agency in a new and complicated century, revealing the transformation of a city and its people by globalization. duration 54:21   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Voces On PBS [#104H] Lemon When Lemon Andersen held a Tony Award in his hands for his work in Russell Simmons' Def Poetry Jam on Broadway, it was close to a miracle. This poet/performer was a three-time felon who'd achieved more than anyone could have ever imagined. But when the show closed, he lost everything and moved his wife and two small daughters back to the projects. In desperation, he turned to the only thing he had left - his pen and his past. Lemon follows one man's journey to bring his life story to the New York stage while battling his darkest demons. duration 56:46   STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    Schools That Change Communities A unique, engaging documentary that turns the current focus of education on its head. While most US schools keep their students bottled up in classrooms as a way of increasing their test scores, this very upbeat special focuses on a diverse range of K-12 public schools in five states that instead break down the walls between the school and its neighborhood. By viewing their surroundings as classrooms, students are not only invigorated, but also more motivated to learn the basics and how to think critically about solving problems they and the larger world they inhabit now face. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley Reports [#301] Education Under Arrest Many public schools are still operating under the 1999 "Zero Tolerance" initiative, which tied federal funding to this mandate. "Zero Tolerance," which came about after the horrifying Columbine tragedy, demands that kids be removed from schools the first time they transgress - even for minor offenses. This puts them into the juvenile justice system - a system that those who work within its confines admit too often does a better job of punishment than rehabilitation and re-integration into schools. This program looks at the connection between the juvenile justice system and the dropout rate among American teens and the efforts to end this link. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#103H] Included: a report from Maine, where an underwater turbine is harnessing the tides to create energy in a brand new way. And, the story of a novel strategy in British Columbia that has reduced alcohol-related driving fatalities by 50%. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5311H] It has been a whirlwind week for developments surrounding President Obama's attempts to take action against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad for alleged chemical weapons attacks in that 2-year civil war. What looked like a potential military strike at the beginning of the week now seems to have turned into a diplomatic dance involving Syria, Russia, the US and the United Nations. All this comes after a full court press by President Obama to garner support for military action; Assad's hour-long interview on PBS; and Russia President Vladimir Putin chastising the US in a New York Times Op-Ed.
    Joining Gwen Ifill for perspective and analysis are: Peter Baker of The New York Times, Martha Raddatz of ABC News, Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post, and James Kitfield of National Journal.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2443H] September 13, 2013 Host: Thuy Vu.
    News Panel:
    LEGISLATIVE ROUNDUP - Lawmakers in Sacramento spent the week scrambling to get through about 400 bills before the end of the legislative session on Friday. Among the most notable is the governor's $315 million plan to ease prison crowding due to a federal court order. Also on the table were bills increasing the minimum wage, expanding immigrant rights, reducing penalties for drug possession and tighter restrictions on guns. The closely watched bill to regulate fracking was criticized by environmental groups, who say it doesn't go far enough.
    NSA SECRECY CHALLENGED - Amidst continuing concerns about their role in NSA surveillance programs, internet giants including Google and Microsoft are challenging the secrecy that surrounds the surveillance orders they receive. Yahoo and Facebook have joined Google and Microsoft in filing lawsuits at the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, seeking permission to disclose more information about their participation in the NSA's data gathering efforts.
    ELDER ABUSE - An investigation of the California Department of Public Health reveals that the agency is failing to pursue cases of alleged abuse against some of the state's most vulnerable people, including elderly patients receiving in-home care or living in nursing homes. Instead, the agency is quietly and quickly closing cases after only minimal investigation.
    Guests: Scott Detrow, KQED News; Michelle Quinn, Politico, and Mina Kim, KQED News
    BAY AREA FALL ARTS PREVIEW - The Bay Area fall arts calendar is jam-packed with anniversaries, big name acts, and world premieres. KQED reporter Cy Musiker, host of "The Do-List," reveals his top picks for the best in music, dance, theatre and more.
    duration 28:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#304H] The Physics of Baseball/World's Most Powerful Microscope When it comes to curve balls and line drives, it all comes down to a physics lesson. And check out the world's most powerful microscope in Berkeley, which is seeking out images of individual atoms. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1204] Around The World - Pacific Journeys: Santiago to Pitcairn Zay Harding begins his Pacific journey in Santiago de Chile, gateway to the culturally unique Easter Island. From here he heads to Tahiti, the Polynesian paradise that enticed Louis-Antoine de Bougainville, Captain Cook and Captain Bligh and his Bounty mutineers to stay longer than planned. Zay embarks on an ocean voyage along the waters charted by these famous explorers, including a perilous crossing to Pitcairn Island, which the descendents of the Bounty mutineers call home today. duration 55:29   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Earthflight, A Nature Special Presentation [#102] Africa Fly and arrow-dive with cape gannets among sharks, dolphins, whales and the great sardine run. Soar with fish eagles, flamingoes, kelp gulls and vultures to see the most animal-packed continent with fresh eyes. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4016#] Ground Zero Supertower Nova returns to Ground Zero to witness the final chapter in an epic story of engineering, innovation, and the perseverance of the human spirit: the completion of One World Trade Center, the skyscraper rising up 104 stories and 1,776 feet from the site where the Twin Towers once stood. In this update of Nova's "Engineering Ground Zero, " which featured behind-the-scenes access to the struggles of the engineers and architects working at 1 WTC and the National September 11 Memorial and Museum, Nova goes inside the construction of the new tower's final floors and the installation of its soaring, 800-ton spire and beacon. But 1 WTC isn't the only engineering marvel taking shape here: Nova goes underground to see the construction of a multi-billion dollar transit center whose sweeping, sinuous design is said to be inspired by the shape of a bird being released from a child's hand. Will the buildings be completed on time under competing business, environmental, and safety demands? And will the final product be a fitting site for national remembrance? duration 56:46   STEREO TV14
  • 11:00 pm
    Life On Fire [#102H] Volcano Doctors Whether the Philippines, Papua New Guinea, Colombia, Chile, Italy or Iceland, each of these countries is home to active volcanoes that are a threat to the populations settled at their feet. Every day, lava, ash, gas, bombs and avalanches are likely to slide down the gaping mouths of the rock giants. To avoid disasters, volcanologists are asked to anticipate and warn. They are asked to be prophets and to know how to analyze the volcanoes' slightest tremors. Around the world, these volcano doctors use their tools and knowledge to try to protect those who live beneath the Earth's fire. duration 55:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#201] Building Babel The film follows a year in the life of Sharif El-Gamal, developer of the so-called "Ground Zero Mosque," a Muslim-led community center two blocks from the World Trade Center. With unlimited access to his home and office, the film paints a portrait of a Muslim-American businessman up against impossible odds. A passionate Brooklyn-born Muslim, Sharif El-Gamal sees Park51 as a centerpiece of his own Muslim American identity. Born of a Polish-Catholic mother and Egyptian-Muslim father, El-Gamal only turned to Islam after 9/11 shook his faith to the core, and sees Park51 as a way to give back to the Lower Manhattan community. Married to a Muslim convert and the father of two daughters, Sharif represents an Islam that remains foreign to most Americans, especially given the way the media and politicians have continued to use Park51 as a point of controversy. Despite a principle goal of helping to rebuild Lower Manhattan, opposition to the plan has been virulent and non-stop. Thousands of Americans have rallied against the prospect of a Muslim institution being constructed in such proximity to Ground Zero, and Park51 has become an internationally discussed symbol of Islam's relationship to the Western world. Building Babel follows Park51?s development through the daily experiences and struggles of the men and women trying to make it a reality. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, September 14, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too