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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, August 24, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, August 24, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10740] Syria * Hasan Verdict * Chelsea Manning * Shields and Lowry * MLK duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32188Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the CEO of Microsoft announces a surprise retirement. Will the end of the Steve Ballmer era usher in big changes at the company? And, sales of new homes plunge. Are rising mortgage rates scaring away home buyers and starting to pinch housing - a key engine of the recovery? duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2974Z] Tavis talks with Emmy-nominated actor Johnny Galecki, who reflects on his role in the hit TV show that revitalized sitcoms, The Big Bang Theory; and with steel guitarist Robert Randolph. The musician Rolling Stone lists as one of the "100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time" reflects on the making of his latest CD, "Lickety Split." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 am
    Secrets of the Dead [#1004] Slave Ship Mutiny When the Meermin set sail from Madagascar en route to South Africa on a hot summer's day in 1766, the Dutch crew had no idea they were about to make history. The ship was filled to capacity with human cargo, slaves bound for hard labor building the Dutch colony, Cape Town. But the Meermin with its crew and cargo would never make it to Cape Town. Instead, in a dramatic altercation, the slaves mutinied and managed to overpower the Dutch crew, ordering the ship be sailed back to Madagascar and freedom. But through a sinister act of deception the crew turned the boat around each evening and made full sail for Cape Town. And so the circumstances for a dramatic climax -- and shipwreck -- were laid when the ship and its desperate passengers finally spied land. This program tracks the efforts of archaeologists, historians and slave descendents to discover the full story of this dramatic historical event. They want to learn what happened on the Meermin, how the slaves were able to overpower their captors, and why the ship ended up wrecked on a wild, windswept beach 200 miles east of Cape Town. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-V (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1651] MARCH ON WASHINGTON 50TH ANNIVERSARY - August 28th marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. 's "I Have a Dream Speech." Many say King's dream is still not fully fulfilled. The Trayvon Martin case highlighted ongoing racial divides, but in some areas, the case has also been a catalyst for new discussions about race. In Sanford, Florida, where neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman shot Martin, pastors have been building relationships across racial lines. Kim Lawton looks at that effort and how, as civil rights leader Vincent Harding says, inter-racial relationships were always part of King's dream.
    MORAL MONDAYS - For the past several months, protesters in North Carolina gathered outside and inside the General Assembly in Raleigh and in other cities to object to what they felt is an extremely unjust budget and far right social agenda. As Lucky Severson reports, Moral Mondays was initiated by Pastor Richard Barber, head of the North Carolina NAACP and includes a number of clergy from different denominations who have signed a statement saying many of the new laws passed by the recently elected legislature and signed by the governor adversely affect the poor, aging and children. More demonstrations are planned for the anniversary of the March on Washington.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1009] Global Real Estate WT explores investment opportunities in global real estate. Jason Wolf of top-performing Third Avenue Real Estate Value Fund and award-winning wealth manager Gregg Fisher explain why they are buying properties overseas. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2224H] * Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer's Vogue Photo Shoot * The achievement gap between girls and boys * Behind the Headlines: The March on Washington: 50 years later
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), Former Judge and Federal Prosecutor Debra Carnahan; Fox News Political Analyst Angela McGlowan; The American Enterprise Institute's Christina Hoff Sommers.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asia Insight [#114] duration 28:03   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Life of Muhammad [#101] The Seeker Drawing on the expertise of some of the world's leading academics and commentators on Islam, the program examines Muhammad's birth and early life, his first marriage to Khadijah at the age of 25, and how he received the first of the revelations that so profoundly affected both his life and the lives of those closest to him. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Life of Muhammad [#102] The Holy Wars Omaar shines a light on key events in Muhammad's life, including the Night Journey to Jerusalem - one of the holiest cities in Islam, his escape from Mecca, the establishment of the Constitution of Medina that recognizes the rights of all people (Jews, Christians and pagan tribes) living in that city, and the 8-year war with the Meccan tribes, which some claim has led to the historic enmity between Muslim and Jewish people, while others that it is the creation of Israel and modern politics. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#233H] America's Gilded Capital Mark Leibovich covers Washington, DC, as chief national correspondent for The New York Times Magazine - and has written about the city's bipartisan lust for power, cash and notoriety in a book that everyone who's anyone in our nation's capital is talking about. The title is This Town, and if you want to know what the insiders of Washington are doing to the very notion of government of, by, and for the people, you have to read it, too. This is the story of how Washington became an occupied city, its hold on reality distorted by greed and ambition; it pulls no punches and names names, revealing the movers and shakers and the deals they make, all in the name of crony capitalism. This week, Mark Leibovich joins Bill to reveal what he has learned about a city where money rules and status is determined by who you know and what they can do for you. duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#209] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2519H] 1. Has Syria crossed the red line with chemical weapons attacks? What are President Obama's options in Syria and in Egypt?
    2. NSA spying on Americans in violation of the US constitution? The NSA says that was a mistake.
    3. Army PFC Bradley Manning sentenced to 35 years for leaking classified information.
    4. Sen. Ted Cruz. the escalating war over Obamacare and Republican threats to shut down the government.
    5. The President jawbones the nation's colleges and universities over the high cost of education.
    6. As we approach the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, the Justice Department prepares to sue Texas over voting rights.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5308H] President Obama returned from his New England vacation to a myriad of overseas and national security issues.
    In Egypt, the interim government continues its crackdown on the Muslim Brotherhood amidst the release of former President Hosni Mubarak from prison. He still faces a retrial in connection with the deaths of protestors during the Egyptian uprisings of 2011 that led to his ouster from office. How might these latest developments play as the Obama administration wrestles with whether to cut aid to the country due to the recent violence?
    In Syria, fresh reports of a chemical gas attack against civilians, allegedly by forces loyal to President Bashar al-Assad, have again put the spotlight on whether the US should intervene further.
    And a new declassified report this week revealed the National Security Agency did in fact illegally collect tens of thousands of emails from Americans as part of its national surveillance program. Will the program come under further scrutiny when Congress returns from recess next month?
    The impact of all three stories and the US government reaction is our focus this week as Gwen is joined by Tom Gjelten of NPR and Alexis Simendinger of Real Clear Politics. In addition, Michael Fletcher of The Washington Post, in a special feature for Smithsonian Magazine, takes a look back at the 1963 March on Washington. He'll recount the stories of participants and the lessons of that time fifty years ago.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2444H] August 23, 2013 OAKLAND TRIES TO EVEN THE ODDS FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN BOYS
    In a collaboration between KQED and the San Francisco Chronicle series Even Odds, we offer an in-depth look at the daunting challenges faced by African American males in Oakland, and the city's attempt to address them. 3 years ago, the Oakland Unified School District faced an alarming statistic - more than half of its African American boys would not graduate. The troubling dropout rate had many factors at play: poverty, crime, high suspension rates and rising absenteeism. The district responded by opening the Office of African American Male Achievement. Its mission is to improve academic outcomes for black boys by pairing them with black men. While race-based, community mentorship is not new, for a public school system it was controversial. The early results are encouraging, but it remains to be seen whether this novel approach will actually work. The program begins with a documentary segment, followed by a panel discussion. Host: Joshua Johnson.
    Guests: Jill Tucker, San Francisco Chronicle; Tiago Robinson, Oakland High School; Pedro Noguera, New York University.
    duration 28:48   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17235Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2224H] * Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer's Vogue Photo Shoot * The achievement gap between girls and boys * Behind the Headlines: The March on Washington: 50 years later
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), Former Judge and Federal Prosecutor Debra Carnahan; Fox News Political Analyst Angela McGlowan; The American Enterprise Institute's Christina Hoff Sommers.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3135] Topics: Martin Luther King - 50 Years On; Obama's NSA Overhaul. Panelists: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Michelle Bernard, Columnist; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#106H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#233H] America's Gilded Capital Mark Leibovich covers Washington, DC, as chief national correspondent for The New York Times Magazine - and has written about the city's bipartisan lust for power, cash and notoriety in a book that everyone who's anyone in our nation's capital is talking about. The title is This Town, and if you want to know what the insiders of Washington are doing to the very notion of government of, by, and for the people, you have to read it, too. This is the story of how Washington became an occupied city, its hold on reality distorted by greed and ambition; it pulls no punches and names names, revealing the movers and shakers and the deals they make, all in the name of crony capitalism. This week, Mark Leibovich joins Bill to reveal what he has learned about a city where money rules and status is determined by who you know and what they can do for you. duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#504H] Redwoods/Science of Chocolate Scientists climb a 320-foot redwood to predict the effects of climate change on these trees. Bay Area chocolate makers explain the elaborate engineering and chemistry behind this tasty treat duration 26:19   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#235] duration 25:40   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Life of Muhammad [#101] The Seeker Drawing on the expertise of some of the world's leading academics and commentators on Islam, the program examines Muhammad's birth and early life, his first marriage to Khadijah at the age of 25, and how he received the first of the revelations that so profoundly affected both his life and the lives of those closest to him. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 pm
    Life of Muhammad [#102] The Holy Wars Omaar shines a light on key events in Muhammad's life, including the Night Journey to Jerusalem - one of the holiest cities in Islam, his escape from Mecca, the establishment of the Constitution of Medina that recognizes the rights of all people (Jews, Christians and pagan tribes) living in that city, and the 8-year war with the Meccan tribes, which some claim has led to the historic enmity between Muslim and Jewish people, while others that it is the creation of Israel and modern politics. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    Life of Muhammad [#103H] The Holy Peace This episode focuses on key events during the later part of the Prophet's life, including the introduction of a moral code known as Sharia and the concept of Jihad. Although Muhammad pardons all his enemies and declares an amnesty at the time of his greatest triumph, he and Islam are seen today as being violent and aggressive. Holy Peace examines how Muhammad dealt with this issue during his lifetime. The program also explores Muhammad's use of marriage to build alliances, and looks at the key messages included in his final sermon. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-V
  • 5:00 pm
    Secrets of the Dead [#1102] Lost in the Amazon This program is a modern day quest to find the truth behind one of exploration's greatest mysteries: what happened to famed adventurer Col. Percy Fawcett, who went looking for a city of gold -- the Lost City of "Z" -- in the Amazon in 1925 and disappeared in the jungles of Brazil forever? New archaeological digs, the science behind the discovery of "newly found" jungle cities and clues collected over the years reveal the fate of Fawcett. The program unravels the truth of what really happened to Fawcett and shares surprising finds that are causing experts to re-think the image of a pristine uninhabited Amazon rainforest: a place that before Columbus, may have had large populations living in sophisticated towns and cities. Fawcett may have actually discovered these ruins fueling his fervor to find the city of gold. Cutting between stylized dramatic Fawcett recreations, old films and archival photos, interviews with family members of Fawcett, jungle villagers and scientists at ancient Indian archaeological sites -- the truth about Fawcett and new understandings of life in pre-Columbian America emerge. Trekking along the paths that Fawcett followed, the search for clues ends at a Xinguano-Kuikuro village in the heart of the Mato Grosso: where a new archaeological discovery may reveal the true location of the Lost City of Z. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3135] Topics: Martin Luther King - 50 Years On; Obama's NSA Overhaul. Panelists: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Michelle Bernard, Columnist; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5308H] President Obama returned from his New England vacation to a myriad of overseas and national security issues.
    In Egypt, the interim government continues its crackdown on the Muslim Brotherhood amidst the release of former President Hosni Mubarak from prison. He still faces a retrial in connection with the deaths of protestors during the Egyptian uprisings of 2011 that led to his ouster from office. How might these latest developments play as the Obama administration wrestles with whether to cut aid to the country due to the recent violence?
    In Syria, fresh reports of a chemical gas attack against civilians, allegedly by forces loyal to President Bashar al-Assad, have again put the spotlight on whether the US should intervene further.
    And a new declassified report this week revealed the National Security Agency did in fact illegally collect tens of thousands of emails from Americans as part of its national surveillance program. Will the program come under further scrutiny when Congress returns from recess next month?
    The impact of all three stories and the US government reaction is our focus this week as Gwen is joined by Tom Gjelten of NPR and Alexis Simendinger of Real Clear Politics. In addition, Michael Fletcher of The Washington Post, in a special feature for Smithsonian Magazine, takes a look back at the 1963 March on Washington. He'll recount the stories of participants and the lessons of that time fifty years ago.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2444H] August 23, 2013 OAKLAND TRIES TO EVEN THE ODDS FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN BOYS
    In a collaboration between KQED and the San Francisco Chronicle series Even Odds, we offer an in-depth look at the daunting challenges faced by African American males in Oakland, and the city's attempt to address them. 3 years ago, the Oakland Unified School District faced an alarming statistic - more than half of its African American boys would not graduate. The troubling dropout rate had many factors at play: poverty, crime, high suspension rates and rising absenteeism. The district responded by opening the Office of African American Male Achievement. Its mission is to improve academic outcomes for black boys by pairing them with black men. While race-based, community mentorship is not new, for a public school system it was controversial. The early results are encouraging, but it remains to be seen whether this novel approach will actually work. The program begins with a documentary segment, followed by a panel discussion. Host: Joshua Johnson.
    Guests: Jill Tucker, San Francisco Chronicle; Tiago Robinson, Oakland High School; Pedro Noguera, New York University.
    duration 28:48   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#504H] Redwoods/Science of Chocolate Scientists climb a 320-foot redwood to predict the effects of climate change on these trees. Bay Area chocolate makers explain the elaborate engineering and chemistry behind this tasty treat duration 26:19   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1202] Around The World - Panamericana: Conquistadors, Aztecs & Revolutions Judith Jones travels south to the lands of ancient empires. In Mexico, she explores the myths and treasures that once drew the Conquistadors to a country rich in natural resources. Following their trail, her first stop is colonial Chihuahua, where Pancho Villa started the Mexican Revolution. In Zacatecas, she visits one of Mexico's many Silver Mines and then travels along the colonial Silver Road to Mexico City, from where the Aztecs once ruled their bloodthirsty empire. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2807H] Birds of the Gods Living in the depths of the New Guinean Rainforest are birds of unimaginable color and beauty. When Europeans first saw the plumes of these fabulous creatures in the 16th century, they believed they must be from heaven and called them Birds of Paradise. The people of New Guinea make even greater claims. They say the birds possess supernatural powers and magic. But to find these birds in New Guinea is one of the toughest assignments and to witness their extraordinary mating displays is even tougher. David Attenborough introduces a young team of New Guinean scientists on a grueling expedition to find and film these Birds of Paradise; the holy grail of wildlife filmmakers. duration 55:19   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3802#] Making Stuff Stronger From carbon nanotubes to artificial skin, our world is poised at the frontier of a revolution in materials science as far-reaching as the biotech breakthroughs of the last two decades. This series explores how materials changed history and are shaping the future, ranging from cost-effective fuel cells and solar panels to quantum computers and ultra-light automobiles. The New York Times' technology correspondent and best-selling author David Pogue brings his trademark goofball humor and techie zeal to this exploration of the future of "stuff." Each episode explores the talent, luck and determination that can turn a wild idea into a cutting-edge material or high-tech breakthrough.
    This episode: What is the strongest material in the world? Is it iron? Are Kevlar and carbon nanotubes the way of the future, or will the powerful properties discovered in natural spider silk one day replace steel? Nova begins the ambitious four-hour program with a quest for the world's strongest stuff. Host David Pogue helps viewers understand what defines strength, examining everything from mollusks to a toucan's beak and testing the world's strongest materials. Pogue travels from the deck of a US naval aircraft carrier to a demolition derby to the country's top research labs to check in with the experts who are re-engineering what nature has given us to create the next generation of strong "stuff."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 11:00 pm
    Nova [#3803H] Making Stuff Smaller How small can we go? Could we one day have robots taking "fantastic voyages" in our bodies to kill rogue cells? The triumphs of tiny are seen all around us in the Information Age: transistors, microchips, laptops, cell phones. Now, David Pogue takes Nova viewers to an even smaller world in Making Stuff Smaller, examining the latest in high-powered nano-circuits and microrobots that may one day hold the key to saving lives and creating materials from the ground up, atom by atom. Pogue explores the star materials of small applications, including silicon, the stuff of computer chips, and carbon, the element now being manipulated at the atomic level to produce future technology. "Smaller" and more portable stuff has already revolutionized the way we live. The nanotechnology to come could change the face of medicine, with intelligent pills that know what medicine to release into the body and treat patients from the "inside" based on changing needs; robots that repair damaged body parts; and more. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#121] Flying: Confessions of a Free Woman| Part 1 In this two part documentary, master storyteller Jennifer Fox lays bare her own turbulent life to penetrate what it means to be a free woman today. As her drama of work and relationships unfolds over four years, our protagonist travels to over seventeen countries to understand how diverse women define their lives when there is no map. Employing an ingenious new camera technique, called "passing the camera", Fox creates a documentary language that mirrors the special way women communicate. Over intimate conversations around kitchen tables from South Africa to Russia, India and Pakistan, she initiates a groundbreaking dialogue among women, illuminating universal concerns across race, class and nationality. duration 2:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, August 24, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED all channels, planned overnight maintenance: early Fri 12/19 midnight-6am

      (this includes all DT9, DT54 and DT25 channels, along with all paid services) We will be doing upgrade and maintenance work in our Master Control area during the overnight hours of late Thurs/early Fri 12/19. Work will begin shortly after midnight early Friday, which may last until 6am, though we hope to finish earlier. This […]

    • KQED Plus OTA ? Optimistically planned maintenance: Fri 12/05 mid-morning

      (DT54.1 thru 54.5) Assuming that the weather and road conditions permit, we plan to do a bit of maintenance on our KQEH transmitter the morning of Friday 12/05… hopefully 10am-11am-ish, but could be a bit later. Most of the work should not affect the outgoing signal, but there will need to be a cable swap […]

    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too