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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, July 30, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10721H] Mid-East Talks * McCain * The Pope on Homosexuality * The Most Dangerous City in the World * American Cities duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32169Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, three multi-billion dollar mergers announced today in three different industries. Why the rush to walk down the corporate aisle now? And, have you ever signed up for a free trial and now you're being hit with unexpected fees? It's not wanted, but it's legal - and the cost is staggering. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2955] Tavis talks with former teen idol Paul Anka, who's celebrating 55 years in the music business. The singer-songwriter reflects on his remarkable longevity in show business, as detailed in his recently released memoir, My Way. duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 2:00 am
    Global Voices [#318] Carmen Meets Borat Director Mercedes Stalenhoef follows the life of 17-year-old Carmen. She lives in a gypsy village in Romania, where the men spend their days tying one on and exchanging coarse words in her father's bar. In the evenings, she watches a Spanish soap opera and dreams of a better life in Spain, where the men are romantic and decent. Her plan to emigrate falls to pieces when an American film crew descends on her village to shoot "Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan." The village is used in the movie to show where the main character comes from and Borat depicts the villagers as primitive caricatures supposedly from Kazakhstan. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#4087] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2956] Tavis talks with musician Taj Mahal - considered by many as an American blues original. The two-time Grammy winner reflects on his career longevity and latest release, the box set "Taj Mahal: The Complete Columbia Albums Collection." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Asia This Week [#317] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3130] Stalking on the Rise In Germany We'll take a look at a place where burials are done free of charge, some villages where harvesting is still carried out with an oxcart, and an island where residents are convinced they're living on holy ground. Our European Journal reporters have set out to gather stories from some of the hidden corners of the continent - and it's all here on our new summer series, "Europe on the Edge". The details:
    SERIES: EUROPE ON THE EDGE - TURKEY/POLAND: GOOD RELATIONS - Poles facing political persecution have sought refuge in Turkey for centuries. During the Crimean War in the mid-nineteenth century, Polish emigres even founded their own village there. Called Polonezkoy, it's located in a nature preserve just outside Istanbul. Even today, the village - which is called "Adampol" in Polish - features half-timbered houses, fenced-in gardens, and a Catholic church. The descendants of the original immigrants continue to uphold many of their old customs, even though they've now been Turkish citizens for three or four generations.
    BULGARIA: PATIENCE IS RUNNING OUT - Protesters in Bulgaria have been packing the streets, demanding new elections, for weeks now. Prime Minister Plamen Orescharski's government only recently took office, but its reputation is already seriously tarnished. Many in Bulgaria are fed up with ongoing corruption and nepotism at the top. Before the most recent election, Orescharski's party and the Coalition for Bulgaria had promised to raise the minimum wage and increase assistance to mothers of young children. After the election, these promises were soon rescinded. The previous government had also been toppled by protests sparked by economic issues. Bulgaria is the poorest country in the EU, and many young and educated people choosing to leave their homeland.
    GERMANY: THE PROBLEM OF STALKING - More and more people in Germany are becoming victims of stalking. Victims' associations say that today's online and communications media have only exacerbated the problem. Today, stalkers can pursue their victims by text message, Facebook and the Internet. It's estimated that around 900,000 Germans are being harassed in this way. The majority of victims are women, who are targeted mainly by acquaintances and former partners. But legal options are limited, and only a small percentage of the cases are ever brought to trial.
    ITALY: THE PLIGHT OF TOMATO FIELDWORKERS - Three euros an hour, or one euro cent per kilo - seasonal laborers on Italy's tomato fields earn meager wages. Many come from Bulgaria, Romania and Senegal - and all hope they'll see a better future. They carry out backbreaking labor under the scorching sun, live in desperate conditions, and are often mistreated by their supervisors. They don't have the money to return home, and find themselves stranded and exploited without mercy - all to keep supermarket prices at rock bottom. Many have likened the conditions of these tomato farm workers as a form of modern slavery.
    PORTUGAL: SUMMER, SUN AND TAX SAVINGS - Beautiful beaches, sunshine, and unspoiled nature draw holiday-makers to the Algarve. Now foreign pensioners will have even more reason spend their retirement years there. A government-sponsored initiative aims to encourage foreign citizens to buy a house and live in Portugal. Called "Living in Portugal", it's especially attractive for pensioners from elsewhere in Europe. Foreigners who move to Portugal and live there at least 183 days during the year pay no taxes in Portugal on foreign income. The government hopes the initiative will help support the country's ailing economy.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 am
    Story of India [#101] Beginnings Michael Wood's fascinating journey through the history of the Indian subcontinent chronicles the incredible richness and diversity of its peoples, cultures and landscapes; outlines the originality and continuing relevance of its ideas; and relates some of the most momentous and moving events in world history. Beginning with the first human migrations out of Africa, using DNA and climate science, ancient manuscripts and oral tales, Wood takes viewers from the tropical backwaters of South India to lost ancient cities in Pakistan - the scene of India's first civilization. He travels on to Turkmenistan in Central Asia, where dramatic new archaeological discoveries cast fresh light on India's deep past. Finally, Wood travels to the vibrant cities of the Ganges plain, where India's ancient myths and histories still intertwine. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Story of India [#102] The Power of Ideas Michael Wood's epic series moves into the revolutionary years after 500 BC - the Age of the Buddha. Traveling by road and rail between the ancient cities of the Ganges plain, he tells the tale of the young prince who gave up the good life and became the Buddha: "India's first and greatest protester." Then, moving by army convoy through Northern Iraq and down the Khyber Pass into Pakistan, Wood shows how Alexander the Great's invasion changed the course of India's history and inspired her first empire. He visits India's earliest capital, Patna, and using archaeology, legend and "India's Rosetta stone," explains how the ideas of the Buddha were turned into political reality by the great Indian emperor Ashoka - "one of the most remarkable figures in history" - who sowed the seeds of "history's most dangerous idea." duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 7:00 am
    Story of India [#103] Spice Routes & Silk Roads/The Growth of Civilization Michael Wood takes viewers to India in the days of the Roman Empire. In India's tropical deep south in Kerala, the spice trade opened India to the world - and gave the world a recipe for dormouse stuffed with pepper! Wood takes one of the great old sailing boats that still cross the Indian Ocean carrying pepper and cloves. He discovers the lost site of Rome's greatest trading port in India and visits the fabulous ancient city of Madurai, with its giant temple and its gold and silk bazaars that were a delight for visiting Greek traders - and still are today. Moving north, Wood takes the Silk Road from the deserts of Turkmenistan through the Khyber Pass into Pakistan to unveil the forgotten Indian empire of the Kushans, who opened up the Silk Road and built a lost Wonder of the World in the caravan city of Peshawar. "In today's world, with the Asian powers rising again," says Wood, "this time looks like the precursor - the first globalization." duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 8:00 am
    Global Voices [#318] Carmen Meets Borat Director Mercedes Stalenhoef follows the life of 17-year-old Carmen. She lives in a gypsy village in Romania, where the men spend their days tying one on and exchanging coarse words in her father's bar. In the evenings, she watches a Spanish soap opera and dreams of a better life in Spain, where the men are romantic and decent. Her plan to emigrate falls to pieces when an American film crew descends on her village to shoot "Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan." The village is used in the movie to show where the main character comes from and Borat depicts the villagers as primitive caricatures supposedly from Kazakhstan. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2956] Tavis talks with musician Taj Mahal - considered by many as an American blues original. The two-time Grammy winner reflects on his career longevity and latest release, the box set "Taj Mahal: The Complete Columbia Albums Collection." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2955] Tavis talks with former teen idol Paul Anka, who's celebrating 55 years in the music business. The singer-songwriter reflects on his remarkable longevity in show business, as detailed in his recently released memoir, My Way. duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    Asia This Week [#317] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3130] Stalking on the Rise In Germany We'll take a look at a place where burials are done free of charge, some villages where harvesting is still carried out with an oxcart, and an island where residents are convinced they're living on holy ground. Our European Journal reporters have set out to gather stories from some of the hidden corners of the continent - and it's all here on our new summer series, "Europe on the Edge". The details:
    SERIES: EUROPE ON THE EDGE - TURKEY/POLAND: GOOD RELATIONS - Poles facing political persecution have sought refuge in Turkey for centuries. During the Crimean War in the mid-nineteenth century, Polish emigres even founded their own village there. Called Polonezkoy, it's located in a nature preserve just outside Istanbul. Even today, the village - which is called "Adampol" in Polish - features half-timbered houses, fenced-in gardens, and a Catholic church. The descendants of the original immigrants continue to uphold many of their old customs, even though they've now been Turkish citizens for three or four generations.
    BULGARIA: PATIENCE IS RUNNING OUT - Protesters in Bulgaria have been packing the streets, demanding new elections, for weeks now. Prime Minister Plamen Orescharski's government only recently took office, but its reputation is already seriously tarnished. Many in Bulgaria are fed up with ongoing corruption and nepotism at the top. Before the most recent election, Orescharski's party and the Coalition for Bulgaria had promised to raise the minimum wage and increase assistance to mothers of young children. After the election, these promises were soon rescinded. The previous government had also been toppled by protests sparked by economic issues. Bulgaria is the poorest country in the EU, and many young and educated people choosing to leave their homeland.
    GERMANY: THE PROBLEM OF STALKING - More and more people in Germany are becoming victims of stalking. Victims' associations say that today's online and communications media have only exacerbated the problem. Today, stalkers can pursue their victims by text message, Facebook and the Internet. It's estimated that around 900,000 Germans are being harassed in this way. The majority of victims are women, who are targeted mainly by acquaintances and former partners. But legal options are limited, and only a small percentage of the cases are ever brought to trial.
    ITALY: THE PLIGHT OF TOMATO FIELDWORKERS - Three euros an hour, or one euro cent per kilo - seasonal laborers on Italy's tomato fields earn meager wages. Many come from Bulgaria, Romania and Senegal - and all hope they'll see a better future. They carry out backbreaking labor under the scorching sun, live in desperate conditions, and are often mistreated by their supervisors. They don't have the money to return home, and find themselves stranded and exploited without mercy - all to keep supermarket prices at rock bottom. Many have likened the conditions of these tomato farm workers as a form of modern slavery.
    PORTUGAL: SUMMER, SUN AND TAX SAVINGS - Beautiful beaches, sunshine, and unspoiled nature draw holiday-makers to the Algarve. Now foreign pensioners will have even more reason spend their retirement years there. A government-sponsored initiative aims to encourage foreign citizens to buy a house and live in Portugal. Called "Living in Portugal", it's especially attractive for pensioners from elsewhere in Europe. Foreigners who move to Portugal and live there at least 183 days during the year pay no taxes in Portugal on foreign income. The government hopes the initiative will help support the country's ailing economy.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 am
    Story of India [#101] Beginnings Michael Wood's fascinating journey through the history of the Indian subcontinent chronicles the incredible richness and diversity of its peoples, cultures and landscapes; outlines the originality and continuing relevance of its ideas; and relates some of the most momentous and moving events in world history. Beginning with the first human migrations out of Africa, using DNA and climate science, ancient manuscripts and oral tales, Wood takes viewers from the tropical backwaters of South India to lost ancient cities in Pakistan - the scene of India's first civilization. He travels on to Turkmenistan in Central Asia, where dramatic new archaeological discoveries cast fresh light on India's deep past. Finally, Wood travels to the vibrant cities of the Ganges plain, where India's ancient myths and histories still intertwine. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Story of India [#102] The Power of Ideas Michael Wood's epic series moves into the revolutionary years after 500 BC - the Age of the Buddha. Traveling by road and rail between the ancient cities of the Ganges plain, he tells the tale of the young prince who gave up the good life and became the Buddha: "India's first and greatest protester." Then, moving by army convoy through Northern Iraq and down the Khyber Pass into Pakistan, Wood shows how Alexander the Great's invasion changed the course of India's history and inspired her first empire. He visits India's earliest capital, Patna, and using archaeology, legend and "India's Rosetta stone," explains how the ideas of the Buddha were turned into political reality by the great Indian emperor Ashoka - "one of the most remarkable figures in history" - who sowed the seeds of "history's most dangerous idea." duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 1:00 pm
    Story of India [#103] Spice Routes & Silk Roads/The Growth of Civilization Michael Wood takes viewers to India in the days of the Roman Empire. In India's tropical deep south in Kerala, the spice trade opened India to the world - and gave the world a recipe for dormouse stuffed with pepper! Wood takes one of the great old sailing boats that still cross the Indian Ocean carrying pepper and cloves. He discovers the lost site of Rome's greatest trading port in India and visits the fabulous ancient city of Madurai, with its giant temple and its gold and silk bazaars that were a delight for visiting Greek traders - and still are today. Moving north, Wood takes the Silk Road from the deserts of Turkmenistan through the Khyber Pass into Pakistan to unveil the forgotten Indian empire of the Kushans, who opened up the Silk Road and built a lost Wonder of the World in the caravan city of Peshawar. "In today's world, with the Asian powers rising again," says Wood, "this time looks like the precursor - the first globalization." duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#4087] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#9151] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2956] Tavis talks with musician Taj Mahal - considered by many as an American blues original. The two-time Grammy winner reflects on his career longevity and latest release, the box set "Taj Mahal: The Complete Columbia Albums Collection." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32170] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, what's behind the surge in home prices, which just posted their biggest annual gain in seven years? And, who pays for college? It's not mom and dad. They're paying less these days, shifting more of the financial burden to the student. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10722] Bradley Manning * Cancer Studies * Military Sexual Assaults * Honduras * Assisted Living duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32170] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, what's behind the surge in home prices, which just posted their biggest annual gain in seven years? And, who pays for college? It's not mom and dad. They're paying less these days, shifting more of the financial burden to the student. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#3002] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#4087] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3392] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10722] Bradley Manning * Cancer Studies * Military Sexual Assaults * Honduras * Assisted Living duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3392] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#19157] (original broadcast date: 7/30/13)
    * Coverage of the Bradley Manning trial with General Michael Hayden, former director of the NSA and the CIA and principal with the Chertoff Group; Phil Mudd, former deputy director of National Security at the FBI and the Counterterrorist Center of the CIA ; Amy Davidson of the New Yorker ; and Yochai Benkler of Harvard Law School
    * Michael R. Gordon of the New York Times; Bobby Ghosh of Time magazine and Michael Hanna, senior fellow at the Century Foundation on the turmoil in Egypt
    duration 56:47   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3392] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2957] Tavis talks with Mary Williams, author of The Last Daughter, and her mother, Hollywood icon - and 2013 Emmy nominee - Jane Fonda. The writer and her Oscar-winning actress-mom describe how an encounter at a summer camp many years ago transformed both their lives forever. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#810H] Seattle, WA / Santa Fe, NM While in Seattle, WA, the team connects with Miss Indigo Blue, a renowned burlesque instructor and performer, and discovers why she decided to take up the bold art form. Her story particularly intrigues Carolyn who finds Miss Indigo Blue's confidence and fearlessness desirable. In Santa Fe, NM, the Roadtrippers link up with Kenny Ausubel and Nina Simons, co-founders of Bioneers, an organization that brings scientific innovators together to promote social and environmental change. Their story of risk-taking resonates with Sarah who realizes that maybe she "doesn't have to play it so safe." duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3392] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10722] Bradley Manning * Cancer Studies * Military Sexual Assaults * Honduras * Assisted Living duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#3002] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10722] Bradley Manning * Cancer Studies * Military Sexual Assaults * Honduras * Assisted Living duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
Tuesday, July 30, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED all channels, planned overnight maintenance: early Fri 12/19 midnight-6am

      (this includes all DT9, DT54 and DT25 channels, along with all paid services) We will be doing upgrade and maintenance work in our Master Control area during the overnight hours of late Thurs/early Fri 12/19. Work will begin shortly after midnight early Friday, which may last until 6am, though we hope to finish earlier. This […]

    • KQED Plus OTA ? Optimistically planned maintenance: Fri 12/05 mid-morning

      (DT54.1 thru 54.5) Assuming that the weather and road conditions permit, we plan to do a bit of maintenance on our KQEH transmitter the morning of Friday 12/05… hopefully 10am-11am-ish, but could be a bit later. Most of the work should not affect the outgoing signal, but there will need to be a cable swap […]

    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too