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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, July 28, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, July 28, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#117] New Muslim Cool Puerto Rican-American rapper Hamza P?rez pulled himself out of drug dealing and street life 12 years ago and became a Muslim. Now he's moved to Pittsburgh's tough North Side to start a new religious community, rebuild his shattered family and take his message of faith to other young people through hard-hitting hip-hop music. But when the FBI raids his mosque, Hamza must confront the realities of the post-9/11 world, and himself. New Muslim Cool takes viewers on Hamza's ride through streets, slums and jail cells; following his spiritual journey to some surprising places in an America that never stops changing. Produced in association with Latino Public Broadcasting (LPB) and the Center for Asian American Media (CAAM). duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Global Voices [#422] A Son's Sacrifice Imran, a young Muslim American, struggles to take over his father's neighborhood halal slaughterhouse in New York City. duration 25:17   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Intelligence Squared U.S. [#105] Should Genetically Engineered Babies Be Prohibited? Imagine a world free of genetic diseases, where parents control their offspring's height, eye color and intelligence. The science may be closer than you think. Genes interact in ways that we don't fully understand and there could be unintended consequences, new diseases that result from our tinkering. But even if the science could be perfected, is it morally wrong? Would it lead to eugenics and a stratified society where only the rich enjoy the benefits of genetic enhancement? Or would the real injustice be depriving our children of every scientifically possible opportunity? duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#229H] John Lewis Marches On This week, two icons of the 60's civil rights era - Bill Moyers and Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) - meet to share experiences and revelations about the momentous March on Washington which they both attended 50 years ago.
    Their discussion takes them to the spot in front of the Lincoln Memorial where Lewis, Martin Luther King, Jr., Bayard Rustin, Roy Wilkins, and others famously spoke about freedom and justice, creating critical momentum for both the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act. While there, Moyers and Lewis attract the attention of schoolchildren, and conduct a spontaneous living history lesson.
    The March on Washington is largely remembered for King's "I Have a Dream" speech. The 23-year-old Lewis, newly named to lead the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, was the youngest of the featured speakers, but among the most defiant.
    Now a 14-term congressman from Georgia, Lewis shares new insight into how the event unfolded - including last-minute conflicts over his own manuscript. He also discusses the continuing challenges to racial and economic equality, and his unwavering dedication to nonviolence and brotherly love as a means toward a more just end - even when facing inevitable violence and brutality.
    "To look out and see the best of America convinced me more than anything else that this is the product, this is the work of the movement," Lewis tells Moyers. "Sometimes you have to not just dream about what could be - you get out and push and you pull and you preach. And you create a climate and environment to get those in high places, to get men and women of good will in power to act."
    Threading rarely-seen documentary footage into their conversation, Moyers - who was deputy director of the newly-created Peace Corps at the time - also shares his own memories of the day. He concludes with an essay about how the pursuit of equal rights and opportunities for all Americans - so championed at the March on Washington - continues to be thwarted.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5304H] * President Obama appears to be gearing up for yet another showdown with Congress over the federal budget. In a series of small town speeches this week, President Obama pledged to focus the rest of his time in office on helping working-class Americans. He defended his domestic policy agenda and accused Republicans of trying to undermine his efforts to bolster the economy with an "endless parade of distractions, political posturing and phony scandals." House Speaker John Boehner pushed back saying the White House wasn't offering any new ideas and that the president's speeches were "more sizzle than steak." John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times will report on the battles that are brewing and how Americans have soured on Washington.
    * Last month the Supreme Court struck down a key part of the landmark Voting Rights Act aimed at preventing voter discrimination. Today, Attorney General Eric Holder reasserted the Justice Department's role in policing voting laws by asking a federal court in Texas to force that state to get pre-approval before making any redistricting changes. Republican Texas Governor Rick Perry said the move showed "utter contempt for the Constitution." Carrie Johnson of NPR will look at the other states where the Justice Department plans to take similar action to protect voters' rights.
    * Edward Snowden, the man who leaked top secret information on US surveillance practices, may be leaving the Moscow airport where he's been living for the past month. He's applied for political asylum in Russia to avoid facing espionage charges in the US. Martha Raddatz of ABC News will have the latest on American concerns about the intelligence Snowden still has in his possession and the growing wedge in US-Russian relations in wake of this international situation.
    * Plus, Molly Ball of The Atlantic will take a closer look at Anthony Weiner's bid to be mayor of New York after admitting he was involved in inappropriate online relationships with multiple women since resigning in disgrace from Congress, and how his wife has chosen to come to his defense.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3131] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#102H] Charlie recaps the major events of the week and sheds new light on the stories and ideas that shape our world. Joining him: Mike Allen, David Leonhardt, Cate Blanchett, and more. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2515H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#117] New Muslim Cool Puerto Rican-American rapper Hamza P?rez pulled himself out of drug dealing and street life 12 years ago and became a Muslim. Now he's moved to Pittsburgh's tough North Side to start a new religious community, rebuild his shattered family and take his message of faith to other young people through hard-hitting hip-hop music. But when the FBI raids his mosque, Hamza must confront the realities of the post-9/11 world, and himself. New Muslim Cool takes viewers on Hamza's ride through streets, slums and jail cells; following his spiritual journey to some surprising places in an America that never stops changing. Produced in association with Latino Public Broadcasting (LPB) and the Center for Asian American Media (CAAM). duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Hawaii: Roots of Fire This documentary goes down below the Hawaiian Islands in a search for the hidden forces that drive the planet's largest and most active volcanic system. It follows earth scientists as they work among the volcanoes of the Big Island of Hawaii, pursuing clues and compiling evidence in a quest to shed new light on the mysterious inner Earth process that has been producing giant volcanoes in the middle of the Pacific Ocean for more than 75 million years.
    Scientists have long been puzzled over the source of the huge quantities of lava erupting out of Hawaii's massive volcanoes. Does the lava come from just below the Earth's crust? Or does it come from much deeper, perhaps even as far down as the Earth's core, some 1800 miles below the surface? The film focuses on an international team of scientists who boldly take on these key questions with a major drilling project into the flanks of Mauna Kea, Hawaii's tallest volcano. As their work progresses, another group of scientists embarks on a huge seismic study that deploys instruments on the islands and the seafloor surrounding them. After years of painstaking research, startling new discoveries are made. Not only do the scientists determine where the lava is coming from, but they solve other long-standing mysteries about the workings of Hawaii's magnificent volcanoes.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1647] AMERICA'S RESILIENT SIKHS - One year after the mass shooting of Sikh worshippers in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, Sikh leaders tell Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly's Managing Editor Kim Lawton that their community has become stronger since the attack, with more optimism and hope. Sikh leaders are campaigning nationally to get more protection from hate crimes and racial profiling. They are also lobbying for Pentagon permission for Sikhs in the military to wear their traditional turbans and unshorn hair.
    THE CONTEMPORARY ART OF TOBI KAHN - At his studio in Long Island City, Kahn creates a vast variety of modern artwork ? glazed wooden boxes, synagogue murals, small flowers and huge installations ? all with an awareness of the spiritual dimension of his work. And, as Kahn told correspondent Bob Faw, he has found that his work can bring peace to those at the end of their lives.
    POPE FRANCIS'S TRIP TO BRAZIL - Pope Francis traveled to Brazil for World Youth Day this week, his first international trip since becoming pope in March. How did his message of poverty and humility resonate with Catholics there and what challenges did he face in the Catholic country that is now experiencing an increase of evangelicals? Host Bob Abernethy speaks with Father Tom Reese, senior analyst for the National Catholic Reporter.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1005] The New Retirement Conversation This week: WT guides you through the new retirement conversation. With traditional pension funds rapidly disappearing, what are the new building blocks for a secure retirement? Personal finance experts Mary Beth Franklin and Kim Lankford discuss the essentials and explain why insurance could become the next big retirement tool. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#226H] Sylvia Johnson tells Ric Edelman how she managed to keep her business growing through a recession. Plus, Ric reveals why most economists are idiots and discusses the continuing issues of racism in the world of business with restaurateur B. Smith. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2515H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3131] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5304H] * President Obama appears to be gearing up for yet another showdown with Congress over the federal budget. In a series of small town speeches this week, President Obama pledged to focus the rest of his time in office on helping working-class Americans. He defended his domestic policy agenda and accused Republicans of trying to undermine his efforts to bolster the economy with an "endless parade of distractions, political posturing and phony scandals." House Speaker John Boehner pushed back saying the White House wasn't offering any new ideas and that the president's speeches were "more sizzle than steak." John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times will report on the battles that are brewing and how Americans have soured on Washington.
    * Last month the Supreme Court struck down a key part of the landmark Voting Rights Act aimed at preventing voter discrimination. Today, Attorney General Eric Holder reasserted the Justice Department's role in policing voting laws by asking a federal court in Texas to force that state to get pre-approval before making any redistricting changes. Republican Texas Governor Rick Perry said the move showed "utter contempt for the Constitution." Carrie Johnson of NPR will look at the other states where the Justice Department plans to take similar action to protect voters' rights.
    * Edward Snowden, the man who leaked top secret information on US surveillance practices, may be leaving the Moscow airport where he's been living for the past month. He's applied for political asylum in Russia to avoid facing espionage charges in the US. Martha Raddatz of ABC News will have the latest on American concerns about the intelligence Snowden still has in his possession and the growing wedge in US-Russian relations in wake of this international situation.
    * Plus, Molly Ball of The Atlantic will take a closer look at Anthony Weiner's bid to be mayor of New York after admitting he was involved in inappropriate online relationships with multiple women since resigning in disgrace from Congress, and how his wife has chosen to come to his defense.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    Life After War: California Veterans KQED / Center for Investigative Journalism Special An in-depth look at some of the challenges faced by members of the armed forces when they return home from serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. The program goes from Los Angeles' Skid Row, where women vets struggle with homelessness in the transition to civilian life, to San Francisco, where veterans suffering from Military Sexual Trauma can seek treatment at the VA Medical Center. Also, an innovative program at City College of San Francisco helps veterans succeed when they go back to school. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#229H] John Lewis Marches On This week, two icons of the 60's civil rights era - Bill Moyers and Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) - meet to share experiences and revelations about the momentous March on Washington which they both attended 50 years ago.
    Their discussion takes them to the spot in front of the Lincoln Memorial where Lewis, Martin Luther King, Jr., Bayard Rustin, Roy Wilkins, and others famously spoke about freedom and justice, creating critical momentum for both the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act. While there, Moyers and Lewis attract the attention of schoolchildren, and conduct a spontaneous living history lesson.
    The March on Washington is largely remembered for King's "I Have a Dream" speech. The 23-year-old Lewis, newly named to lead the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, was the youngest of the featured speakers, but among the most defiant.
    Now a 14-term congressman from Georgia, Lewis shares new insight into how the event unfolded - including last-minute conflicts over his own manuscript. He also discusses the continuing challenges to racial and economic equality, and his unwavering dedication to nonviolence and brotherly love as a means toward a more just end - even when facing inevitable violence and brutality.
    "To look out and see the best of America convinced me more than anything else that this is the product, this is the work of the movement," Lewis tells Moyers. "Sometimes you have to not just dream about what could be - you get out and push and you pull and you preach. And you create a climate and environment to get those in high places, to get men and women of good will in power to act."
    Threading rarely-seen documentary footage into their conversation, Moyers - who was deputy director of the newly-created Peace Corps at the time - also shares his own memories of the day. He concludes with an essay about how the pursuit of equal rights and opportunities for all Americans - so championed at the March on Washington - continues to be thwarted.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    Inside Washington [#2515H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3131] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2220H] Efforts to save the lives of women and children by increasing access to maternal and child care. This special documentary includes interviews with Melinda Gates, Co-founder of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation; Global Health Corps CEO Barbara Bush; Population Services International Global Ambassador Mandy Moore; and many more women on their work. (repeat) duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 pm
    LinkAsia [#152] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:30 pm
    Hawaii: Roots of Fire This documentary goes down below the Hawaiian Islands in a search for the hidden forces that drive the planet's largest and most active volcanic system. It follows earth scientists as they work among the volcanoes of the Big Island of Hawaii, pursuing clues and compiling evidence in a quest to shed new light on the mysterious inner Earth process that has been producing giant volcanoes in the middle of the Pacific Ocean for more than 75 million years.
    Scientists have long been puzzled over the source of the huge quantities of lava erupting out of Hawaii's massive volcanoes. Does the lava come from just below the Earth's crust? Or does it come from much deeper, perhaps even as far down as the Earth's core, some 1800 miles below the surface? The film focuses on an international team of scientists who boldly take on these key questions with a major drilling project into the flanks of Mauna Kea, Hawaii's tallest volcano. As their work progresses, another group of scientists embarks on a huge seismic study that deploys instruments on the islands and the seafloor surrounding them. After years of painstaking research, startling new discoveries are made. Not only do the scientists determine where the lava is coming from, but they solve other long-standing mysteries about the workings of Hawaii's magnificent volcanoes.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#102H] Charlie recaps the major events of the week and sheds new light on the stories and ideas that shape our world. Joining him: Mike Allen, David Leonhardt, Cate Blanchett, and more. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 pm
    Moyers & Company [#229H] John Lewis Marches On This week, two icons of the 60's civil rights era - Bill Moyers and Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) - meet to share experiences and revelations about the momentous March on Washington which they both attended 50 years ago.
    Their discussion takes them to the spot in front of the Lincoln Memorial where Lewis, Martin Luther King, Jr., Bayard Rustin, Roy Wilkins, and others famously spoke about freedom and justice, creating critical momentum for both the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act. While there, Moyers and Lewis attract the attention of schoolchildren, and conduct a spontaneous living history lesson.
    The March on Washington is largely remembered for King's "I Have a Dream" speech. The 23-year-old Lewis, newly named to lead the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, was the youngest of the featured speakers, but among the most defiant.
    Now a 14-term congressman from Georgia, Lewis shares new insight into how the event unfolded - including last-minute conflicts over his own manuscript. He also discusses the continuing challenges to racial and economic equality, and his unwavering dedication to nonviolence and brotherly love as a means toward a more just end - even when facing inevitable violence and brutality.
    "To look out and see the best of America convinced me more than anything else that this is the product, this is the work of the movement," Lewis tells Moyers. "Sometimes you have to not just dream about what could be - you get out and push and you pull and you preach. And you create a climate and environment to get those in high places, to get men and women of good will in power to act."
    Threading rarely-seen documentary footage into their conversation, Moyers - who was deputy director of the newly-created Peace Corps at the time - also shares his own memories of the day. He concludes with an essay about how the pursuit of equal rights and opportunities for all Americans - so championed at the March on Washington - continues to be thwarted.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5304H] * President Obama appears to be gearing up for yet another showdown with Congress over the federal budget. In a series of small town speeches this week, President Obama pledged to focus the rest of his time in office on helping working-class Americans. He defended his domestic policy agenda and accused Republicans of trying to undermine his efforts to bolster the economy with an "endless parade of distractions, political posturing and phony scandals." House Speaker John Boehner pushed back saying the White House wasn't offering any new ideas and that the president's speeches were "more sizzle than steak." John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times will report on the battles that are brewing and how Americans have soured on Washington.
    * Last month the Supreme Court struck down a key part of the landmark Voting Rights Act aimed at preventing voter discrimination. Today, Attorney General Eric Holder reasserted the Justice Department's role in policing voting laws by asking a federal court in Texas to force that state to get pre-approval before making any redistricting changes. Republican Texas Governor Rick Perry said the move showed "utter contempt for the Constitution." Carrie Johnson of NPR will look at the other states where the Justice Department plans to take similar action to protect voters' rights.
    * Edward Snowden, the man who leaked top secret information on US surveillance practices, may be leaving the Moscow airport where he's been living for the past month. He's applied for political asylum in Russia to avoid facing espionage charges in the US. Martha Raddatz of ABC News will have the latest on American concerns about the intelligence Snowden still has in his possession and the growing wedge in US-Russian relations in wake of this international situation.
    * Plus, Molly Ball of The Atlantic will take a closer look at Anthony Weiner's bid to be mayor of New York after admitting he was involved in inappropriate online relationships with multiple women since resigning in disgrace from Congress, and how his wife has chosen to come to his defense.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Inside Washington [#2515H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3131] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    Life After War: California Veterans KQED / Center for Investigative Journalism Special An in-depth look at some of the challenges faced by members of the armed forces when they return home from serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. The program goes from Los Angeles' Skid Row, where women vets struggle with homelessness in the transition to civilian life, to San Francisco, where veterans suffering from Military Sexual Trauma can seek treatment at the VA Medical Center. Also, an innovative program at City College of San Francisco helps veterans succeed when they go back to school. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 6:30 pm
    Hawaii: Roots of Fire This documentary goes down below the Hawaiian Islands in a search for the hidden forces that drive the planet's largest and most active volcanic system. It follows earth scientists as they work among the volcanoes of the Big Island of Hawaii, pursuing clues and compiling evidence in a quest to shed new light on the mysterious inner Earth process that has been producing giant volcanoes in the middle of the Pacific Ocean for more than 75 million years.
    Scientists have long been puzzled over the source of the huge quantities of lava erupting out of Hawaii's massive volcanoes. Does the lava come from just below the Earth's crust? Or does it come from much deeper, perhaps even as far down as the Earth's core, some 1800 miles below the surface? The film focuses on an international team of scientists who boldly take on these key questions with a major drilling project into the flanks of Mauna Kea, Hawaii's tallest volcano. As their work progresses, another group of scientists embarks on a huge seismic study that deploys instruments on the islands and the seafloor surrounding them. After years of painstaking research, startling new discoveries are made. Not only do the scientists determine where the lava is coming from, but they solve other long-standing mysteries about the workings of Hawaii's magnificent volcanoes.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 pm
    Revolutionaries [#207H] Transforming Music Meet musician and inventor Tod Machover, the creator of technologies behind "Guitar Hero" and "Rock Band." Computer History Museum's John Hollar speaks to the influential composer, whose work has been performed internationally, about the future of digital music and his research as the professor of music and media at MIT Media Lab, where he directs the Opera of the Future group. duration 53:15   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#229H] John Lewis Marches On This week, two icons of the 60's civil rights era - Bill Moyers and Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) - meet to share experiences and revelations about the momentous March on Washington which they both attended 50 years ago.
    Their discussion takes them to the spot in front of the Lincoln Memorial where Lewis, Martin Luther King, Jr., Bayard Rustin, Roy Wilkins, and others famously spoke about freedom and justice, creating critical momentum for both the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act. While there, Moyers and Lewis attract the attention of schoolchildren, and conduct a spontaneous living history lesson.
    The March on Washington is largely remembered for King's "I Have a Dream" speech. The 23-year-old Lewis, newly named to lead the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, was the youngest of the featured speakers, but among the most defiant.
    Now a 14-term congressman from Georgia, Lewis shares new insight into how the event unfolded - including last-minute conflicts over his own manuscript. He also discusses the continuing challenges to racial and economic equality, and his unwavering dedication to nonviolence and brotherly love as a means toward a more just end - even when facing inevitable violence and brutality.
    "To look out and see the best of America convinced me more than anything else that this is the product, this is the work of the movement," Lewis tells Moyers. "Sometimes you have to not just dream about what could be - you get out and push and you pull and you preach. And you create a climate and environment to get those in high places, to get men and women of good will in power to act."
    Threading rarely-seen documentary footage into their conversation, Moyers - who was deputy director of the newly-created Peace Corps at the time - also shares his own memories of the day. He concludes with an essay about how the pursuit of equal rights and opportunities for all Americans - so championed at the March on Washington - continues to be thwarted.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    America Reframed [#125] Big Enough In this intimate portrait, several dwarfs who appeared in Jan Krawitz and Thomas Ott's 1982 film Little People welcome the camera into their lives once again. Through a prism of "then and now," the characters in the film confront physical and emotional challenges with humor, grace, and sometimes, frustration. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 pm
    Last Harvest: The Yemenis of the San Joaquin This program explores the lives and times of Muslim immigrants from Yemen who settled in California's San Joaquin Valley. Yemeni migrant workers started coming to the US in the post-1965 era when the new immigration law opened the gates to non-Europeans. While most settled in the Detroit area, a small band of villagers from the mountainous Ibb region found work in the San Joaquin Valley where they tended the vineyards that produce a yearly bounty of internationally renowned table grapes. At the peak of the sojourn migration, some 5000 Yemenis were employed in the fields. Today only several hundred remain. This is their story. duration 22:28   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#318] Carmen Meets Borat Director Mercedes Stalenhoef follows the life of 17-year-old Carmen. She lives in a gypsy village in Romania, where the men spend their days tying one on and exchanging coarse words in her father's bar. In the evenings, she watches a Spanish soap opera and dreams of a better life in Spain, where the men are romantic and decent. Her plan to emigrate falls to pieces when an American film crew descends on her village to shoot "Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan." The village is used in the movie to show where the main character comes from and Borat depicts the villagers as primitive caricatures supposedly from Kazakhstan. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Global Voices [#122] Overbooked Sergio, a middle-aged Italian, and Youssef, from Morocco, work in a tiny office in Turin managing the weekly bus to the Magreb. Originally just a smart business idea, the agency is now much more than that. Documenting an odd pair in the middle of a changing world, "Overbooked" takes viewers into the chaotic, funny and sometimes tragic moments of the agency. duration 54:29   STEREO TVG
Sunday, July 28, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED DT9s Over the Air: beginning Wed 7/09

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) The PSIP Info part of our Over the Air (OTA) signal for KQED DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3 dropped out of our overall signal early Wednesday 7/09. Once PSIP was restored most OTA receivers moved our signal back to the correct channel locations. However, for some viewers, it appears as if they have lost […]

    • KQED FM 88.1 translator off air Tues 6/03

      The Martinez translator for KQED-FM will be off the air all day Tuesday June 3rd. We are rebuilding the 25 year old site with all new antennas and cabling. This should only affect people listening on 88.1MHz in the Martinez/Benicia area.

    • KQET planned overnight outage: early Tues 5/13

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET’s Over The Air (OTA) signal will shut down late May 12/early Tues 5/13 shortly after midnight to allow for extensive electrical maintenance work at the transmitter. Engineers will do their best to complete the work by 6am Tuesday morning. This will affect OTA viewers of the DT25 channels, and signal providers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too