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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus. Read more about this transition on our FAQ page.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, June 30, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, June 30, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#103] La Americana When nine-year-old Carla suffers a life-threatening accident, her mother, Carmen, must leave her behind and make the dangerous and illegal journey from Bolivia to the U.S., where she hopes to earn enough to save her daughter's life. Working in New York to support Carla's medical needs, Carmen struggles in vain to legalize her immigration status, and wrestles with the prospect of never seeing her daughter again. Then, after six years of separation, Congress proposes "amnesty" legislation that could allow Carmen and Carla to be reunited at last. Filmed across three countries in a captivating cinematic narrative, LA AMERICANA is Carmen's story, and the story of millions of illegal immigrants who must leave their families behind to pursue the elusive American dream. duration 1:29:07   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Serving America: Memories of Peace Corps This program highlights the experiences of some of the nearly 3000 volunteers who served during the early years of the Peace Corps. A mix of archival film and photographs, along with personal stories from former volunteers, tells a story of service and idealism. Interviews convey the volunteers' passion, commitment and bravery as they lived and worked in developing countries, including South and Central America, Africa and the Middle East. From almost fatal obstacles to spiritual epiphanies, these men and women describe their transformative experiences. Donna Shalala, former US Secretary of Health and Human Services (1993-2001), recounts the adventure of serving in Iran between 1962 and 1964. "What the Peace Corps really did is make me a citizen of the world," says Shalala. duration 26:44   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#217] Teaching Math to the Core Teaching Math to the Core: Math Common Core State Standards emphasize analysis and problem solving: the how and why of every answer. We'll follow four phenomenal math teachers as they clearly show us how the Common Core can be implemented in classrooms. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#225H] The Faces of America's Hungry * Here in the richest country on earth, 50 million of us - 1 in 6 Americans - go hungry. More than a third of them are children. And yet Congress can't pass a Farm Bill because our representatives continue to fight over how many billions to slash from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, better known as food stamps. The debate is filled with tired cliches about freeloaders undeserving of government help, living large at the expense of honest, hardworking taxpayers. But a new documentary, A Place at the Table, paints a truer picture of America's poor.
    This week Kristi Jacobson, one of the film's directors and producers, and Mariana Chilton, director of the Center for Hunger-Free Communities, join Bill to break these stereotypes apart and share how hunger hits hard at people from every walk of life. The story of American families facing food insecurity is as frustrating as it is heartbreaking, because the truth is as avoidable as it is tragic.
    "If we could think about poverty during childhood as a type of a disease, if we could pay as much attention to poverty for children as we pay attention to infectious disease, we might be able to do something in this country," Chilton explains to Bill.
    * Also, on the program, journalist Greg Kaufmann - who's dedicated himself to the beat of poverty, food and politics - talks about the need to meet and accurately understand Americans in poverty to truly help them. A frequent contributor for The Nation, Kaufmann claims that the poor have been stereotyped and demonized in an effort to justify huge cuts in food stamps and other programs low-income Americans rely on to survive.
    "People are working and they're not getting paid enough to feed their families, pay their utilities, pay for their housing, pay for the healthcare," Kaufmann tells Bill. "50% of the jobs in this country pay less than $34,000 a year. 25% pay less than the poverty line for a family of 4 - which is $23,000 a year. So if you're not paying people enough to pay for the basics, they're going to need help getting food."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5252] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3127] Topics: Supremes Rule on Gay Marriage; Obama in Africa. Panelists: Michelle Bernard, Author; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Need To Know [#326H] JEFF GREENFIELD ANCHORS. On the second of two inauguration specials examining the advocacy group "Common Good's" proposals to end bureaucratic gridlock and get the United States moving forward, Need to Know anchor Jeff Greenfield explores how malpractice lawsuits contribute to rising healthcare costs. Correspondent William Brangham travels to Denmark, where medical disputes are settled by experts without ever going to court. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2511H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#103] La Americana When nine-year-old Carla suffers a life-threatening accident, her mother, Carmen, must leave her behind and make the dangerous and illegal journey from Bolivia to the U.S., where she hopes to earn enough to save her daughter's life. Working in New York to support Carla's medical needs, Carmen struggles in vain to legalize her immigration status, and wrestles with the prospect of never seeing her daughter again. Then, after six years of separation, Congress proposes "amnesty" legislation that could allow Carmen and Carla to be reunited at last. Filmed across three countries in a captivating cinematic narrative, LA AMERICANA is Carmen's story, and the story of millions of illegal immigrants who must leave their families behind to pursue the elusive American dream. duration 1:29:07   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    QUEST [#602H] Pump It Up: Heart Health Special Report Investigate the number one cause of death in America, heart disease, which kills close to 600,000 people each year - more than die from cancer, car accidents or AIDS. Meet a teenager trying to lower her risk; a heart attack patient and the team that saved her life, and a researcher working to one day rebuild a damaged heart from the inside out. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1643] SUPREME COURT DECISIONS - Tim O'Brien analyzes the important Supreme Court decisions on gay marriage, voting rights and affirmative action that came down earlier this week.
    DECISION REACTION -Managing editor Kim Lawton reports on the widespread religious reaction to the Supreme Court decision on same-sex marriage.
    DECISION ANALYSIS - Host Bob Abernethy discusses the Supreme Court decisions, their import, reaction to them and what it means for those affected, with Kim Lawton and Tim O'Brien.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1001] Women, Investing & Retirement, Part 1 In part one of Consuelo Mack WealthTrack's two-part series on women, investing and retirement, Morgan Stanley's award-winning financial advisor Ami Forte and GenSpring's Senior Strategist Jewelle Bickford discuss why the traditional financial planning approach doesn't work for women. duration 27:26   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#222H] Ever wanted to bottle your own wine? Ric Edelman tells you what it's going to cost and then answers questions on US Savings Bonds, financial pitfalls for young adults and visits Sesame Street for a discussion of how to teach kids about money with the irrepressible Elmo. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2511H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3127] Topics: Supremes Rule on Gay Marriage; Obama in Africa. Panelists: Michelle Bernard, Author; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week [#5252H] A number of blockbuster decisions were handed down by the Supreme Court this week dealing with same-sex marriage and voting rights. But the justices held off on ruling on the validity of affirmative action in school admissions by sending that case back to the lower courts. < br />In two landmark decisions, the high court struck down part of the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) and refused to reinstate a ban on same-sex marriages in California. The decisions appear to have laid the legal groundwork for future cases challenging state laws banning gay marriage but neither decision addressed whether same-sex marriage is a fundamental right under the US Constitution. While supporters of gay rights are celebrating, opponents vow to continue their fight to preserve traditional marriage.
    Earlier in the week, the sharply divided Supreme Court struck down a key provision of the historic 1965 Voting Rights Act that requires states and local districts with a history of discrimination to get federal approval to change voting laws. In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court ruled the formula to determine which places need monitoring is out of date and ruled that Congress needs to revise the provision.
    And in a decision about affirmative action, the high court questioned whether race should be a determinant in deciding college admissions at the University of Texas. The court sent the case to the lower court for further review saying that school needs to show that there are, "no workable race-neutral alternatives."
    Joining Gwen Ifill to discuss the legal and policy implications as well as the political fallout from this week's Supreme Court decisions: Pete Williams of NBC News, Joan Biskupic of Reuters, Dan Balz of The Washington Post, and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2435H] June 28, 2013 Guest Host: Scott Shafer.
    News Panel:
    GAY MARRIAGE VICTORIES - Gay rights advocates celebrated historic victories this week when the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act and also upheld a lower court ruling finding California's ban on same-sex marriage unconstitutional. The two rulings will have major legal ramifications at both the federal and state level. What do the court's decisions mean and when will gay couples be allowed to legally marry in California? Also, how do the SCOTUS rulings on affirmative action and voting rights impact California?
    PRESIDENT OBAMA'S CLIMATE PLAN - President Obama this week called for sweeping executive action to combat the effects of climate change before a cheering crowd of environmentalists in Washington, D.C. One major proposal is modeled after California's ambitious climate change goals and pushes for a national cap-and-trade bill. Other initiatives include eliminating tax loopholes for big oil and creating policies that address the impact of severe weather.
    POSSIBLE BART STRIKE - Members of BART's two largest unions have voted to authorize a strike which could result in transit chaos for thousands of commuters as early as next Monday. Fears are building that train operators, station agents and maintenance workers could walk off the job if a deal is not reached by Sunday. Negotiations between the union and BART management have broken down over wages, health and retirement benefits, and safety issues.
    Guests: Vik Amar, UC Davis School of Law; Paul Rogers, SJ Mercury News; Michael Cabanatuan, SF Chronicle.
    Please Note: This Week In Northern California will not air the weekend beginning July 5th. It returns Friday 7/12.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#225H] The Faces of America's Hungry * Here in the richest country on earth, 50 million of us - 1 in 6 Americans - go hungry. More than a third of them are children. And yet Congress can't pass a Farm Bill because our representatives continue to fight over how many billions to slash from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, better known as food stamps. The debate is filled with tired cliches about freeloaders undeserving of government help, living large at the expense of honest, hardworking taxpayers. But a new documentary, A Place at the Table, paints a truer picture of America's poor.
    This week Kristi Jacobson, one of the film's directors and producers, and Mariana Chilton, director of the Center for Hunger-Free Communities, join Bill to break these stereotypes apart and share how hunger hits hard at people from every walk of life. The story of American families facing food insecurity is as frustrating as it is heartbreaking, because the truth is as avoidable as it is tragic.
    "If we could think about poverty during childhood as a type of a disease, if we could pay as much attention to poverty for children as we pay attention to infectious disease, we might be able to do something in this country," Chilton explains to Bill.
    * Also, on the program, journalist Greg Kaufmann - who's dedicated himself to the beat of poverty, food and politics - talks about the need to meet and accurately understand Americans in poverty to truly help them. A frequent contributor for The Nation, Kaufmann claims that the poor have been stereotyped and demonized in an effort to justify huge cuts in food stamps and other programs low-income Americans rely on to survive.
    "People are working and they're not getting paid enough to feed their families, pay their utilities, pay for their housing, pay for the healthcare," Kaufmann tells Bill. "50% of the jobs in this country pay less than $34,000 a year. 25% pay less than the poverty line for a family of 4 - which is $23,000 a year. So if you're not paying people enough to pay for the basics, they're going to need help getting food."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    Inside Washington [#2511H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3127] Topics: Supremes Rule on Gay Marriage; Obama in Africa. Panelists: Michelle Bernard, Author; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2216H] WENDY DAVIS AND THE TEXAS ABORTION BATTLE - Texas State Senator Wendy Davis' rise to women's rights stardom.
    SAME-SEX MARRIAGE RULINGS - What's next and how it affects the future of the LGBT community and the nation.
    FLEXISM - Employers are finding new ways to adapt to their employees' needs.
    Panelists: The Heritage Foundation's Jennifer Marshall, Author and Political Analyst Lara Brown, Red Alert Politics Editor Francesca Chambers, Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC) and Center for American Progress' Advisor for LGBT Policy & Racial Justice Aisha Moodie-Mills (for the gay marriage segment).
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 pm
    LinkAsia [#148] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:30 pm
    QUEST [#602H] Pump It Up: Heart Health Special Report Investigate the number one cause of death in America, heart disease, which kills close to 600,000 people each year - more than die from cancer, car accidents or AIDS. Meet a teenager trying to lower her risk; a heart attack patient and the team that saved her life, and a researcher working to one day rebuild a damaged heart from the inside out. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Need To Know [#326H] JEFF GREENFIELD ANCHORS. On the second of two inauguration specials examining the advocacy group "Common Good's" proposals to end bureaucratic gridlock and get the United States moving forward, Need to Know anchor Jeff Greenfield explores how malpractice lawsuits contribute to rising healthcare costs. Correspondent William Brangham travels to Denmark, where medical disputes are settled by experts without ever going to court. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 pm
    Moyers & Company [#225H] The Faces of America's Hungry * Here in the richest country on earth, 50 million of us - 1 in 6 Americans - go hungry. More than a third of them are children. And yet Congress can't pass a Farm Bill because our representatives continue to fight over how many billions to slash from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, better known as food stamps. The debate is filled with tired cliches about freeloaders undeserving of government help, living large at the expense of honest, hardworking taxpayers. But a new documentary, A Place at the Table, paints a truer picture of America's poor.
    This week Kristi Jacobson, one of the film's directors and producers, and Mariana Chilton, director of the Center for Hunger-Free Communities, join Bill to break these stereotypes apart and share how hunger hits hard at people from every walk of life. The story of American families facing food insecurity is as frustrating as it is heartbreaking, because the truth is as avoidable as it is tragic.
    "If we could think about poverty during childhood as a type of a disease, if we could pay as much attention to poverty for children as we pay attention to infectious disease, we might be able to do something in this country," Chilton explains to Bill.
    * Also, on the program, journalist Greg Kaufmann - who's dedicated himself to the beat of poverty, food and politics - talks about the need to meet and accurately understand Americans in poverty to truly help them. A frequent contributor for The Nation, Kaufmann claims that the poor have been stereotyped and demonized in an effort to justify huge cuts in food stamps and other programs low-income Americans rely on to survive.
    "People are working and they're not getting paid enough to feed their families, pay their utilities, pay for their housing, pay for the healthcare," Kaufmann tells Bill. "50% of the jobs in this country pay less than $34,000 a year. 25% pay less than the poverty line for a family of 4 - which is $23,000 a year. So if you're not paying people enough to pay for the basics, they're going to need help getting food."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5252H] A number of blockbuster decisions were handed down by the Supreme Court this week dealing with same-sex marriage and voting rights. But the justices held off on ruling on the validity of affirmative action in school admissions by sending that case back to the lower courts. < br />In two landmark decisions, the high court struck down part of the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) and refused to reinstate a ban on same-sex marriages in California. The decisions appear to have laid the legal groundwork for future cases challenging state laws banning gay marriage but neither decision addressed whether same-sex marriage is a fundamental right under the US Constitution. While supporters of gay rights are celebrating, opponents vow to continue their fight to preserve traditional marriage.
    Earlier in the week, the sharply divided Supreme Court struck down a key provision of the historic 1965 Voting Rights Act that requires states and local districts with a history of discrimination to get federal approval to change voting laws. In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court ruled the formula to determine which places need monitoring is out of date and ruled that Congress needs to revise the provision.
    And in a decision about affirmative action, the high court questioned whether race should be a determinant in deciding college admissions at the University of Texas. The court sent the case to the lower court for further review saying that school needs to show that there are, "no workable race-neutral alternatives."
    Joining Gwen Ifill to discuss the legal and policy implications as well as the political fallout from this week's Supreme Court decisions: Pete Williams of NBC News, Joan Biskupic of Reuters, Dan Balz of The Washington Post, and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Inside Washington [#2511H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3127] Topics: Supremes Rule on Gay Marriage; Obama in Africa. Panelists: Michelle Bernard, Author; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2435H] June 28, 2013 Guest Host: Scott Shafer.
    News Panel:
    GAY MARRIAGE VICTORIES - Gay rights advocates celebrated historic victories this week when the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act and also upheld a lower court ruling finding California's ban on same-sex marriage unconstitutional. The two rulings will have major legal ramifications at both the federal and state level. What do the court's decisions mean and when will gay couples be allowed to legally marry in California? Also, how do the SCOTUS rulings on affirmative action and voting rights impact California?
    PRESIDENT OBAMA'S CLIMATE PLAN - President Obama this week called for sweeping executive action to combat the effects of climate change before a cheering crowd of environmentalists in Washington, D.C. One major proposal is modeled after California's ambitious climate change goals and pushes for a national cap-and-trade bill. Other initiatives include eliminating tax loopholes for big oil and creating policies that address the impact of severe weather.
    POSSIBLE BART STRIKE - Members of BART's two largest unions have voted to authorize a strike which could result in transit chaos for thousands of commuters as early as next Monday. Fears are building that train operators, station agents and maintenance workers could walk off the job if a deal is not reached by Sunday. Negotiations between the union and BART management have broken down over wages, health and retirement benefits, and safety issues.
    Guests: Vik Amar, UC Davis School of Law; Paul Rogers, SJ Mercury News; Michael Cabanatuan, SF Chronicle.
    Please Note: This Week In Northern California will not air the weekend beginning July 5th. It returns Friday 7/12.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    QUEST [#602H] Pump It Up: Heart Health Special Report Investigate the number one cause of death in America, heart disease, which kills close to 600,000 people each year - more than die from cancer, car accidents or AIDS. Meet a teenager trying to lower her risk; a heart attack patient and the team that saved her life, and a researcher working to one day rebuild a damaged heart from the inside out. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 pm
    Revolutionaries [#205H] Doing Well By Doing Good Can one turn a successful career in technology into a life as a social entrepreneur? Meet Matt Flannery, former programmer at Ti Vo and founder of Kiva, and John Wood, former Microsoft executive and founder of Room to Read. KQED's Dave Iverson moderates an inspiring conversation with the two men, who have found a way to make a difference in the world with their successes in Silicon Valley. duration 53:14   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#225H] The Faces of America's Hungry * Here in the richest country on earth, 50 million of us - 1 in 6 Americans - go hungry. More than a third of them are children. And yet Congress can't pass a Farm Bill because our representatives continue to fight over how many billions to slash from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, better known as food stamps. The debate is filled with tired cliches about freeloaders undeserving of government help, living large at the expense of honest, hardworking taxpayers. But a new documentary, A Place at the Table, paints a truer picture of America's poor.
    This week Kristi Jacobson, one of the film's directors and producers, and Mariana Chilton, director of the Center for Hunger-Free Communities, join Bill to break these stereotypes apart and share how hunger hits hard at people from every walk of life. The story of American families facing food insecurity is as frustrating as it is heartbreaking, because the truth is as avoidable as it is tragic.
    "If we could think about poverty during childhood as a type of a disease, if we could pay as much attention to poverty for children as we pay attention to infectious disease, we might be able to do something in this country," Chilton explains to Bill.
    * Also, on the program, journalist Greg Kaufmann - who's dedicated himself to the beat of poverty, food and politics - talks about the need to meet and accurately understand Americans in poverty to truly help them. A frequent contributor for The Nation, Kaufmann claims that the poor have been stereotyped and demonized in an effort to justify huge cuts in food stamps and other programs low-income Americans rely on to survive.
    "People are working and they're not getting paid enough to feed their families, pay their utilities, pay for their housing, pay for the healthcare," Kaufmann tells Bill. "50% of the jobs in this country pay less than $34,000 a year. 25% pay less than the poverty line for a family of 4 - which is $23,000 a year. So if you're not paying people enough to pay for the basics, they're going to need help getting food."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    America Reframed [#126] Follow The Leader A political coming-of-age documentary about three boys who want to be President. Over three life-changing years, each rethinks his beliefs and discovers who he truly wants to be as an adult. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 pm
    Out of Order Now more than ever, American citizens are discontented and disillusioned with national politics, with approval ratings for Congress consistently ranking low regardless of the party in power. Senior politicians also note the disappearance of the collegiality they once shared with peers of differing political ideologies. As a result, the ability to discuss issues from varying points of view and negotiate solutions, appears to be fading from the American political process.
    Among many topics, this program addresses the decline in civil discourse and the news media's role in it, partisan gridlock, gerrymandering, vanishing commitment to reasonable compromise, the vilification of moderates and declining civic engagement. It relies on interviews with a broad range of political experts and observers from journalists, academics and political strategists to senior elected officials. They include: journalist Bob Schieffer (CBS News), Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA), Sen. Susan Collins (R-MA), Fmr Sen. Evan Bayh (D-IN), Fmr Sen. Alan Simpson (R-WY), Fmr Sen. John Warner (R-VA) .
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#605] Ninos De La Memoria Hundreds - possibly thousands - of children disappeared from El Salvador in the midst of that country's civil war in the 1980s. Ninos de la Memoria follows three of those children as they return to their native country in search of identity and answers. duration 57:18   STEREO
  • 12:00 am
    Dabbawallas This documentary explores a form of work that has existed in Bombay, India for more than 100 years. Each day 4,000 Dabbawallas (box persons) deliver 100,000 lunches at high levels of reliability. This delivery system functions without any of the trappings of modern day work, such as technology, business procedures and practices, and so on. The program focuses on what people in more-developed countries can learn from workers in less-developed countries, the reliance upon human and social ingenuity for organizing rather than relying on external mechanisms such as technology, and according respect for the seldom-heard voices of disadvantaged populations in India. By Paul Goodman. duration 56:11   STEREO TVG
Sunday, June 30, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • DT9s: Sutro Tower testing, early Tues 4/22 1am-5am

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED (and 3 other local Bay Area stations) will be doing full-load testing on new equipment at Sutro Tower early Tues 4/22 between 1am & 5am. If all goes as planned the KQED transmitter will go off twice during the early part of this period for between 15 and 30 seconds each […]

    • KQED DT9 planned, very short outages, Tues 4/15 (& possibly Wed 4/16)

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED DT9′s Over the Air (OTA) signal from Sutro Tower will experience a few extremely brief outages on Tuesday 4/15 between 10am and 5pm (and possibly on Wed 4/16 if the work cannot be completed in 1 day). Each outage should be measurable in seconds (not minutes). This work will not affect […]

    • KQET DT25 Planned Outage: early Tues 4/15 (btwn 5am-6am)

      (DT 25.1, 25.2, 25.3) At some point between 5am and 6am early Tuesday 4/15, KQET’s signal from the transmitter on Fremont Peak northeast of Monterey will shut down for a short period of time to allow AT&T to do work on our fiber interface. The outage should be relatively short, but its precise start time […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too