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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Tuesday, May 21, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, May 21, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10631] Syrian Violence * Blog Platform Bought by Yahoo! * Myanmar's President at the White House * Coding as a Civic Duty * Diagnosing Mental Disorders * Women in Science duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32119] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, CEOs that are making headlines. First, Yahoo's Marissa Mayer - will her billion dollar bet on a blog site payoff for investors? And NBR will look at what Apple CEO Tim Cook is expected to say on Capitol Hill tomorrow about overhauling the tax code and his big pile of cash sitting overseas. Also tonight, we'll take you inside the Dreamliner's first flight since the jet was grounded four months ago. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2905] Tavis talks with one of rap's most in-demand performers, Talib Kweli, The socially aware MC explains his long absence from recording and the challenges he issues with his new CD, "Prisoner of Conscious." Tavis also chats with award-winning environment and science journalist Dan Fagin. A winner of both of America's best-known science journalism prizes, Fagin recaps the story he tells in his new text, Toms River. duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 2:00 am
    Global Voices [#525] Poor Us: The Animated History of Poverty Do we know what poverty is? The poor may always have been with us, but attitudes towards them have changed. Beginning in the Neolithic Age, Ben Lewis's film takes us through the changing world of poverty. You go to sleep, you dream, you become poor through the ages. And when you awake, what can you say about poverty now? There are still very poor people, to be sure, but the new poverty has more to do with inequality? duration 53:34   STEREO
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#4037] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2906] Tavis talks with Maine's former US senator Olympia Snowe. The outspoken centrist weighs in on why Washington isn't solving the big problems and offers solutions from her text, Fighting for the Common Good. Tavis also chats with Grammy-winning jazz artist Terence Blanchard. The five-time Grammy winner reflects on pushing musical boundaries with his new CD, "Magnetic," and composing his first opera, the jazz-infused Champion. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Asia This Week [#307] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    European Journal [#3120] The Nanny Orphans of Romania Many of the autocratic leaders that rule in Africa, Latin America and Arab countries often purchase properties abroad. Many have long favored France's Cote d'Azur; entire clans purchased top quality real estate here - using money plundered from their nation's coffers. But now friendly relations with the West have cooled, and some of the luxury villas are standing empty. The details:
    ROMANIA: MAMA CLEANS IN THE WEST - More and more children in Romania are growing up without parents. They're cared for by other relatives, in homes or simply live on the street. Child welfare organization UNICEF estimates that some 350,000 of these "orphans" have parents working in Western Europe. Most of the parents work - legally or illegally - as nannies, cleaners or farm laborers. For years seasonal workers, in particular, have been traveling to Western European countries like Germany, Italy and Spain where cheap labor is in demand. Some don't ever return to their children in Romania.
    FRANCE: BEN ALI'S VILLAS - With 260 days of sunshine a year, France's Cote d'Azur draws hordes of tourists. But it's also an attractive place for shady rulers to park their ill-got money. Many buy luxury homes here; former Tunisian president Ben Ali is thought to own villas on the Cote d'Azur. In Ben Ali's case, France's public prosecutor is now investigating. But many French citizens of Tunisian descent believe the investigation is taking too long, so they're collecting evidence on their own. Since the Arab Spring two years ago, the number of vacant luxury homes on the Cote D'Azur has kept on growing.
    TURKEY: WINEGROWERS UNDER PRESSURE - In Turkey, the country's Islamic-leaning, conservative government has massively restricted sales of alcohol. Yet Turkish wines are currently very popular. Vintners are focusing more on quality and are winning international prizes. But in many areas of the countryside and even in some large cities, bars and restaurants are no longer being issued liquor licenses. Supermarkets are having to take alcoholic beverages off their shelves and sales over the Internet are also forbidden. Yet, in spite of these measures, alcohol consumption is rising. People are crowding to the areas of major cities where alcoholic drinks are still being served.
    SWITZERLAND: TICKETS FOR PROSTITUTES - Zurich's Sihlquai riverbank has a reputation as being Switzerland's toughest area for street walkers. Here prostitutes service as many as 30 customers per night. Local authorities now want to curtail this booming trade. Prostitutes are now to be given a number and purchase a ticket. A stand costs four euros a night. In future, prostitutes will be required to have health insurance and to attend counseling. Starting in August, prostitutes should no longer be seen on the Sihlquai. They're to ply their trade in an industrial area of Zurich - out of the sight of the local residents.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 am
    Pacific Heartbeat [#102H] Under A Jarvis Moon Under a Jarvis Moon is the story of 130 young men from Hawai'i who, from the late 1930s through the early years of World War II, were part of a clandestine mission by the U.S. federal government to occupy desert islands in the middle of the Pacific. The first wave of these colonists were Hawaiian high school students, chosen because government officials assumed Pacific Islanders could best survive the harsh conditions present on the tiny, isolated islands. For the young men, who were unaware of the true purpose of their role as colonists, what ensued is a tale of intrigue, courage, and ultimately, tragedy. Amazingly, these men (four of whom are still alive) are only now being recognized for their sacrifice, and efforts are underway for the United States to officially acknowledge them for serving their country. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Saving The Ocean [#109] Cod Comeback? In the rich fishing grounds of New England and Canada, it seemed as if cod would never run out - until they did. Fishing communities from Newfoundland to Massachusetts fell apart. Widespread closures in the 1990s aimed to let the cod recover, but it's been a long wait. Carl Safina goes fishing to find some of the first signs that the famous codfish just might, indeed, be coming back. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 6:30 am
    Saving The Ocean [#110] Scourge of the Lionfish Lionfish are beautiful, colorful reef fish found throughout the Indian and Pacific oceans - that's the good news. The bad news is they're now found all over the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic coasts of North and South America as well. Alien to those waters, lionfish are the perfect invasive species - aggressive, without predators, prolific breeders and tolerant of a wide range of conditions. Numbering in the millions, they are damaging to native fish species. Diving in the Bahamas to help clear lionfish from reefs, sitting down to a lionfish dinner in the Yucatan and joining a lionfish-only fishing derby in Florida, Carl Safina learns how people are fighting back. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Nature [#3013H] Great Zebra Exodus When thunderclouds begin to gather over Botswana's Kalahari each year, 20 000 zebras begin an ancient journey, as southern Africa's biggest animal migration gets underway. In a never-ending quest for grass and water, the striped herds make their epic trek across the vast otherworldly landscape of the Kalahari's Makgadikgadi Pans, through prides of lions, and past families of meerkats, taking on the desert salt pans in their own way. The story of this spectacular annual migration is told through the eyes of zebra stallions, their mares, and their young, revealing the trials and triumphs and the fascinating social bonds that hold zebra families together. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG-V (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 8:00 am
    Global Voices [#525] Poor Us: The Animated History of Poverty Do we know what poverty is? The poor may always have been with us, but attitudes towards them have changed. Beginning in the Neolithic Age, Ben Lewis's film takes us through the changing world of poverty. You go to sleep, you dream, you become poor through the ages. And when you awake, what can you say about poverty now? There are still very poor people, to be sure, but the new poverty has more to do with inequality? duration 53:34   STEREO
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2906] Tavis talks with Maine's former US senator Olympia Snowe. The outspoken centrist weighs in on why Washington isn't solving the big problems and offers solutions from her text, Fighting for the Common Good. Tavis also chats with Grammy-winning jazz artist Terence Blanchard. The five-time Grammy winner reflects on pushing musical boundaries with his new CD, "Magnetic," and composing his first opera, the jazz-infused Champion. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2905] Tavis talks with one of rap's most in-demand performers, Talib Kweli, The socially aware MC explains his long absence from recording and the challenges he issues with his new CD, "Prisoner of Conscious." Tavis also chats with award-winning environment and science journalist Dan Fagin. A winner of both of America's best-known science journalism prizes, Fagin recaps the story he tells in his new text, Toms River. duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    Asia This Week [#307] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 am
    European Journal [#3120] The Nanny Orphans of Romania Many of the autocratic leaders that rule in Africa, Latin America and Arab countries often purchase properties abroad. Many have long favored France's Cote d'Azur; entire clans purchased top quality real estate here - using money plundered from their nation's coffers. But now friendly relations with the West have cooled, and some of the luxury villas are standing empty. The details:
    ROMANIA: MAMA CLEANS IN THE WEST - More and more children in Romania are growing up without parents. They're cared for by other relatives, in homes or simply live on the street. Child welfare organization UNICEF estimates that some 350,000 of these "orphans" have parents working in Western Europe. Most of the parents work - legally or illegally - as nannies, cleaners or farm laborers. For years seasonal workers, in particular, have been traveling to Western European countries like Germany, Italy and Spain where cheap labor is in demand. Some don't ever return to their children in Romania.
    FRANCE: BEN ALI'S VILLAS - With 260 days of sunshine a year, France's Cote d'Azur draws hordes of tourists. But it's also an attractive place for shady rulers to park their ill-got money. Many buy luxury homes here; former Tunisian president Ben Ali is thought to own villas on the Cote d'Azur. In Ben Ali's case, France's public prosecutor is now investigating. But many French citizens of Tunisian descent believe the investigation is taking too long, so they're collecting evidence on their own. Since the Arab Spring two years ago, the number of vacant luxury homes on the Cote D'Azur has kept on growing.
    TURKEY: WINEGROWERS UNDER PRESSURE - In Turkey, the country's Islamic-leaning, conservative government has massively restricted sales of alcohol. Yet Turkish wines are currently very popular. Vintners are focusing more on quality and are winning international prizes. But in many areas of the countryside and even in some large cities, bars and restaurants are no longer being issued liquor licenses. Supermarkets are having to take alcoholic beverages off their shelves and sales over the Internet are also forbidden. Yet, in spite of these measures, alcohol consumption is rising. People are crowding to the areas of major cities where alcoholic drinks are still being served.
    SWITZERLAND: TICKETS FOR PROSTITUTES - Zurich's Sihlquai riverbank has a reputation as being Switzerland's toughest area for street walkers. Here prostitutes service as many as 30 customers per night. Local authorities now want to curtail this booming trade. Prostitutes are now to be given a number and purchase a ticket. A stand costs four euros a night. In future, prostitutes will be required to have health insurance and to attend counseling. Starting in August, prostitutes should no longer be seen on the Sihlquai. They're to ply their trade in an industrial area of Zurich - out of the sight of the local residents.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 am
    Pacific Heartbeat [#102H] Under A Jarvis Moon Under a Jarvis Moon is the story of 130 young men from Hawai'i who, from the late 1930s through the early years of World War II, were part of a clandestine mission by the U.S. federal government to occupy desert islands in the middle of the Pacific. The first wave of these colonists were Hawaiian high school students, chosen because government officials assumed Pacific Islanders could best survive the harsh conditions present on the tiny, isolated islands. For the young men, who were unaware of the true purpose of their role as colonists, what ensued is a tale of intrigue, courage, and ultimately, tragedy. Amazingly, these men (four of whom are still alive) are only now being recognized for their sacrifice, and efforts are underway for the United States to officially acknowledge them for serving their country. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Saving The Ocean [#109] Cod Comeback? In the rich fishing grounds of New England and Canada, it seemed as if cod would never run out - until they did. Fishing communities from Newfoundland to Massachusetts fell apart. Widespread closures in the 1990s aimed to let the cod recover, but it's been a long wait. Carl Safina goes fishing to find some of the first signs that the famous codfish just might, indeed, be coming back. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 pm
    Saving The Ocean [#110] Scourge of the Lionfish Lionfish are beautiful, colorful reef fish found throughout the Indian and Pacific oceans - that's the good news. The bad news is they're now found all over the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic coasts of North and South America as well. Alien to those waters, lionfish are the perfect invasive species - aggressive, without predators, prolific breeders and tolerant of a wide range of conditions. Numbering in the millions, they are damaging to native fish species. Diving in the Bahamas to help clear lionfish from reefs, sitting down to a lionfish dinner in the Yucatan and joining a lionfish-only fishing derby in Florida, Carl Safina learns how people are fighting back. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    Nature [#3013H] Great Zebra Exodus When thunderclouds begin to gather over Botswana's Kalahari each year, 20 000 zebras begin an ancient journey, as southern Africa's biggest animal migration gets underway. In a never-ending quest for grass and water, the striped herds make their epic trek across the vast otherworldly landscape of the Kalahari's Makgadikgadi Pans, through prides of lions, and past families of meerkats, taking on the desert salt pans in their own way. The story of this spectacular annual migration is told through the eyes of zebra stallions, their mares, and their young, revealing the trials and triumphs and the fascinating social bonds that hold zebra families together. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG-V (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#4037] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#9101] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2906] Tavis talks with Maine's former US senator Olympia Snowe. The outspoken centrist weighs in on why Washington isn't solving the big problems and offers solutions from her text, Fighting for the Common Good. Tavis also chats with Grammy-winning jazz artist Terence Blanchard. The five-time Grammy winner reflects on pushing musical boundaries with his new CD, "Magnetic," and composing his first opera, the jazz-infused Champion. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32120] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the CEOs of two well-known companies are once again making headlines. On Capitol Hill, Apple CEO Tim Cook defends his company's tax strategy, as billions of dollars sit overseas. In Tampa, JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon wins a contentious shareholder vote and gets to keep both titles of Chairman and CEO. Also, NBR brings you the first in a series of reports on healthcare. Tonight, we'll look at how Watson, the supercomputer, is helping doctors fight cancer. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10632] Oklahoma Tornado Recovery * IRS Chief Testifies * Questions for the Justice Department * Apple's Tax Controversy * Sally Ride's Legacy duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32120] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the CEOs of two well-known companies are once again making headlines. On Capitol Hill, Apple CEO Tim Cook defends his company's tax strategy, as billions of dollars sit overseas. In Tampa, JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon wins a contentious shareholder vote and gets to keep both titles of Chairman and CEO. Also, NBR brings you the first in a series of reports on healthcare. Tonight, we'll look at how Watson, the supercomputer, is helping doctors fight cancer. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2212] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#4037] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3342] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10632] Oklahoma Tornado Recovery * IRS Chief Testifies * Questions for the Justice Department * Apple's Tax Controversy * Sally Ride's Legacy duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3342] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#19107] (original broadcast date: 5/21/13)
    A discussion about the tornado that hit parts of Oklahoma on Monday, we are joined by David Paulison, former Director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA); Peter Baker, New York Times White House correspondent; Andrew Revkin, former New York Times reporter and senior fellow at Pace University; and Brian Walsh, Senior Writer for Time magazine.
    duration 56:47   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3342] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2907] Tavis talks with best-selling novelist Khaled Hosseini. The physician-turned-writer talks about his highly anticipated third novel, And the Mountains Echoed. Tavis also chats with Scottish singer-songwriter Emile Sande. The former med student reflects on her stunning international success in the music business. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3342] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#811H] Oklahoma / Texas / Louisiana At the University of Oklahoma, the team meets Mike Biggerstaff, a professor of meteorology, where they learn what it is about weather that lights him up. Moving on to Houston, TX, they visit Jennifer Arnold, a 3-foot, 2-inch-tall doctor and star of the reality series, The Little Couple, where they hear her story of overcoming personal obstacles to realize her dreams. Finally, in New Orleans, LA, the team talks with Charline Gipson, a corporate lawyer, and discovers what 'success' means to her and the steps she took to achieve it. Charline's story of taking her own path despite others' disapproval inspires Denise who realizes she can do the same in life. duration 26:47   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3342] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10632] Oklahoma Tornado Recovery * IRS Chief Testifies * Questions for the Justice Department * Apple's Tax Controversy * Sally Ride's Legacy duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3342] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2212] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10632] Oklahoma Tornado Recovery * IRS Chief Testifies * Questions for the Justice Department * Apple's Tax Controversy * Sally Ride's Legacy duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
Tuesday, May 21, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

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Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

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KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

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KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too