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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus. Read more about this transition on our FAQ page.

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KQED World: Sunday, May 19, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, May 19, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    10 Buildings That Changed America The stories of ten American architectural marvels, including a state capitol building designed by Thomas Jefferson, the original indoor shopping mall, the first airport of the Jet Age, and a futuristic concert hall. You may not be familiar with all of these buildings, but they probably shaped the way you live, work, shop, and play. Host Geoffrey Baer takes a journey across America and inside these ten groundbreaking works of art and engineering. duration 56:26   STEREO TVPG
  • 1:00 am
    1962 World's Fair: When Seattle Invented The Future The 1962 World's Fair, a 6-month celebration of science and technology, featured an exciting mix of culture, cuisine and celebrity, drawing more than 10 million visitors from around the world to the then relatively unknown mill town of Seattle. Through historical photographs and archival footage, this program brings to life the textures and sounds of Seattle in the late 1950s and early '60s.
    The city's business, civic and cultural leaders, historians and longtime residents reminisce about the excitement and ambition the Fair ignited. Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen credits seeing the 605-foot Space Needle, Monorail, "Bubbleator" and other exhibits for inspiring his love of technology and science. Public television's own Rick Steves shares his vivid memory of seeing "exotic" Belgian Waffles for the first time at The Food Circus. The Fair also offered an eclectic mix of high art and low culture, from opera concerts and paintings by Roy Lichtenstein and Jasper Johns, to Gracie Hanson's racy Vegas-style nightclub revue and an adult puppet show. The documentary includes rare footage captured at the fair, including appearances by Space Age hero John Glenn; politicians Adlai Stevenson, Richard Nixon, Lyndon Johnson, Robert Kennedy and Hubert H. Humphrey; journalist Edward R. Murrow; the Duke of Edinburgh; and beloved performers Roy Rogers and Dale Evans, Peggy Lee, Lawrence Welk, the Lennon Sisters, Bob Hope, Miles Davis and Elvis.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#211] High School English High School English: We'll see how teachers, including 2010 National Teacher of the Year, Sarah Brown Wessling, are working to implement the Common Core State Standards. As students are asked to go deeper into every text they read, we'll see them dissecting, discussing, and debating their way through complex lessons. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    America Reframed [#124] West 47th Street Mental illness is a topic rife with stereotypes and misunderstanding. Made with depth and compassion, West 47th Street is an intimate cin? ma v?rit? portrait of four people struggling to recover from serious mental illness. They've all come to Fountain House, a renowned rehabilitation center in New York City's Hell's Kitchen. Over three years, the film follows its subjects as they deal with drug regimens, health issues, group homes and work programs with courage and humor. duration 1:46:28   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Global Voices [#118] Daughter from Danang/Balikbayan This highly honored, critically acclaimed film tells the story of a Vietnamese mother and her Amerasian daughter who are joyously reunited after 22 years - but whose illusions are quickly shattered as the reality of cultural differences and years of separation sets in. duration 1:24:45   STEREO TVPG
  • MORNING
  • 6:30 am
    Little Manila: Filipinos In California's Heartland Filled with chop suey houses, gambling dens, and dance halls, Little Manila was the area in Stockton notoriously called, Skid Row, but it was also the closest thing Filipinos had to a hometown. In its heyday in the 30s, this lively area had the largest population of Filipinos outside of the Philippines. This program tells the story of Jimmy Ente, Jr., a longtime Stockton resident recruited to work in the asparagus fields. Jimmy, and many other like him, faced backbreaking work, low wages, and at times extreme racism to fulfill their dreams. Narrated by famed Filipino-American producer Dean Devlin, this documentary tells the immigrant story as Filipinos experienced it. duration 26:45   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 am
    Need To Know [#320H] Special Report: In part three of its award-winning series on US immigration policies done in conjunction with the Nation Institute, NTK examines how Obama administration policies are leading to the deportation - and ultimately the deaths - of thousands of undocumented workers who have worked in the US for decades, even raising families here. These undocumented workers are the very people the president and some Republican lawmakers say should be eligible for a pathway to citizenship. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 am
    QUEST [#202H] Alzheimer's: Is the Cure in the Genes? / Biofuels: Beyond Ethanol Meet the San Francisco researchers looking at our DNA to find an Alzheimer's cure and find out how the Bay Area is at the center of America's race to make alternative fuels. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1637] THE BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA - The national council of the Boy Scouts of America will vote next week on a proposal to lift the long-standing ban on gay scouts, although allowing gay adult leaders is not under consideration. As Deborah Potter reports, most scout troops are sponsored by faith-based groups, some of whom say that lifting the ban is incompatible with scout values, and could lead them to withdraw their sponsorship.
    SEQUESTRATION AND THE POOR - The $ 85 billion federal spending cuts imposed by sequestration will severely impact city governments and their programs for the poor-programs like Head Start, supplemental nutrition and public housing. The head of Catholic Charities in Maryland tells Lucky Severson that his budget is a "moral document" and that failure to ease the cuts on programs for the poor is "frankly immoral."
    REFORMING WASHINGTON - Host Bob Abernethy profiles former White House press secretary Mike McCurry. McCurry has a new graduate degree from Wesley Seminary and wants to change Washington's political climate. < br />SIKH TURBAN SHOWDOWN - At a Sikh Foundation of Virginia "Turban Showdown," Sikh parents helped children wrap their turbans. Youth and education coordinator Surinder Singh explains the meaning of the turban and why, for Sikhs, it is a mark of pride, respect and responsibility.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#947] Great Investors: Robert Kleinschmidt This week features an exclusive interview with "Great Investor" Robert Kleinschmidt. Tocqueville Fund's contrarian portfolio manager discusses where he is betting against the herd to stay ahead of it. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#216H] Investment advisor Ric Edelman explores the pitfallls of buying a vacation home, tells how to locate a lost retirement account from a previous employer and interviews country music legend Randy Travis about the financial realities behind the show-biz glamour. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2505H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3121] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week [#5246H] A trifecta of troubles dogged the Obama administration this week. There was the continuing fallout from the deadly attacks on the US consulate in Benghazi, Libya. Then news broke that the Internal Revenue Service has been targeting conservative groups when they applied for tax exempt status. And finally it was revealed that the Justice Department had secretly seized the telephone records of Associated Press reporters as part of an investigation into classified leaks.
    By mid-week President Obama announced that he had asked for, and accepted, the resignation of Acting IRS Commissioner Steven Miller. On the same day the White House released 100 pages of emails between the CIA, White House and State Department written in the wake of the Benghazi attacks, and Attorney General Eric Holder testified before the House Judiciary Committee about the Justice Department's probe of AP reporters as part of an investigation into a story about a terrorist plot in Yemen.
    Despite the actions taken, the Obama administration continues to face harsh criticism from Republicans over a lack of transparency and the perceived politicization of the IRS. Conservative lawmakers are also demanding more details about the events at the diplomatic mission in Benghazi as well information on what, if any, involvement the White House had in the Justice Department's leak investigation.
    Gwen will discuss the politics and policy surrounding this week's "scandals" as well as details from Friday's House hearings on the actions of the IRS with Gloria Borger of CNN, John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News, John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times, and Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2430H] May 17, 2013 Guest Host: Scott Shafer.
    News Panel:
    GOV. BROWN'S MAY REVISED BUDGET - Gov. Jerry Brown's revised budget is $1.3 billion leaner than his original budget released in January. With a surge in state tax revenue and no deficit for the first time in years, Republicans cheered the governor's caution against spending. Democrats were less enthused. Schools appear to be the big winner with $2.9 billion in additional funding, but there are no increases for severely cut social safety net programs or for prison population reduction. Gov. Brown cited federal sequestration cuts, falling wages and higher Social Security payroll taxes as obstacles to the state's economic recovery, warning "It's a call for prudence, not exuberance. "
    NEW INQUIRIES INTO BAY BRIDGE BOLTS - A state Senate committee grilled Caltrans officials Tuesday over the 2,300 galvanized steel rods on the new $6.4 billion eastern span of the Bay Bridge, whose installation and safety is now questionable. The hearing came a day after the Federal Highway Administration agreed to investigate Caltrans' decision-making process and the $10 million fix for the 32 rods that have already failed.
    VETERAN BENEFITS UNTAPPED - Veterans returning from war find there are yet other battles to wage at home: from weathering the long-term effects of trauma to finding stable jobs and housing. In California, a state program to help veterans buy homes remains largely unspent: last year, only 83 loans totaling $10.5 million were originated, despite over $ 1 billion in available funds. Democratic Assembly Speaker John A. Perez has taken aim at the program, adding to the clamor of voices demanding that veterans get more help, and in a more timely fashion.
    Guests: Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group; Jaxon Van Derbeken, San Francisco Chronicle; Aaron Glantz, Center for Investigative Reporting.
    ANNA DEAVERE SMITH PITCHES EMPATHY - It's not a word often heard in politics and on the news, but "empathy" is something that today's leaders might want to cultivate at least, so says performer and playwright Anna Deavere Smith. In an upcoming workshop in San Francisco, Smith aims to teach the art of empathy, and it's not just for actors. "Who is that boss that you're gonna go in and talk to if you would like a raise?" said Smith. "Who is that person you're about to fire?" Scott Shafer talks with Smith about how empathy can be a useful tool in many of life's arenas.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#219H] The Toxic Politics of Science * Science can be a battleground - witness the politics of climate change, the teaching of evolution, the uncharted terrain of genetic modification and stem cell research, among other contentious issues. But when industries release untested chemicals into our environment - putting profits before public health - our children are the first to suffer. Nowhere is this more troubling than in the ongoing story of lead poisoning.
    This week, Bill talks with David Rosner and Gerald Markowitz, public health historians who've been taking on the chemical industry for years - writing about the hazards of industrial pollution and the neglect of worker safety - despite industry efforts to undermine them. Their latest book, Lead Wars: The Politics of Science and the Fate of America's Children, is the culmination of 20 years of research. Markowitz and Rosner warn that, for young children, there's no safe level of exposure to this dangerous toxin still lurking in millions of homes.
    Rosner and Markowitz discuss thwarted efforts to hold the lead industry accountable, failed attempts to find cheap solutions, and the cost to the future of our children. As long as the chemical industry and its powerful lobbies prevail in blocking efforts to reform outdated laws, the authors say, we will continue to float in a soup of toxins - inhaling, drinking, and absorbing chemicals that we may learn, years later, have put us all in harm's way.
    * Also on the show, Bill is joined by the heads of two independent watchdog groups keeping an eye on government as well as on powerful interests - like chemical companies - seeking to influence it. Sheila Krumholz, executive director of the Center for Responsive Politics and OpenSecrets.org, and Danielle Brian, who runs the Project on Government Oversight, talk to Bill about the importance of transparency to our democracy, and their efforts to scrutinize who's giving money, who's receiving it, and most importantly, what's expected in return.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    Inside Washington [#2505H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3121] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2210H] This special edition features a documentary entitled New Americans, which explores the concept of birth tourism - families travel to the United States so their children will be born US citizens. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 pm
    LinkAsia [#142] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:30 pm
    QUEST [#202H] Alzheimer's: Is the Cure in the Genes? / Biofuels: Beyond Ethanol Meet the San Francisco researchers looking at our DNA to find an Alzheimer's cure and find out how the Bay Area is at the center of America's race to make alternative fuels. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Need To Know [#320H] Special Report: In part three of its award-winning series on US immigration policies done in conjunction with the Nation Institute, NTK examines how Obama administration policies are leading to the deportation - and ultimately the deaths - of thousands of undocumented workers who have worked in the US for decades, even raising families here. These undocumented workers are the very people the president and some Republican lawmakers say should be eligible for a pathway to citizenship. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 pm
    Moyers & Company [#219H] The Toxic Politics of Science * Science can be a battleground - witness the politics of climate change, the teaching of evolution, the uncharted terrain of genetic modification and stem cell research, among other contentious issues. But when industries release untested chemicals into our environment - putting profits before public health - our children are the first to suffer. Nowhere is this more troubling than in the ongoing story of lead poisoning.
    This week, Bill talks with David Rosner and Gerald Markowitz, public health historians who've been taking on the chemical industry for years - writing about the hazards of industrial pollution and the neglect of worker safety - despite industry efforts to undermine them. Their latest book, Lead Wars: The Politics of Science and the Fate of America's Children, is the culmination of 20 years of research. Markowitz and Rosner warn that, for young children, there's no safe level of exposure to this dangerous toxin still lurking in millions of homes.
    Rosner and Markowitz discuss thwarted efforts to hold the lead industry accountable, failed attempts to find cheap solutions, and the cost to the future of our children. As long as the chemical industry and its powerful lobbies prevail in blocking efforts to reform outdated laws, the authors say, we will continue to float in a soup of toxins - inhaling, drinking, and absorbing chemicals that we may learn, years later, have put us all in harm's way.
    * Also on the show, Bill is joined by the heads of two independent watchdog groups keeping an eye on government as well as on powerful interests - like chemical companies - seeking to influence it. Sheila Krumholz, executive director of the Center for Responsive Politics and OpenSecrets.org, and Danielle Brian, who runs the Project on Government Oversight, talk to Bill about the importance of transparency to our democracy, and their efforts to scrutinize who's giving money, who's receiving it, and most importantly, what's expected in return.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5246H] A trifecta of troubles dogged the Obama administration this week. There was the continuing fallout from the deadly attacks on the US consulate in Benghazi, Libya. Then news broke that the Internal Revenue Service has been targeting conservative groups when they applied for tax exempt status. And finally it was revealed that the Justice Department had secretly seized the telephone records of Associated Press reporters as part of an investigation into classified leaks.
    By mid-week President Obama announced that he had asked for, and accepted, the resignation of Acting IRS Commissioner Steven Miller. On the same day the White House released 100 pages of emails between the CIA, White House and State Department written in the wake of the Benghazi attacks, and Attorney General Eric Holder testified before the House Judiciary Committee about the Justice Department's probe of AP reporters as part of an investigation into a story about a terrorist plot in Yemen.
    Despite the actions taken, the Obama administration continues to face harsh criticism from Republicans over a lack of transparency and the perceived politicization of the IRS. Conservative lawmakers are also demanding more details about the events at the diplomatic mission in Benghazi as well information on what, if any, involvement the White House had in the Justice Department's leak investigation.
    Gwen will discuss the politics and policy surrounding this week's "scandals" as well as details from Friday's House hearings on the actions of the IRS with Gloria Borger of CNN, John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News, John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times, and Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Inside Washington [#2505H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3121] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2430H] May 17, 2013 Guest Host: Scott Shafer.
    News Panel:
    GOV. BROWN'S MAY REVISED BUDGET - Gov. Jerry Brown's revised budget is $1.3 billion leaner than his original budget released in January. With a surge in state tax revenue and no deficit for the first time in years, Republicans cheered the governor's caution against spending. Democrats were less enthused. Schools appear to be the big winner with $2.9 billion in additional funding, but there are no increases for severely cut social safety net programs or for prison population reduction. Gov. Brown cited federal sequestration cuts, falling wages and higher Social Security payroll taxes as obstacles to the state's economic recovery, warning "It's a call for prudence, not exuberance. "
    NEW INQUIRIES INTO BAY BRIDGE BOLTS - A state Senate committee grilled Caltrans officials Tuesday over the 2,300 galvanized steel rods on the new $6.4 billion eastern span of the Bay Bridge, whose installation and safety is now questionable. The hearing came a day after the Federal Highway Administration agreed to investigate Caltrans' decision-making process and the $10 million fix for the 32 rods that have already failed.
    VETERAN BENEFITS UNTAPPED - Veterans returning from war find there are yet other battles to wage at home: from weathering the long-term effects of trauma to finding stable jobs and housing. In California, a state program to help veterans buy homes remains largely unspent: last year, only 83 loans totaling $10.5 million were originated, despite over $ 1 billion in available funds. Democratic Assembly Speaker John A. Perez has taken aim at the program, adding to the clamor of voices demanding that veterans get more help, and in a more timely fashion.
    Guests: Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group; Jaxon Van Derbeken, San Francisco Chronicle; Aaron Glantz, Center for Investigative Reporting.
    ANNA DEAVERE SMITH PITCHES EMPATHY - It's not a word often heard in politics and on the news, but "empathy" is something that today's leaders might want to cultivate at least, so says performer and playwright Anna Deavere Smith. In an upcoming workshop in San Francisco, Smith aims to teach the art of empathy, and it's not just for actors. "Who is that boss that you're gonna go in and talk to if you would like a raise?" said Smith. "Who is that person you're about to fire?" Scott Shafer talks with Smith about how empathy can be a useful tool in many of life's arenas.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    QUEST [#202H] Alzheimer's: Is the Cure in the Genes? / Biofuels: Beyond Ethanol Meet the San Francisco researchers looking at our DNA to find an Alzheimer's cure and find out how the Bay Area is at the center of America's race to make alternative fuels. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 pm
    Revolutionaries [#214H] Gavin Newsom Gavin Newsom talks about his book Citizenville, which tells the story of how ordinary citizens can use new digital tools to dissolve political gridlock and transform American democracy. As social networking and smart phones have changed the way we communicate with one another, these technologies are also changing our relationship with government. Michael Krasny, host of KQED Public Radio's Forum, moderates. duration 53:14   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#219H] The Toxic Politics of Science * Science can be a battleground - witness the politics of climate change, the teaching of evolution, the uncharted terrain of genetic modification and stem cell research, among other contentious issues. But when industries release untested chemicals into our environment - putting profits before public health - our children are the first to suffer. Nowhere is this more troubling than in the ongoing story of lead poisoning.
    This week, Bill talks with David Rosner and Gerald Markowitz, public health historians who've been taking on the chemical industry for years - writing about the hazards of industrial pollution and the neglect of worker safety - despite industry efforts to undermine them. Their latest book, Lead Wars: The Politics of Science and the Fate of America's Children, is the culmination of 20 years of research. Markowitz and Rosner warn that, for young children, there's no safe level of exposure to this dangerous toxin still lurking in millions of homes.
    Rosner and Markowitz discuss thwarted efforts to hold the lead industry accountable, failed attempts to find cheap solutions, and the cost to the future of our children. As long as the chemical industry and its powerful lobbies prevail in blocking efforts to reform outdated laws, the authors say, we will continue to float in a soup of toxins - inhaling, drinking, and absorbing chemicals that we may learn, years later, have put us all in harm's way.
    * Also on the show, Bill is joined by the heads of two independent watchdog groups keeping an eye on government as well as on powerful interests - like chemical companies - seeking to influence it. Sheila Krumholz, executive director of the Center for Responsive Politics and OpenSecrets.org, and Danielle Brian, who runs the Project on Government Oversight, talk to Bill about the importance of transparency to our democracy, and their efforts to scrutinize who's giving money, who's receiving it, and most importantly, what's expected in return.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    America Reframed [#124] West 47th Street Mental illness is a topic rife with stereotypes and misunderstanding. Made with depth and compassion, West 47th Street is an intimate cin? ma v?rit? portrait of four people struggling to recover from serious mental illness. They've all come to Fountain House, a renowned rehabilitation center in New York City's Hell's Kitchen. Over three years, the film follows its subjects as they deal with drug regimens, health issues, group homes and work programs with courage and humor. duration 1:46:28   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#118] Daughter from Danang/Balikbayan This highly honored, critically acclaimed film tells the story of a Vietnamese mother and her Amerasian daughter who are joyously reunited after 22 years - but whose illusions are quickly shattered as the reality of cultural differences and years of separation sets in. duration 1:24:45   STEREO TVPG
  • 12:30 am
    Little Manila: Filipinos In California's Heartland Filled with chop suey houses, gambling dens, and dance halls, Little Manila was the area in Stockton notoriously called, Skid Row, but it was also the closest thing Filipinos had to a hometown. In its heyday in the 30s, this lively area had the largest population of Filipinos outside of the Philippines. This program tells the story of Jimmy Ente, Jr., a longtime Stockton resident recruited to work in the asparagus fields. Jimmy, and many other like him, faced backbreaking work, low wages, and at times extreme racism to fulfill their dreams. Narrated by famed Filipino-American producer Dean Devlin, this documentary tells the immigrant story as Filipinos experienced it. duration 26:45   STEREO TVG
Sunday, May 19, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED DT9 planned, very short outages, Tues 4/15 (& possibly Wed 4/16)

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED DT9′s Over the Air (OTA) signal from Sutro Tower will experience a few extremely brief outages on Tuesday 4/15 between 10am and 5pm (and possibly on Wed 4/16 if the work cannot be completed in 1 day). Each outage should be measurable in seconds (not minutes). This work will not affect […]

    • KQET DT25 Planned Outage: early Tues 4/15 (btwn 5am-6am)

      (DT 25.1, 25.2, 25.3) At some point between 5am and 6am early Tuesday 4/15, KQET’s signal from the transmitter on Fremont Peak northeast of Monterey will shut down for a short period of time to allow AT&T to do work on our fiber interface. The outage should be relatively short, but its precise start time […]

    • Occasional sound issues, Comcast Cable, Black remote control

      Originally posted 6/19/2013: Some Comcast Basic Cable customers around the Bay Area have reported audio issues with KQED and KQED Plus, on channels 9 and 10. The problem is not related to KQED’s transmission but may be caused by the language setting on your Comcast remote control. If your Comcast remote control is black, please […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too