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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus. Read more about this transition on our FAQ page.

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KQED World: Saturday, May 18, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, May 18, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10630] IRS Hearing * Sexual Assault in the Military * Shields and Brooks * MacNeil and Lehrer Cover the Watergate Hearings duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32118] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the fireworks were in Washington where lawmakers grilled IRS officials about the targeting of conservative groups. But did we get any answers? And, NBR will tell you about a stock that's up 300% over the past three years and why it's been quite a ride for investors. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2904] Tavis talks with surgeon and breast cancer expert Dr. Susan Love. A longtime advocate of preventive breast cancer research, Love describes her personal journey as a cancer patient. Tavis also chats with economist Peter Blair Henry. The dean of NYU's Stern School of Business, Henry unpacks his book, Turnaround: Third World Lessons for First World Growth. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Saving The Ocean [#107H] River of Kings, Part 2 In the second part of this two-part special, Carl Safina meets the tribal leaders who inspired this grand vision of restoration, which has its roots in the native fishing rights campaigns of the 1960s; and our cameras discover some of the first wild Chinook salmon, descended miraculously from hatchery stock, now beginning to re-populate the Nisqually's pristine spawning grounds. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:30 am
    Saving The Ocean [#108H] Trinidad's Turtle Giants After local leaders launched a crusade to end the slaughter of Trinidad's thousand-pound leatherback turtles, the turtles were transformed from shark bait to tourist attraction. Now Trinidad's beaches support 80 percent of the entire Caribbean's leatherbacks and nearby villages make a great living catering to the visitors. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Washington [#2505H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5246] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2210H] This special edition features a documentary entitled New Americans, which explores the concept of birth tourism - families travel to the United States so their children will be born US citizens. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#203] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Need To Know [#320H] Special Report: In part three of its award-winning series on US immigration policies done in conjunction with the Nation Institute, NTK examines how Obama administration policies are leading to the deportation - and ultimately the deaths - of thousands of undocumented workers who have worked in the US for decades, even raising families here. These undocumented workers are the very people the president and some Republican lawmakers say should be eligible for a pathway to citizenship. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3121] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    10 Buildings That Changed America The stories of ten American architectural marvels, including a state capitol building designed by Thomas Jefferson, the original indoor shopping mall, the first airport of the Jet Age, and a futuristic concert hall. You may not be familiar with all of these buildings, but they probably shaped the way you live, work, shop, and play. Host Geoffrey Baer takes a journey across America and inside these ten groundbreaking works of art and engineering. duration 56:26   STEREO TVPG
  • 7:00 am
    European Journal [#3119] A Shortage of Physicians Costing Lives In Poland Britain/Bulgaria - scare tactics - Earlier this year, it emerged that the British government had actually considered whether to launch a negative ad campaign designed to scare off jobseekers coming from Bulgaria and Romania. Now some smart Bulgarians have been turning the tables on the British. Starting in 2014, Bulgarians and Romanians will have the right to work anywhere in the EU. Some people in Britain are worried they'll see a huge wave of immigrants similar to that from Poland in 2004. News of a possible advertising campaign designed to discourage would-be immigrants has outraged many in Bulgaria, because since their country joined the EU, tens of thousands of Britons have been buying Bulgarian houses. So why are the Brits moving in? A group of Bulgarian artists explain... Lithuania: the Charlemagne Prize for Grybauskaite - One of Europe's most coveted awards has gone to Lithuanian President Dalia Grybauskaite this year. She's being honored for her dedication to Europe. Since 1950 the Charlemagne Prize has been awarded for special contributions to European integration. The jury praised Dalia Grybauskaite's courage and discipline in overcoming widespread uncertainty at home and leading her country through the financial crisis, and closer to European Monetary Union. Dalia Grybauskaite has been Lithuania's president since 2009. After her country joined the European Union, she began working at the European Commission, first in education and culture, and later as budget commissioner. Poland: A shortage of doctors costs lives - Poland has a medical emergency. Doctors are leaving for better paid jobs in other EU countries. Many Poles have been left to rely on the emergency services. Dominika was just two-and-a-half years old. She suddenly came down with a fever and her parents called the emergency services in the small town of Skierniewice. But no doctor had time. By the time a doctor saw Dominika, it was too late. She didn't survive. Her fate has sent shockwaves through Poland, because it illustrates a dramatic situation. The country does not have enough doctors, nurses or other caregivers. Spain: The jobless turn to sheep farming - In Spain there's a new career niche for the unemployed. In Andalusia, qualified masons, waiters and academics are learning the basics for jobs as goat herders or shepherds. It's a pilot project: Experienced breeders teach jobless people the practical applications. Agricultural engineers or veterinarians teach the theory. The shepherd schools are financed by the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development. Participants hope they'll soon be making a living as shepherds, pig farmers or donkey breeders - all jobs with a future in Spain. duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 am
    Global 3000 [#520] New York's Ambassadors On Wheels Power outages are common in Lebanon, so diesel generators are hard at work across the country. But they are expensive to run and bad for the environment. Renewables linked to the grid may be the answer. Child labor is a global problem. In Bolivia, young workers have set up a union to fight for their rights. The details:
    RENEWABLE ENERGY IN LEBANON - Because of frequent and lengthy power outages, many families and businesses in Lebanon make use of diesel generators, which pollute the environment. Wind turbines and photovoltaic systems are promising alternatives. A project initiated by the UN links up decentralized renewable energy sources to the grid. A net-metering system keeps track of how much green energy each small provider feeds into the grid. That earns the provider credits for energy to be taken from the grid at a later date.
    CHILD WORKERS AND THEIR UNION IN BOLIVIA - Around the world an estimated 215 million children work on a regular basis. The prevailing view is that child labor must be abolished, but child workers in Bolivia - and elsewhere - argue there is no alternative for now, and are fighting for their rights. Child workers in Bolivia have set up their own labor union. They are demanding decent pay, working hours that do not conflict with the school day, and better conditions. They say they have to work to feed themselves and their families. In their eyes, child labor should only be banned when adults succeed in making enough to support their families.
    QUESTIONNAIRE: JANA STROE, A TAXI DRIVER IN NEW YORK CITY, USA - Jana Stroe (57) from Romania has been driving a cab in New York for almost 26 years. As a proud New Yorker, she sees taxi drivers as ambassadors for the city. She loves driving and meeting people from all over the world. She works hard and hopes to see her son through law school.
    CHINESE NURSES PREPARE TO WORK IN GERMANY - There is a shortage of caregivers and nurses in Germany, and plenty of well-qualified staff in China who are eager to work abroad. A commercial school in China prepares nurses to go and work abroad, teaching them the language of their destination country and informing them about the customs and culture there. A group of 150 are getting ready to come to Germany.
    duration 26:00   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#142] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2505H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5246H] A trifecta of troubles dogged the Obama administration this week. There was the continuing fallout from the deadly attacks on the US consulate in Benghazi, Libya. Then news broke that the Internal Revenue Service has been targeting conservative groups when they applied for tax exempt status. And finally it was revealed that the Justice Department had secretly seized the telephone records of Associated Press reporters as part of an investigation into classified leaks.
    By mid-week President Obama announced that he had asked for, and accepted, the resignation of Acting IRS Commissioner Steven Miller. On the same day the White House released 100 pages of emails between the CIA, White House and State Department written in the wake of the Benghazi attacks, and Attorney General Eric Holder testified before the House Judiciary Committee about the Justice Department's probe of AP reporters as part of an investigation into a story about a terrorist plot in Yemen.
    Despite the actions taken, the Obama administration continues to face harsh criticism from Republicans over a lack of transparency and the perceived politicization of the IRS. Conservative lawmakers are also demanding more details about the events at the diplomatic mission in Benghazi as well information on what, if any, involvement the White House had in the Justice Department's leak investigation.
    Gwen will discuss the politics and policy surrounding this week's "scandals" as well as details from Friday's House hearings on the actions of the IRS with Gloria Borger of CNN, John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News, John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times, and Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2430H] May 17, 2013 Guest Host: Scott Shafer.
    News Panel:
    GOV. BROWN'S MAY REVISED BUDGET - Gov. Jerry Brown's revised budget is $1.3 billion leaner than his original budget released in January. With a surge in state tax revenue and no deficit for the first time in years, Republicans cheered the governor's caution against spending. Democrats were less enthused. Schools appear to be the big winner with $2.9 billion in additional funding, but there are no increases for severely cut social safety net programs or for prison population reduction. Gov. Brown cited federal sequestration cuts, falling wages and higher Social Security payroll taxes as obstacles to the state's economic recovery, warning "It's a call for prudence, not exuberance. "
    NEW INQUIRIES INTO BAY BRIDGE BOLTS - A state Senate committee grilled Caltrans officials Tuesday over the 2,300 galvanized steel rods on the new $6.4 billion eastern span of the Bay Bridge, whose installation and safety is now questionable. The hearing came a day after the Federal Highway Administration agreed to investigate Caltrans' decision-making process and the $10 million fix for the 32 rods that have already failed.
    VETERAN BENEFITS UNTAPPED - Veterans returning from war find there are yet other battles to wage at home: from weathering the long-term effects of trauma to finding stable jobs and housing. In California, a state program to help veterans buy homes remains largely unspent: last year, only 83 loans totaling $10.5 million were originated, despite over $ 1 billion in available funds. Democratic Assembly Speaker John A. Perez has taken aim at the program, adding to the clamor of voices demanding that veterans get more help, and in a more timely fashion.
    Guests: Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group; Jaxon Van Derbeken, San Francisco Chronicle; Aaron Glantz, Center for Investigative Reporting.
    ANNA DEAVERE SMITH PITCHES EMPATHY - It's not a word often heard in politics and on the news, but "empathy" is something that today's leaders might want to cultivate at least, so says performer and playwright Anna Deavere Smith. In an upcoming workshop in San Francisco, Smith aims to teach the art of empathy, and it's not just for actors. "Who is that boss that you're gonna go in and talk to if you would like a raise?" said Smith. "Who is that person you're about to fire?" Scott Shafer talks with Smith about how empathy can be a useful tool in many of life's arenas.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17137Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2210H] This special edition features a documentary entitled New Americans, which explores the concept of birth tourism - families travel to the United States so their children will be born US citizens. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3121] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#320H] Special Report: In part three of its award-winning series on US immigration policies done in conjunction with the Nation Institute, NTK examines how Obama administration policies are leading to the deportation - and ultimately the deaths - of thousands of undocumented workers who have worked in the US for decades, even raising families here. These undocumented workers are the very people the president and some Republican lawmakers say should be eligible for a pathway to citizenship. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#219H] The Toxic Politics of Science * Science can be a battleground - witness the politics of climate change, the teaching of evolution, the uncharted terrain of genetic modification and stem cell research, among other contentious issues. But when industries release untested chemicals into our environment - putting profits before public health - our children are the first to suffer. Nowhere is this more troubling than in the ongoing story of lead poisoning.
    This week, Bill talks with David Rosner and Gerald Markowitz, public health historians who've been taking on the chemical industry for years - writing about the hazards of industrial pollution and the neglect of worker safety - despite industry efforts to undermine them. Their latest book, Lead Wars: The Politics of Science and the Fate of America's Children, is the culmination of 20 years of research. Markowitz and Rosner warn that, for young children, there's no safe level of exposure to this dangerous toxin still lurking in millions of homes.
    Rosner and Markowitz discuss thwarted efforts to hold the lead industry accountable, failed attempts to find cheap solutions, and the cost to the future of our children. As long as the chemical industry and its powerful lobbies prevail in blocking efforts to reform outdated laws, the authors say, we will continue to float in a soup of toxins - inhaling, drinking, and absorbing chemicals that we may learn, years later, have put us all in harm's way.
    * Also on the show, Bill is joined by the heads of two independent watchdog groups keeping an eye on government as well as on powerful interests - like chemical companies - seeking to influence it. Sheila Krumholz, executive director of the Center for Responsive Politics and OpenSecrets.org, and Danielle Brian, who runs the Project on Government Oversight, talk to Bill about the importance of transparency to our democracy, and their efforts to scrutinize who's giving money, who's receiving it, and most importantly, what's expected in return.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#202H] Alzheimer's: Is the Cure in the Genes? / Biofuels: Beyond Ethanol Meet the San Francisco researchers looking at our DNA to find an Alzheimer's cure and find out how the Bay Area is at the center of America's race to make alternative fuels. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#221] duration 25:40   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Global Voices [#126] Imelda This film is about former Philippine First Lady Imelda Marcos and the intersection of personal and public power, myth and illusion. It addresses how excessive power is amassed and sustained by popular support, and how one woman rationalizes her seemingly unconscionable abuse of such power. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG-V
  • 3:30 pm
    Filipino Champions of SOMA Many Filipinos have considered South of Market (SOMA) in San Francisco home for more than a hundred years. Filipinos were shipped to San Francisco to work in restaurants, hotels and fields in the early 1900s. These early immigrants struggled with poverty and discrimination, but they found support from kababayans in SOMA. This documentary recognizes three Filipino Champions of SoMA: Rudy Corpuz of United Playaz; Filipino American Development Foundation's MC Canlas; and Westbay Pilipino Multi-Service Center's Rudy Asercion. duration 25:04   STEREO TVG
  • 4:00 pm
    Among B-Boys Christopher Woon's first documentary feature explores the intersection of rugged urban b-boyin' (breakdancing) and the traditional roots of Hmong culture. But instead of the usual generational conflict, Among B-Boys unveils a story of the modern and the traditional actually affirming each other, visually weaving between the older generation's memory of ethnicity and war and the younger generation's toprocks, footwork, freezes and power-moves. Woon focuses on three breakers - Impact and Vlln of Underground Flow, and Sukie of Velocity/Soul Rivals Crew-who reveal the path towards b-boy cultural citizenship in America, but continually steer us back to their families, history and community. Produced as a short in 2004 and originally focused on the California Central Valley, the feature film follows the expansion of the Hmong community into the Midwest, with its main protagonists now in Tulsa, Oklahoma. duration 55:24   STEREO TVPG
  • 5:00 pm
    Global Voices [#306] Return to the Border/Take A Look In the past half-century, millions of people around the globe have sacrificed themselves for communism and socialism. In RETURN TO THE BORDER, a Chinese-born filmmaker reflects on the personal ramifications of these political ideals, from his memories of a childhood in the border town of Dandong to his experiences in North Korea. duration 54:08   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3121] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5246H] A trifecta of troubles dogged the Obama administration this week. There was the continuing fallout from the deadly attacks on the US consulate in Benghazi, Libya. Then news broke that the Internal Revenue Service has been targeting conservative groups when they applied for tax exempt status. And finally it was revealed that the Justice Department had secretly seized the telephone records of Associated Press reporters as part of an investigation into classified leaks.
    By mid-week President Obama announced that he had asked for, and accepted, the resignation of Acting IRS Commissioner Steven Miller. On the same day the White House released 100 pages of emails between the CIA, White House and State Department written in the wake of the Benghazi attacks, and Attorney General Eric Holder testified before the House Judiciary Committee about the Justice Department's probe of AP reporters as part of an investigation into a story about a terrorist plot in Yemen.
    Despite the actions taken, the Obama administration continues to face harsh criticism from Republicans over a lack of transparency and the perceived politicization of the IRS. Conservative lawmakers are also demanding more details about the events at the diplomatic mission in Benghazi as well information on what, if any, involvement the White House had in the Justice Department's leak investigation.
    Gwen will discuss the politics and policy surrounding this week's "scandals" as well as details from Friday's House hearings on the actions of the IRS with Gloria Borger of CNN, John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News, John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times, and Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2430H] May 17, 2013 Guest Host: Scott Shafer.
    News Panel:
    GOV. BROWN'S MAY REVISED BUDGET - Gov. Jerry Brown's revised budget is $1.3 billion leaner than his original budget released in January. With a surge in state tax revenue and no deficit for the first time in years, Republicans cheered the governor's caution against spending. Democrats were less enthused. Schools appear to be the big winner with $2.9 billion in additional funding, but there are no increases for severely cut social safety net programs or for prison population reduction. Gov. Brown cited federal sequestration cuts, falling wages and higher Social Security payroll taxes as obstacles to the state's economic recovery, warning "It's a call for prudence, not exuberance. "
    NEW INQUIRIES INTO BAY BRIDGE BOLTS - A state Senate committee grilled Caltrans officials Tuesday over the 2,300 galvanized steel rods on the new $6.4 billion eastern span of the Bay Bridge, whose installation and safety is now questionable. The hearing came a day after the Federal Highway Administration agreed to investigate Caltrans' decision-making process and the $10 million fix for the 32 rods that have already failed.
    VETERAN BENEFITS UNTAPPED - Veterans returning from war find there are yet other battles to wage at home: from weathering the long-term effects of trauma to finding stable jobs and housing. In California, a state program to help veterans buy homes remains largely unspent: last year, only 83 loans totaling $10.5 million were originated, despite over $ 1 billion in available funds. Democratic Assembly Speaker John A. Perez has taken aim at the program, adding to the clamor of voices demanding that veterans get more help, and in a more timely fashion.
    Guests: Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group; Jaxon Van Derbeken, San Francisco Chronicle; Aaron Glantz, Center for Investigative Reporting.
    ANNA DEAVERE SMITH PITCHES EMPATHY - It's not a word often heard in politics and on the news, but "empathy" is something that today's leaders might want to cultivate at least, so says performer and playwright Anna Deavere Smith. In an upcoming workshop in San Francisco, Smith aims to teach the art of empathy, and it's not just for actors. "Who is that boss that you're gonna go in and talk to if you would like a raise?" said Smith. "Who is that person you're about to fire?" Scott Shafer talks with Smith about how empathy can be a useful tool in many of life's arenas.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#202H] Alzheimer's: Is the Cure in the Genes? / Biofuels: Beyond Ethanol Meet the San Francisco researchers looking at our DNA to find an Alzheimer's cure and find out how the Bay Area is at the center of America's race to make alternative fuels. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1206] Around The World - Silk Road: X'ian to Kashgar In China, Megan McCormick follows the legendary trade route along which caravans of treasures once found their way into Europe. Starting at the silk capital of Xi'an, she passes Jiayugan and the Jade Gate, once frontier towns on the edge to the uncivilized western world. Passing through the Flaming Mountains, she stops to sample the wines and grapes of Turpan, one of the lowest and hottest places on earth. After visiting a 1,000 Buddha cave in Kuqa, she ends her journey at the famous Kashgar Market where wares from east and west are still traded today. duration 56:52   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3013H] Great Zebra Exodus When thunderclouds begin to gather over Botswana's Kalahari each year, 20 000 zebras begin an ancient journey, as southern Africa's biggest animal migration gets underway. In a never-ending quest for grass and water, the striped herds make their epic trek across the vast otherworldly landscape of the Kalahari's Makgadikgadi Pans, through prides of lions, and past families of meerkats, taking on the desert salt pans in their own way. The story of this spectacular annual migration is told through the eyes of zebra stallions, their mares, and their young, revealing the trials and triumphs and the fascinating social bonds that hold zebra families together. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG-V (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4002H] Decoding Neanderthals Over 60,000 years ago, the first modern humans --people physically identical to us today -- left their African homeland and entered Europe, then a bleak and inhospitable continent in the grip of the Ice Age. But when they arrived, they were not alone: the stocky, powerfully built Neanderthals had already been living there for hundred of thousands of years. So what happened when the first modern humans encountered the Neanderthals? Did we make love or war? That question has tantalized generations of scholars and seized the popular imagination. Then, in 2010, a team led by geneticist Svante Paabo announced stunning news. Not only had they reconstructed much of the Neanderthal genome -- an extraordinary technical feat that would have seemed impossible only a decade ago -- but their analysis showed that "we" modern humans had interbred with Neanderthals, leaving a small but consistent signature of Neanderthal genes behind in everyone outside Africa today. duration 56:16   STEREO TVPG
  • 11:00 pm
    Secrets of the Dead [#1204] Cavemen Cold Case A tomb of 49,000 year-old Neanderthal bones discovered in El Sidron, a remote, mountainous region of northern Spain, leads to a compelling investigation to solve a double mystery: How did this group of Neanderthals die? And could the fate of this group help explain Neanderthal extinction? Scientists examine the bones and discover signs that tell a shocking story of how this group may have met their deaths. Some bones bear distinct signs of cannibalism. Was it a result of ritual or hunger? Neanderthal experts are adamant that they were not bloodthirsty brutes. What happened here 49,000 years ago will take viewers on a much bigger journey - from El Sidron to the other end of the Iberian Peninsula, where scientists are excavating beneath the seas off Gibraltar in search of Neanderthal sites. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    10 Buildings That Changed America The stories of ten American architectural marvels, including a state capitol building designed by Thomas Jefferson, the original indoor shopping mall, the first airport of the Jet Age, and a futuristic concert hall. You may not be familiar with all of these buildings, but they probably shaped the way you live, work, shop, and play. Host Geoffrey Baer takes a journey across America and inside these ten groundbreaking works of art and engineering. duration 56:26   STEREO TVPG
Saturday, May 18, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • DT9s: Sutro Tower testing, early Tues 4/22 1am-5am

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED (and 3 other local Bay Area stations) will be doing full-load testing on new equipment at Sutro Tower early Tues 4/22 between 1am & 5am. If all goes as planned the KQED transmitter will go off twice during the early part of this period for between 15 and 30 seconds each […]

    • KQED DT9 planned, very short outages, Tues 4/15 (& possibly Wed 4/16)

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED DT9′s Over the Air (OTA) signal from Sutro Tower will experience a few extremely brief outages on Tuesday 4/15 between 10am and 5pm (and possibly on Wed 4/16 if the work cannot be completed in 1 day). Each outage should be measurable in seconds (not minutes). This work will not affect […]

    • KQET DT25 Planned Outage: early Tues 4/15 (btwn 5am-6am)

      (DT 25.1, 25.2, 25.3) At some point between 5am and 6am early Tuesday 4/15, KQET’s signal from the transmitter on Fremont Peak northeast of Monterey will shut down for a short period of time to allow AT&T to do work on our fiber interface. The outage should be relatively short, but its precise start time […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

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Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

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KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

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KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

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V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

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KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too