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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, April 27, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, April 27, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10615] Chemical Weapons Believed to be Used in Syrian Civil War * FAA Furloughs * 300 Reported Dead in Bangladesh Factory Collapse * Shields and Brooks * George Jones Dies at 81 duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32103] Tonight on Nightly Business Report - finding the growth. What today's weaker than expected GDP number means for the rest of the year. McDonald's CEO Don Thompson talks about where he sees growth. And stock picks in our weekly Market Monitor segment. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2889] Tavis talks with actor-director Kevin Bacon. The Emmy-nominated actor explains his decision to do television, with his role in the Fox suspense series, The Following. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Saving The Ocean [#101H] Shark Reef In the first episode, host Carl Safina travels to Glover's Reef Marine Reserve, a coral atoll in the central American country of Belize. Accompanied by a team of U.S. researchers, who've been studying the reserve for eight years, Carl catches, tags and releases a wide variety of sharks. He scuba dives to check out the shark-counting instruments that the researchers have placed around the atoll, and he also visits the shark fin trader in Belize City's fish market. The fin trade now threatens sharks worldwide, but the sharks in Glover's Reef Reserve are safe and thriving. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:30 am
    Saving The Ocean [#102H] The Sacred Island In the second episode, host Carl Safina travels to the island of Pemba, part of the Zanzibar chain off the East African coast, to discover a remarkable story of local villages winning control over their vital fishing grounds. Once threatened by resort development, Pemba's pristine reefs and lagoons are now managed by, and for, the fishermen. Carl fishes with the locals in traditional dhows and dugout canoes, and meets the influential Imams whose sermons explained how the Koran requires good stewardship of the world and its resources. Pemba's fishing families are all Muslim, and Carl believes Islam could be a key to ocean conservation in the large parts of the world where fishing people are Muslim. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Washington [#2502H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5243] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2207H] The panelists discuss: Women in power; Wadjda, a groundbreaking Saudi film; and the internet, sexual assault and women on campus.
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), Former Bush Advisor Mercy Viana Schlapp, Feminist Activist Erin Matson, Conservative Commentator Darlene Kennedy.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#202] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Need To Know [#317H] With the gun control debate raging after the mass school shooting in Newtown, CT, Need to Know examines the history of the Second Amendment and how it shapes the discussion today. Ray Suarez anchors a panel including: George Mason Law School professor Joyce Lee Malcolm, former New York Times foreign correspondent and editor Craig Whitney, and Fordham University history professor Saul Cornell. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3118] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#216H] Trading Democracy for "Security" * The violent Boston rampage triggered a local and federal response that, according to journalist Glenn Greenwald, adds a new dimension to troubling questions about government secrecy, overreach, and what we sacrifice in the name of national security. Greenwald joins Bill this week to peel back layers that reveal what the Boston bombings and drone attacks have in common, and how secrecy leads to abuse of government power.
    * Also on the show, political scholars Norman Ornstein and Thomas Mann tell Bill that Congress' failure to make progress on gun control last week - despite support for background checks from 90% of the American public - is symptomatic of a legislative branch reduced to dysfunction, partisan ravings and obstruction. A year ago, the two - who had strong reputations as non-partisan analysts - decided to speak truth to power with their book It's Even Worse Than It Looks: How the American Constitutional System Collided with the New Politics of Extremism. In it, they argue that congressional gridlock is mostly the fault of the right wing of the Republican Party, which engages in "policy hostage-taking" to extend their political war against the president. What's more, Ornstein and Mann say, the mainstream media and media fact-checkers add to the problem by pretending both parties are equally to blame.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 am
    European Journal [#3116] Putting a military tank in your garage - A Ukrainian phenomenon HUNGARY: THE PROBLEM OF WATER - Nearly 2 million people in Hungary - particularly in the southeast - lack access to clean drinking water. In a number of European countries, the groundwater is contaminated with heavy metals. Hungary, Serbia and Croatia are especially affected, but the problem is particularly acute in Hungary, where many municipalities cannot afford to drill down to deeper and cleaner groundwater. At the same time, the European Union says clean water is a human right, and member states must take action to ensure it. But both local governments and national leaders in Hungary are ignoring the problem.
    TURKEY: WHEN WOMEN EARN MONEY - Equality for women remains a controversial issue in Turkish society, even though legally their status is clear. The Turkish constitution says that men and women are completely equal. As part of the country's bid for EU membership in recent years, Turkey has instituted a number of legal reforms. That's improved the situation of women. For instance, women no longer need their husbands' permission to work. One example of the change can be found in the small, traditional town of Ayvalik on the Aegean Sea. Here women earn money of their own producing handbags from recycled materials.
    ITALY: A WAVE OF BANKRUPTCIES - Despite the ongoing euro crisis, the three major players in Italy's parliament are still mired in gridlock. The stalemate is affecting the economy, and every day hundreds of small businesses are shutting their doors permanently. Private consumption is down, and businesses can no longer afford to pay their workers. Much of the blame also lies with the government, which owes private businesses about 100 billion euros for goods and services. The sole beneficiaries of the recession are auction houses, which are doing booming business.
    UKRAINE: PRIVATELY OWNED TANKS - In Ukraine, some private citizens have taken to owning armored vehicles. Though they consume 160 liters of fuel an hour, their owners think tanks are a demonstration of power and masculinity. Now that the Ukrainian military has radically downsized, many military vehicles have been taken out of service and sold. For wealthy military buffs, a private tank has become the coveted new plaything. Some have invested in entire fleets of them and strut their stuff on local fields and roadways.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 am
    Global 3000 [#517] Modern Slavery In Singapore Many domestic servants in Singapore suffer abuse and humiliation at the hands of their wealthy employers. They arrive full of dreams for a better future, but often the reality is a nightmare. We also take a look at how safer sex might help save the Amazon rainforest, where a government-supported condom factory uses only locally-produced and sustainable latex during production. The details:
    MODERN SLAVERY IN SINGAPORE - Many domestic workers in Singapore suffer exploitation, abuse and even rape at the hands of their wealthy employers. Most of the women arrive here via agencies that recruit in the slums of Indonesia and the Philippines. They hope to earn enough money to help support their families back at home. But once they arrive in Singapore, they are at the mercy of their employers. Often, their passports are taken away from them. There are more than 200,000 such domestic servants in Singapore, and for many of them their workplace is little more than a prison. They're expected to be available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and never get a day off, let alone a holiday.
    CONDOMS FROM THE RAINFOREST - Around 40 percent of condoms worldwide are made of latex extracted from rubber trees. Now some of them are being produced on-site in the Brazilian Amazon. The government-backed latex factory in the state of Acre uses only local latex. The project helps preserve the Amazon by using sustainable materials and methods, and the work provides an income for the rubber tappers. The condoms are distributed free of charge as part of a national campaign against sexually-transmitted diseases. < br />SOUTH AFRICA: THE REA VAYA EXPRESS BUS SYSTEM - Traffic congestion is a perennial problem in Johannesburg. One solution could be Rea Vaya, the first public bus rapid transit system, the first of its kind in Africa. The Rea Vaya buses are replacing thousands of taxis and minibuses that clog the roads, and it's hoped that one day they'll lower carbon emissions by 40,000 tons a year. The buses use separate bus lanes and during peak hours they run every five minutes. One bus can replace more than 40 cars or 6 minibus taxis. Ticket prices are affordable, too, and the service is very popular.
    duration 26:00   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#139] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2502H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5243H] * The two brothers suspected in the Boston Marathon bombings were planning a larger-scale attack in Times Square. That's what the surviving brother Tamerlan Tsarnaev has told investigators who questioned him in his Boston hospital room this week. Meanwhile federal authorities are under pressure from Republicans in Congress to answer questions over whether information provided by the Russians about the surviving 19-year-old brother's possible ties to radical Islamists was mishandled or not followed up on appropriately. Martha Raddatz of ABC News will have the latest on the bombing investigation.
    * On Thursday Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel confirmed that US intelligence has strong evidence that Syria has used chemical weapons, specifically, the nerve agent sarin, in its fight against rebel forces. The White House has warned that Syria's use of chemical weapons would be a "red line" for possible intervention. James Kitfield of National Journal will look at the dilemma facing the Obama administration that wants to support Syrian rebels while avoiding a military engagement in the Middle East.
    * This week US Senator Max Baucus of Montana announced that he will not seek re-election next year. Baucus becomes the 6th Senate Democrat to announce his retirement this election cycle. Susan Davis of USA Today will report on why Republicans see the departure of this influential red-state Democrat as an opportunity to take back control of the Senate in 2014.
    * Plus, Dan Balz of The Washington Post will report on the dedication of the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum and how it reflects the legacy of Mr. Bush's 8 years in office.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2427H] April 26, 2013 Guest Host: Scott Shafer.
    News Panel:
    SCHOOL FUNDING DEBATED - Gov. Jerry Brown's proposal to dramatically revamp how public school funding is distributed is encountering resistance. The governor's formula would funnel more resources to school districts with higher numbers of English-learners and students from low-income households. Calling it a "civil rights cause for the children of California," Mr. Brown has promised his opponents "the battle of their lives." But Senate Democrats have a competing plan to peg funding individually to disadvantaged students and schools.
    WEST COAST OIL PIPELINE - As controversy over the Keystone XL pipeline to the Gulf Coast continues, a similar project is receiving little attention but could hit closer to home for California residents. The Trans Mountain pipeline carrying oil from Canada's tar sands to the West Coast is looking to nearly triple its capacity, making it potentially bigger than Keystone. Canadian authorities have the final say over Trans Mountain's plans, but environmentalists say it bears watching.
    STEPPING UP SURVEILLANCE - San Francisco's Chinese New Year parade, its Bay-to-Breakers race and the Gay Pride parade all travel along Market Street. Now, Police Chief Greg Suhr wants to install surveillance monitors along the thoroughfare. The proposal comes in light of the role that security cameras played in the rapid arrest of a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing. Will the move increase safety or infringe upon civil liberties?
    Guests: Jill Tucker, San Francisco Chronicle; David R. Baker, San Francisco Chronicle; and C. W. Nevius, San Francisco Chronicle.
    SAN FRANCISCO ETHICS REFORM: INTERVIEW WITH DENNIS HERRERA - A proposal to bring more sunshine into San Francisco's city hall is in the works - in the form of an ethics ordinance introduced by City Attorney Dennis Herrera and Board of Supervisors President David Chiu this week. The legislation broadens the definition of who qualifies as a lobbyist and aims to increase transparency surrounding development and construction projects. Scott Shafer talks with City Attorney Herrera about the proposed law as well as recent inquiries into alleged "patient dumping" by a Nevada hospital.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17116Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2207H] The panelists discuss: Women in power; Wadjda, a groundbreaking Saudi film; and the internet, sexual assault and women on campus.
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), Former Bush Advisor Mercy Viana Schlapp, Feminist Activist Erin Matson, Conservative Commentator Darlene Kennedy.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3118] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#317H] With the gun control debate raging after the mass school shooting in Newtown, CT, Need to Know examines the history of the Second Amendment and how it shapes the discussion today. Ray Suarez anchors a panel including: George Mason Law School professor Joyce Lee Malcolm, former New York Times foreign correspondent and editor Craig Whitney, and Fordham University history professor Saul Cornell. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#216H] Trading Democracy for "Security" * The violent Boston rampage triggered a local and federal response that, according to journalist Glenn Greenwald, adds a new dimension to troubling questions about government secrecy, overreach, and what we sacrifice in the name of national security. Greenwald joins Bill this week to peel back layers that reveal what the Boston bombings and drone attacks have in common, and how secrecy leads to abuse of government power.
    * Also on the show, political scholars Norman Ornstein and Thomas Mann tell Bill that Congress' failure to make progress on gun control last week - despite support for background checks from 90% of the American public - is symptomatic of a legislative branch reduced to dysfunction, partisan ravings and obstruction. A year ago, the two - who had strong reputations as non-partisan analysts - decided to speak truth to power with their book It's Even Worse Than It Looks: How the American Constitutional System Collided with the New Politics of Extremism. In it, they argue that congressional gridlock is mostly the fault of the right wing of the Republican Party, which engages in "policy hostage-taking" to extend their political war against the president. What's more, Ornstein and Mann say, the mainstream media and media fact-checkers add to the problem by pretending both parties are equally to blame.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#204] Earth Day Special: Where We've Been, Where We're Headed Explore the birth of the Bay Area's environmental movement a generation ago, then see what gains have been made and what challenges remain. duration 26:47   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#218] duration 25:10   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Play Again What are the consequences of a childhood removed from nature? One generation from now most people in the US will have spent more time in the virtual world than in nature.
    New media technologies have improved our lives in countless ways. Information now appears with a click. Overseas friends are part of our daily lives. And even grandma loves Wii. But what are we missing when we are behind screens? And how will this impact our children, our society, and eventually, our planet?
    At a time when children play more behind screens than outside, this moving and humorous documentary explores the changing balance between the virtual and natural worlds. It follows 6 teenagers who, like the "average American child," spend 5 to 15 hours a day behind screens. It unplugs these teens and takes them on their first wilderness adventure - no electricity, no cell phone coverage, no virtual reality. Through the voices of children and leading experts including journalist Richard Louv, sociologist Juliet Schor, environmental writer Bill McKibben, educators Diane Levin and Nancy Carlsson-Paige, neuroscientist Gary Small, parks advocate Charles Jordan, and geneticist David Suzuki, this program investigates the consequences of a childhood removed from nature and encourages action for a sustainable future.
    duration 56:16   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Frontline [#3021H] Climate of Doubt Four years ago, climate change was hot. Politicians from both parties, pressed by an anxious public, seemed poised to act. But that was then. Today, public opinion about the climate issue has cooled and politicians either ignore the issue or loudly proclaim their skepticism of scientific evidence that human activity is imperiling the planet. What's behind this reversal? Frontline correspondent John Hockenberry, of PRI's The Takeaway, goes inside the organizations that fought the scientific establishment, environmental groups, and lawmakers to shift the direction of debate on climate issues and redefine the politics of global warming. duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 pm
    Dust Bowl [#101H] The Great Plow Up In the first episode, feel the full force of the worst manmade environmental disaster in America's history as survivors recall the terror of the dust storms, the desperation of hungry families and how they managed to find hope even as the earth and heavens seemed to turn against them. duration 1:55:16   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3118] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5243H] * The two brothers suspected in the Boston Marathon bombings were planning a larger-scale attack in Times Square. That's what the surviving brother Tamerlan Tsarnaev has told investigators who questioned him in his Boston hospital room this week. Meanwhile federal authorities are under pressure from Republicans in Congress to answer questions over whether information provided by the Russians about the surviving 19-year-old brother's possible ties to radical Islamists was mishandled or not followed up on appropriately. Martha Raddatz of ABC News will have the latest on the bombing investigation.
    * On Thursday Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel confirmed that US intelligence has strong evidence that Syria has used chemical weapons, specifically, the nerve agent sarin, in its fight against rebel forces. The White House has warned that Syria's use of chemical weapons would be a "red line" for possible intervention. James Kitfield of National Journal will look at the dilemma facing the Obama administration that wants to support Syrian rebels while avoiding a military engagement in the Middle East.
    * This week US Senator Max Baucus of Montana announced that he will not seek re-election next year. Baucus becomes the 6th Senate Democrat to announce his retirement this election cycle. Susan Davis of USA Today will report on why Republicans see the departure of this influential red-state Democrat as an opportunity to take back control of the Senate in 2014.
    * Plus, Dan Balz of The Washington Post will report on the dedication of the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum and how it reflects the legacy of Mr. Bush's 8 years in office.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2427H] April 26, 2013 Guest Host: Scott Shafer.
    News Panel:
    SCHOOL FUNDING DEBATED - Gov. Jerry Brown's proposal to dramatically revamp how public school funding is distributed is encountering resistance. The governor's formula would funnel more resources to school districts with higher numbers of English-learners and students from low-income households. Calling it a "civil rights cause for the children of California," Mr. Brown has promised his opponents "the battle of their lives." But Senate Democrats have a competing plan to peg funding individually to disadvantaged students and schools.
    WEST COAST OIL PIPELINE - As controversy over the Keystone XL pipeline to the Gulf Coast continues, a similar project is receiving little attention but could hit closer to home for California residents. The Trans Mountain pipeline carrying oil from Canada's tar sands to the West Coast is looking to nearly triple its capacity, making it potentially bigger than Keystone. Canadian authorities have the final say over Trans Mountain's plans, but environmentalists say it bears watching.
    STEPPING UP SURVEILLANCE - San Francisco's Chinese New Year parade, its Bay-to-Breakers race and the Gay Pride parade all travel along Market Street. Now, Police Chief Greg Suhr wants to install surveillance monitors along the thoroughfare. The proposal comes in light of the role that security cameras played in the rapid arrest of a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing. Will the move increase safety or infringe upon civil liberties?
    Guests: Jill Tucker, San Francisco Chronicle; David R. Baker, San Francisco Chronicle; and C. W. Nevius, San Francisco Chronicle.
    SAN FRANCISCO ETHICS REFORM: INTERVIEW WITH DENNIS HERRERA - A proposal to bring more sunshine into San Francisco's city hall is in the works - in the form of an ethics ordinance introduced by City Attorney Dennis Herrera and Board of Supervisors President David Chiu this week. The legislation broadens the definition of who qualifies as a lobbyist and aims to increase transparency surrounding development and construction projects. Scott Shafer talks with City Attorney Herrera about the proposed law as well as recent inquiries into alleged "patient dumping" by a Nevada hospital.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#204] Earth Day Special: Where We've Been, Where We're Headed Explore the birth of the Bay Area's environmental movement a generation ago, then see what gains have been made and what challenges remain. duration 26:47   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1203] Around The World - Panamericana: Incas & Inquisitions Brianna Barnes journeys to Peru, home of the legendary Incas, where she begins her trek in Cajamarca, where thousands of Incan soldiers were slaughtered by Pizarro's conquistadors. After visiting one of the world's largest gold mines, Brianna makes her way to Lima, the "City of Kings," once home to the Spanish Inquisition in South America. In Cusco, she learns about the golden Inca Empire before ending her journey on the volcano El Misti, where incredibly well-preserved ice mummies tell the story of the country's illustrious past. duration 56:07   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2903H] Jungle Eagle The most powerful raptor in the world, the harpy eagle, hides away deep in the South American jungle. Harpy eagles are barely ever seen, let alone filmed. In this extraordinary documentary, our team of cameramen steps into the world of this monkey-eating eagle and even risks injury to obtain intimate pictures of them bringing back large monkeys to the nest. The tables soon turn, however, as one of these massive birds starts following the team. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4011H] Australia's First 4 Billion Years: Monsters Of all the continents on Earth, none preserves a more spectacular story of its origins than Australia. Nova's mini-series takes viewers on a rollicking adventure from the birth of the Earth to the emergence of the world we know today. With help from high-energy host and scientist Richard Smith, we meet titanic dinosaurs and giant kangaroos, sea monsters and prehistoric crustaceans, disappearing mountains and deadly asteroids. This is the untold story of the Land Down Under, the one island continent that has got it all. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 11:00 pm
    Nature [#2905] Kangaroo Mob Meet the mob of street smart kangaroos moving into Australia's capital city and the ecologists following their every move. Over the course of one drought-stricken year we follow mob leader, Black Spot, and kangaroo mother, Madge, with her two young joeys -- mischievous Sonny and tiny pouch-bound Alice. Here is a look at what happens when human development encroaches on wildlife habitat and two very different species are forced to co-exist. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Dust Bowl [#101H] The Great Plow Up In the first episode, feel the full force of the worst manmade environmental disaster in America's history as survivors recall the terror of the dust storms, the desperation of hungry families and how they managed to find hope even as the earth and heavens seemed to turn against them. duration 1:55:16   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
Saturday, April 27, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED DT9s Over the Air: beginning Wed 7/09

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) The PSIP Info part of our Over the Air (OTA) signal for KQED DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3 dropped out of our overall signal early Wednesday 7/09. Once PSIP was restored most OTA receivers moved our signal back to the correct channel locations. However, for some viewers, it appears as if they have lost […]

    • KQED FM 88.1 translator off air Tues 6/03

      The Martinez translator for KQED-FM will be off the air all day Tuesday June 3rd. We are rebuilding the 25 year old site with all new antennas and cabling. This should only affect people listening on 88.1MHz in the Martinez/Benicia area.

    • KQET planned overnight outage: early Tues 5/13

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET’s Over The Air (OTA) signal will shut down late May 12/early Tues 5/13 shortly after midnight to allow for extensive electrical maintenance work at the transmitter. Engineers will do their best to complete the work by 6am Tuesday morning. This will affect OTA viewers of the DT25 channels, and signal providers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

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Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

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KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

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KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too