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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus. Read more about this transition on our FAQ page.

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KQED World: Sunday, March 31, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, March 31, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    American Masters [#2603H] Philip Roth: Unmasked Often referred to as the greatest living American writer, Philip Roth's 31st novel - and 4th film made from one of his novels-- is due to appear in 2013. "Goodbye Columbus," the collection of short stories published in 1959, put the 26-year old Roth on the map and "Portnoy's Complaint," 10 years later, propelled him into a scandalous spotlight. Yet he steadily earned the reputation as a man of letters, commanding ownership of the Jewish-American novel and making Newark, NJ a literary destination. He practically invented the genre of factual/fictional autobiography - his thinly-veiled "Zuckerman Trilogy" follows the protagonist's path from aspiring young writer to compromised celebrity. His career was considered dead by 1990 - and then exploded with a dozen best sellers in the past two decades. This film bears out Roth's promise to the director: "we'll speak of everything: women, rabbis, politicians, psycho-analysis, literary critics and me." duration 1:25:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 1:30 am
    Erma Bombeck: Legacy of Laughter This program examines the extraordinary life and career of the beloved American humorist (1927-1996), whose honest tales of domestic life gave voice to millions of homemakers. Archival photographs, video clips and personal memorabilia trace Bombeck's life, from her childhood during the Great Depression to her work as a women's rights activist. The program is interspersed with uplifting and humorous interviews with Erma's family, friends and colleagues, including a touching on-camera introduction and narration by her neighbor and friend, former talk-show host Phil Donahue. It also features readings from some of Bombeck's best columns, and documents her continuing impact on readers, parents and writers today. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#204] Common Core State Standards The Common Core State Standards: Watch teachers break new ground putting the Common Core Standards into practice in Math and English Language Arts. The emphasis of these lessons is on deeper thinking, analyzing, and problem solving to better prepare students for success in college and future careers. duration 57:50   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    America Reframed [#123] Men of Hula This program captures the journey of legendary master teacher Robert Cazimero and the only all-male hula school in Hawai'i as they prepare to compete at the world's largest hula festival. Beyond deep-rooted stereotypes of "grass-skirt girls," the film tells a story of Hawaiian pride as the men celebrate their 30th anniversary in continuing the revival of men dancing hula. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Sousa on the Rez: Marching to the Beat of a Different Drum Native American music may not conjure images of tubas, trumpets and John Phillip Sousa marches. Yet this vibrant musical tradition has been a part of Native American culture for more than 100 years. This program traces the origins of the 4 remaining multi-generational, community-based tribal bands: the Iroquois Indian Band from upstate New York, the Fort Mojave Tribal Band from Needles, Calif., the Zuni Pueblo Band from northwestern New Mexico and the Navajo Nation Band from Arizona. Combining profiles of contemporary bands with fresh historical research, it offers an unexpected and engaging picture of this little-known aspect of the Native music scene. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Global Voices [#522] Dinner with the President: A Nation's Journey An intimate dinner with former President Pervez Musharraf and his mother provides the backdrop for a filmic journey through contemporary Pakistan. Engaging with people from all levels of Pakistani society, the filmmakers search for answers in a place where tribal loyalties struggle against modernization and religious Islamic forces lean toward theocracy. duration 54:37   STEREO
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#212H] And Justice for Some Fifty years ago, the Supreme Court's landmark decision in the case of Gideon v. Wainwright established the constitutional right of criminal defendants to legal representation, even if they can't afford it. The Court ruled there shouldn't be one kind of justice for the rich and another for the poor, but the scales of the American legal system still tilt heavily in favor of the white and wealthy. This week, attorney and legal scholar Bryan Stevenson exposes the system's failures, and ongoing struggles at the crossroads of race, class and justice.
    Stevenson's Alabama-based Equal Justice Initiative has reversed the death sentences of more than 75 inmates. But right now, there are more than 3100 inmates on death row, and more than 60% are members of racial or ethnic minorities. Over time, Supreme Court Justices have fine-tuned the circumstances under which the death penalty may still apply, but no set of laws or jurisprudence can undo wrongful executions - or, it seems, completely prevent them. According to journalists Martin Clancy and Tim O'Brien, authors of Murder at the Supreme Court, in recent years at least 18 inmates were released from death row because DNA evidence proved their innocence. These cases are among more than 140 death penalty exonerations over the last three decades.
    The broadcast closes with a Bill Moyers Essay on the hypocrisy of "justice for all" in a society where billions are squandered for a war born in fraud while the poor are pushed aside.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 am
    Need To Know [#313H] Is It Over for the American Dream? Anchor Jeff Greenfield leads a round table discussion on economic inequality, mobility, debt, and the state of the American economy 4 years after the official end of the recession. We've invited 3 highly-respected economic thinkers from different perspectives, to see if there is some common economic ground, and whether that common ground tells us anything about how we can improve our economic health. Roundtable participants:
    Jared Bernstein, former Chief Economic Adviser to Vice President Biden;
    Rana Foroohar of Time Magazine;
    and John Makin of the American Enterprise Institute.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 am
    QUEST [#211H] How Edison Got His Groove Back/ Science Flexes its Muscles Discover how researchers are recovering 100-year-old sound recordings and learn about the technology race to detect performance-enhancing drugs. duration 26:20   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1630] SAME-SEX MARRIAGE - This past week the Supreme Court heard arguments on the constitutionality of California's Proposition 8 same-sex marriage restrictions and the Defense of Marriage Act. Religious groups filed briefs on both sides of the disputes. Tim O'Brien reports on the arguments and the justices' responses to the lawyers as they presented the cases.
    NICK VUJICIC - Nick Vujicic is an evangelist and motivational speaker who, in the last 10 years, has traveled to 44 countries and spoken to 5 million people - despite having no arms or legs due to a rare disease he was born with. He has had to deal with his anger and sometimes depression, but he tells Lucky Severson "if God can do something beautiful with my broken pieces, then God truly has a plan for each and every one of us."
    HOLY WEEK - The three days leading up to Easter comprise the holiest time of the year for Christians. Filled with worship, prayer and pilgrimages, they commemorate Jesus' crucifixion on Good Friday and resurrection on Easter. Father Kenneth Semon of The Church of the Holy Faith in Santa Fe, New Mexico says "To go through the experience of the three days is really to go through what changes life for people."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#940] Financial Thought Leaders: Robert Shiller Why is renowned Yale economist Robert Shiller, who predicted the bursting of the tech and housing bubbles, now calling the bond market "dangerous?" A "Financial Thought Leader" and visionary, Shiller shares his views and advice on the stock, bond and housing markets on this week's Consuelo Mack WealthTrack. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#209H] Financial advisor Ric Edelman looks at the reality behind every golfer's dream - the legendary 17th hole at Sawgrass. Later, he gives a pedicab driver in San Francisco advice on money market funds and talks to BET found Bob Johnson about the hard lessons of his upbringing. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2450] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3114] TOPICS: Republicans Eastering; China's Cyber-Sabatoge?; Old School. PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Susan Ferrechio, The Washington Examiner. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week [#5239H] * The Supreme Court heard arguments in two cases on the future of same-sex marriage this week. The first challenged California's Proposition 8, a voter-approved ban on gay marriages. The second challenged the constitutionality of the 1996 federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), which limits the definition of marriage to opposite-sex couples.
    While public opinion in favor of marriage equality is rapidly growing, some justices seemed skeptical on whether the court should even weigh in on the debate. Justice Anthony Kennedy, the courts unpredictable swing vote, even went so far as to call it "uncharted territory." We will get analysis of the arguments in both cases from Joan Biskupic of Reuters and Pete Williams of NBC News. Dan Balz of The Washington Post will report on the political considerations lawmakers - Democrats and Republicans - are making when deciding whether to support gay marriage.
    * Congress may be on recess, but that didn't stop President Obama from prodding lawmakers to take action on strengthening gun laws. During a White House event on Thursday he invoked the Newtown elementary school shooting saying, "Shame on us if we've forgotten." However, the prospects for passing stricter federal gun-control measures seem to be fading. At least three Republican senators - Mike Lee of Utah, Rand Paul of Kentucky and Ted Cruz of Texas - have said they will block a vote on gun legislation. John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times will report on the renewed push by the White House to, in the words of the president, "make sure that fewer parents have to endure the pain of losing a child to an act of violence."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2423H] March 29, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    BROKEN BOLTS ON BAY BRIDGE - The new eastern span of the Bay Bridge will undergo repairs for more than thirty broken bolts. Caltrans says the span is still safe and the setback won't stall the scheduled Labor Day weekend opening. Also, the Golden Gate Bridge makes national news this week as the first bridge in California and the third in the country to have all electronic tolling.
    STOCKTON BANKRUPTCY ON TRIAL - Wall Street creditors seeking to block the City of Stockton's filing for Chapter 9 protection took the city to court. At the center of the debate is whether Stockton's obligation to the California Public Employees' Retirement System should be protected. The judge is expected to rule on Monday.
    DRAKE'S BAY OYSTER COMPANY FIGHTS BACK - The Drakes Bay Oyster Company is fighting to stay open in Point Reyes National Seashore despite an order by the US Interior Department to close up shop. The family-owned, Marin County company's cause has generated controversy, while attracting support from Louisiana to Washington, DC.
    Guests: Tom Vacar, KTVU News; Scott Smith, The Record; and Robert Gammon, East Bay Express.
    IS YOUR COUCH TOXIC? INTERVIEW WITH ARLENE BLUM - They're in just about all our homes - couches and chairs containing polyurethane foam which contain large quantities of chemical flame retardants, mandated by California law. But flame retardants have been linked to numerous health problems, including cancer, learning problems and infertility, and state lawmakers are now considering whether to overhaul the law. The debate was started by Berkeley scientist Arlene Blum, who pioneered research showing the dangers of Chlorinated Tris in children's pajamas. She succeeded in getting it removed from clothing, in 1977. Now, decades later, she's back on the front lines battling flame retardants, this time, in our furniture.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#212H] And Justice for Some Fifty years ago, the Supreme Court's landmark decision in the case of Gideon v. Wainwright established the constitutional right of criminal defendants to legal representation, even if they can't afford it. The Court ruled there shouldn't be one kind of justice for the rich and another for the poor, but the scales of the American legal system still tilt heavily in favor of the white and wealthy. This week, attorney and legal scholar Bryan Stevenson exposes the system's failures, and ongoing struggles at the crossroads of race, class and justice.
    Stevenson's Alabama-based Equal Justice Initiative has reversed the death sentences of more than 75 inmates. But right now, there are more than 3100 inmates on death row, and more than 60% are members of racial or ethnic minorities. Over time, Supreme Court Justices have fine-tuned the circumstances under which the death penalty may still apply, but no set of laws or jurisprudence can undo wrongful executions - or, it seems, completely prevent them. According to journalists Martin Clancy and Tim O'Brien, authors of Murder at the Supreme Court, in recent years at least 18 inmates were released from death row because DNA evidence proved their innocence. These cases are among more than 140 death penalty exonerations over the last three decades.
    The broadcast closes with a Bill Moyers Essay on the hypocrisy of "justice for all" in a society where billions are squandered for a war born in fraud while the poor are pushed aside.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    Inside Washington [#2450] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3114] TOPICS: Republicans Eastering; China's Cyber-Sabatoge?; Old School. PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Susan Ferrechio, The Washington Examiner. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2203H] RUNNING FROM OFFICE: A new study shows women are less likely to have considered running for office and this gender gap exists even when men and women are equally engaged politically.
    SAME-SEX MARRIAGE: Looking ahead to the changes we can expect with same sex marriage after this week's Supreme Court hearings on California's proposition 8 and the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA).
    BEHIND THE HEADLINES: The Westboro Baptist Church. Lauren Drain who was kicked out of the church is on a mission to help others who find themselves in cults.
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), Progressive Magazine's Ruth Conniff, Independent Women's Forum Executive Director Sabrina Schaeffer, Conservative Commentator Darlene Kennedy
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 pm
    LinkAsia [#135] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:30 pm
    QUEST [#211H] How Edison Got His Groove Back/ Science Flexes its Muscles Discover how researchers are recovering 100-year-old sound recordings and learn about the technology race to detect performance-enhancing drugs. duration 26:20   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Need To Know [#313H] Is It Over for the American Dream? Anchor Jeff Greenfield leads a round table discussion on economic inequality, mobility, debt, and the state of the American economy 4 years after the official end of the recession. We've invited 3 highly-respected economic thinkers from different perspectives, to see if there is some common economic ground, and whether that common ground tells us anything about how we can improve our economic health. Roundtable participants:
    Jared Bernstein, former Chief Economic Adviser to Vice President Biden;
    Rana Foroohar of Time Magazine;
    and John Makin of the American Enterprise Institute.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 pm
    Moyers & Company [#212H] And Justice for Some Fifty years ago, the Supreme Court's landmark decision in the case of Gideon v. Wainwright established the constitutional right of criminal defendants to legal representation, even if they can't afford it. The Court ruled there shouldn't be one kind of justice for the rich and another for the poor, but the scales of the American legal system still tilt heavily in favor of the white and wealthy. This week, attorney and legal scholar Bryan Stevenson exposes the system's failures, and ongoing struggles at the crossroads of race, class and justice.
    Stevenson's Alabama-based Equal Justice Initiative has reversed the death sentences of more than 75 inmates. But right now, there are more than 3100 inmates on death row, and more than 60% are members of racial or ethnic minorities. Over time, Supreme Court Justices have fine-tuned the circumstances under which the death penalty may still apply, but no set of laws or jurisprudence can undo wrongful executions - or, it seems, completely prevent them. According to journalists Martin Clancy and Tim O'Brien, authors of Murder at the Supreme Court, in recent years at least 18 inmates were released from death row because DNA evidence proved their innocence. These cases are among more than 140 death penalty exonerations over the last three decades.
    The broadcast closes with a Bill Moyers Essay on the hypocrisy of "justice for all" in a society where billions are squandered for a war born in fraud while the poor are pushed aside.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5239H] * The Supreme Court heard arguments in two cases on the future of same-sex marriage this week. The first challenged California's Proposition 8, a voter-approved ban on gay marriages. The second challenged the constitutionality of the 1996 federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), which limits the definition of marriage to opposite-sex couples.
    While public opinion in favor of marriage equality is rapidly growing, some justices seemed skeptical on whether the court should even weigh in on the debate. Justice Anthony Kennedy, the courts unpredictable swing vote, even went so far as to call it "uncharted territory." We will get analysis of the arguments in both cases from Joan Biskupic of Reuters and Pete Williams of NBC News. Dan Balz of The Washington Post will report on the political considerations lawmakers - Democrats and Republicans - are making when deciding whether to support gay marriage.
    * Congress may be on recess, but that didn't stop President Obama from prodding lawmakers to take action on strengthening gun laws. During a White House event on Thursday he invoked the Newtown elementary school shooting saying, "Shame on us if we've forgotten." However, the prospects for passing stricter federal gun-control measures seem to be fading. At least three Republican senators - Mike Lee of Utah, Rand Paul of Kentucky and Ted Cruz of Texas - have said they will block a vote on gun legislation. John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times will report on the renewed push by the White House to, in the words of the president, "make sure that fewer parents have to endure the pain of losing a child to an act of violence."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Inside Washington [#2450] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 5:30 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3114] TOPICS: Republicans Eastering; China's Cyber-Sabatoge?; Old School. PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Susan Ferrechio, The Washington Examiner. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2423H] March 29, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    BROKEN BOLTS ON BAY BRIDGE - The new eastern span of the Bay Bridge will undergo repairs for more than thirty broken bolts. Caltrans says the span is still safe and the setback won't stall the scheduled Labor Day weekend opening. Also, the Golden Gate Bridge makes national news this week as the first bridge in California and the third in the country to have all electronic tolling.
    STOCKTON BANKRUPTCY ON TRIAL - Wall Street creditors seeking to block the City of Stockton's filing for Chapter 9 protection took the city to court. At the center of the debate is whether Stockton's obligation to the California Public Employees' Retirement System should be protected. The judge is expected to rule on Monday.
    DRAKE'S BAY OYSTER COMPANY FIGHTS BACK - The Drakes Bay Oyster Company is fighting to stay open in Point Reyes National Seashore despite an order by the US Interior Department to close up shop. The family-owned, Marin County company's cause has generated controversy, while attracting support from Louisiana to Washington, DC.
    Guests: Tom Vacar, KTVU News; Scott Smith, The Record; and Robert Gammon, East Bay Express.
    IS YOUR COUCH TOXIC? INTERVIEW WITH ARLENE BLUM - They're in just about all our homes - couches and chairs containing polyurethane foam which contain large quantities of chemical flame retardants, mandated by California law. But flame retardants have been linked to numerous health problems, including cancer, learning problems and infertility, and state lawmakers are now considering whether to overhaul the law. The debate was started by Berkeley scientist Arlene Blum, who pioneered research showing the dangers of Chlorinated Tris in children's pajamas. She succeeded in getting it removed from clothing, in 1977. Now, decades later, she's back on the front lines battling flame retardants, this time, in our furniture.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    QUEST [#211H] How Edison Got His Groove Back/ Science Flexes its Muscles Discover how researchers are recovering 100-year-old sound recordings and learn about the technology race to detect performance-enhancing drugs. duration 26:20   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 pm
    Revolutionaries [#201H] An Evening with Marissa Mayer Meet Marissa Mayer, the new CEO of Yahoo!. Interviewed by NPR's Laura Sydell when she was Google's Vice President of Local, Maps and Location Services, Mayer speaks about her education, being hired as Google's first female engineer and much more. duration 53:13   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#212H] And Justice for Some Fifty years ago, the Supreme Court's landmark decision in the case of Gideon v. Wainwright established the constitutional right of criminal defendants to legal representation, even if they can't afford it. The Court ruled there shouldn't be one kind of justice for the rich and another for the poor, but the scales of the American legal system still tilt heavily in favor of the white and wealthy. This week, attorney and legal scholar Bryan Stevenson exposes the system's failures, and ongoing struggles at the crossroads of race, class and justice.
    Stevenson's Alabama-based Equal Justice Initiative has reversed the death sentences of more than 75 inmates. But right now, there are more than 3100 inmates on death row, and more than 60% are members of racial or ethnic minorities. Over time, Supreme Court Justices have fine-tuned the circumstances under which the death penalty may still apply, but no set of laws or jurisprudence can undo wrongful executions - or, it seems, completely prevent them. According to journalists Martin Clancy and Tim O'Brien, authors of Murder at the Supreme Court, in recent years at least 18 inmates were released from death row because DNA evidence proved their innocence. These cases are among more than 140 death penalty exonerations over the last three decades.
    The broadcast closes with a Bill Moyers Essay on the hypocrisy of "justice for all" in a society where billions are squandered for a war born in fraud while the poor are pushed aside.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    NCRM Freedom Awards [#2012] Highlights from The National Civil Rights Museum's Freedom Award ceremony held in Memphis, Tennessee on October 16, 2012. This year's honorees include Marlo Thomas, National Outreach Director for St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis; Dr. Bernard Lafayette, one of the 1961 Freedom Riders; Muhammad Yunis, who created Grameen Bank devoted to providing the poorest of Bangladesh with micro-loans; and Dr. Rameck Hunt, Dr. Sampson Davis and Dr. George Jenkins, better known as the Three Doctors. The program includes a musical performance by Patti LaBelle. Hosted by actress Holly Robinson Peete. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 pm
    America Reframed [#123] Men of Hula This program captures the journey of legendary master teacher Robert Cazimero and the only all-male hula school in Hawai'i as they prepare to compete at the world's largest hula festival. Beyond deep-rooted stereotypes of "grass-skirt girls," the film tells a story of Hawaiian pride as the men celebrate their 30th anniversary in continuing the revival of men dancing hula. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:30 pm
    California Women Win The Vote Using both historical materials and live reenactments, this film presents the dramatic Suffrage campaign that won the women of California the right to vote nine years before the Federal Amendment. The campaign becomes a role model and motivation for the rest of the country; today, the tactics and spirit of these women are a guide and an inspiration for citizen activism in a democratic society. Narrated by Bonnie Franklin. duration 26:17   STEREO TVG
  • 12:00 am
    AfroPop: The Ultimate Cultural Exchange [#402] Burning in the Sun This film follows the journey of a young social entrepreneur on a quest to electrify the rural households in his native Mali. Looking to make his mark on the world, 26-year-old Daniel Dembele returns to his homeland and starts a local business building solar panels, the first of its kind in the sun-drenched nation. It traces Dembele's journey - from growing the budding idea into a viable company to servicing his first customers in the tiny village of Banko. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
Sunday, March 31, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED DT9 planned, very short outages, Tues 4/15 (& possibly Wed 4/16)

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED DT9′s Over the Air (OTA) signal from Sutro Tower will experience a few extremely brief outages on Tuesday 4/15 between 10am and 5pm (and possibly on Wed 4/16 if the work cannot be completed in 1 day). Each outage should be measurable in seconds (not minutes). This work will not affect […]

    • KQET DT25 Planned Outage: early Tues 4/15 (btwn 5am-6am)

      (DT 25.1, 25.2, 25.3) At some point between 5am and 6am early Tuesday 4/15, KQET’s signal from the transmitter on Fremont Peak northeast of Monterey will shut down for a short period of time to allow AT&T to do work on our fiber interface. The outage should be relatively short, but its precise start time […]

    • Occasional sound issues, Comcast Cable, Black remote control

      Originally posted 6/19/2013: Some Comcast Basic Cable customers around the Bay Area have reported audio issues with KQED and KQED Plus, on channels 9 and 10. The problem is not related to KQED’s transmission but may be caused by the language setting on your Comcast remote control. If your Comcast remote control is black, please […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

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Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

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KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too