Donate

TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, March 30, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, March 30, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10595] North Korea Readies Rockets * Proposed Changes to Gasoline Pollution *Veterans Benefits * "How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia" * Shields and Brooks duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32083] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2869] Tavis talks with Shameless co-star Emmy Rossum. The versatile actress-singer talks about her multiple projects, including a film, TV show and new CD. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Global Voices [#526] Land Rush How do you feed the world? 75% of Mali's population are farmers, but rich, land-hungry nations like China and Saudi Arabia are leasing Mali's land in order to turn large areas into agribusiness farms. Many Malian peasants do not welcome these efforts, seeing them as yet another manifestation of imperialism. As Mali experiences a military coup, the developers are scared off ? but can Mali's farmers combat food shortages and escape poverty on their own terms? duration 56:46   STEREO
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Washington [#2450] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 3:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5239] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2203H] RUNNING FROM OFFICE: A new study shows women are less likely to have considered running for office and this gender gap exists even when men and women are equally engaged politically.
    SAME-SEX MARRIAGE: Looking ahead to the changes we can expect with same sex marriage after this week's Supreme Court hearings on California's proposition 8 and the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA).
    BEHIND THE HEADLINES: The Westboro Baptist Church. Lauren Drain who was kicked out of the church is on a mission to help others who find themselves in cults.
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), Progressive Magazine's Ruth Conniff, Independent Women's Forum Executive Director Sabrina Schaeffer, Conservative Commentator Darlene Kennedy
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#131] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Need To Know [#313H] Is It Over for the American Dream? Anchor Jeff Greenfield leads a round table discussion on economic inequality, mobility, debt, and the state of the American economy 4 years after the official end of the recession. We've invited 3 highly-respected economic thinkers from different perspectives, to see if there is some common economic ground, and whether that common ground tells us anything about how we can improve our economic health. Roundtable participants:
    Jared Bernstein, former Chief Economic Adviser to Vice President Biden;
    Rana Foroohar of Time Magazine;
    and John Makin of the American Enterprise Institute.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3114] TOPICS: Republicans Eastering; China's Cyber-Sabatoge?; Old School. PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Susan Ferrechio, The Washington Examiner. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#212H] And Justice for Some Fifty years ago, the Supreme Court's landmark decision in the case of Gideon v. Wainwright established the constitutional right of criminal defendants to legal representation, even if they can't afford it. The Court ruled there shouldn't be one kind of justice for the rich and another for the poor, but the scales of the American legal system still tilt heavily in favor of the white and wealthy. This week, attorney and legal scholar Bryan Stevenson exposes the system's failures, and ongoing struggles at the crossroads of race, class and justice.
    Stevenson's Alabama-based Equal Justice Initiative has reversed the death sentences of more than 75 inmates. But right now, there are more than 3100 inmates on death row, and more than 60% are members of racial or ethnic minorities. Over time, Supreme Court Justices have fine-tuned the circumstances under which the death penalty may still apply, but no set of laws or jurisprudence can undo wrongful executions - or, it seems, completely prevent them. According to journalists Martin Clancy and Tim O'Brien, authors of Murder at the Supreme Court, in recent years at least 18 inmates were released from death row because DNA evidence proved their innocence. These cases are among more than 140 death penalty exonerations over the last three decades.
    The broadcast closes with a Bill Moyers Essay on the hypocrisy of "justice for all" in a society where billions are squandered for a war born in fraud while the poor are pushed aside.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 am
    Focus On Europe [#3112] Russia's Dashboard Cameras - A Legal Necessity GERMANY: FROM MUSEUM TO AUCTION HOUSE - Many museums in eastern Germany face an uncertain future. They have to return numbers of exhibits to their former owners. A 20-year time limit on returning art objects expropriated by communist East Germany is running out. After the Second World War, illegal trade in art was rife, at least in eastern Germany. In communist East Germany private collectors and aristocrats in particular were systematically dispossessed. The public collections have now had two decades to come to agreements with the artworks' former owners. Where that has not been possible, auction houses now have cause to rejoice.
    HUNGARY: RESISTANCE FROM THE JUDICIARY - Time and again Viktor Orban's regime in Hungary has tried to disempower the country's courts. They have been bastions of resistance and overturned one piece of legislation after another. The history of Hungary's only opposition radio station is all too symbolic of the power struggle between the government and the courts. The state media authority has already tried several times to revoke the frequency rights of the broadcaster Klubradio. Now, for the fourth time, a court has ruled in favor of the station. The courts also struck down a ban on homeless people living on the streets and an amendment on church recognition. Now Hungary's right-wing prime minister Viktor Orban has amended the constitution, drastically curtailing the powers of the Constitutional Court.
    RUSSIA: SELF-HELP ON THE ROADS - They film everything that moves on Russia's roads: car accidents, meteor strikes and traffic jams. Dash cams have taken off in Russia. More and more drivers have dashboard mounted cameras in their vehicles, though that has little to do with pure voyeurism. Whether staged car accidents or cases of attempts at police bribery, when there's doubt, the pictures from dash cams are considered in court to constitute evidence.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 am
    Global 3000 [#513] South Africa - Not Quite Yet A Rainbow Nation Brazil's brick-making industry goes green: instead of cutting down trees in local forests to fire its brick kiln, one factory uses biomass for the energy it needs. We also take a look at South Africa, where an interracial couple has to battle prejudice - more than twenty years after the end of apartheid. Does skin color still decide people's fates? The details:
    SOUTH AFRICA: THE DREAM OF A RAINBOW NATION - Under apartheid, interracial marriages were forbidden and contact between whites and blacks was prosecuted by the state. Thousands of people were found guilty of violating the Immorality Act, which could result in a long prison sentence. The provision of the act prohibiting interracial marriages wasn't repealed until 1985. Its effects are still felt today: interracial relationships are still the exception to the rule. Nelson Mandela's call for a Rainbow Nation has not been realized for many people here. Pippa Tshabalala and her husband Sekwa have been together since their school days. Although they have good jobs, they still have to fight prejudice across society.
    BRAZIL AND THE ENVIRONMENT - BIOMASS IN CAPELA - In the northeastern part of Brazil, Capela is a center of the energy-intensive brick making industry. Until recently factories fueled their kilns by cutting down trees from the Caatinga-- a virgin forest that covers much of the region. But some have recently made the switch to biomass. New fuels range from wood chips that are byproducts of the furniture industry to bamboo and eucalyptus trees that are sourced from sustainable plantations. The factories also re-use the heat generated by their kilns to dry their bricks - and use ash as compost. That makes production significantly more climate-friendly than conventional methods. Some are also investing in social projects, including literacy programs and environmental education for children.
    SOCIAL ENTREPRENEUR: CHRISTOPHE CHEVALIER - Romans-sur-Isere is a town in the French Alps that has been a traditional center for shoemaking. But most of the big shoemakers have left; well-known brands have moved their production to China or Turkey. But entrepreneur Christophe Chevalier is fighting the trend.
    duration 26:00   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#135] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2450] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5239H] * The Supreme Court heard arguments in two cases on the future of same-sex marriage this week. The first challenged California's Proposition 8, a voter-approved ban on gay marriages. The second challenged the constitutionality of the 1996 federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), which limits the definition of marriage to opposite-sex couples.
    While public opinion in favor of marriage equality is rapidly growing, some justices seemed skeptical on whether the court should even weigh in on the debate. Justice Anthony Kennedy, the courts unpredictable swing vote, even went so far as to call it "uncharted territory." We will get analysis of the arguments in both cases from Joan Biskupic of Reuters and Pete Williams of NBC News. Dan Balz of The Washington Post will report on the political considerations lawmakers - Democrats and Republicans - are making when deciding whether to support gay marriage.
    * Congress may be on recess, but that didn't stop President Obama from prodding lawmakers to take action on strengthening gun laws. During a White House event on Thursday he invoked the Newtown elementary school shooting saying, "Shame on us if we've forgotten." However, the prospects for passing stricter federal gun-control measures seem to be fading. At least three Republican senators - Mike Lee of Utah, Rand Paul of Kentucky and Ted Cruz of Texas - have said they will block a vote on gun legislation. John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times will report on the renewed push by the White House to, in the words of the president, "make sure that fewer parents have to endure the pain of losing a child to an act of violence."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2423H] March 29, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    BROKEN BOLTS ON BAY BRIDGE - The new eastern span of the Bay Bridge will undergo repairs for more than thirty broken bolts. Caltrans says the span is still safe and the setback won't stall the scheduled Labor Day weekend opening. Also, the Golden Gate Bridge makes national news this week as the first bridge in California and the third in the country to have all electronic tolling.
    STOCKTON BANKRUPTCY ON TRIAL - Wall Street creditors seeking to block the City of Stockton's filing for Chapter 9 protection took the city to court. At the center of the debate is whether Stockton's obligation to the California Public Employees' Retirement System should be protected. The judge is expected to rule on Monday.
    DRAKE'S BAY OYSTER COMPANY FIGHTS BACK - The Drakes Bay Oyster Company is fighting to stay open in Point Reyes National Seashore despite an order by the US Interior Department to close up shop. The family-owned, Marin County company's cause has generated controversy, while attracting support from Louisiana to Washington, DC.
    Guests: Tom Vacar, KTVU News; Scott Smith, The Record; and Robert Gammon, East Bay Express.
    IS YOUR COUCH TOXIC? INTERVIEW WITH ARLENE BLUM - They're in just about all our homes - couches and chairs containing polyurethane foam which contain large quantities of chemical flame retardants, mandated by California law. But flame retardants have been linked to numerous health problems, including cancer, learning problems and infertility, and state lawmakers are now considering whether to overhaul the law. The debate was started by Berkeley scientist Arlene Blum, who pioneered research showing the dangers of Chlorinated Tris in children's pajamas. She succeeded in getting it removed from clothing, in 1977. Now, decades later, she's back on the front lines battling flame retardants, this time, in our furniture.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17088Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2203H] RUNNING FROM OFFICE: A new study shows women are less likely to have considered running for office and this gender gap exists even when men and women are equally engaged politically.
    SAME-SEX MARRIAGE: Looking ahead to the changes we can expect with same sex marriage after this week's Supreme Court hearings on California's proposition 8 and the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA).
    BEHIND THE HEADLINES: The Westboro Baptist Church. Lauren Drain who was kicked out of the church is on a mission to help others who find themselves in cults.
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), Progressive Magazine's Ruth Conniff, Independent Women's Forum Executive Director Sabrina Schaeffer, Conservative Commentator Darlene Kennedy
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3114] TOPICS: Republicans Eastering; China's Cyber-Sabatoge?; Old School. PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Susan Ferrechio, The Washington Examiner. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#313H] Is It Over for the American Dream? Anchor Jeff Greenfield leads a round table discussion on economic inequality, mobility, debt, and the state of the American economy 4 years after the official end of the recession. We've invited 3 highly-respected economic thinkers from different perspectives, to see if there is some common economic ground, and whether that common ground tells us anything about how we can improve our economic health. Roundtable participants:
    Jared Bernstein, former Chief Economic Adviser to Vice President Biden;
    Rana Foroohar of Time Magazine;
    and John Makin of the American Enterprise Institute.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#212H] And Justice for Some Fifty years ago, the Supreme Court's landmark decision in the case of Gideon v. Wainwright established the constitutional right of criminal defendants to legal representation, even if they can't afford it. The Court ruled there shouldn't be one kind of justice for the rich and another for the poor, but the scales of the American legal system still tilt heavily in favor of the white and wealthy. This week, attorney and legal scholar Bryan Stevenson exposes the system's failures, and ongoing struggles at the crossroads of race, class and justice.
    Stevenson's Alabama-based Equal Justice Initiative has reversed the death sentences of more than 75 inmates. But right now, there are more than 3100 inmates on death row, and more than 60% are members of racial or ethnic minorities. Over time, Supreme Court Justices have fine-tuned the circumstances under which the death penalty may still apply, but no set of laws or jurisprudence can undo wrongful executions - or, it seems, completely prevent them. According to journalists Martin Clancy and Tim O'Brien, authors of Murder at the Supreme Court, in recent years at least 18 inmates were released from death row because DNA evidence proved their innocence. These cases are among more than 140 death penalty exonerations over the last three decades.
    The broadcast closes with a Bill Moyers Essay on the hypocrisy of "justice for all" in a society where billions are squandered for a war born in fraud while the poor are pushed aside.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#211] How Edison Got His Groove Back/ Science Flexes its Muscles Discover how researchers are recovering 100-year-old sound recordings and learn about the technology race to detect performance-enhancing drugs. duration 26:20   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#214] duration 25:40   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Helen of Troy Bettany Hughes travels across the eastern Mediterranean on an epic journey to find out the truth about Helen of Troy, known as "the face that launched a thousand ships." She has been blamed for causing the Trojan War, a conflict that resulted in countless deaths. During her own voyage in Helen's wake, Bettany Hughes sorts the reality from the myths told about Helen. She travels from the city where it is said Helen was born - Sparta in the mountains of Greece - to the archaeological site in modern Turkey that will be forever linked with the war fought in Helen's name: Troy. duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 4:00 pm
    California Women Win The Vote Using both historical materials and live reenactments, this film presents the dramatic Suffrage campaign that won the women of California the right to vote nine years before the Federal Amendment. The campaign becomes a role model and motivation for the rest of the country; today, the tactics and spirit of these women are a guide and an inspiration for citizen activism in a democratic society. Narrated by Bonnie Franklin. duration 26:17   STEREO TVG
  • 4:30 pm
    In Her Power Empowerment expert Helene Lerner, host and executive producer of numerous Emmy winning public television specials, reveals the keys to "authentic power" in this dynamic documentary. Based on Lerner's book about personal reinvention, it encourages women to believe in themselves and pursue even their most intimidating and inconvenient dreams. The special features insights from actors Julianne Moore, Jamie Lee Curtis and Jane Seymour, Xerox CEO Ursula Burns and other inspiring self-made women. Accepting the discomfort of change, embracing one's unique talents, letting go of false beliefs and building a "power web" of support, Learner believes,helps women move through fear and uncertainty. To illustrate her points, Lerner leads a heartfelt discussion among four women who have faced distinct personal obstacles and altered the course of their lives. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 5:00 pm
    Get Real! Wise Women Speak This award-winning documentary features extraordinary women and the inner fire which propels them to use their wisdom and experience to change the world. The film creates a vivid mosaic, weaving together ancient archetypes, modern-day stories and interviews, impressionistic re-enactments and an original score of Celtic and world-influenced music by Jamshied Sharifi. Featuring Marianne Williamson, Della Reese, Jane Fonda, Nikki Giovanni, Sylvia Earle, Susan L. Taylor, Tenzin Palmo, Jody Williams, Indigenous Grandmothers Agnes Baker Pilgram and Flordemayo, Jean Shinoda Bolen, Laura Carstensen, Angeles Arrien, Linda Leitch, Swanee Hunt, Vivian Castleberry, Roberta Pollard and Martha Jackson-Javis. duration 58:25   STEREO TVG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3114] TOPICS: Republicans Eastering; China's Cyber-Sabatoge?; Old School. PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Susan Ferrechio, The Washington Examiner. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5239H] * The Supreme Court heard arguments in two cases on the future of same-sex marriage this week. The first challenged California's Proposition 8, a voter-approved ban on gay marriages. The second challenged the constitutionality of the 1996 federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), which limits the definition of marriage to opposite-sex couples.
    While public opinion in favor of marriage equality is rapidly growing, some justices seemed skeptical on whether the court should even weigh in on the debate. Justice Anthony Kennedy, the courts unpredictable swing vote, even went so far as to call it "uncharted territory." We will get analysis of the arguments in both cases from Joan Biskupic of Reuters and Pete Williams of NBC News. Dan Balz of The Washington Post will report on the political considerations lawmakers - Democrats and Republicans - are making when deciding whether to support gay marriage.
    * Congress may be on recess, but that didn't stop President Obama from prodding lawmakers to take action on strengthening gun laws. During a White House event on Thursday he invoked the Newtown elementary school shooting saying, "Shame on us if we've forgotten." However, the prospects for passing stricter federal gun-control measures seem to be fading. At least three Republican senators - Mike Lee of Utah, Rand Paul of Kentucky and Ted Cruz of Texas - have said they will block a vote on gun legislation. John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times will report on the renewed push by the White House to, in the words of the president, "make sure that fewer parents have to endure the pain of losing a child to an act of violence."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2423H] March 29, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    BROKEN BOLTS ON BAY BRIDGE - The new eastern span of the Bay Bridge will undergo repairs for more than thirty broken bolts. Caltrans says the span is still safe and the setback won't stall the scheduled Labor Day weekend opening. Also, the Golden Gate Bridge makes national news this week as the first bridge in California and the third in the country to have all electronic tolling.
    STOCKTON BANKRUPTCY ON TRIAL - Wall Street creditors seeking to block the City of Stockton's filing for Chapter 9 protection took the city to court. At the center of the debate is whether Stockton's obligation to the California Public Employees' Retirement System should be protected. The judge is expected to rule on Monday.
    DRAKE'S BAY OYSTER COMPANY FIGHTS BACK - The Drakes Bay Oyster Company is fighting to stay open in Point Reyes National Seashore despite an order by the US Interior Department to close up shop. The family-owned, Marin County company's cause has generated controversy, while attracting support from Louisiana to Washington, DC.
    Guests: Tom Vacar, KTVU News; Scott Smith, The Record; and Robert Gammon, East Bay Express.
    IS YOUR COUCH TOXIC? INTERVIEW WITH ARLENE BLUM - They're in just about all our homes - couches and chairs containing polyurethane foam which contain large quantities of chemical flame retardants, mandated by California law. But flame retardants have been linked to numerous health problems, including cancer, learning problems and infertility, and state lawmakers are now considering whether to overhaul the law. The debate was started by Berkeley scientist Arlene Blum, who pioneered research showing the dangers of Chlorinated Tris in children's pajamas. She succeeded in getting it removed from clothing, in 1977. Now, decades later, she's back on the front lines battling flame retardants, this time, in our furniture.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#211] How Edison Got His Groove Back/ Science Flexes its Muscles Discover how researchers are recovering 100-year-old sound recordings and learn about the technology race to detect performance-enhancing drugs. duration 26:20   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1110] Amsterdam City Guide 2 Brianna and Jonathan Atherton travel to Amsterdam, the capital of the Netherlands that was built around a network of beautiful canals overlooked by the gabled mansions of 17th century merchants. Jonathan visits the Rijksmuseum, which has a magnificent collection of paintings by the great Dutch Masters, while Brianna marvels at the artistic genius of Vincent van Gogh at the Van Gogh Museum. She then visits a replica of an East India cargo, discovering how the great wealth of the city was extracted from the Dutch colonies in Asia, while on the other side Jonathan observes a dockland squat. Briana later ventures to the Anne Frank House and hears about her family's last days in hiding from the Nazis. In stark contrast, Jonathan ends his trip partying at the Gay Parade, one of Amsterdam's biggest events of the year. duration 56:23   STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2803] Braving Iraq In the early 1990s, Saddam Hussein destroyed the Mesopotamian Marshes when its inhabitants rebelled against him. Once the richest wildlife habitat in the Middle East, this beautiful "Garden of Eden" was reduced to mile after mile of scorched earth and was thought to have been destroyed forever. But one man is making an extraordinary effort to restore both animals and people to the scene of one of the greatest ecocides of the 20th century. Is it a dream too far? Can man and animal live again in what remains one of the most politically troubled and dangerous places on earth? duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3906H] Hunting The Elements What are things made of? It's a simple question with an astonishing answer. Fewer than 100 naturally occurring elements form the ingredients of everything in our world -- from solid rocks to ethereal gases, from scorching acids to the living cells in our body. David Pogue, lively host of Nova's popular "Making Stuff" series and personal technology correspondent for "The New York Times," spins viewers through the world of weird, extreme chemistry on a quest to unlock the secrets of the elements. Why are some elements, like platinum and gold, relatively inert while others, like phosphorus and potassium, are violently explosive? Why are some vital to every breath we take while others are potentially lethal? Punctuated by surprising and often alarming experiments, Pogue takes NOVA on a roller coaster ride through nature's hidden lab and the compelling stories of discovery that revealed its secrets. duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 12:00 am
    American Masters [#2603H] Philip Roth: Unmasked Often referred to as the greatest living American writer, Philip Roth's 31st novel - and 4th film made from one of his novels-- is due to appear in 2013. "Goodbye Columbus," the collection of short stories published in 1959, put the 26-year old Roth on the map and "Portnoy's Complaint," 10 years later, propelled him into a scandalous spotlight. Yet he steadily earned the reputation as a man of letters, commanding ownership of the Jewish-American novel and making Newark, NJ a literary destination. He practically invented the genre of factual/fictional autobiography - his thinly-veiled "Zuckerman Trilogy" follows the protagonist's path from aspiring young writer to compromised celebrity. His career was considered dead by 1990 - and then exploded with a dozen best sellers in the past two decades. This film bears out Roth's promise to the director: "we'll speak of everything: women, rabbis, politicians, psycho-analysis, literary critics and me." duration 1:25:46   STEREO TVPG
Saturday, March 30, 2013

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too