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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, December 23, 2012

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, December 23, 2012
  • 12:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#150H] What We Can Learn from Lincoln One reason so many people are disillusioned by the state of things in America - even more so after the terror in Newtown - is that our political system hasn't produced consistently good results in a long time. We've forgotten that democracy is supposed to be about addressing our problems through a political system that encourages bargaining, compromise, and progress. Except for taking us to war, showering largesse on the privileged and powerful, and courting donors instead of representing voters, Washington politics promotes gridlock, paralysis, and stalemate.
    But Bill Moyers points to a new ray of hope - not in politics, but in theaters: the movie Lincoln. This week, Pulitzer Prize-winner Tony Kushner, who wrote the film's screenplay, joins Bill for a "history lesson about politics." The two talk about finding the man inside the monument, and what Abraham Lincoln - 147 years after his death - can still teach us all about politics, compromise, and the survival of American democracy.
    "The job of the president is both to make the compromises necessary to actually have things happen in a democracy, which means compromising at a slower pace than anybody would necessarily like," Kushner tells Bill. "At the same time he has to keep telling us where we're going, what we're trying to arrive at. And I think that Obama has done an astonishing job of doing that over and over, of reminding us that government is a good thing, and that we share responsibility for one another because without that shared responsibility our own lives are destroyed."
    "You will be reminded that politics can be made to work for the good of the country," says Bill of the show. "It could even help us reduce the violence in America and make more Newtown tragedies less likely."
    Also on the show, Bill reflects on the elementary school shooting in Connecticut and its implications for our culture.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 am
    Heat and Harvest: Impact of Climate Change On California September 28, 2012 From the vast fields of fruits and nuts in the Central Valley to the waterways of the Sacramento Delta - and many growing centers in between - climate change is beginning to take its toll on California agriculture. According to a recent report commissioned by the state EPA and Energy Commission, yields in key crops are expected to drop significantly over the coming decades as climate change alters key growing conditions.
    The list of crops most directly affected under business as usual conditions, assuming a 2 degree warming by 2050, reads like a walk through a supermarket produce section: yields of citrus crops in the San Joaquin Valley are expected to drop about 18% by 2050; grapes about 6%; cherries and other orchard crops about 9%. But this is not just a look into the state's future. California's farms, often called the nation's breadbasket, are already feeling the effects of the trifecta of converging forces prompted by climate change: shorter cold seasons, longer seasons of extreme heat, and dwindling water supplies.
    This multi-platform collaboration of the Center for Investigative Reporting and KQED's science and environment reporting teams examines how climate change is already playing out in one of California's largest industries. Three documentary reports are woven into one comprehensive program.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 1:30 am
    Changing Seas [#402H] Mysterious Microbes On coral reefs, microorganisms are copious creatures. Throughout Florida, scientists painstakingly work to identify key players within this microbial community and directly link a devastating coral disease to a human pathogen. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 am
    Globe Trekker [#1114] Globe Trekker Special: The Making of Globe Trekker Go behind the scenes of Globe Trekker to find out how the world's longest running and most popular travel series is made. Viewers will join a crew on the road to witness the logistical challenges of shooting this series, hearing the perspectives of hosts, producers, directors and crew. They'll also uncover never-before-seen moments from shoots over the years. duration 54:57   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 am
    Nature [#2403H] Christmas In Yellowstone Nature examines wolves, coyotes, elk, bison, bears and otters as they make their way through their most challenging season of the year. As snow falls and the Christmas lights glow in Jackson Hole, a holiday season of a different sort settles in the great winter world of Yellowstone. Breathtaking landscapes of snowcapped peaks and frozen icicles surround the wildlife as they adapt to the cold conditions. The program also profiles the men who first explored Yellowstone National Park. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVG
  • 4:00 am
    POV [#2503H] The City Dark Is darkness becoming extinct? When filmmaker Ian Cheney moves from rural Maine to New York City and discovers streets awash in light and skies devoid of stars, he embarks on a journey to America's brightest and darkest corners, asking astronomers, cancer researchers and ecologists what is lost in the glare of city lights. Blending a humorous, searching narrative with poetic footage of the night sky, "The City Dark" provides a fascinating introduction to the science of the dark and an exploration of our relationship to the stars. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 5:00 am
    Desert Reef This program reveals the narrative of a changing planet. The fossilized ocean reef in New Mexico's Guadalupe Mountains tells a fascinating story of profound sea-level fluctuation and climate change more than 280 million years ago. Can research on Earth's ancient past help scientists better understand the dire proclamations and controversies surrounding global climate change in the modern world? duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Heat and Harvest: Impact of Climate Change On California September 28, 2012 From the vast fields of fruits and nuts in the Central Valley to the waterways of the Sacramento Delta - and many growing centers in between - climate change is beginning to take its toll on California agriculture. According to a recent report commissioned by the state EPA and Energy Commission, yields in key crops are expected to drop significantly over the coming decades as climate change alters key growing conditions.
    The list of crops most directly affected under business as usual conditions, assuming a 2 degree warming by 2050, reads like a walk through a supermarket produce section: yields of citrus crops in the San Joaquin Valley are expected to drop about 18% by 2050; grapes about 6%; cherries and other orchard crops about 9%. But this is not just a look into the state's future. California's farms, often called the nation's breadbasket, are already feeling the effects of the trifecta of converging forces prompted by climate change: shorter cold seasons, longer seasons of extreme heat, and dwindling water supplies.
    This multi-platform collaboration of the Center for Investigative Reporting and KQED's science and environment reporting teams examines how climate change is already playing out in one of California's largest industries. Three documentary reports are woven into one comprehensive program.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 6:30 am
    Natural Heroes [#506] The Story of More Stuff Three short animated documentaries change the way you look at all the stuff in your life forever. The stories of Bottled Water, Cosmetics and Electronics expose the connections between a huge number of environmental and social issues, and calls us together to create a more sustainable and just world. This is a fast-paced, fact-filled look that will teach you something, make you laugh, and have you thinking twice about "more stuff." duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 7:00 am
    Changing Seas [#402H] Mysterious Microbes On coral reefs, microorganisms are copious creatures. Throughout Florida, scientists painstakingly work to identify key players within this microbial community and directly link a devastating coral disease to a human pathogen. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#150H] What We Can Learn from Lincoln One reason so many people are disillusioned by the state of things in America - even more so after the terror in Newtown - is that our political system hasn't produced consistently good results in a long time. We've forgotten that democracy is supposed to be about addressing our problems through a political system that encourages bargaining, compromise, and progress. Except for taking us to war, showering largesse on the privileged and powerful, and courting donors instead of representing voters, Washington politics promotes gridlock, paralysis, and stalemate.
    But Bill Moyers points to a new ray of hope - not in politics, but in theaters: the movie Lincoln. This week, Pulitzer Prize-winner Tony Kushner, who wrote the film's screenplay, joins Bill for a "history lesson about politics." The two talk about finding the man inside the monument, and what Abraham Lincoln - 147 years after his death - can still teach us all about politics, compromise, and the survival of American democracy.
    "The job of the president is both to make the compromises necessary to actually have things happen in a democracy, which means compromising at a slower pace than anybody would necessarily like," Kushner tells Bill. "At the same time he has to keep telling us where we're going, what we're trying to arrive at. And I think that Obama has done an astonishing job of doing that over and over, of reminding us that government is a good thing, and that we share responsibility for one another because without that shared responsibility our own lives are destroyed."
    "You will be reminded that politics can be made to work for the good of the country," says Bill of the show. "It could even help us reduce the violence in America and make more Newtown tragedies less likely."
    Also on the show, Bill reflects on the elementary school shooting in Connecticut and its implications for our culture.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#926] Global Opportunities Bonds are expensive and investors are fleeing stocks, so where should you invest? This week's WT features global bond manager David Rolley from Loomis Sayles and global stock investor Rupal Bhansali from Ariel Investments, who discuss where they are finding the best investment opportunities. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#221H] Should you put your retirement money into Collectibles and Fine Art? Ric Edelman and his staff visit one of the world's largest auction houses to find out. Plus, our Cash Comedy sketches look at the funny side of the world's worst dates and the editor of Variety gives us an inside look at the business of show business. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2436] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3052] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    After Newtown One week after the tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary School, PBS brings together its news and public affairs teams in a joint effort to analyze and illuminate the issues. This program covers mental illness in young adults; access to guns and gun laws; the neuroscience of violence; the culture and media; the security of schools and colleges. Gwen Ifill anchors the broadcast, which brings together the resources of the PBS NewsHour, Frontline, Washington Week, Need to Know, and Nova. duration 56:46   STEREO
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#150H] What We Can Learn from Lincoln One reason so many people are disillusioned by the state of things in America - even more so after the terror in Newtown - is that our political system hasn't produced consistently good results in a long time. We've forgotten that democracy is supposed to be about addressing our problems through a political system that encourages bargaining, compromise, and progress. Except for taking us to war, showering largesse on the privileged and powerful, and courting donors instead of representing voters, Washington politics promotes gridlock, paralysis, and stalemate.
    But Bill Moyers points to a new ray of hope - not in politics, but in theaters: the movie Lincoln. This week, Pulitzer Prize-winner Tony Kushner, who wrote the film's screenplay, joins Bill for a "history lesson about politics." The two talk about finding the man inside the monument, and what Abraham Lincoln - 147 years after his death - can still teach us all about politics, compromise, and the survival of American democracy.
    "The job of the president is both to make the compromises necessary to actually have things happen in a democracy, which means compromising at a slower pace than anybody would necessarily like," Kushner tells Bill. "At the same time he has to keep telling us where we're going, what we're trying to arrive at. And I think that Obama has done an astonishing job of doing that over and over, of reminding us that government is a good thing, and that we share responsibility for one another because without that shared responsibility our own lives are destroyed."
    "You will be reminded that politics can be made to work for the good of the country," says Bill of the show. "It could even help us reduce the violence in America and make more Newtown tragedies less likely."
    Also on the show, Bill reflects on the elementary school shooting in Connecticut and its implications for our culture.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    Inside Washington [#2436] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3052] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2141H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 pm
    LinkAsia [#121] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:30 pm
    Changing Seas [#402H] Mysterious Microbes On coral reefs, microorganisms are copious creatures. Throughout Florida, scientists painstakingly work to identify key players within this microbial community and directly link a devastating coral disease to a human pathogen. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Heat and Harvest: Impact of Climate Change On California September 28, 2012 From the vast fields of fruits and nuts in the Central Valley to the waterways of the Sacramento Delta - and many growing centers in between - climate change is beginning to take its toll on California agriculture. According to a recent report commissioned by the state EPA and Energy Commission, yields in key crops are expected to drop significantly over the coming decades as climate change alters key growing conditions.
    The list of crops most directly affected under business as usual conditions, assuming a 2 degree warming by 2050, reads like a walk through a supermarket produce section: yields of citrus crops in the San Joaquin Valley are expected to drop about 18% by 2050; grapes about 6%; cherries and other orchard crops about 9%. But this is not just a look into the state's future. California's farms, often called the nation's breadbasket, are already feeling the effects of the trifecta of converging forces prompted by climate change: shorter cold seasons, longer seasons of extreme heat, and dwindling water supplies.
    This multi-platform collaboration of the Center for Investigative Reporting and KQED's science and environment reporting teams examines how climate change is already playing out in one of California's largest industries. Three documentary reports are woven into one comprehensive program.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 3:30 pm
    Moyers & Company [#150H] What We Can Learn from Lincoln One reason so many people are disillusioned by the state of things in America - even more so after the terror in Newtown - is that our political system hasn't produced consistently good results in a long time. We've forgotten that democracy is supposed to be about addressing our problems through a political system that encourages bargaining, compromise, and progress. Except for taking us to war, showering largesse on the privileged and powerful, and courting donors instead of representing voters, Washington politics promotes gridlock, paralysis, and stalemate.
    But Bill Moyers points to a new ray of hope - not in politics, but in theaters: the movie Lincoln. This week, Pulitzer Prize-winner Tony Kushner, who wrote the film's screenplay, joins Bill for a "history lesson about politics." The two talk about finding the man inside the monument, and what Abraham Lincoln - 147 years after his death - can still teach us all about politics, compromise, and the survival of American democracy.
    "The job of the president is both to make the compromises necessary to actually have things happen in a democracy, which means compromising at a slower pace than anybody would necessarily like," Kushner tells Bill. "At the same time he has to keep telling us where we're going, what we're trying to arrive at. And I think that Obama has done an astonishing job of doing that over and over, of reminding us that government is a good thing, and that we share responsibility for one another because without that shared responsibility our own lives are destroyed."
    "You will be reminded that politics can be made to work for the good of the country," says Bill of the show. "It could even help us reduce the violence in America and make more Newtown tragedies less likely."
    Also on the show, Bill reflects on the elementary school shooting in Connecticut and its implications for our culture.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 4:30 pm
    Heat and Harvest: Impact of Climate Change On California September 28, 2012 From the vast fields of fruits and nuts in the Central Valley to the waterways of the Sacramento Delta - and many growing centers in between - climate change is beginning to take its toll on California agriculture. According to a recent report commissioned by the state EPA and Energy Commission, yields in key crops are expected to drop significantly over the coming decades as climate change alters key growing conditions.
    The list of crops most directly affected under business as usual conditions, assuming a 2 degree warming by 2050, reads like a walk through a supermarket produce section: yields of citrus crops in the San Joaquin Valley are expected to drop about 18% by 2050; grapes about 6%; cherries and other orchard crops about 9%. But this is not just a look into the state's future. California's farms, often called the nation's breadbasket, are already feeling the effects of the trifecta of converging forces prompted by climate change: shorter cold seasons, longer seasons of extreme heat, and dwindling water supplies.
    This multi-platform collaboration of the Center for Investigative Reporting and KQED's science and environment reporting teams examines how climate change is already playing out in one of California's largest industries. Three documentary reports are woven into one comprehensive program.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 5:00 pm
    Inside Washington [#2436] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 5:30 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3052] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    Heat and Harvest: Impact of Climate Change On California September 28, 2012 From the vast fields of fruits and nuts in the Central Valley to the waterways of the Sacramento Delta - and many growing centers in between - climate change is beginning to take its toll on California agriculture. According to a recent report commissioned by the state EPA and Energy Commission, yields in key crops are expected to drop significantly over the coming decades as climate change alters key growing conditions.
    The list of crops most directly affected under business as usual conditions, assuming a 2 degree warming by 2050, reads like a walk through a supermarket produce section: yields of citrus crops in the San Joaquin Valley are expected to drop about 18% by 2050; grapes about 6%; cherries and other orchard crops about 9%. But this is not just a look into the state's future. California's farms, often called the nation's breadbasket, are already feeling the effects of the trifecta of converging forces prompted by climate change: shorter cold seasons, longer seasons of extreme heat, and dwindling water supplies.
    This multi-platform collaboration of the Center for Investigative Reporting and KQED's science and environment reporting teams examines how climate change is already playing out in one of California's largest industries. Three documentary reports are woven into one comprehensive program.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 6:30 pm
    Changing Seas [#402H] Mysterious Microbes On coral reefs, microorganisms are copious creatures. Throughout Florida, scientists painstakingly work to identify key players within this microbial community and directly link a devastating coral disease to a human pathogen. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1108] Globe Trekker Food Hour: Morocco Ben O'Donoghue starts his culinary adventures with lunch at the camel market in Casablanca, learns to cook "harira" (the soup that breaks the Ramadan fast) in the imperial city of Fes, lives with a nomadic family in the high dunes of the Western Sahara, scours the markets in Marrakesh for ingredients to make the classic "tagine," samples Berber delicacies in the High Atlas mountains and fishes for his dinner in the port of Essaouira. duration 57:38   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#150H] What We Can Learn from Lincoln One reason so many people are disillusioned by the state of things in America - even more so after the terror in Newtown - is that our political system hasn't produced consistently good results in a long time. We've forgotten that democracy is supposed to be about addressing our problems through a political system that encourages bargaining, compromise, and progress. Except for taking us to war, showering largesse on the privileged and powerful, and courting donors instead of representing voters, Washington politics promotes gridlock, paralysis, and stalemate.
    But Bill Moyers points to a new ray of hope - not in politics, but in theaters: the movie Lincoln. This week, Pulitzer Prize-winner Tony Kushner, who wrote the film's screenplay, joins Bill for a "history lesson about politics." The two talk about finding the man inside the monument, and what Abraham Lincoln - 147 years after his death - can still teach us all about politics, compromise, and the survival of American democracy.
    "The job of the president is both to make the compromises necessary to actually have things happen in a democracy, which means compromising at a slower pace than anybody would necessarily like," Kushner tells Bill. "At the same time he has to keep telling us where we're going, what we're trying to arrive at. And I think that Obama has done an astonishing job of doing that over and over, of reminding us that government is a good thing, and that we share responsibility for one another because without that shared responsibility our own lives are destroyed."
    "You will be reminded that politics can be made to work for the good of the country," says Bill of the show. "It could even help us reduce the violence in America and make more Newtown tragedies less likely."
    Also on the show, Bill reflects on the elementary school shooting in Connecticut and its implications for our culture.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 pm
    Iranian Americans This program explores the history and lives of the Iranian American community in the United States. Beginning with the 1979 Iranian Revolution, through the mass immigration of Iranians to the U.S., the story of the Iranian Americans is a classic American immigrant story. The Iranian Americans have overcome hardship, including discrimination, to become a great voice in the chorus of the American melting pot. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 10:00 pm
    First Freedom: The Fight for Religious Liberty The right of freedom of religion in the United States instigated a fundamental shift in human history. No other aspect of the American Revolution was as intrepid in its own time, or ultimately, as influential worldwide. This program profiles the generation of colonial Americans who raised the ideal of religious freedom to the level of a fundamental human right. And it honors those founders who could not rest until it was carved into law. duration 1:26:46   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 11:30 pm
    Heat and Harvest: Impact of Climate Change On California September 28, 2012 From the vast fields of fruits and nuts in the Central Valley to the waterways of the Sacramento Delta - and many growing centers in between - climate change is beginning to take its toll on California agriculture. According to a recent report commissioned by the state EPA and Energy Commission, yields in key crops are expected to drop significantly over the coming decades as climate change alters key growing conditions.
    The list of crops most directly affected under business as usual conditions, assuming a 2 degree warming by 2050, reads like a walk through a supermarket produce section: yields of citrus crops in the San Joaquin Valley are expected to drop about 18% by 2050; grapes about 6%; cherries and other orchard crops about 9%. But this is not just a look into the state's future. California's farms, often called the nation's breadbasket, are already feeling the effects of the trifecta of converging forces prompted by climate change: shorter cold seasons, longer seasons of extreme heat, and dwindling water supplies.
    This multi-platform collaboration of the Center for Investigative Reporting and KQED's science and environment reporting teams examines how climate change is already playing out in one of California's largest industries. Three documentary reports are woven into one comprehensive program.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 12:00 am
    Globe Trekker [#1114] Globe Trekker Special: The Making of Globe Trekker Go behind the scenes of Globe Trekker to find out how the world's longest running and most popular travel series is made. Viewers will join a crew on the road to witness the logistical challenges of shooting this series, hearing the perspectives of hosts, producers, directors and crew. They'll also uncover never-before-seen moments from shoots over the years. duration 54:57   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
Sunday, December 23, 2012

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too