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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

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KQED World: Saturday, November 24, 2012

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, November 24, 2012
  • 12:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#31365Z] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17328Z] duration 28:03   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10505H] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 am
    Charlie Rose [#18240H] (original broadcast date: 11/23/12)
    Charlie Rose Brain Series 2 Episode 11: Pain
    Eric Kandel of Columbia University; David Julius, University of California, San Francisco; Allan Basbaum, University of California, San Francisco; Robert Dworkin, University of Rochester Medical Center; David Borsook of Boston Children's Hospital; and Laurie Klein, nursing student at LSU.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2740] Tavis talks with musician and Grammy-winning producer-turned-label exec Don Was, who shares the future he sees for Blue Note Records. duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 3:30 am
    Nightly Business Report [#31365Z] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10505H] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Democracy Now! [#2085] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Global 3000 [#443] Deadly Mosquitoes - Kenya's Battle Against Malaria Malaria is a growing problem in the Kenyan highlands. Because the nights are getting warmer and rain more frequent, mosquitoes that carry the disease are multiplying rapidly. Aid agencies and NGOs have joined forces with the World Health Organization to focus on prevention. The Kenyan NGO Alliance Against Malaria distributes free mosquito nets and uses rap music to teach children about the disease. duration 26:10   STEREO
  • 6:30 am
    European Journal [#3046] duration 26:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1612H] CARING FOR AN AGING PARENT - "A lot of people in caregiving situations ask, 'Why is God doing this to me? Where is God in the midst of all this?' and they really struggle with spiritual matters," says Rev. Kate Bryant. Her church started a special ministry to support parental caregivers. We also talk to Jane Gross, author of "A Bittersweet Season: Caring for Our Aging Parents - and Ourselves." (originally broadcast April 13, 2012).
    RABBI ADIN STEINSALTZ - "The idea of the Talmud is that you are allowed to ask questions about everything," says Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz, who calls the Talmud "the central pillar of Jewish culture" and "a vast book encouraging you to ask questions." Translating the Talmud into modern Hebrew and English has been his life's work. (originally broadcast April 27, 2012).
    DANA GREENE ON POET DENISE LEVERTOV - Watch our interview at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC with biographer Dana Greene, author of Denise Levertov: A Poet's Life. Levertov (1923-1997) was a poet of doubt and faith, Christianity and Judaism, war and peace, protest, lament, nature, spirituality, and more.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#146H] What It's Like to Go to War America has been at war for over a decade, with millions of soldiers having seen death and dying up close in Afghanistan and Iraq. But most Americans -- watching comfortably on their TVs and computers, witness to statistics, speeches, and "expert" rhetoric -- don't get what's really going on there. In an encore edition of Moyers & Company (check local listings), Bill talks to Karl Marlantes - a highly-decorated Vietnam veteran, Rhodes Scholar, author, and PTSD survivor - about what we on the insulated outside need to understand about the minds and hearts of our modern warriors. Marlantes shares with Bill intimate stories about how his battlefield experiences both shaped him and nearly destroyed him, even after returning to civilian life. "'Thou shalt not kill' is a tenet you just do not violate, and so all your young life, that's drilled into your head," Marlantes tells Bill. "And then suddenly, you're 18 or 19 and they're saying, 'Go get 'em and kill for your country.' And then you come back and it's like, 'Well, thou shalt not kill' again. Believe me, that's a difficult thing to deal with." "You take a young man and put him in the role of God, where he is asked to take a life -- that's something no 19-year-old is able to handle." What it's like to go to war. Next on Moyers & Company. duration 52:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2432] duration 26:46   TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5221H] President Obama's historic trip to Asia was overshadowed this week by escalating violence in the Middle East. In addition, there were the looming fiscal cliff negotiations and post-election politics on Capitol Hill.
    * The President dispatched Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to the region to help finalize a cease fire agreement between Israel and the Palestinians, But are the chances for peace more complicated now that with new leaders and power structures in the region following the Arab Spring? We'll get analysis from Peter Baker of The New York Times who traveled overseas with the president this week.
    * Molly Ball of The Atlantic will examine the post-election politics surrounding the fiscal cliff negotiations and the political maneuvering ahead.
    * Meanwhile, many Americans will be spending part of their holiday weekend shopping. But with a sluggish economic recovery and the potential for tax increases if a deficit deal is not reached by year's end, will shoppers spend less? Jim Tankersley of National Journal will report on some of the key issues here at home and overseas that could slow down the US economic recovery.
    * While millions of people will be spending this holiday weekend with family and friends, that's not the case for tens of thousands of men and women serving in the military. Martha Raddatz of ABC News shares some of the untold stories of sacrifice in this week's Washington Week Backstory.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    Prison Break August 24, 2012 An in-depth investigation of the unprecedented and far-reaching efforts to overhaul California's prison system. KQED and the Center for Investigative Reporting examine the impact of the decision to transfer authority for thousands of low-level offenders from state prisons to local systems, following the call from the U.S. Supreme Court to reduce overcrowding and improve inmate health. Featuring interviews with San Francisco D.A. George Gascon and Los Angeles D.A. Steve Cooley and hosted by Scott Shafer. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17328Z] duration 28:03   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2137H] HEAVY SPENDING ON HOLIDAY SHOPPING: Despite the looming threat of the fiscal cliff, women are still planning on spending big on holiday shopping.
    UK WILL NOT SEE WOMEN BISHOPS: The Church of England won't be setting an example of gender equality. The church did not pass a measure to ordain women bishops, despite growing support.
    WOMEN AND HOURLY WORK: Working Mother Magazine's Carol Evans explains the costs and benefits of hourly work for women and businesses.
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC); Hadley Heath Independent Women's Forum Policy Analyst; Marjorie Clifton SpikeTheWaterCooler.com Founder; Crystal Wright, Conservative Blogger.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3048] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#263H] Scott Simon anchors. On a special "Help Wanted" edition, Need to Know updates two reports about innovative state employment programs: the first, in Oregon, to create jobs; the second, in Rhode Island, to preserve them. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#146H] What It's Like to Go to War America has been at war for over a decade, with millions of soldiers having seen death and dying up close in Afghanistan and Iraq. But most Americans -- watching comfortably on their TVs and computers, witness to statistics, speeches, and "expert" rhetoric -- don't get what's really going on there. In an encore edition of Moyers & Company (check local listings), Bill talks to Karl Marlantes - a highly-decorated Vietnam veteran, Rhodes Scholar, author, and PTSD survivor - about what we on the insulated outside need to understand about the minds and hearts of our modern warriors. Marlantes shares with Bill intimate stories about how his battlefield experiences both shaped him and nearly destroyed him, even after returning to civilian life. "'Thou shalt not kill' is a tenet you just do not violate, and so all your young life, that's drilled into your head," Marlantes tells Bill. "And then suddenly, you're 18 or 19 and they're saying, 'Go get 'em and kill for your country.' And then you come back and it's like, 'Well, thou shalt not kill' again. Believe me, that's a difficult thing to deal with." "You take a young man and put him in the role of God, where he is asked to take a life -- that's something no 19-year-old is able to handle." What it's like to go to war. Next on Moyers & Company. duration 52:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#208] Tagging Tuna/ Darfur Cooking Stoves Scientists work to uncover the lives of tuna in time to protect them and a simple stove design from Bay Area researchers is improving life in the refugee camps of Darfur. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#148] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Miller Center Forums [#1608] Michele Dunne - Crisis In Syria Michele Dunne is director of the Atlantic Council's Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East. She has served in the White House on the National Security Council staff, on the State Department's Policy Planning staff, in its Bureau of Intelligence and Research, and as a diplomat in Cairo and Jerusalem. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Playing for the World: The 1904 Fort Shaw Indian Girls Basketball Team In 1902, a unique combination of Native women came together at a boarding school in Montana. They used the new sport of basketball to help them adjust to a rapidly changing world. Their travels and experiences led them to places they never imagined. Ultimately, these women played for something much larger than themselves. duration 56:36   STEREO TVG
  • 4:00 pm
    Modoc War, The The Modoc War of 1872 was one of the costliest American Indian wars in U.S. history. For seven months, a handful of Modoc Indian warriors and their families held off hundreds of U.S. Army soldiers. The international press took notice and people were enthralled as one of the last real-life Wild West battles unfolded on the American frontier. Again and again, the small band of Indians overcame incredible odds to protect their way of life. "The Modoc War" revisits the battle scenes, and uses rare historical images and original wood cut drawings from the period. Additionally, interviews with Modoc descendants and written first-hand accounts bring the Modoc War to life. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 pm
    History Detectives [#708] * Mussolini Dagger - Many servicemen brought back souvenirs from World War II, but did the uncle of a Reno, Nevada, man score a dagger from Fascist Italian dictator Benito Mussolini? The dagger bears the symbols of Italian Fascism, and the initial "M" hangs from the belt clip. A family letter says the uncle had orders to pick up Mussolini, but when he arrived, Mussolini was already dead and hanging in the town square. The letter goes on to say that he went to Mussolini's apartment, where he grabbed the dictator's dagger. Wes Cowan connects various records, pictures and expert opinions to come up with an answer.
    * Liberia Letter - A Lynchburg, South Carolina, woman has a scrapbook of handwritten letters sent to her great-great-grandmother, a freed slave who lived in South Carolina. She thinks her ancestor's brother, Harvey McLeod, wrote the letters. What caught her attention were the repeated references to Liberia. In 1877, Harvey writes: "I hope you will change your mind and come to Liberia, Africa with us." Was this family part of the post-slavery exodus to Liberia? As Tukufu Zuberi tracks the path of the letters, the story pieces together a tale of slaves adapting to freedom.
    * N.E.A.R. Device - A Colorado ham radio enthusiast may have stumbled across some Cold War history. While sorting through a bucket of old power adapters, he came across a curious device, a hand-sized black box with the wording "National Emergency Alarm Repeater, Civilian Warning Device." The contributor believes it may have had something to do with nuclear attack preparedness, but he lived through the cold war and has never heard of a Civilian Warning Device. Gwendolyn Wright sifts through the secrets to find out whether anyone mass-produced this device and what happened to this Civilian Warning program.
    duration 56:15   STEREO TVG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3048] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5221H] President Obama's historic trip to Asia was overshadowed this week by escalating violence in the Middle East. In addition, there were the looming fiscal cliff negotiations and post-election politics on Capitol Hill.
    * The President dispatched Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to the region to help finalize a cease fire agreement between Israel and the Palestinians, But are the chances for peace more complicated now that with new leaders and power structures in the region following the Arab Spring? We'll get analysis from Peter Baker of The New York Times who traveled overseas with the president this week.
    * Molly Ball of The Atlantic will examine the post-election politics surrounding the fiscal cliff negotiations and the political maneuvering ahead.
    * Meanwhile, many Americans will be spending part of their holiday weekend shopping. But with a sluggish economic recovery and the potential for tax increases if a deficit deal is not reached by year's end, will shoppers spend less? Jim Tankersley of National Journal will report on some of the key issues here at home and overseas that could slow down the US economic recovery.
    * While millions of people will be spending this holiday weekend with family and friends, that's not the case for tens of thousands of men and women serving in the military. Martha Raddatz of ABC News shares some of the untold stories of sacrifice in this week's Washington Week Backstory.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    Prison Break August 24, 2012 An in-depth investigation of the unprecedented and far-reaching efforts to overhaul California's prison system. KQED and the Center for Investigative Reporting examine the impact of the decision to transfer authority for thousands of low-level offenders from state prisons to local systems, following the call from the U.S. Supreme Court to reduce overcrowding and improve inmate health. Featuring interviews with San Francisco D.A. George Gascon and Los Angeles D.A. Steve Cooley and hosted by Scott Shafer. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#208] Tagging Tuna/ Darfur Cooking Stoves Scientists work to uncover the lives of tuna in time to protect them and a simple stove design from Bay Area researchers is improving life in the refugee camps of Darfur. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1110] Amsterdam City Guide 2 Brianna and Jonathan Atherton travel to Amsterdam, the capital of the Netherlands that was built around a network of beautiful canals overlooked by the gabled mansions of 17th century merchants. Jonathan visits the Rijksmuseum, which has a magnificent collection of paintings by the great Dutch Masters, while Brianna marvels at the artistic genius of Vincent van Gogh at the Van Gogh Museum. She then visits a replica of an East India cargo, discovering how the great wealth of the city was extracted from the Dutch colonies in Asia, while on the other side Jonathan observes a dockland squat. Briana later ventures to the Anne Frank House and hears about her family's last days in hiding from the Nazis. In stark contrast, Jonathan ends his trip partying at the Gay Parade, one of Amsterdam's biggest events of the year. duration 56:23   STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2904H] My Life As A Turkey Based on a true story. Deep in the wilds of Florida, writer and naturalist Joe Hutto was given the rare opportunity to raise wild turkeys from chicks. Hutto spent each day out and about as a "wild turkey" with his family of chicks until the day came when he had to let his children grow up and go off on their own. As it turned out, this was harder than he ever imagined. Hutto's story eventually became a book, Illuminations in the Flatlands. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3916#] Inside The Megastorm Was Hurricane Sandy a freak combination of weather systems? Or are hurricanes increasing in intensity due to a warming climate? How did this perfect storm make search and rescue so dangerous? This episode takes viewers moment by moment through Hurricane Sandy, its impacts, and the future of storm protection. Through first person accounts from those who survived, and from experts and scientists, it gives scientific context to a new breed of storms. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 11:00 pm
    Nova scienceNOW [#604H] Can I Eat That? What are the secrets behind your favorite foods? Why are some treats - like chocolate chip cookies - delectable, while others - like cookies made with mealworms - disgusting? You may think you understand what makes something sweet, salty or bitter, but David Pogue gets a taste of a much more complicated truth as he ventures into labs and kitchens where everything from apple pie to Thanksgiving turkey to juicy grasshoppers is diced, sliced, dissected and put under the microscope. If scientists can uncover exactly what's behind the mouth-watering flavors and textures we take for granted every day, could they help us enjoy our food more - without packing on the pounds? duration 55:17   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 12:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#146H] What It's Like to Go to War America has been at war for over a decade, with millions of soldiers having seen death and dying up close in Afghanistan and Iraq. But most Americans -- watching comfortably on their TVs and computers, witness to statistics, speeches, and "expert" rhetoric -- don't get what's really going on there. In an encore edition of Moyers & Company (check local listings), Bill talks to Karl Marlantes - a highly-decorated Vietnam veteran, Rhodes Scholar, author, and PTSD survivor - about what we on the insulated outside need to understand about the minds and hearts of our modern warriors. Marlantes shares with Bill intimate stories about how his battlefield experiences both shaped him and nearly destroyed him, even after returning to civilian life. "'Thou shalt not kill' is a tenet you just do not violate, and so all your young life, that's drilled into your head," Marlantes tells Bill. "And then suddenly, you're 18 or 19 and they're saying, 'Go get 'em and kill for your country.' And then you come back and it's like, 'Well, thou shalt not kill' again. Believe me, that's a difficult thing to deal with." "You take a young man and put him in the role of God, where he is asked to take a life -- that's something no 19-year-old is able to handle." What it's like to go to war. Next on Moyers & Company. duration 52:46   STEREO TVG
Saturday, November 24, 2012

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    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

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      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

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      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

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