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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

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KQED World: Saturday, October 13, 2012

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, October 13, 2012
  • 12:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#31335Z] Record earnings at two of the nation's biggest banks: JPMorgan and Wells Fargo. NBR's Susie Gharib speaks with KBW banking analyst Fred Cannon. Wall Street shrugs off those record banking results and ends the week lower. Tonight's "Market Monitor" believes 2013 will be a year of revitalization for U.S. stocks. And, political campaign ads are crowding the airwaves but who is actually losing out? NBR's Darren Gersh takes a look at how the nation's retailers are paying the price. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17286Z] duration 28:03   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10475H] Campaign 2012 * Nobel Peace Prize goes to the European Union * Making Sen$e: Predicting the Presidential Election * Shields and Brooks duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 am
    Charlie Rose [#18210H] (original broadcast date: 10/12/12)
    * a conversation with Felipe Calderon, President of Mexico
    * Bill Maris & Kevin Rose of Google on Google Ventures
    * photographer Brigitte Lacombe on her book and exhibition "Hey'Ya: Arab Women in Sport."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2710Z] Phyllis Bennis (Institute for Policy Studies) duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Nightly Business Report [#31335Z] Record earnings at two of the nation's biggest banks: JPMorgan and Wells Fargo. NBR's Susie Gharib speaks with KBW banking analyst Fred Cannon. Wall Street shrugs off those record banking results and ends the week lower. Tonight's "Market Monitor" believes 2013 will be a year of revitalization for U.S. stocks. And, political campaign ads are crowding the airwaves but who is actually losing out? NBR's Darren Gersh takes a look at how the nation's retailers are paying the price. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10475H] Campaign 2012 * Nobel Peace Prize goes to the European Union * Making Sen$e: Predicting the Presidential Election * Shields and Brooks duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Democracy Now! [#2055] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Global 3000 [#440] India's Sterilization Lottery EVERY TICKET A WINNER - INDIA'S STERILIZATION LOTTERY: India's population has already reached 1.22 billion people and it's constantly growing. While birth rates among the new middle class in urban areas have diminished considerably, large families in the countryside are still the norm. In an effort to reduce birth rates, especially in rural regions, authorities recently introduced a program that's likely to raise eyebrows in other parts of the world. Women are being offered the chance to win big rewards by opting for sterilization. In the state of Rajasthan, women receive 600 rupies (about 9 euros) as soon as they've undergone the procedure. In addition they are automatically entered in a lottery. The prizes range from televisions, kitchen appliances to even cars. Offering incentives to volunteer for sterilization has fuelled plenty of criticism, but India's health authorities say the campaign is a big success. duration 26:10   STEREO
  • 6:30 am
    European Journal [#3040] Drug Dealers Bring The Wild West to Marseilles FRANCE: WILD WEST IN MARSEILLES: The drugs trade is flourishing in the northern part of Marseilles and gang warfare is raging. 20 people have already been killed in gang related violence this year. Police and other officials are giving the area a wide berth. Residents are largely left to cope on their own in troubled neighborhoods. The northern part of Marseille is home to the poorest of the poor. Half of the area's young people are unemployed, a fact that plays into the hands of weapons and drug dealers. For years the projects have been controlled by gangs who are waging a brutal conflict with each other. So far politicians have proven ineffective when it comes to restoring order. Now the mayor is calling for the army to be sent in. duration 26:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1606H] NONE OF THE ABOVE - Part 1 of a 3-part series on the fast-growing number of Americans - now 20% of US adults - who have no affiliation with any religious organization. Host Bob Abernethy reports the results of a joint Pew Forum/RENW survey, released this week, on the characteristics of the unaffiliated, especially the one-third of young people 18 to 29 who describe themselves as atheists, agnostics or "nothing in particular." Why is this group growing so fast, and what are the implications of this growth for politics and religion? < br />MINNESOTA MARRIAGE AMENDMENT - Minnesotans will vote in the upcoming election on a hotly contested amendment to the state constitution that would define marriage as the union of one man and one woman. As Fred de Sam Lazaro reports, the Minneapolis-St. Paul Catholic archdiocese is appropriating more than $1 million to support the amendment but other religious organizations are working to defeat it. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#140H] Justice Not Politics * This week, James Balog, one of the world's premier cinema-photographers, explains how "the earth is having a fever." At tremendous risk to his own safety, Balog has been documenting the erosion of glaciers in Switzerland, Greenland, Iceland, and Alaska. He joins Bill to share his photos and discoveries, describing his process and transformation from climate change skeptic to true believer. Balog's soon-to-be-released film, Chasing Ice, is a breathtaking account of climate change in action.
    * Afterward, Bill explores a judicial system under partisan attack. 38 states now elect their high court judges. Over the last decade, $200 million - much of it secret and tied to partisan agendas - has been pouring into these judicial campaigns. In Florida, Pennsylvania, and Iowa, for example, justices are being targeted by radical groups that abhor judicial independence and want the courts to reflect their own political biases.
    In Iowa, a state whose judicial system has been praised for its fairness and impartiality, the political and religious Right ousted 3 justices in 2010 over marriage equality, and is now trying to take down a fourth over the same issue. But this time a bipartisan coalition called Justice Not Politics is fighting back. Its co-founders - Democrat Sally Pederson and Republican Joy Corning, each of whom served Iowa for 8 years as lieutenant governor - talk with Bill about what's at stake when justices are at the mercy of partisan passions and money in politics.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2426] duration 26:46   TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5215H] All eyes were on Danville, KY Thursday night for a spirited debate - the one and only - between Vice President Joe Biden and Congressman Paul Ryan. Last week's first presidential debate had a significant impact on the race giving Mitt Romney a much needed boost against President Obama. Will the performance of Biden or Ryan sway voters or make them more eager to see Obama/Romney Debate #2 next week?
    Joining Gwen for a look at the state of the presidential race, analysis of the Vice Presidential square-off plus the week's developments on the attack on the US consulate in Libya and Romney's foreign policy address:
    Jeff Zeleny of The New York Times,
    Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post,
    Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times,
    and Alexis Simendinger of Real Clear Politics.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2402H] October 12, 2012 NEWS PANEL:
    CAMPAIGN UPDATE - Thursday night's debate between Vice President Joe Biden and Congressman Paul Ryan takes on new significance with the race remaining a tight one following last week's debate between President Obama and Gov. Romney. Meanwhile former President Clinton was in California to stump for Democratic congressional candidates and President Obama made a fundraising stop in San Francisco.
    PROPOSITIONS 34 & 36 - For the first time in more than 30 years, Californians will decide whether to abolish the death penalty, replacing it with life imprisonment without parole. Prop 34 advocates say repealing the penalty will save the state $100 million annually in the first few years. Prop 36 would revise the state's harsh 3 strikes law to impose a life sentence only when a new felony conviction is serious or violent.
    SAN FRANCISCO SHERIFF MIRKARIMI REINSTATED - Mirkarimi returned to work on Wednesday after a nearly 9-hour hearing Tuesday and a vote by 4 members of the Board of Supervisors to reinstate him. Mirkarimi was suspended without pay by Mayor Ed Lee for official misconduct after pleading guilty to a misdemeanor count of false imprisonment stemming from an altercation with his wife, Eliana Lopez. District Attorney George Gascon has called for the sheriff to forfeit oversight of issues related to domestic abuse in the department and efforts to recall him are already underway.
    Guests: Carla Marinucci, San Francisco Chronicle; Scott Shafer, KQED Public Radio; and Barbara Taylor, KCBS
    INTERVIEW: AWARD-WINNING HUSBAND AND WIFE JOURNALISTS LYNN POVICH AND STEPHEN SHEPARD - Povich and 45 of her female colleagues made history in 1970 when they filed the first-ever sex discrimination lawsuit against their bosses at Newsweek magazine. Her new memoir, "The Good Girls Revolt", details the inspirational story behind this milestone in the women's movement. Former Businessweek editor-in-chief Shepard's book, "Deadlines and Disruptions", chronicles his nearly 50 years in journalism and the industry's turbulent transition to the digital age.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17286Z] duration 28:03   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2131H] ROMNEY'S APPEAL TO WOMEN: The GOP Presidential candidate is hopeful his recent comments on abortion will lure in more women voters.
    INTERNATIONAL DAY OF THE GIRL CHILD: As the UN marks the first international day of the girl child a 14-year-old Pakistani girl fights for her life because of her dedication to educating girls worldwide. The UN also takes aim at ending child marriage.
    WOMEN AND WAGE THEFT: A hush, hush problem that is affecting women across the country and costing them millions of dollars.
    Panelists: Del.Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC); Feminist Majority Foundation's Kim Gandy; Conservative Commentator Tara Setmayer; The Heritage Foundation's Jennifer Marshall.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3042] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#257H] Anchor Ray Suarez hosts a round table discussion about the likelihood of going over the "fiscal cliff", the effect on the American economy, and possible solutions to avoiding another recession. Guests on the panel include economist Douglas Holtz-Eakin, a former Director of the Congressional Budget Office, former four-term Oklahoma Senator Don Nickles, economist Bo Cutter and Maya Rockeymore, Chair of the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare. duration 26:46   STEREO
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#140H] Justice Not Politics * This week, James Balog, one of the world's premier cinema-photographers, explains how "the earth is having a fever." At tremendous risk to his own safety, Balog has been documenting the erosion of glaciers in Switzerland, Greenland, Iceland, and Alaska. He joins Bill to share his photos and discoveries, describing his process and transformation from climate change skeptic to true believer. Balog's soon-to-be-released film, Chasing Ice, is a breathtaking account of climate change in action.
    * Afterward, Bill explores a judicial system under partisan attack. 38 states now elect their high court judges. Over the last decade, $200 million - much of it secret and tied to partisan agendas - has been pouring into these judicial campaigns. In Florida, Pennsylvania, and Iowa, for example, justices are being targeted by radical groups that abhor judicial independence and want the courts to reflect their own political biases.
    In Iowa, a state whose judicial system has been praised for its fairness and impartiality, the political and religious Right ousted 3 justices in 2010 over marriage equality, and is now trying to take down a fourth over the same issue. But this time a bipartisan coalition called Justice Not Politics is fighting back. Its co-founders - Democrat Sally Pederson and Republican Joy Corning, each of whom served Iowa for 8 years as lieutenant governor - talk with Bill about what's at stake when justices are at the mercy of partisan passions and money in politics.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    This American Land [#211] Idaho Wilderness, Loggerhead Turtles, Sandfish Lizard, Wrangling Water Idaho Wilderness: Its wild residents could fill a volume of some of the most iconic American wildlife: From elk and moose to spawning salmon, mountain goats and sheep to black bears and cougars. Efforts are underway to protect central Idaho's Boulder-White Clouds Mountains, designating 330,000 acres as wilderness. The proposed federal legislation would both protect these lands, and ensure economic sustainability.
    Loggerhead Turtles: These animals make one of the most treacherous journeys of any creatures, without any parental involvement. Human development is making their survival even more dangerous. Sharon Collins of Georgia Public Broadcasting shows us how these amazing reptiles struggle in an epic journey. These large sea turtles are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act.
    Sandfish Lizard: The sandfish is a little lizard that lives in the Sahara Desert. Scientists are fascinated by its slithering moves. It can tuck its limbs close to its body, and literally "swim" through the sand, just like an eel wiggles its way through water. Physicists are studying this little creature, and using it to inspire new robotic moves that could one day help search-and-rescue crews find survivors in piles of rubble, left from disasters like Hurricane Katrina. The little sandfish is teaching us a lot about what it takes to worm through rugged terrain and debris.
    Wrangling Water: Cattle are not the only things being rounded up in Florida. Ranchers are also herding water! For years, experts have searched for answers about how to increase water storage in the northern Everglades, and reduce the pollution levels. A pilot program pays ranchers to use their low-lying lands for "environmental services" - namely to store water. Water that's captured during the June through October wet season can then be slowly released during dry months into the tributaries of Lake Okeechobee. And it's proving to be a good thing both for the economy and the environment.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    QUEST [#608H] Agricultural Pests, Sylvia Earle As winters have become warmer, California is becoming more hospitable to destructive insect pests. QUEST investigates how climate change is impacting the state's massive farming industry. Plus, meet two ocean scientists: Stephen Palumbi, who reflects on his career studying tropical corals; and renowned deep sea explorer Sylvia Earle. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Miller Center Forums [#1508] Theda Skocpol - The Tea Party and the Remaking of Republican Conservatism Theda Skocpol is the Victor S. Thomas Professor of Government and Sociology at Harvard University, where she served as director of the Center for American Political Studies (1999 to 2006) and as dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (2005 to 2007). Her focus is on US public policy and citizen participation. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Rare This documentary follows an inspiring and extraordinary mother in a race against time as she unites a group of isolated people from around the world in a quest to cure her daughter's rare genetic disease. Together, they discover that community, laughter and hope are some of the greatest therapies.
    When Donna Appell learned that her baby daughter Ashley suffered from a rare genetic disorder that would kill her in 30 years, she was told there were less than 30 people in the US who had been diagnosed with it and no one knew where to find them. Realizing that no one was going to help cure "just one child," Donna set about forming an advocacy group and harnessing the internet to gather as many patients as possible who suffered from Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome (HPS), which includes albinism, blindness, a bleeding disorder and often a fatal pulmonary fibrosis.
    Filmed with intimate access over 3 years, as the clock ticks and the stakes get higher, this film follows Donna and her advocacy group as they travel to Puerto Rico and throughout the US in a race to fill a drug trial they hope could prolong her daughter's life. Along the way we become part of a sweet love story when Donna's daughter Ashley falls for an earnest young man who has the same fatal disease.
    duration 55:58   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    Frontline [#3101H] The Choice 2012 This election special offers dual biographies of the presidential candidates. It takes the long view, through sweeping panoramas of the candidates' biographies and explorations of the national landscape that shapes the campaigns, voters' attitudes and the winner's prospects for governing. duration 1:56:46   SRND51 (Secondary audio: Spanish)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3042] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5215H] All eyes were on Danville, KY Thursday night for a spirited debate - the one and only - between Vice President Joe Biden and Congressman Paul Ryan. Last week's first presidential debate had a significant impact on the race giving Mitt Romney a much needed boost against President Obama. Will the performance of Biden or Ryan sway voters or make them more eager to see Obama/Romney Debate #2 next week?
    Joining Gwen for a look at the state of the presidential race, analysis of the Vice Presidential square-off plus the week's developments on the attack on the US consulate in Libya and Romney's foreign policy address:
    Jeff Zeleny of The New York Times,
    Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post,
    Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times,
    and Alexis Simendinger of Real Clear Politics.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2402H] October 12, 2012 NEWS PANEL:
    CAMPAIGN UPDATE - Thursday night's debate between Vice President Joe Biden and Congressman Paul Ryan takes on new significance with the race remaining a tight one following last week's debate between President Obama and Gov. Romney. Meanwhile former President Clinton was in California to stump for Democratic congressional candidates and President Obama made a fundraising stop in San Francisco.
    PROPOSITIONS 34 & 36 - For the first time in more than 30 years, Californians will decide whether to abolish the death penalty, replacing it with life imprisonment without parole. Prop 34 advocates say repealing the penalty will save the state $100 million annually in the first few years. Prop 36 would revise the state's harsh 3 strikes law to impose a life sentence only when a new felony conviction is serious or violent.
    SAN FRANCISCO SHERIFF MIRKARIMI REINSTATED - Mirkarimi returned to work on Wednesday after a nearly 9-hour hearing Tuesday and a vote by 4 members of the Board of Supervisors to reinstate him. Mirkarimi was suspended without pay by Mayor Ed Lee for official misconduct after pleading guilty to a misdemeanor count of false imprisonment stemming from an altercation with his wife, Eliana Lopez. District Attorney George Gascon has called for the sheriff to forfeit oversight of issues related to domestic abuse in the department and efforts to recall him are already underway.
    Guests: Carla Marinucci, San Francisco Chronicle; Scott Shafer, KQED Public Radio; and Barbara Taylor, KCBS
    INTERVIEW: AWARD-WINNING HUSBAND AND WIFE JOURNALISTS LYNN POVICH AND STEPHEN SHEPARD - Povich and 45 of her female colleagues made history in 1970 when they filed the first-ever sex discrimination lawsuit against their bosses at Newsweek magazine. Her new memoir, "The Good Girls Revolt", details the inspirational story behind this milestone in the women's movement. Former Businessweek editor-in-chief Shepard's book, "Deadlines and Disruptions", chronicles his nearly 50 years in journalism and the industry's turbulent transition to the digital age.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#608H] Agricultural Pests, Sylvia Earle As winters have become warmer, California is becoming more hospitable to destructive insect pests. QUEST investigates how climate change is impacting the state's massive farming industry. Plus, meet two ocean scientists: Stephen Palumbi, who reflects on his career studying tropical corals; and renowned deep sea explorer Sylvia Earle. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1120] Papua New Guinea The trekkers explore New Britain Island, the largest in the Bismarck Archipelago of Papua New Guinea. Inhabited by the indigenous Papuans and the Austronesians, the island was captured by the Japanese during World War II. Today the island's traditional cultures are diverse and complex but there are several ancient traditions which remain active today, especially the Dukduk Secret Society. Next, we visit the township of Rabaul, once the provincial capital until it was destroyed in 1994 by a massive volcanic eruption. Rabaul is still a superb location for scuba diving, snorkeling and wreck dives. We travel onwards to the stunningly beautiful island of Bougainville, named after a French navigator, and an excellent location for wreck-diving and sea kayaking. duration 56:31   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3001H] Siberian Tiger Quest Chris Morgan has tracked large predators in some of the wildest and most remote places on Earth. He now embarks on his greatest challenge - to find and film the Siberian tiger living wild and free in Russia's far eastern forests. This film features the work of Korean cameraman, Sooyong Park, who spent two years in the forest tracking and filming the world's biggest cat. Park's tracking technique was very unconventional. He dug himself into an underground pit and, incredibly, waited there for weeks at a time, hoping for a glimpse of a wild tiger. Morgan adopts the same method while he shares with us firsthand the difficulty of seeing the rare Siberian tiger. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3913#] Secrets of the Viking Sword The Vikings were among the fiercest warriors of all time. Yet only a select few carried the ultimate weapon of their era: the feared Ulfberht sword. Fashioned using a process that would remain unknown to the Vikings' rivals for centuries, the Ulfberht was a revolutionary high-tech tool as well as a work of art. Considered one of the greatest swords ever made, it remains a fearsome weapon more than a millennium after it last saw battle. But how did Viking sword makers design and build the Ulfberht, and what was its role in history? Now, Nova uses cutting edge science and old-fashioned detective work to reconstruct the Ulfberht and finally unravel the "Mystery of the Viking Sword." duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 11:00 pm
    Nova scienceNOW [#601H] What Makes Us Human? Scientists have struggled for centuries to pinpoint the qualities that separate human beings from the millions of other animals who have evolved on this planet. David Pogue explores the traits we once thought were uniquely ours - language, tool-making, even laughter - to uncover their evolutionary roots. He traces some of the crucial steps that transformed cave men to accountants - and learns how much of his own DNA came from a Neanderthal ancestor. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 12:00 am
    Richard Bangs' Adventures with Purpose "Switzerland: Quest for the Sublime" Switzerland - a country of great peaks, waterfalls, glaciers and grand scenery - served as the birthplace of adventure tourism, the wellspring of ecotourism and an inspiration for organized tours into the wild. In his latest travel special, adventurer Richard Bangs sets off for old-world Europe, and explores the origins of adventure travel and searches for what philosophers and poets of the past called "the sublime." Bangs' quest to unearth the true meaning of "sublime" begins in the heart of Switzerland: Lucerne. Later, he travels to the chic winter resort of St. Moritz, climbs aboard the famous Glacier Express train and heads to Zermatt and experiences the rapture of the Matterhorn. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
Saturday, October 13, 2012

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

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Comcast 10 and 710
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Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

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Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

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V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

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Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too