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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, August 26, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#11040H] MICHAEL BROWN FUNERAL - Thousands gathered in Ferguson, Missouri today for the funeral of Michael Brown, the unarmed black teenager fatally shot by a white police officer just over 2 weeks ago. Gwen Ifill discusses the shooting and its impact with Tracie Keesee, co-founder and director of outreach at the Center for Policing Equity at UCLA, Frederick Harris, director of the Center on African American Politics and Society at Columbia University, and Reverend Starsky Wilson, pastor of Saint John's Church in St. Louis, and president and CEO of Deaconess Foundation, a faith-based grant making organization. NAPA EARTHQUAKE - An earthquake struck Napa Valley, California in the early hours of Sunday morning. Residents have begun to clean up and assess the damages. Spencer Michels has the story.
    US OPTIONS FOR HALTING THE ISLAMIC STATE GROUP - The killing last week of American journalist James Foley has intensified the debate over how the United States should handle the Islamic State militant group. Jeffrey Brown analyzes the possibilities with Stephen Walt, a professor of international affairs at Harvard University, and retired Army Colonel Peter Mansoor, who served as the executive officer to the commander of US forces in Iraq, General David Petraeus, during the surge in 2007 and 2008, and is now a professor of military history at Ohio State University.
    RETHINKING COLLEGE - In the first installment of a week-long series focusing on innovations in higher education, Hari Sreenivasan explores the idea of competency based credits as an alternative to the traditional credit hour system. BORDER CRISIS - A group of lawyers has filed a lawsuit against the US government, charging immigration officials with violating the due process rights of the detainees held at a New Mexico detention center. Kathleen McCleery interviewed one of the attorneys offering free legal services at the facility prior to the suit being filed. The interview is part of a series of conversations with individuals on the front lines of the immigration crisis.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#33169H] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the S&P 500 breaks through 2,000 for the first time ever. Which sectors got the market to this point and which will lead the next leg? And, will Burger King become a Canadian company, with a lower tax rate, by buying Tim Hortons? duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3275] Tavis talks with 5-time Emmy winning actor Allison Janney, who discusses her roles in her latest - and very different - projects: CBS' comedy, Mom, and the Showtime drama series, Masters of Sex. Originally aired on June 10, 2014 duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Rebels with a Cause Narrated by Oscar-winning actress Frances McDormand, this program spotlights a group of dedicated conservationists who fought to preserve open space, protect agriculture and wildlife, and establish public parks near San Francisco. Beginning in the 1950s, ordinary citizens from all walks of life, concerned by the intentions of residential land developers and the environmental cost of "progress," began banding together to save a vast stretch of Northern California coastline. Their passionate activism at both the local and federal level helped create Point Reyes National Seashore and the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. These precedent-setting efforts also raised Californians' awareness of their power to promote change, fostered a national movement to preserve open spaces, and shaped the environmental movement of today. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#5107] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3276] Tavis talks with Emmy-winning actor Jim Parsons. The Big Bang Theory star discusses his role in HBO's The Normal Heart-one that he reprises from his award-winning turn on Broadway. Tavis also chats with 10-time Grammy-winning trumpet legend Arturo Sandoval. The Cuban trumpet virtuoso and composer chats about his current tour and demonstrates why he's one of today's most influential musicians. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Asia This Week [#417] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3234] Joint Border Patrols: Decreasing Criminal Activity Ireland: Dark Past - A horrific report shook Ireland this summer. It was suggested babies that had died in a home for unwed mothers were buried in mass graves around the site. The home was in operation up until the 1960's. Such homes were run by the Catholic church on behalf of the Irish government. Tens of thousands of unmarried mothers gave birth in them. Many of them tell of medical experiments on infants, neglect and forced adoption. Their infant mortality rate was much higher than the national average. Now the state and church are investigating what actually happened in what were called mother and baby homes. Crimea: Changing Sides - After the annexation of the Ukrainian peninsula by Russia, people there are trying to return to everyday life. But the road to normality is long, and political stances in Kiev and Moscow have solidified. While politicians argue about topics such as possession of Crimea, how to feed the people on the peninsula and what will happen to tourism, the football club hitherto known as FC Sevastopol has its own worries. The team used to play in the Ukrainian Premier League. Now under another name and with a changed squad, they've been incorporated into the third division of the Russian league. But the Ukrainian football federation is opposed to the move - as are the international associations FIFA and UEFA. Poland/Germany: Joint Border Patrols - The border between Germany and Poland is nearly 500 kilometres long. Now Poland is part of the Schengen area, there are no more checks on the border crossings. For criminals that's a great advantage; for the police, a big problem. Since the opening of the German-Polish border in 2007, cross-border criminal activity has increased. Car thieves in particular take advantage of the freedom to travel eastwards. That's why since 2007 German and Polish police have been on patrol together on both sides of the border. But until now, according to law, the police from the respective neighboring country had to give up pursuing criminals shortly before they reached border. Now a new agreement on cross-border police cooperation, ensures police the same rights on both sides of the border. That should make pursuing suspects more effective. Spain: Catalonian Dream - It's long been clear that Catalonia would like to secede from Spain. A referendum on independence is planned for 9 November. The government in Madrid, however, has declared the referendum illegal. Thirty-two years on Public Television! duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 am
    History Detectives Special Investigations [#103] Texas Servant Girl Murders In 1885, six African-American servants and two white society women were killed in Austin, Texas - almost all bludgeoned with an ax, dragged from their beds and raped. As quickly as the killings started, they stopped. No killer was ever identified. Desperate to find someone to blame, the authorities first rounded up hundreds of black men. Later, they pointed the finger at a white man, James Philips, whom they accused of murdering his teenage bride. Although Philips was eventually acquitted, the trial was akin to the OJ Simpson trial, with sensational, lurid details spilling out in court. After the furor and panic died down, so did the memory of the killings. Can the History Detectives solve these murders? They pore over the records and apply cutting-edge police techniques to determine who killed the servant girls of Austin. duration 56:46   STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: none)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    History Detectives Special Investigations [#104H] Who Killed Jimmy Hoffa? In one of history's most fascinating unsolved mysteries, former Teamsters president Jimmy Hoffa went missing on July 30, 1975, never to be found. Hoffa, a hero to many working Americans, played a major role in the growth and development of the trucking union. But he fell afoul of the law, with allegations that the powerful pension fund was under mob control and used, among other things, to finance Vegas casinos. What exactly happened to Hoffa that day, and why? Recently declassified FBI files and interviews with people close to the story allow a detailed accounting of what likely occurred. The investigation is an exploration of Hoffa's final days and hours and a revelatory window on power and corruption in the post-war era labor movement. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-V
  • 7:00 am
    Local USA [#105] Native American Culture Three stories about the modern Native American culture: A look at how climate change is effecting a Pacific Northwest tribe known as the "Salmon People" and how science can help find a solution; the Lincoln, Nebraska rock star artist who's creating sculptures, linking the past to the present; and the fight an Oklahoma tribe tries to revive their fading language. duration 26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Local USA [#104] Head Trauma at War Traumatic brain injuries, or TBI, has received increasing attention especially among athletes and soldiers returning from combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. We examine the links between TBI and post-traumatic stress disorder, and the damage they can do, through the story of retired Army sergeant Andrew Reeves of Colchester, Vermont. duration 26:52   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    Rebels with a Cause Narrated by Oscar-winning actress Frances McDormand, this program spotlights a group of dedicated conservationists who fought to preserve open space, protect agriculture and wildlife, and establish public parks near San Francisco. Beginning in the 1950s, ordinary citizens from all walks of life, concerned by the intentions of residential land developers and the environmental cost of "progress," began banding together to save a vast stretch of Northern California coastline. Their passionate activism at both the local and federal level helped create Point Reyes National Seashore and the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. These precedent-setting efforts also raised Californians' awareness of their power to promote change, fostered a national movement to preserve open spaces, and shaped the environmental movement of today. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3276] Tavis talks with Emmy-winning actor Jim Parsons. The Big Bang Theory star discusses his role in HBO's The Normal Heart-one that he reprises from his award-winning turn on Broadway. Tavis also chats with 10-time Grammy-winning trumpet legend Arturo Sandoval. The Cuban trumpet virtuoso and composer chats about his current tour and demonstrates why he's one of today's most influential musicians. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3275] Tavis talks with 5-time Emmy winning actor Allison Janney, who discusses her roles in her latest - and very different - projects: CBS' comedy, Mom, and the Showtime drama series, Masters of Sex. Originally aired on June 10, 2014 duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    Asia This Week [#417] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3234] Joint Border Patrols: Decreasing Criminal Activity Ireland: Dark Past - A horrific report shook Ireland this summer. It was suggested babies that had died in a home for unwed mothers were buried in mass graves around the site. The home was in operation up until the 1960's. Such homes were run by the Catholic church on behalf of the Irish government. Tens of thousands of unmarried mothers gave birth in them. Many of them tell of medical experiments on infants, neglect and forced adoption. Their infant mortality rate was much higher than the national average. Now the state and church are investigating what actually happened in what were called mother and baby homes. Crimea: Changing Sides - After the annexation of the Ukrainian peninsula by Russia, people there are trying to return to everyday life. But the road to normality is long, and political stances in Kiev and Moscow have solidified. While politicians argue about topics such as possession of Crimea, how to feed the people on the peninsula and what will happen to tourism, the football club hitherto known as FC Sevastopol has its own worries. The team used to play in the Ukrainian Premier League. Now under another name and with a changed squad, they've been incorporated into the third division of the Russian league. But the Ukrainian football federation is opposed to the move - as are the international associations FIFA and UEFA. Poland/Germany: Joint Border Patrols - The border between Germany and Poland is nearly 500 kilometres long. Now Poland is part of the Schengen area, there are no more checks on the border crossings. For criminals that's a great advantage; for the police, a big problem. Since the opening of the German-Polish border in 2007, cross-border criminal activity has increased. Car thieves in particular take advantage of the freedom to travel eastwards. That's why since 2007 German and Polish police have been on patrol together on both sides of the border. But until now, according to law, the police from the respective neighboring country had to give up pursuing criminals shortly before they reached border. Now a new agreement on cross-border police cooperation, ensures police the same rights on both sides of the border. That should make pursuing suspects more effective. Spain: Catalonian Dream - It's long been clear that Catalonia would like to secede from Spain. A referendum on independence is planned for 9 November. The government in Madrid, however, has declared the referendum illegal. Thirty-two years on Public Television! duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 am
    History Detectives Special Investigations [#103] Texas Servant Girl Murders In 1885, six African-American servants and two white society women were killed in Austin, Texas - almost all bludgeoned with an ax, dragged from their beds and raped. As quickly as the killings started, they stopped. No killer was ever identified. Desperate to find someone to blame, the authorities first rounded up hundreds of black men. Later, they pointed the finger at a white man, James Philips, whom they accused of murdering his teenage bride. Although Philips was eventually acquitted, the trial was akin to the OJ Simpson trial, with sensational, lurid details spilling out in court. After the furor and panic died down, so did the memory of the killings. Can the History Detectives solve these murders? They pore over the records and apply cutting-edge police techniques to determine who killed the servant girls of Austin. duration 56:46   STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    History Detectives Special Investigations [#104H] Who Killed Jimmy Hoffa? In one of history's most fascinating unsolved mysteries, former Teamsters president Jimmy Hoffa went missing on July 30, 1975, never to be found. Hoffa, a hero to many working Americans, played a major role in the growth and development of the trucking union. But he fell afoul of the law, with allegations that the powerful pension fund was under mob control and used, among other things, to finance Vegas casinos. What exactly happened to Hoffa that day, and why? Recently declassified FBI files and interviews with people close to the story allow a detailed accounting of what likely occurred. The investigation is an exploration of Hoffa's final days and hours and a revelatory window on power and corruption in the post-war era labor movement. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-V
  • 1:00 pm
    Local USA [#105] Native American Culture Three stories about the modern Native American culture: A look at how climate change is effecting a Pacific Northwest tribe known as the "Salmon People" and how science can help find a solution; the Lincoln, Nebraska rock star artist who's creating sculptures, linking the past to the present; and the fight an Oklahoma tribe tries to revive their fading language. duration 26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 pm
    Local USA [#104] Head Trauma at War Traumatic brain injuries, or TBI, has received increasing attention especially among athletes and soldiers returning from combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. We examine the links between TBI and post-traumatic stress disorder, and the damage they can do, through the story of retired Army sergeant Andrew Reeves of Colchester, Vermont. duration 26:52   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#5107] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#10170] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#3276] Tavis talks with Emmy-winning actor Jim Parsons. The Big Bang Theory star discusses his role in HBO's The Normal Heart-one that he reprises from his award-winning turn on Broadway. Tavis also chats with 10-time Grammy-winning trumpet legend Arturo Sandoval. The Cuban trumpet virtuoso and composer chats about his current tour and demonstrates why he's one of today's most influential musicians. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#33170] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11041] CEASEFIRE- Israel and Hamas agreed today to an open-ended ceasefire, ending weeks of rocket fire and airstrikes. Gwen Ifill analyzes the agreement with Dennis Ross, a former US diplomat who is now a counselor at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, and Shibley Telhami, the Anwar Sadat Professor for Peace and Development at the University of Maryland and a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution.
    TAX FLIGHT - In recent years a number of US companies have relocated outside the country's borders by merging with or purchasing foreign companies. Burger King is the latest example. Today the company announced it will purchase Tim Hortons, a Canadian restaurant chain, and move its headquarters to Ontario, where the corporate tax rate is lower. Jeffrey Brown discusses this decision with economist Roberton Williams, a senior fellow at the non-partisan Tax Policy Center, a joint venture of the Urban Institute and the Brookings Institution.
    RETHINKING COLLEGE - As part of a week-long series dedicated to "rethinking college," Hari Sreenivasan reports on the growing burden of student debt.
    QUEST FOR UNITY - The Obama administration has stated that it will only offer more military support to Iraq in its battle against the Islamic State militant group once the nation has formed a more inclusive government. Chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner reports from Northern Iraq on why national unity is a tall order for this fractured country to fill.
    BORDER CRISIS - As part of an ongoing series of conversations with those impacted by the immigration crisis, Jeffrey Brown speaks with Gary Thrasher, a rancher and veterinarian who lives in Arizona, near the Mexican border, and treats cattle from Arizona to New Mexico to West Texas- along a major corridor for illegal immigrants and drug smugglers.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#33170] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#4022] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#5107] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3672H] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11041] CEASEFIRE- Israel and Hamas agreed today to an open-ended ceasefire, ending weeks of rocket fire and airstrikes. Gwen Ifill analyzes the agreement with Dennis Ross, a former US diplomat who is now a counselor at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, and Shibley Telhami, the Anwar Sadat Professor for Peace and Development at the University of Maryland and a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution.
    TAX FLIGHT - In recent years a number of US companies have relocated outside the country's borders by merging with or purchasing foreign companies. Burger King is the latest example. Today the company announced it will purchase Tim Hortons, a Canadian restaurant chain, and move its headquarters to Ontario, where the corporate tax rate is lower. Jeffrey Brown discusses this decision with economist Roberton Williams, a senior fellow at the non-partisan Tax Policy Center, a joint venture of the Urban Institute and the Brookings Institution.
    RETHINKING COLLEGE - As part of a week-long series dedicated to "rethinking college," Hari Sreenivasan reports on the growing burden of student debt.
    QUEST FOR UNITY - The Obama administration has stated that it will only offer more military support to Iraq in its battle against the Islamic State militant group once the nation has formed a more inclusive government. Chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner reports from Northern Iraq on why national unity is a tall order for this fractured country to fill.
    BORDER CRISIS - As part of an ongoing series of conversations with those impacted by the immigration crisis, Jeffrey Brown speaks with Gary Thrasher, a rancher and veterinarian who lives in Arizona, near the Mexican border, and treats cattle from Arizona to New Mexico to West Texas- along a major corridor for illegal immigrants and drug smugglers.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3672H] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#20177] (broadcast date: 8/26/14)
    Charlie's interviews with 3 of the funniest women out there: Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Kristen Wiig, and Mindy Kaling.
    duration 56:47   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3672H] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#3277] Tavis talks with African American history scholar, Dr. Peniel E. Joseph. The award-winning writer dissects his groundbreaking biography of the controversial Black activist, Stokely Carmichael. Tavis also chats with one of country music's most successful singers, Martina McBride. The 4-time CMA female vocalist of the year explains why she's charting new territory on her latest CD, "Everlasting." Originally aired on March 20, 2014 duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3672H] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#206] Interviews include a pop music critic for the Chicago Sun-Times; a songwriter and producer in Nashville and Julliard graduate that went on to found a tuition- free classical music school. duration 26:46   TVPG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3672H] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11041] CEASEFIRE- Israel and Hamas agreed today to an open-ended ceasefire, ending weeks of rocket fire and airstrikes. Gwen Ifill analyzes the agreement with Dennis Ross, a former US diplomat who is now a counselor at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, and Shibley Telhami, the Anwar Sadat Professor for Peace and Development at the University of Maryland and a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution.
    TAX FLIGHT - In recent years a number of US companies have relocated outside the country's borders by merging with or purchasing foreign companies. Burger King is the latest example. Today the company announced it will purchase Tim Hortons, a Canadian restaurant chain, and move its headquarters to Ontario, where the corporate tax rate is lower. Jeffrey Brown discusses this decision with economist Roberton Williams, a senior fellow at the non-partisan Tax Policy Center, a joint venture of the Urban Institute and the Brookings Institution.
    RETHINKING COLLEGE - As part of a week-long series dedicated to "rethinking college," Hari Sreenivasan reports on the growing burden of student debt.
    QUEST FOR UNITY - The Obama administration has stated that it will only offer more military support to Iraq in its battle against the Islamic State militant group once the nation has formed a more inclusive government. Chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner reports from Northern Iraq on why national unity is a tall order for this fractured country to fill.
    BORDER CRISIS - As part of an ongoing series of conversations with those impacted by the immigration crisis, Jeffrey Brown speaks with Gary Thrasher, a rancher and veterinarian who lives in Arizona, near the Mexican border, and treats cattle from Arizona to New Mexico to West Texas- along a major corridor for illegal immigrants and drug smugglers.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3672H] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#4022] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#11041] CEASEFIRE- Israel and Hamas agreed today to an open-ended ceasefire, ending weeks of rocket fire and airstrikes. Gwen Ifill analyzes the agreement with Dennis Ross, a former US diplomat who is now a counselor at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, and Shibley Telhami, the Anwar Sadat Professor for Peace and Development at the University of Maryland and a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution.
    TAX FLIGHT - In recent years a number of US companies have relocated outside the country's borders by merging with or purchasing foreign companies. Burger King is the latest example. Today the company announced it will purchase Tim Hortons, a Canadian restaurant chain, and move its headquarters to Ontario, where the corporate tax rate is lower. Jeffrey Brown discusses this decision with economist Roberton Williams, a senior fellow at the non-partisan Tax Policy Center, a joint venture of the Urban Institute and the Brookings Institution.
    RETHINKING COLLEGE - As part of a week-long series dedicated to "rethinking college," Hari Sreenivasan reports on the growing burden of student debt.
    QUEST FOR UNITY - The Obama administration has stated that it will only offer more military support to Iraq in its battle against the Islamic State militant group once the nation has formed a more inclusive government. Chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner reports from Northern Iraq on why national unity is a tall order for this fractured country to fill.
    BORDER CRISIS - As part of an ongoing series of conversations with those impacted by the immigration crisis, Jeffrey Brown speaks with Gary Thrasher, a rancher and veterinarian who lives in Arizona, near the Mexican border, and treats cattle from Arizona to New Mexico to West Texas- along a major corridor for illegal immigrants and drug smugglers.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
Tuesday, August 26, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED all channels, planned overnight maintenance: early Fri 12/19 midnight-6am

      (this includes all DT9, DT54 and DT25 channels, along with all paid services) We will be doing upgrade and maintenance work in our Master Control area during the overnight hours of late Thurs/early Fri 12/19. Work will begin shortly after midnight early Friday, which may last until 6am, though we hope to finish earlier. This […]

    • KQED Plus OTA ? Optimistically planned maintenance: Fri 12/05 mid-morning

      (DT54.1 thru 54.5) Assuming that the weather and road conditions permit, we plan to do a bit of maintenance on our KQEH transmitter the morning of Friday 12/05… hopefully 10am-11am-ish, but could be a bit later. Most of the work should not affect the outgoing signal, but there will need to be a cable swap […]

    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too