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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, August 3, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, August 3, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#209] The Pruitt-Igoe Myth This program tells the story of the transformation of the American city in the decades after World War II, through the lens of the infamous Pruitt-Igoe housing development and the St. Louis residents who called it home. At the film's historical center is an analysis of the massive impact of the national urban renewal program of the 1950s and 1960s, which prompted the process of mass suburbanization and emptied American cities of their residents, businesses, and industries. Those left behind in the city faced a destitute, rapidly de-industrializing St. Louis, parceled out to downtown interests and increasingly segregated by class and race. The residents of Pruitt-Igoe were among the hardest hit. Their gripping stories of survival, adaptation, and success are at the emotional heart of the film. duration 1:29:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    New Metropolis [#101] A Crack in the Pavement This documentary unravels the national infrastructure and regional land-use debate through the stories of two public officials from southern Ohio trying to save their aging towns from losing residents and businesses to newer suburban communities. It intertwines their stories with commentary from national experts who examine the policies and practices that favor sprawl development over revitalizing existing, older communities. Features: Tom Moeller, City Manager, Madeira, OH; Richard Ellison, Mayor, Elmwood Place, OH; Members of the First Suburbs Consortium of Ohio; Myron Orfield, Bruce Katz, Dr. Carla Chifos and Kim Gibson. Narrated by actor Peter Coyote. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#309] Elementary School Basics Follow along for a full hour with eager-to-learn elementary school students. From doing the "Monster Match" for English, to Decimal Games in Math, to exploring ecosystems in Science, these lessons are inviting and visual. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#330H] John Lithgow on the Role of a Lifetime Back in the 1970s, a time of Vietnam and Watergate, war and corruption, disaffected youth flocked to productions of Shakespeare's "Hamlet," the story of a young prince angered by betrayal and the abuse of power. Today, in an era of aging baby boomers and an unstable world, we're surrounded by productions of Shakespeare's "King Lear," the story of an elderly monarch losing strength and sanity, seeking order in uncertainty.
    Why are we so drawn these days to the tale of Lear and his dysfunctional family? John Lithgow, the award-winning actor and writer is playing him right now in The Public Theater's free Shakespeare in the Park production, and on this week's edition, he tells Bill Moyers what it's like to perform the monumental role, and what he thinks its significance is in a time of so much violence and unrest.
    Lithgow has been blogging about the experience in The New York Times. "'King Lear' is full of high-pitched, raw emotion," he wrote. "From day one, I've been tracking Lear's journey into madness. It's a journey fueled by humiliation, anger, regret and sorrow. His interaction with every character he confronts is scaldingly intense. I've found it impossible to rehearse the role dispassionately. Try as I may to restrain myself, the emotions simply run away with me."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Asia This Week [#416] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5404H] * Congress scrambled to try and address a number of critical issues from border security to funding for the Veterans Administration before leaving to start its summer recess, but once again politics stalled any legislative progress. Intra-party politics forced House GOP leaders to cancel a Thursday vote on their own border bill because of strong opposition by members of their own party. House Republicans then moved to delay their August recess. Earlier in the week partisan politics were the backdrop to a vote by House Republicans to sue President Obama over his alleged abuse of executive power in enforcing the Affordable Care Act. Can anything be done to bridge the political divide that has lead to this legislative failure? We'll get answers and analysis from Robert Costa of The Washington Post and Molly Ball of The Atlantic.
    * The crises in the Middle East and Ukraine continue to spark international criticism and outrage. On Thursday the US and UN announced that Israel and Hamas have agreed to a 72-hour cease-fire to begin Friday morning. During this time forces on the ground will remain in place while negotiations for a more durable truce continue.
    * President Obama announced new sanctions against Russia for its continued actions to undermine Ukraine's sovereignty. Meanwhile the investigation into the downing of a Malaysian jetliner is being hampered by violent clashes between Ukraine's government forces and pro-Russian separatists.
    Elise Labott of CNN and Yochi Dreazen of Foreign Policy magazine will examine why the US and European nations are taking a hard line on the deadly conflicts in Gaza and Ukraine.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3232H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#203] * Discussion about the Ebola virus outbreak with Doctor John LaPook, Chief medical correspondent for CBS News * Khaled Meshaal, political leader of Hamas * The crash of Malaysian Air 17 with Sabrina Tavernise of The New York Times * Mike Allen of Politico * Tim Finchem, Commissioner of golf's PGA Tour * a look at the Charles James exhibit at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3231] duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#209] The Pruitt-Igoe Myth This program tells the story of the transformation of the American city in the decades after World War II, through the lens of the infamous Pruitt-Igoe housing development and the St. Louis residents who called it home. At the film's historical center is an analysis of the massive impact of the national urban renewal program of the 1950s and 1960s, which prompted the process of mass suburbanization and emptied American cities of their residents, businesses, and industries. Those left behind in the city faced a destitute, rapidly de-industrializing St. Louis, parceled out to downtown interests and increasingly segregated by class and race. The residents of Pruitt-Igoe were among the hardest hit. Their gripping stories of survival, adaptation, and success are at the emotional heart of the film. duration 1:29:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    QUEST [#311] Profile: Sylvia Earle/SETI: The New Search for ET QUEST profiles marine scientist and deep sea explorer Sylvia Earle, and find out why SETI scientists now say we might be hearing from ET sooner than you think. duration 26:18   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Asia Biz Forecast [#516] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1106] Financial Thought Leader Jason Trennert "Financial Thought Leader" and leading investment strategist Jason Trennert, who explains his "TINA" theme of "there is no alternative" to stocks. Guest: Jason Trennert, Chief Investment Strategist, Strategas Research Partners. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#322H] Financial Planner Ric Edelman explains the best way to pay for your children's college tuition. Plus, if you are underwater on a property, would you be better off walking away than drowning with it? And as we create more and more technological marvels how do we make sure they're used for good and not evil? All that and more on this edition of The Truth About Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    This American Land [#401] Forage Fish, Wild Olympics, Biofuel from Cornfield Residue, Fire Ants Researchers on the Oregon coast study the role that forage fish play in the food chain. Sometimes called "bait fish", sardines, anchovies, smelt and other small fish are vitally important in sustaining larger species - including sea birds, salmon, and marine mammals like sea lions. Humans also catch forage fish, mainly for animal feed, and there's growing concern that large-scale commercial harvesting of forage fish comes at the expense of other marine life, potentially with catastrophic results. Spectacular Olympic National Park is the centerpiece of the verdant Olympic Peninsula in northwest Washington State, right up against the Canadian border. There's now a bill in Congress that would add more protection to the forests and watersheds around the park, and we explore why there's wide support for the proposal among the people living there. In another report on emerging second-generation biofuels, we travel to Iowa where farmers are discovering there's growing demand for the residue in their cornfields - stalks, leaves, husks and cobs - left on the ground after the corn is harvested, That residue, called "corn stover", is biomass that can also be converted into ethanol. Everybody wants to eradicate biting, invasive fire ants, but scientists say they can learn a great deal by studying the social structure of these insects. New research shows that the widespread success of fire ants has been assisted when humans disturb natural areas with roads and development. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3232H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5404H] * Congress scrambled to try and address a number of critical issues from border security to funding for the Veterans Administration before leaving to start its summer recess, but once again politics stalled any legislative progress. Intra-party politics forced House GOP leaders to cancel a Thursday vote on their own border bill because of strong opposition by members of their own party. House Republicans then moved to delay their August recess. Earlier in the week partisan politics were the backdrop to a vote by House Republicans to sue President Obama over his alleged abuse of executive power in enforcing the Affordable Care Act. Can anything be done to bridge the political divide that has lead to this legislative failure? We'll get answers and analysis from Robert Costa of The Washington Post and Molly Ball of The Atlantic.
    * The crises in the Middle East and Ukraine continue to spark international criticism and outrage. On Thursday the US and UN announced that Israel and Hamas have agreed to a 72-hour cease-fire to begin Friday morning. During this time forces on the ground will remain in place while negotiations for a more durable truce continue.
    * President Obama announced new sanctions against Russia for its continued actions to undermine Ukraine's sovereignty. Meanwhile the investigation into the downing of a Malaysian jetliner is being hampered by violent clashes between Ukraine's government forces and pro-Russian separatists.
    Elise Labott of CNN and Yochi Dreazen of Foreign Policy magazine will examine why the US and European nations are taking a hard line on the deadly conflicts in Gaza and Ukraine.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#137H] Loretta Lynch on the CPUC, Tech's Diversity Deficit and Free Art!
    Former CPUC President Loretta Lynch on the California Public Utilities Commisison
    Emails that reveal an unusually close relationship between PG&E and the California Public Utilities Commission are leading to calls for the removal of Michael Peevey, the head of the regulatory agency. The emails were obtained from a lawsuit settlement related to the 2010 San Bruno pipeline blast that killed eight people, destroyed 38 homes and leveled a neighborhood. The city's mayor says state officials are "subject to undue influence" by PG&E and that state oversight of the utility is corrupted. Loretta Lynch is a former CPUC president and a longtime critic of corporate influence at the state agency. Lynch sits down with Scott Shafer.

    Further Reporting:
    Outrage Over "Cozy" Correspondence Between CPUC, PG&E
    PG&E Charged With Obstructing San Bruno Investigation

    Diversity Deficit in the Tech Industry
    While tech thrives in the Bay Area, not everyone is enjoying the boom equally. The industry is being criticized for lack of diversity when it comes to age, gender and ethnicity. Recently an over 50-year old worker filed a lawsuit against social media giant Twitter for age discrimination. And in the last few weeks, a number of high tech companies including Twitter, Google and Facebook have released their employee demographics. They show Silicon Valley and tech companies are largely filled with young, Caucasian and Asian male employees.

    Guests:
    • Laura Sydell, NPR Digital Culture Correspondent
    • Michelle Quinn, San Jose Mercury News Business Columnist
    • Eric Abrams, Director of Diversity Initiatives, U.C. Berkeley Haas School of Business

    Free Art! Contemporary Artist Ronald Chase
    For the past six decades San Francisco artist Ronald Chase has worked in a variety of mediums - from abstract paintings and drawings to mixed media and photography. Some of his finest work is in the collections of major museums in Paris, Canada, New York and our own SFMOMA. Now, as he approaches 80, Chase has decided to share his legacy in an unusual fashion. On Saturday, August 2, anyone who stops by his Mission District studio will have the opportunity to take home a piece of art -- absolutely free. Thuy Vu sits down with Chase to learn what inspired him to make such a bold move.

    Ronald Chase's Artwork
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#330H] John Lithgow on the Role of a Lifetime Back in the 1970s, a time of Vietnam and Watergate, war and corruption, disaffected youth flocked to productions of Shakespeare's "Hamlet," the story of a young prince angered by betrayal and the abuse of power. Today, in an era of aging baby boomers and an unstable world, we're surrounded by productions of Shakespeare's "King Lear," the story of an elderly monarch losing strength and sanity, seeking order in uncertainty.
    Why are we so drawn these days to the tale of Lear and his dysfunctional family? John Lithgow, the award-winning actor and writer is playing him right now in The Public Theater's free Shakespeare in the Park production, and on this week's edition, he tells Bill Moyers what it's like to perform the monumental role, and what he thinks its significance is in a time of so much violence and unrest.
    Lithgow has been blogging about the experience in The New York Times. "'King Lear' is full of high-pitched, raw emotion," he wrote. "From day one, I've been tracking Lear's journey into madness. It's a journey fueled by humiliation, anger, regret and sorrow. His interaction with every character he confronts is scaldingly intense. I've found it impossible to rehearse the role dispassionately. Try as I may to restrain myself, the emotions simply run away with me."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1748] DRUGS OF LAST RESORT - Jamie and Jason Fowler are seeking access to experimental drugs that have not yet been approved by the FDA to treat their son Jack's life-threatening disease. The pharmaceutical company can make the treatment available to the family without FDA approval, but that could further delay the clinical trials required for official release. "How do we balance the rapid and accelerated approval of drugs that we can establish, definitively establish, are safe and effective," asks Dr. Russell Medford, who chairs the bioethics committee for the Biotechnology Industry Organization, "versus the immediate needs of individual patients who cannot wait for us to come to those final determinations?"
    THE AMANDA LINDHOUT STORY - In 2008, Canadian journalist Amanda Lindhout was kidnapped by a group of Somali teenagers and held captive for over 460 days. She was tortured, starved, and abused repeatedly before finally being released for a ransom. Lindhout says she did more than just survive the ordeal, she was transformed by it. "Physically I was in chains on the floor, and I had no power, no control over that, but I still had the power to choose my response to what was happening to me, to hold on to my own morals and my own values," Lindhout explains. "I knew somehow at the deepest part of my being that if I chose forgiveness, that experience just would not have the power to crush me." Lindhout is the author of a memoir about her ordeal, A House in the Sky, written with Sara Corbett.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 pm
    QUEST [#311] Profile: Sylvia Earle/SETI: The New Search for ET QUEST profiles marine scientist and deep sea explorer Sylvia Earle, and find out why SETI scientists now say we might be hearing from ET sooner than you think. duration 26:18   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Miller Center's American Forum [#2206H] Hillary Clinton, the Midterm Elections and the Coming Political Carnival in 2016 Journalists Jonathan Allen and Amie Parnes discuss Hillary Clinton, the presumed front-runner for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination, her political rebirth after defeat at the hands of Barack Obama, the Benghazi controversy, the role of former president Bill Clinton and what the authors call in a new book the "the merciless Clinton political machine." Allen and Parnes - working for Politico and The Hill - had an inside look at Clinton's last campaign and her tenure as Secretary of State. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1317] Globe Trekker Special: World War II Our Trekkers visit many of the European sites that played a major role in World War II. From the forests of Compiegne in northern France to the island of Crete, where veterans and locals recount the first major airborne invasion by the Germans, this episode takes viewers on a haunting journey of discovery. Other locations include Nuremberg, Vienna, Dunkirk, the Italian town of Anzio, the Normandy beaches, Dresden, Berlin and Auschwitz. duration 57:01   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    My Wild Affair [#103] The Rhino Who Joined The Family Rescued from flooding caused by the damming of the Zambezi River, Rupert, an orphaned black rhinoceros, was brought up in the suburban family home of wildlife vet Dr. John Condy. Rupert captured the hearts of the vet's four young children before his eventual release into the wild. Fifty years later, the children are searching for clues to their childhood friend's fate. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    Nova [#4011H] Australia's First 4 Billion Years: Monsters Of all the continents on Earth, none preserves a more spectacular story of its origins than Australia. Nova's mini-series takes viewers on a rollicking adventure from the birth of the Earth to the emergence of the world we know today. With help from high-energy host and scientist Richard Smith, we meet titanic dinosaurs and giant kangaroos, sea monsters and prehistoric crustaceans, disappearing mountains and deadly asteroids. This is the untold story of the Land Down Under, the one island continent that has got it all. duration 55:01   STEREO TVPG
  • 5:00 pm
    Time Scanners [#101H] Egyptian Pyramids The team travels to Egypt to scan the pyramids - the tombs of the mighty pharaohs - to find out how the necropolis evolved from simple mud-brick structures to the most impressive buildings in the ancient world. They use their cutting-edge laser technology to scan Djoser's Step Pyramid at Saqqara, Meidum's collapsed pyramid, the mysterious Bent Pyramid at Dashur and the famous Great Pyramid at Giza. duration 53:31   SRND51 TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#196H] Included: We explore the growing number of clothing companies now catering to the styles of transgender and gender non-conforming people, a market that advocates and its customers say has been long-ignored by mainstream fashion designers. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#137H] Loretta Lynch on the CPUC, Tech's Diversity Deficit and Free Art!
    Former CPUC President Loretta Lynch on the California Public Utilities Commisison
    Emails that reveal an unusually close relationship between PG&E and the California Public Utilities Commission are leading to calls for the removal of Michael Peevey, the head of the regulatory agency. The emails were obtained from a lawsuit settlement related to the 2010 San Bruno pipeline blast that killed eight people, destroyed 38 homes and leveled a neighborhood. The city's mayor says state officials are "subject to undue influence" by PG&E and that state oversight of the utility is corrupted. Loretta Lynch is a former CPUC president and a longtime critic of corporate influence at the state agency. Lynch sits down with Scott Shafer.

    Further Reporting:
    Outrage Over "Cozy" Correspondence Between CPUC, PG&E
    PG&E Charged With Obstructing San Bruno Investigation

    Diversity Deficit in the Tech Industry
    While tech thrives in the Bay Area, not everyone is enjoying the boom equally. The industry is being criticized for lack of diversity when it comes to age, gender and ethnicity. Recently an over 50-year old worker filed a lawsuit against social media giant Twitter for age discrimination. And in the last few weeks, a number of high tech companies including Twitter, Google and Facebook have released their employee demographics. They show Silicon Valley and tech companies are largely filled with young, Caucasian and Asian male employees.

    Guests:
    • Laura Sydell, NPR Digital Culture Correspondent
    • Michelle Quinn, San Jose Mercury News Business Columnist
    • Eric Abrams, Director of Diversity Initiatives, U.C. Berkeley Haas School of Business

    Free Art! Contemporary Artist Ronald Chase
    For the past six decades San Francisco artist Ronald Chase has worked in a variety of mediums - from abstract paintings and drawings to mixed media and photography. Some of his finest work is in the collections of major museums in Paris, Canada, New York and our own SFMOMA. Now, as he approaches 80, Chase has decided to share his legacy in an unusual fashion. On Saturday, August 2, anyone who stops by his Mission District studio will have the opportunity to take home a piece of art -- absolutely free. Thuy Vu sits down with Chase to learn what inspired him to make such a bold move.

    Ronald Chase's Artwork
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:00 pm
    Global Voices [#710] El General Past and present collide as award-winning filmmaker Natalia Almada brings to life audio recordings she inherited about her great-grandfather Plutarco Elias Calles, a revolutionary general who became Mexico's president in 1924. In his time, Calles was called "El Bolshevique" and "El Jefe Maximo" (the foremost chief). Today, he is remembered as "el Quema-Curas" (priest-burner) and as a dictator who ruled through puppet presidents until he was exiled in 1936. Through Almada's grandmother's recordings, El General moves between memories of a daughter grappling with history's portrait of her father and the weight of his legacy on the country today. duration 1:21:58   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 pm
    Last Harvest: The Yemenis of the San Joaquin This program explores the lives and times of Muslim immigrants from Yemen who settled in California's San Joaquin Valley. Yemeni migrant workers started coming to the US in the post-1965 era when the new immigration law opened the gates to non-Europeans. While most settled in the Detroit area, a small band of villagers from the mountainous Ibb region found work in the San Joaquin Valley where they tended the vineyards that produce a yearly bounty of internationally renowned table grapes. At the peak of the sojourn migration, some 5000 Yemenis were employed in the fields. Today only several hundred remain. This is their story. duration 22:28   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 pm
    My Wild Affair [#103] The Rhino Who Joined The Family Rescued from flooding caused by the damming of the Zambezi River, Rupert, an orphaned black rhinoceros, was brought up in the suburban family home of wildlife vet Dr. John Condy. Rupert captured the hearts of the vet's four young children before his eventual release into the wild. Fifty years later, the children are searching for clues to their childhood friend's fate. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Pioneers In Aviation: The Race to the Moon [#103H] The Race to the Moon Documents the era of the 1950s and 1960s, as post-war America finds itself locked in an ideological struggle with the Soviet Union-an adversary whose philosophy promised the destruction of capitalism. In 1957, the Soviet launch of Sputnik suddenly shifted the Cold War battlefield to space and heralded the decade-long Race to the Moon. As did his predecessors, President Kennedy turns to the captains of his Aviation Industry-now in the autumn of their years-with the century's greatest aerospace challenge. Highlights include:
    * Newly discovered footage documenting President Kennedy's 1963 visit to McDonnell Aircraft in St. Louis, in celebration of the Mercury Space Program.
    * Emotionally charged footage of Astronaut John Glenn's triumphant return to McDonnell Aircraft, after orbiting the Earth- to share his achievement with "Mr. Mac" and his employees.
    * Photographs of the unknown 19-year-old Marilyn Monroe, modeling the cabin features of the new Douglas DC-6.
    * Boeing Test Pilot Tex Johnston's legendary barrel-roll of the "Dash-8 0"-prototype of the Boeing 707-over Lake Washington during the 1955 Seattle Gold Cup Races.
    duration 56:40   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#710] El General Past and present collide as award-winning filmmaker Natalia Almada brings to life audio recordings she inherited about her great-grandfather Plutarco Elias Calles, a revolutionary general who became Mexico's president in 1924. In his time, Calles was called "El Bolshevique" and "El Jefe Maximo" (the foremost chief). Today, he is remembered as "el Quema-Curas" (priest-burner) and as a dictator who ruled through puppet presidents until he was exiled in 1936. Through Almada's grandmother's recordings, El General moves between memories of a daughter grappling with history's portrait of her father and the weight of his legacy on the country today. duration 1:21:58   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 am
    Last Harvest: The Yemenis of the San Joaquin This program explores the lives and times of Muslim immigrants from Yemen who settled in California's San Joaquin Valley. Yemeni migrant workers started coming to the US in the post-1965 era when the new immigration law opened the gates to non-Europeans. While most settled in the Detroit area, a small band of villagers from the mountainous Ibb region found work in the San Joaquin Valley where they tended the vineyards that produce a yearly bounty of internationally renowned table grapes. At the peak of the sojourn migration, some 5000 Yemenis were employed in the fields. Today only several hundred remain. This is their story. duration 22:28   STEREO TVG
Sunday, August 3, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED all channels, planned overnight maintenance: early Fri 12/19 midnight-6am

      (this includes all DT9, DT54 and DT25 channels, along with all paid services) We will be doing upgrade and maintenance work in our Master Control area during the overnight hours of late Thurs/early Fri 12/19. Work will begin shortly after midnight early Friday, which may last until 6am, though we hope to finish earlier. This […]

    • KQED Plus OTA ? Optimistically planned maintenance: Fri 12/05 mid-morning

      (DT54.1 thru 54.5) Assuming that the weather and road conditions permit, we plan to do a bit of maintenance on our KQEH transmitter the morning of Friday 12/05… hopefully 10am-11am-ish, but could be a bit later. Most of the work should not affect the outgoing signal, but there will need to be a cable swap […]

    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

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KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
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KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

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KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

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v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

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KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too