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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, July 15, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#11010] CITIGROUP SETTLEMENT - Citigroup has agreed to a $7 billion settlement with the US government for its misconduct leading up to the 2008 financial crisis. Judy Woodruff has the report.
    MIDEAST VIOLENCE - Air attacks continue to escalate in the Gaza Strip, driving up the Palestinian death toll. Chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner speaks with Martin Indyk, vice president and director of the Foreign Policy Program at the Brookings Institution, and former US special envoy for the Israeli-Palestinian negotiations.
    UKRAINE - Fighting continued in Ukraine today as Kiev accused the Russian military of shooting down a Ukranian military transport plane. Judy Woodruff debriefs with New York Times reporter Sabrina Tavernise.
    JOHN OLIVER - Comedian John Oliver's fresh spin on the news has launched him from Daily Show correspondent to lead anchor of his own HBO show. Jeffrey Brown sits down with Oliver to talk about comedy, current eventsand his success.
    WORLD CUP - Yesterday the 2014 FIFA World Cup ended with Germany's 1-0 victory over Argentina. Judy Woodruff follows up with ESPN's Tommy Smyth and the Wall Street Journal's Matthew Futterman.
    OBITUARY: NADINE GORDIMER - Nobel Prize-winning writer and anti-Apartheid activist Nadine Gordimer died today at her home in Johannesburg. The NewsHour remembers her with an excerpt from a 1987 interview she did with former correspondent Charlayne Hunter-Gault.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#33139] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3245] Tavis talks with Rick Savage and Joe Elliott, who reflect on their careers as two original members of the chart-topping British heavy metal band, Def Leppard. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Global Voices [#707] The Mosuo Sisters Two spirited daughters from China's last remaining matrilineal ethnic minority are thrust into the worldwide economic downturn when they lose the only jobs they've ever known. Left with few options, Jua Ma and La Tsuo leave Beijing for home, a remote village in the foothills of the Himalayas. But home is no longer what it was, as growing exposure to the modern world irreparably changes the provocative traditions the Mosuo have built around their belief that marriage is an attack on the family.
    Determined to keep their mother and siblings out of poverty, one sister sacrifices her dream of an education and stays home to farm, while the other leaves to try her luck in the city. From Lijiang to Chengdu, Jua Ma's interactions with rich Chinese businessmen, lecherous gangsters, Tibetan monks, and fledgling pop stars lead her on a precarious path that pits her hopes and dreams against bitter realities.
    duration 54:33   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#5077] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3246] Tavis talks with pioneering comedienne Joan Rivers in part 1 of a revealing 2-part conversation. The internationally renowned comedienne and best-selling author talks about her latest text, Diary of a Mad Diva. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Asia This Week [#413] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3228] Millions of Wasted Funds Down The Drain In Eu Projects Series Launch: Secret Heroes - Part 1: Hungary: A Loophole to Freedom - The beginning of the end of the Soviet Bloc came 25 years ago in Hungary. One million East Germans had arrived there and put pressure on the already crumbling Iron Curtain. In the summer of 1989, the first group of East German citizens managed to flee en masse to the West - with the knowledge of the Hungarian government. Even though the borders were still patrolled, hundreds of them passed through to the Austrian side. Hungarian Arpad Bella was a commander at a small border crossing that was reopened after decades of being closed. Bella was completely on his own, since his superiors had failed to inform him. And he reacted with a great deal of sound judgment and humaneness. No shots were fired, and the East Germans entered the West unharmed. Britain: Operation "Trojan Horse" - For months, debate has raged in Birmingham over the role of Islam in the city's schools. An anonymous warning about Muslim fundamentalists has authorities alarmed. The allegations are serious: there are indications of an organized campaign to covertly co-opt schools in England. An inquiry discovered that at several schools in Birmingham, girls and boys were segregated. At some schools, Arabic is a required subject, and Christian holidays are no longer observed. School trips are organized to Mecca and Medina. The conservative education minister, Michael Gove, has announced that with the coming school year, all state schools are required to teach "British values." The schools under investigation have rejected the accusations. Poland: Test Tube Babies - Many Polish couples with fertility problems are fulfilling their wish for children by using artificial fertilization techniques. One Warsaw woman is expected her second child using this method. The surprising thing is that, while the entire family had to collect money to pay for her first artificial insemination, her second test tube baby is being funded by the government. Laws have been relaxed in Poland, a Catholic country where some priests refuse to baptize babies conceived through in vitro fertilization. Still, the method has been used in that country since 1987, and now the state is even helping defray the costs of the expensive reproductive procedure. Italy: Wasted EU Funds - To keep Europe growing together, the European Union is providing billions of euros in the coming seven years. But supervision of the structural projects is difficult. Spain and Italy head the list of countries receiving high European Union subsidies and being suspected of investing those funds in pointless projects. There are also accusations of bribery and undue advantage-taking. The EU budgetary committee has its eye on both countries. Our reporter Cornelia Kolden went to take a closer look in Italy. On the shores of idyllic Lake Trasimeno, she discovered EU investments that have literally been bogged down. duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 am
    Constitution USA with Peter Sagal [#101H] A More Perfect Union Sagal explores the Constitution's most striking and innovative feature: its resilient brand of federalism. The framers created a strong national government while preserving much of the power and independence of the states. This delicate balance of power, seemingly hard-wired for disagreement and conflict, has served America well for more than two centuries. But it has also led to tensions throughout American history and still sparks controversy today over medical marijuana, gun control and "Obamacare." duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: Spanish)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Constitution USA with Peter Sagal [#102H] It's A Free Country Ask Americans what the Constitution's most important feature is and most will say it's the guarantees of liberty enshrined in the Bill of Rights. In this episode, Sagal explores the history of the Bill of Rights and addresses several stories - ripped from the headlines - involving freedom of speech, freedom of religion and right to privacy. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG-L (Secondary audio: Spanish)
  • 7:00 am
    Local USA [#119] Building An Identity As the Asian American population in the United States rises, so do their questions about their place in America; a Japanese-Filipino man narrates the story of his "becoming American"; a group of mixed race professionals is New York address issues of identity and acceptance; and new mothers try to balance their old heritage with their new culture. duration 28:14   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Local USA [#118] Harnessing The Sun The story of America's solar industry, and the promise of solar today and tomorrow: the rise and fall of the 1970s American solar energy program; a non-profit dedicated to providing low income families with solar panels; the Seattle company that built "the world's greenest office building"; and the creative couple in Idaho blazing new solar paths for America's highways. duration 29:04   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    Global Voices [#707] The Mosuo Sisters Two spirited daughters from China's last remaining matrilineal ethnic minority are thrust into the worldwide economic downturn when they lose the only jobs they've ever known. Left with few options, Jua Ma and La Tsuo leave Beijing for home, a remote village in the foothills of the Himalayas. But home is no longer what it was, as growing exposure to the modern world irreparably changes the provocative traditions the Mosuo have built around their belief that marriage is an attack on the family.
    Determined to keep their mother and siblings out of poverty, one sister sacrifices her dream of an education and stays home to farm, while the other leaves to try her luck in the city. From Lijiang to Chengdu, Jua Ma's interactions with rich Chinese businessmen, lecherous gangsters, Tibetan monks, and fledgling pop stars lead her on a precarious path that pits her hopes and dreams against bitter realities.
    duration 54:33   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3246] Tavis talks with pioneering comedienne Joan Rivers in part 1 of a revealing 2-part conversation. The internationally renowned comedienne and best-selling author talks about her latest text, Diary of a Mad Diva. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3245] Tavis talks with Rick Savage and Joe Elliott, who reflect on their careers as two original members of the chart-topping British heavy metal band, Def Leppard. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    Asia This Week [#413] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3228] Millions of Wasted Funds Down The Drain In Eu Projects Series Launch: Secret Heroes - Part 1: Hungary: A Loophole to Freedom - The beginning of the end of the Soviet Bloc came 25 years ago in Hungary. One million East Germans had arrived there and put pressure on the already crumbling Iron Curtain. In the summer of 1989, the first group of East German citizens managed to flee en masse to the West - with the knowledge of the Hungarian government. Even though the borders were still patrolled, hundreds of them passed through to the Austrian side. Hungarian Arpad Bella was a commander at a small border crossing that was reopened after decades of being closed. Bella was completely on his own, since his superiors had failed to inform him. And he reacted with a great deal of sound judgment and humaneness. No shots were fired, and the East Germans entered the West unharmed. Britain: Operation "Trojan Horse" - For months, debate has raged in Birmingham over the role of Islam in the city's schools. An anonymous warning about Muslim fundamentalists has authorities alarmed. The allegations are serious: there are indications of an organized campaign to covertly co-opt schools in England. An inquiry discovered that at several schools in Birmingham, girls and boys were segregated. At some schools, Arabic is a required subject, and Christian holidays are no longer observed. School trips are organized to Mecca and Medina. The conservative education minister, Michael Gove, has announced that with the coming school year, all state schools are required to teach "British values." The schools under investigation have rejected the accusations. Poland: Test Tube Babies - Many Polish couples with fertility problems are fulfilling their wish for children by using artificial fertilization techniques. One Warsaw woman is expected her second child using this method. The surprising thing is that, while the entire family had to collect money to pay for her first artificial insemination, her second test tube baby is being funded by the government. Laws have been relaxed in Poland, a Catholic country where some priests refuse to baptize babies conceived through in vitro fertilization. Still, the method has been used in that country since 1987, and now the state is even helping defray the costs of the expensive reproductive procedure. Italy: Wasted EU Funds - To keep Europe growing together, the European Union is providing billions of euros in the coming seven years. But supervision of the structural projects is difficult. Spain and Italy head the list of countries receiving high European Union subsidies and being suspected of investing those funds in pointless projects. There are also accusations of bribery and undue advantage-taking. The EU budgetary committee has its eye on both countries. Our reporter Cornelia Kolden went to take a closer look in Italy. On the shores of idyllic Lake Trasimeno, she discovered EU investments that have literally been bogged down. duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 am
    Constitution USA with Peter Sagal [#101H] A More Perfect Union Sagal explores the Constitution's most striking and innovative feature: its resilient brand of federalism. The framers created a strong national government while preserving much of the power and independence of the states. This delicate balance of power, seemingly hard-wired for disagreement and conflict, has served America well for more than two centuries. But it has also led to tensions throughout American history and still sparks controversy today over medical marijuana, gun control and "Obamacare." duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: Spanish)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Constitution USA with Peter Sagal [#102H] It's A Free Country Ask Americans what the Constitution's most important feature is and most will say it's the guarantees of liberty enshrined in the Bill of Rights. In this episode, Sagal explores the history of the Bill of Rights and addresses several stories - ripped from the headlines - involving freedom of speech, freedom of religion and right to privacy. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG-L (Secondary audio: Spanish)
  • 1:00 pm
    Local USA [#119] Building An Identity As the Asian American population in the United States rises, so do their questions about their place in America; a Japanese-Filipino man narrates the story of his "becoming American"; a group of mixed race professionals is New York address issues of identity and acceptance; and new mothers try to balance their old heritage with their new culture. duration 28:14   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 pm
    Local USA [#118] Harnessing The Sun The story of America's solar industry, and the promise of solar today and tomorrow: the rise and fall of the 1970s American solar energy program; a non-profit dedicated to providing low income families with solar panels; the Seattle company that built "the world's greenest office building"; and the creative couple in Idaho blazing new solar paths for America's highways. duration 29:04   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#5077] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#10140] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#3246] Tavis talks with pioneering comedienne Joan Rivers in part 1 of a revealing 2-part conversation. The internationally renowned comedienne and best-selling author talks about her latest text, Diary of a Mad Diva. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#33140] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11011] YELLEN'S REPORT TO CONGRESS - Federal Reserve chairwoman Janet Yellen spoke before the Senate Banking Committee today. Gwen Ifill discusses her remarks with Greg Ip, the US economics editor of The Economist, and Diane Swonk, chief economist at Mesirow Financial.
    ARTISAN ECONOMY - Can small businesses and local startups generate the jobs required to jumpstart the economy? NewsHour's economics correspondent Paul Solman investigates how Brooklyn hipsters could save the middle class.
    IMMIGRATION - Protestors on both sides of the immigration debate clashed in Oracle, Arizona today. At another point on the border, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas was detained by the border patrol. Judy Woodruff reports.
    HAMAS - Israel resumed air strikes on Palestine after Hamas rejected an Egyptian cease-fire proposal. Foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner examines why Hamas declined the proposal.
    CULTURE AT RISK - In the latest installment of his series "Culture At Risk," Jeffrey Brown explains how a stadium that has become a landmark in Southern Florida ties together architecture, graffiti and a city's identity.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#33140] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#3252] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#5077] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3642H] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11011] YELLEN'S REPORT TO CONGRESS - Federal Reserve chairwoman Janet Yellen spoke before the Senate Banking Committee today. Gwen Ifill discusses her remarks with Greg Ip, the US economics editor of The Economist, and Diane Swonk, chief economist at Mesirow Financial.
    ARTISAN ECONOMY - Can small businesses and local startups generate the jobs required to jumpstart the economy? NewsHour's economics correspondent Paul Solman investigates how Brooklyn hipsters could save the middle class.
    IMMIGRATION - Protestors on both sides of the immigration debate clashed in Oracle, Arizona today. At another point on the border, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas was detained by the border patrol. Judy Woodruff reports.
    HAMAS - Israel resumed air strikes on Palestine after Hamas rejected an Egyptian cease-fire proposal. Foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner examines why Hamas declined the proposal.
    CULTURE AT RISK - In the latest installment of his series "Culture At Risk," Jeffrey Brown explains how a stadium that has become a landmark in Southern Florida ties together architecture, graffiti and a city's identity.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3642H] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#20147] (broadcast date: 7/15/14)
    * Discussion about the negotiations with Iran over its nuclear program with Karim Sadjadpour, Senior Associate at the Carnegie Endowment for Peace and Ray Takeyh, Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations
    * Reid Hoffman, co-founder and Executive Chairman of LinkedIn
    duration 56:47   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3642H] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#3247] Tavis talks with pioneering comedienne Joan Rivers. Rivers keeps the laughs coming, but also does some serious reflecting in the conclusion of our 2-part conversation. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3642H] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#804H] Tempe, AZ / Albuquerque, NM The Roadtrippers start out in Tempe, AZ, where they speak with Todd McFarlane, the creator of the best-selling comic book series Spawn, and Antoine's personal hero. The team is given encouraging advice by Todd to move away from the idea that they "need to have everything now." Next, the team heads to Albuquerque, NM, where they meet with lobbyist and co-founder of the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta, Tom Rutherford. Afterward, as they head back on the Road, an unfortunate event happens-an unexpected mechanical issue leads the Green RV to catch fire. The Roadtrippers pull over and no one is seriously injured; but emotions are high as the stark realization sets in as to whether they'll be able to continue their journey. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3642H] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11011] YELLEN'S REPORT TO CONGRESS - Federal Reserve chairwoman Janet Yellen spoke before the Senate Banking Committee today. Gwen Ifill discusses her remarks with Greg Ip, the US economics editor of The Economist, and Diane Swonk, chief economist at Mesirow Financial.
    ARTISAN ECONOMY - Can small businesses and local startups generate the jobs required to jumpstart the economy? NewsHour's economics correspondent Paul Solman investigates how Brooklyn hipsters could save the middle class.
    IMMIGRATION - Protestors on both sides of the immigration debate clashed in Oracle, Arizona today. At another point on the border, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas was detained by the border patrol. Judy Woodruff reports.
    HAMAS - Israel resumed air strikes on Palestine after Hamas rejected an Egyptian cease-fire proposal. Foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner examines why Hamas declined the proposal.
    CULTURE AT RISK - In the latest installment of his series "Culture At Risk," Jeffrey Brown explains how a stadium that has become a landmark in Southern Florida ties together architecture, graffiti and a city's identity.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3642H] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#3252] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#11011] YELLEN'S REPORT TO CONGRESS - Federal Reserve chairwoman Janet Yellen spoke before the Senate Banking Committee today. Gwen Ifill discusses her remarks with Greg Ip, the US economics editor of The Economist, and Diane Swonk, chief economist at Mesirow Financial.
    ARTISAN ECONOMY - Can small businesses and local startups generate the jobs required to jumpstart the economy? NewsHour's economics correspondent Paul Solman investigates how Brooklyn hipsters could save the middle class.
    IMMIGRATION - Protestors on both sides of the immigration debate clashed in Oracle, Arizona today. At another point on the border, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas was detained by the border patrol. Judy Woodruff reports.
    HAMAS - Israel resumed air strikes on Palestine after Hamas rejected an Egyptian cease-fire proposal. Foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner examines why Hamas declined the proposal.
    CULTURE AT RISK - In the latest installment of his series "Culture At Risk," Jeffrey Brown explains how a stadium that has become a landmark in Southern Florida ties together architecture, graffiti and a city's identity.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
Tuesday, July 15, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too