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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Monday, June 9, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Monday, June 9, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    Simple Piece of Paper What happens when a state allows adopted citizens to have their original birth certificates? In 2011, Illinois became the largest state in the Union to reverse sealed records laws, providing adult adoptees access to the document recording their birth. 'A Simple Piece of Paper' tells the story of over a dozen adoptees, as they open their records. Their collective experiences provoke a new question: what would have happened if the records had been opened sooner? duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Grove, The More Americans have been lost to AIDS than in all the US wars since 1900. And the pandemic has killed 22 million people worldwide. But few know about the existence of the National AIDS Memorial, a 7-acre grove hidden in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park. This program chronicles this garden's transformation from a neglected eyesore to landscaped sanctuary to national memorial. The film shows how a community in crisis found healing and remembrance, and how the seeds of a few visionary environmentalists blossomed into something larger than they could have imagined. But as the Grove's stakeholders seek broader public recognition through an international design competition, a battle erupts over what constitutes an appropriate memorial for the AIDS pandemic. What does it mean to be a national memorial? And how do we mark a time of unimaginable loss? duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 2:00 am
    Great Conversations [#102] Elizabeth Gilbert and Zz Packer Great Conversations is a series featuring distinguished authors, each recognized in an area of prominence and each uniquely paired with an interviewer. In this program, author Elizabeth Gilbert discusses her books Eat, Pray, Love and Stern Men with ZZ Packer, author of Drinking Coffee Elsewhere. Elizabeth Gilbert's recent memoir Eat, Pray, Love has been in the top tier of the New York Times non-fiction bestseller list since 2006. Her debut novel, Stern Men, will be reissued by Penguin Books in late February 2009. Gilbert's skill as a writer traverses many genres. She has written for magazines as varied as GQ, The New York Times, SPIN, and Travel & Leisure. Her short story collection, Pilgrims, received a Pushcart Prize and was a finalist for the PEN/Hemingway Award. She adapted her GQ article on Eustace Conway into a biography of the naturalist, The Last American Man, which was a finalist for the National Book Award in non-fiction. Elizabeth Gilbert appears on the list of "The 2008 TIME 100: The World's Most Influential People". The film rights to Eat, Pray, Love have been sold to Paramount, and production is to begin soon, with Julia Roberts to star. ZZ Packer's short-story collection, Drinking Coffee Elsewhere, was included in the New Yorker's Debut Fiction issue in 2000, was a New York Times Notable Book, and was a PEN/Faulkner Award finalist. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, Harper's, Zoetrope, Seventeen, Harper's, The Best American Short Stories, New York Times Magazine, Ploughshares, New York Times Book Review, and Salon. Her writing has also been anthologized in 25 and Under: Fiction. In 2008 she edited the annual New Stories from the South: The Year's Best. duration 56:28   TVG
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#5051] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3220] Tavis talks with the music director of LA Opera James Conlon. The 2-time Grammy-winning composer and conductor explains his passion for introducing the work of composers that are not well-known to contemporary audiences. Tavis also chats with Grammy-winning singer-songwriter-producer Ledisi. The multiple Grammy-nominated artist shares the backstory of her latest CD, "The Truth." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    LinkAsia [#250] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 4:30 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1740] BLOODLESS SURGERY - For Jehovah's Witnesses receiving blood transfusions is a sin. Betty Rollin reports on a bloodless surgery program at Englewood Hospital in New Jersey which serves not only Jehovah's Witnesses but nearly all of their patients. Neurosurgeon Dr. Abe Steinberger says "The risks of giving blood in many cases outweigh the benefits of giving blood." (Originally aired July 12, 2013)
    THE PAINFUL PILGRIMAGE OF CHRISTIAN WIMAN - Poet, seeker and victim, Christian Wiman talks with Judy Valente about his spiritual journey and the central importance of poetry, new metaphors and all the arts to experiencing, for him, the "glimmers of God." The former editor of Poetry magazine taught this year at the Yale Divinity School and Yale's Institute of Sacred Music. Married, with two young daughters, Wiman describes his "glimpses" of the holy at the same time that he lives with an incurable cancer. (Originally aired October 25, 2013)
    SHAVUOT - This past week, Jews observed Shavuot. Also known as the Feast of Weeks, it comes seven weeks after Passover and, along with Passover and Sukkot, is one of three Jewish pilgrimage festivals. It acknowledges the harvest by the Jews as an agricultural people thousands of years ago, and celebrates God's giving of the Torah to the Israelites on Mt. Sinai. (Originally aired June 17, 2011)
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Nature [#2810H] Outback Pelicans The Australian outback is the driest place on the driest inhabited continent on the planet. It is a place you might expect to see kangaroos but certainly not waterbirds. Yet once every 10 years, rains flood into dried-up river beds and head inland to create the largest lake in Australia, and 100,000 pelicans -- a third of all the pelicans in Australia -- arrive for the event. Leaving their homes on coasts and harbors, they come to feed on fish washed in on the floods and on billions of brine shrimp and other crustaceans which hatch and grow to adulthood in a few days in water twice as salty as the Dead Sea. The pelicans have come home to court and raise as many families as possible before the water and the food disappear once more. duration 55:15   SRND51 TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    AfroPop: The Ultimate Cultural Exchange [#606] The Deported The film follows a group of men, raised in the United States or Canada, and repatriated to Haiti for crimes ranging from violent assaults to driving violations and petty theft. Faced with a language and culture they do not understand, the men struggle to adapt to a new and unfamiliar country hostile to their presence. The deportee's families, meanwhile, grapple with anxiety, blame and regret. duration 56:46   STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Global Voices [#702] In The Matter of Cha Jung Hee Her passport said she was Cha Jung Hee. She knew she was not. So began a 40-year deception for a Korean adoptee who came to the United States in 1966. Told to keep her true identity secret from her new American family, the 8-year-old girl quickly forgot she had ever been anyone else. But why had her identity been switched? And who was the real Cha Jung Hee? In the Matter of Cha Jung Hee is the search to find the answers, as acclaimed filmmaker Deann Borshay Liem (First Person Plural, POV 2000) returns to her native Korea to find her "double," the mysterious girl whose place she took in America. duration 52:52   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    Simple Piece of Paper What happens when a state allows adopted citizens to have their original birth certificates? In 2011, Illinois became the largest state in the Union to reverse sealed records laws, providing adult adoptees access to the document recording their birth. 'A Simple Piece of Paper' tells the story of over a dozen adoptees, as they open their records. Their collective experiences provoke a new question: what would have happened if the records had been opened sooner? duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3220] Tavis talks with the music director of LA Opera James Conlon. The 2-time Grammy-winning composer and conductor explains his passion for introducing the work of composers that are not well-known to contemporary audiences. Tavis also chats with Grammy-winning singer-songwriter-producer Ledisi. The multiple Grammy-nominated artist shares the backstory of her latest CD, "The Truth." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3219] Tavis talks with biographer Dr. Peniel E. Joseph. The African American history scholar unpacks his biography of Stokely Carmichael, one of the most controversial and important leaders of the civil rights movement. Tavis also chats with Orphan Black star Tatiana Maslany, named by Variety to its 2013 list of "10 actors to watch," who talks about the buzz surrounding her breakout hit series. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    LinkAsia [#250] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 10:30 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1740] BLOODLESS SURGERY - For Jehovah's Witnesses receiving blood transfusions is a sin. Betty Rollin reports on a bloodless surgery program at Englewood Hospital in New Jersey which serves not only Jehovah's Witnesses but nearly all of their patients. Neurosurgeon Dr. Abe Steinberger says "The risks of giving blood in many cases outweigh the benefits of giving blood." (Originally aired July 12, 2013)
    THE PAINFUL PILGRIMAGE OF CHRISTIAN WIMAN - Poet, seeker and victim, Christian Wiman talks with Judy Valente about his spiritual journey and the central importance of poetry, new metaphors and all the arts to experiencing, for him, the "glimmers of God." The former editor of Poetry magazine taught this year at the Yale Divinity School and Yale's Institute of Sacred Music. Married, with two young daughters, Wiman describes his "glimpses" of the holy at the same time that he lives with an incurable cancer. (Originally aired October 25, 2013)
    SHAVUOT - This past week, Jews observed Shavuot. Also known as the Feast of Weeks, it comes seven weeks after Passover and, along with Passover and Sukkot, is one of three Jewish pilgrimage festivals. It acknowledges the harvest by the Jews as an agricultural people thousands of years ago, and celebrates God's giving of the Torah to the Israelites on Mt. Sinai. (Originally aired June 17, 2011)
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 am
    Nature [#2810H] Outback Pelicans The Australian outback is the driest place on the driest inhabited continent on the planet. It is a place you might expect to see kangaroos but certainly not waterbirds. Yet once every 10 years, rains flood into dried-up river beds and head inland to create the largest lake in Australia, and 100,000 pelicans -- a third of all the pelicans in Australia -- arrive for the event. Leaving their homes on coasts and harbors, they come to feed on fish washed in on the floods and on billions of brine shrimp and other crustaceans which hatch and grow to adulthood in a few days in water twice as salty as the Dead Sea. The pelicans have come home to court and raise as many families as possible before the water and the food disappear once more. duration 55:15   SRND51 TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    AfroPop: The Ultimate Cultural Exchange [#606] The Deported The film follows a group of men, raised in the United States or Canada, and repatriated to Haiti for crimes ranging from violent assaults to driving violations and petty theft. Faced with a language and culture they do not understand, the men struggle to adapt to a new and unfamiliar country hostile to their presence. The deportee's families, meanwhile, grapple with anxiety, blame and regret. duration 56:46   STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    Global Voices [#702] In The Matter of Cha Jung Hee Her passport said she was Cha Jung Hee. She knew she was not. So began a 40-year deception for a Korean adoptee who came to the United States in 1966. Told to keep her true identity secret from her new American family, the 8-year-old girl quickly forgot she had ever been anyone else. But why had her identity been switched? And who was the real Cha Jung Hee? In the Matter of Cha Jung Hee is the search to find the answers, as acclaimed filmmaker Deann Borshay Liem (First Person Plural, POV 2000) returns to her native Korea to find her "double," the mysterious girl whose place she took in America. duration 52:52   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#5051] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#10114] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#3220] Tavis talks with the music director of LA Opera James Conlon. The 2-time Grammy-winning composer and conductor explains his passion for introducing the work of composers that are not well-known to contemporary audiences. Tavis also chats with Grammy-winning singer-songwriter-producer Ledisi. The multiple Grammy-nominated artist shares the backstory of her latest CD, "The Truth." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#33114] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10946] VA WAIT TIMES - After allegations of malfeasance proved true, the Department of Veterans Affairs now says that 57,000 veterans have been waiting 90 days or more for their first medical appointment. Gwen Ifill analyzes the report with Ralph Ibson, national policy director of the Wounded Warrior Project, and Dr. Sam Foote, the former Veterans Affairs doctor who drew attention to the misconduct in Phoenix.
    KARACHI AIRPORT ATTACK - A Taliban attack on Pakistan's busiest airport left over two dozen dead on Sunday. Judy Woodruff speaks with Christine Fair, an assistant professor at Georgetown University, and Shuja Nawaz, director of the South Asia Center at the Atlantic Council to get more on the attack and the larger picture in Pakistan.
    STANDARDS BACKLASH - As educators and lawmakers across the nation are engaged in ever-escalating disputes over a set of education standards known as "Common Core," Louisiana state legislators are debating whether or not to repeal the curriculum it adopted in 2010. Louisiana Public Broadcasting's Shauna Sanford reports on how the debate is playing out in that state.
    STUDENT DEBT - President Obama approved an executive order on Monday that limits some student loan payments to 10 percent of personal income. Gwen Ifill discusses the rising costs of education and the impact of this executive order with Richard Vedder, director of the Center for College Affordability & Productivity, and Deanne Loonin, director of the National Consumer Law Center's Student Loan Borrower Assistance Project.
    ALL THE WAY - "Breaking Bad" star Bryan Cranston won a Tony Award on Sunday for his portrayal of President Lyndon B. Johnson in the Broadway play, "All The Way." Jeffrey Brown brings us a second look at his conversation with Cranston in New York City, recorded earlier this spring.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#33114] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#3226] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#5051] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3616H] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10946] VA WAIT TIMES - After allegations of malfeasance proved true, the Department of Veterans Affairs now says that 57,000 veterans have been waiting 90 days or more for their first medical appointment. Gwen Ifill analyzes the report with Ralph Ibson, national policy director of the Wounded Warrior Project, and Dr. Sam Foote, the former Veterans Affairs doctor who drew attention to the misconduct in Phoenix.
    KARACHI AIRPORT ATTACK - A Taliban attack on Pakistan's busiest airport left over two dozen dead on Sunday. Judy Woodruff speaks with Christine Fair, an assistant professor at Georgetown University, and Shuja Nawaz, director of the South Asia Center at the Atlantic Council to get more on the attack and the larger picture in Pakistan.
    STANDARDS BACKLASH - As educators and lawmakers across the nation are engaged in ever-escalating disputes over a set of education standards known as "Common Core," Louisiana state legislators are debating whether or not to repeal the curriculum it adopted in 2010. Louisiana Public Broadcasting's Shauna Sanford reports on how the debate is playing out in that state.
    STUDENT DEBT - President Obama approved an executive order on Monday that limits some student loan payments to 10 percent of personal income. Gwen Ifill discusses the rising costs of education and the impact of this executive order with Richard Vedder, director of the Center for College Affordability & Productivity, and Deanne Loonin, director of the National Consumer Law Center's Student Loan Borrower Assistance Project.
    ALL THE WAY - "Breaking Bad" star Bryan Cranston won a Tony Award on Sunday for his portrayal of President Lyndon B. Johnson in the Broadway play, "All The Way." Jeffrey Brown brings us a second look at his conversation with Cranston in New York City, recorded earlier this spring.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3616H] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#20121] (original broadcast date: 6/09/14)
    * A discussion about Hillary Clinton and her upcoming memoir "Hard Choices" with Joe Klein of Time; Maggie Haberman of CNN; and John Dickerson, political director at CBS News
    * Sarah Lewis on her book 'The Rise: Creativity, the Gift of Failure, and the Search for Mastery'
    duration 56:47   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3616H] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#3221] Tavis talks with Rep. Xavier Becerra, chair of the House Democratic Caucus, and 10-year-old Jersey Vargas - a real-life face behind immigration statistics. The California congressman - co-sponsor of the bill known as HR15 - and the pint-sized activist weigh in on US immigration policy and the impact on families. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3616H] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#1004H] Don't Feel Trapped In Texas, the Roadtrippers head to the Texas Instruments headquarters to meet Process Integration Engineer Byron Williams. Byron shares his struggle with self-doubt that almost stopped him from pursuing a career in science, and encourages the Roadtrippers to re-frame challenge as a motivator. Later, the crew heads to the ATT Foundry to speak with Senior Marketing Manager Tracy Parrish. Tracy discusses her switch from engineering to teaching, and helps Megan overcome her anxiety about teaching STEM subjects. The team ends the week at the National Space Biomedical Research Facility in Houston. There, Deputy Chief Scientist Dorit Donoviel discusses the courage it took to leave a comfortable job and try a new field. She encourages the team to never be afraid of venturing in new directions if they start to feel stagnant. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3616H] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10946] VA WAIT TIMES - After allegations of malfeasance proved true, the Department of Veterans Affairs now says that 57,000 veterans have been waiting 90 days or more for their first medical appointment. Gwen Ifill analyzes the report with Ralph Ibson, national policy director of the Wounded Warrior Project, and Dr. Sam Foote, the former Veterans Affairs doctor who drew attention to the misconduct in Phoenix.
    KARACHI AIRPORT ATTACK - A Taliban attack on Pakistan's busiest airport left over two dozen dead on Sunday. Judy Woodruff speaks with Christine Fair, an assistant professor at Georgetown University, and Shuja Nawaz, director of the South Asia Center at the Atlantic Council to get more on the attack and the larger picture in Pakistan.
    STANDARDS BACKLASH - As educators and lawmakers across the nation are engaged in ever-escalating disputes over a set of education standards known as "Common Core," Louisiana state legislators are debating whether or not to repeal the curriculum it adopted in 2010. Louisiana Public Broadcasting's Shauna Sanford reports on how the debate is playing out in that state.
    STUDENT DEBT - President Obama approved an executive order on Monday that limits some student loan payments to 10 percent of personal income. Gwen Ifill discusses the rising costs of education and the impact of this executive order with Richard Vedder, director of the Center for College Affordability & Productivity, and Deanne Loonin, director of the National Consumer Law Center's Student Loan Borrower Assistance Project.
    ALL THE WAY - "Breaking Bad" star Bryan Cranston won a Tony Award on Sunday for his portrayal of President Lyndon B. Johnson in the Broadway play, "All The Way." Jeffrey Brown brings us a second look at his conversation with Cranston in New York City, recorded earlier this spring.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3616H] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#3226] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10946] VA WAIT TIMES - After allegations of malfeasance proved true, the Department of Veterans Affairs now says that 57,000 veterans have been waiting 90 days or more for their first medical appointment. Gwen Ifill analyzes the report with Ralph Ibson, national policy director of the Wounded Warrior Project, and Dr. Sam Foote, the former Veterans Affairs doctor who drew attention to the misconduct in Phoenix.
    KARACHI AIRPORT ATTACK - A Taliban attack on Pakistan's busiest airport left over two dozen dead on Sunday. Judy Woodruff speaks with Christine Fair, an assistant professor at Georgetown University, and Shuja Nawaz, director of the South Asia Center at the Atlantic Council to get more on the attack and the larger picture in Pakistan.
    STANDARDS BACKLASH - As educators and lawmakers across the nation are engaged in ever-escalating disputes over a set of education standards known as "Common Core," Louisiana state legislators are debating whether or not to repeal the curriculum it adopted in 2010. Louisiana Public Broadcasting's Shauna Sanford reports on how the debate is playing out in that state.
    STUDENT DEBT - President Obama approved an executive order on Monday that limits some student loan payments to 10 percent of personal income. Gwen Ifill discusses the rising costs of education and the impact of this executive order with Richard Vedder, director of the Center for College Affordability & Productivity, and Deanne Loonin, director of the National Consumer Law Center's Student Loan Borrower Assistance Project.
    ALL THE WAY - "Breaking Bad" star Bryan Cranston won a Tony Award on Sunday for his portrayal of President Lyndon B. Johnson in the Broadway play, "All The Way." Jeffrey Brown brings us a second look at his conversation with Cranston in New York City, recorded earlier this spring.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
Monday, June 9, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too