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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, May 24, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, May 24, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10935] UKRAINE - More deadly clashes erupted in eastern Ukraine on Friday as pro-Moscow rebels battled with forces loyal to Kiev ahead of presidential elections this weekend. Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent Margaret Warner reports from the divided country's capital on what's in store for Sunday's poll.
    THE COST OF NOT CARING - As states cut back on the number of psychiatric hospital beds, many Americans desperately in need of care are falling through the cracks of our healthcare system. Judy Woodruff interviews USA Today medical reporter Liz Szabo, who has worked to shed light on the issue.
    RACE & BREAST CANCER - Gwen Ifill explores a widening racial gap in treatment and outcomes for women battling breast cancer, and what health officials in one city are doing to make sure more black women fighting the disease get the treatment they need.
    SHIELDS & GERSON - Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and Washington Post columnist Michael Gerson analyze the week's biggest stories.
    PLATO AT THE GOOGLEPLEX - Are ancient philosophical questions still relevant in today's modern world? Chief Arts, Culture and Society Correspondent Jeffrey Brown sits down with author Rebecca Goldstein to discuss her new book "Plato at the Googleplex," on why philosophy is here to stay.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#33103H] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, new home sales rise giving hope to the housing market. But not everyone thinks things are picking up. And, our Market Monitor guest has a list of stocks he expects will gain 25% over the next 18 months. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3209Z] Tavis talks with activist-author Nell Bernstein. The self-described writer-turned-activist shares startling backstories of her text, Burning Down the House, an indictment of the juvenile justice system. Tavis also chats with veteran actor Ed O'Neill, who talks about his role as patriarch Jay Pritchett - for which he's received 3 consecutive Emmy nominations - on ABC's top comedy, Modern Family. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 am
    Company of Heroes Easy Company, the 2nd Battalion of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment of the 101st Airborne Division, widely known as the "Screaming Eagles," remains one of the most revered combat units in US military history. The Army company's legendary exploits in World War II inspired Stephen Ambrose's book, Band of Brothers, and the Emmy-winning HBO miniseries of the same name. Following two years of hard training, the soldiers of Easy Company parachuted into Normandy on D-Day and, later, into Holland for Operation Market Garden. They fought their way through Belgium, France and Germany, survived overwhelming odds, liberated concentration camps, and drank a victory toast in April 1945 at Hitler's hideout in the Alps.
    In 2009, 20 of the few remaining survivors from Easy Company shared their rarely told stories of sacrifice and courage for Marcus Brotherton's oral-history book project, We Who Are Alive and Remain: Untold Stories From the Band of Brothers. In this documentary, those same veterans - along with the families of three deceased others - recount the horrors and the victories, the bonds they made, the tears and blood they shed, and the friends they lost.
    duration 57:10   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1738] POPE FRANCIS MIDDLE EAST TRIP - This weekend Pope Francis makes a pilgrimage to the region Christians call "the Holy Land" to meet with Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew and to try to reinforce the unity of Western and Eastern Christians. But he will also engage Jewish, Christian and Muslim religious leaders and address issues such as the diminishing number of Christians in the region and the Israeli-Palestinian peace process. "This pope," says Haris Tarin of the Muslim Public Affairs Council, "can remind the region that dignity and peace and living together in harmony is in essence what the peace process should be about."
    RELIGIOUS FREEDOM IN MISSISSIPPI - Baptist pastor and Mississippi state senator Phillip Gandy recently sponsored and the legislature passed a religious freedom restoration act "to protect people of faith from having their religious freedoms violated," says Gandy. But others see it as an attempt to legalize discrimination under the pretext of religion, or to insulate the state's Christian residents from the changes in LGBT civil rights occurring across the country. "It's aiming at keeping government in its place," Gandy explains. But National Council of Churches president and general secretary Jim Winkler describes it as "a rearguard action by those concerned by changes taking place in society."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1048] Great Investor Steven Romick A rare interview "Great Investor" Steven Romick (Portfolio Manager, FPA Crescent Fund), Morningstar's 2013 Allocation Fund Manager of the Year, on why he is holding large sums of cash in his FPA Crescent Fund. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2311] Becoming Papa - a Look at a groundbreaking program for men in Rio De Janeiro's favelas to stem the tide of violence and promote healthy relationships. (originally airdate: 5/24/14) duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#304] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Matter of Duty: The Continuing War Against PTSD This program tells the stories of Maine soldiers who were deployed to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Gulf War and the Vietnam War and returned home to face a new, relentless enemy: post-traumatic stress disorder. PTSD is a condition that is not well understood here in Maine and it will have lasting implications for the entire state. It is a national epidemic.
    This documentary details Kennebec Sheriff Randy Liberty's personal battle with PTSD and several veterans in his charge at the Kennebec County Jail. Liberty's honesty about his own condition and his efforts to help other veterans vividly depicts the continuing impact of war on the men and women who have served our country.
    duration 56:47   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Coming Back with Wes Moore [#102] Fitting In Host Wes Moore reflects on the idea of fitting in when you and the home you are returning to is fundamentally changed by war. Wes follows up with Andy Clark as he prepares to return to Afghanistan as a military contractor and Brad Farnsley as he struggles to accept his situation at the Warrior Transition Unit.
    He also meets Bobby Henline, who's body was more than 40% burned when his Humvee was hit by an IED and has since found himself on stage as a stand-up comedian. But he still struggles with PTSD, which is making it difficult to cope with his tumultuous family life and straining his relationship with his wife.
    Taylor Urruela lost his right leg to an IED two days before he was set to leave and now has a prosthetic limb. He now attends the University of Tampa to study Sports Management, while at the same time plans to try out for their baseball team.
    Earl Johnson is determined to use the skills he learned in the military to remake his neighborhood - Baltimore's infamous Oliver. Working with Operation Oliver, he cleans up trash, boards up abandoned homes, and works as a conduit between the police and drug dealers. But his zealous drive is putting a tremendous strain on his relationship with his wife, Zina. And his past military service also comes into question, revealing a series of secrets that even his wife is unaware of.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-V (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1738] POPE FRANCIS MIDDLE EAST TRIP - This weekend Pope Francis makes a pilgrimage to the region Christians call "the Holy Land" to meet with Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew and to try to reinforce the unity of Western and Eastern Christians. But he will also engage Jewish, Christian and Muslim religious leaders and address issues such as the diminishing number of Christians in the region and the Israeli-Palestinian peace process. "This pope," says Haris Tarin of the Muslim Public Affairs Council, "can remind the region that dignity and peace and living together in harmony is in essence what the peace process should be about."
    RELIGIOUS FREEDOM IN MISSISSIPPI - Baptist pastor and Mississippi state senator Phillip Gandy recently sponsored and the legislature passed a religious freedom restoration act "to protect people of faith from having their religious freedoms violated," says Gandy. But others see it as an attempt to legalize discrimination under the pretext of religion, or to insulate the state's Christian residents from the changes in LGBT civil rights occurring across the country. "It's aiming at keeping government in its place," Gandy explains. But National Council of Churches president and general secretary Jim Winkler describes it as "a rearguard action by those concerned by changes taking place in society."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#320H] Our Heritage of Racism Every once in a while, an article or book comes along that changes how we think and talk about race in America. So it is with the cover story in the new issue of The Atlantic magazine. Written by journalist Ta-Nahisi Coates, its provocative title is "The Case for Reparations," and it urges that we begin a national dialogue on whether the US should compensate African Americans not only as recognition of slavery's "ancient brutality" - as President Lyndon Johnson called it - but also as acknowledgement of all the prejudice and discrimination that have followed in a direct line from this, our original sin.
    "I am not asking you, as a white person, to see yourself as an enslaver," Coates explains to Bill Moyers. "I'm asking you as an American to see all of the freedoms that you enjoy and see how they are rooted in things that the country you belong to condoned or actively participated in in the past. And that covers everything from enslavement to the era of lynching, when we effectively decided that we weren't going to afford African Americans the same level of protection of the law. There are plenty of African Americans in this country - and I would say that this goes right up to the White House - who are not by any means poor, but are very much afflicted by white supremacy."
    Reparations, Coates says, are "what the US, first of all, really owes African Americans, but not far behind that, what it owes itself, because this is really about our health as a country. I firmly believe that reparation is a chance to be pioneers. We say we set all these examples about liberty and freedom and democracy and all that great stuff. Well, here's an opportunity for us to live that out."
    Ta-Nehisi Coates has written for many publications, including The New York Times and The Washington Post. He is a senior editor for The Atlantic magazine and author of the 2008 memoir, "The Beautiful Struggle: A Father, Two Sons, and an Unlikely Road to Manhood."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#248] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    Maria Hinojosa: One-On-One [#503H] Jose Hernandez Former NASA astronaut Jose Hernandez talks about his long journey from the dusty fields of California to the International Space Station. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5347H] * The latest on alleged mismanagement of VA hospitals, the indictment of five Chinese Army officials over cyber spying, analysis Tuesday's primary elections and President Lyndon Johnson's call to make America a 'Great Society' fifty years later. Joining Gwen: Jeff Zeleny, ABC News; Pete Williams, NBC News; Susan Davis, USA Today; Karen Tumulty, Washington Post.
    * The House voted to end the NSA's practice of bulk collecting phone records. USA Today's Susan Davis details how they came to this decision. Pete Williams of NBC News talks about the growing number of states that have overturned bans on same-sex marriage across the country. President Obama nominated San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro to become secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development. ABC News' Jeff Zeleny examines the president's selection and discusses what's next for current HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    Hunger in the Valley of Plenty California's San Joaquin Valley is one of the most productive farm regions on the planet. Yet the people who work and live near those farms can't always access that bounty. duration 27:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17143Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2311] Becoming Papa - a Look at a groundbreaking program for men in Rio De Janeiro's favelas to stem the tide of violence and promote healthy relationships. (originally airdate: 5/24/14) duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3222H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#145] * Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel * Paul Rieckhoff, founder and chief executive of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America * Sheryl Gay Stolberg of the New York Times on the potential fallout from the scandal at the Veterans Administration * David Remnick on the Ukraine's presidential elections * Daniel Radcliffe discusses his role in the revival of "The Cripple of Inishmaan" duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#320H] Our Heritage of Racism Every once in a while, an article or book comes along that changes how we think and talk about race in America. So it is with the cover story in the new issue of The Atlantic magazine. Written by journalist Ta-Nahisi Coates, its provocative title is "The Case for Reparations," and it urges that we begin a national dialogue on whether the US should compensate African Americans not only as recognition of slavery's "ancient brutality" - as President Lyndon Johnson called it - but also as acknowledgement of all the prejudice and discrimination that have followed in a direct line from this, our original sin.
    "I am not asking you, as a white person, to see yourself as an enslaver," Coates explains to Bill Moyers. "I'm asking you as an American to see all of the freedoms that you enjoy and see how they are rooted in things that the country you belong to condoned or actively participated in in the past. And that covers everything from enslavement to the era of lynching, when we effectively decided that we weren't going to afford African Americans the same level of protection of the law. There are plenty of African Americans in this country - and I would say that this goes right up to the White House - who are not by any means poor, but are very much afflicted by white supremacy."
    Reparations, Coates says, are "what the US, first of all, really owes African Americans, but not far behind that, what it owes itself, because this is really about our health as a country. I firmly believe that reparation is a chance to be pioneers. We say we set all these examples about liberty and freedom and democracy and all that great stuff. Well, here's an opportunity for us to live that out."
    Ta-Nehisi Coates has written for many publications, including The New York Times and The Washington Post. He is a senior editor for The Atlantic magazine and author of the 2008 memoir, "The Beautiful Struggle: A Father, Two Sons, and an Unlikely Road to Manhood."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1738] POPE FRANCIS MIDDLE EAST TRIP - This weekend Pope Francis makes a pilgrimage to the region Christians call "the Holy Land" to meet with Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew and to try to reinforce the unity of Western and Eastern Christians. But he will also engage Jewish, Christian and Muslim religious leaders and address issues such as the diminishing number of Christians in the region and the Israeli-Palestinian peace process. "This pope," says Haris Tarin of the Muslim Public Affairs Council, "can remind the region that dignity and peace and living together in harmony is in essence what the peace process should be about."
    RELIGIOUS FREEDOM IN MISSISSIPPI - Baptist pastor and Mississippi state senator Phillip Gandy recently sponsored and the legislature passed a religious freedom restoration act "to protect people of faith from having their religious freedoms violated," says Gandy. But others see it as an attempt to legalize discrimination under the pretext of religion, or to insulate the state's Christian residents from the changes in LGBT civil rights occurring across the country. "It's aiming at keeping government in its place," Gandy explains. But National Council of Churches president and general secretary Jim Winkler describes it as "a rearguard action by those concerned by changes taking place in society."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#701H] Next Meal: Engineering Food Discover how genetically engineered crops are made, their pros and cons, and what the future might hold for research and regulations such as labeling. In a half-hour special, QUEST Northern California explores genetically engineered crops in the wake of Proposition 37, the November 2012 initiative that would have required foods containing genetically engineered ingredients to be labeled in California. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#321] duration 25:41   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Civil War: The Untold Story [#104] Death Knell of the Confederacy September 19, 1863. The first day of the Battle of Chickamauga ends in a bloody draw. On the next day, the battle is determined by one of the biggest blunders of the Civil War. Miscommunication, confusion, and fatigue with Union General William Rosecrans and his generals have left a gap in the Union line more than a quarter mile wide. James Longstreet's force of 11,000 from the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, pour through the gap and split the Union army in two. Rosecrans and his beaten army escape to Chattanooga. Chickamauga's combined casualties of 34,000 are only topped by the carnage at Gettysburg. In October, Rosecrans is replaced by U.S. Grant, who immediately plans an offensive. In November 1863, Grant routes the Confederate stronghold just outside Chattanooga. As they escape southward into Georgia, a Confederate officer calls the devastating defeat: "the death knell of the Confederacy." duration 54:00   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 pm
    Escape from a Nazi Death Camp October 14th 2013 was the 70th anniversary of an event that shook the Nazi party to its core. In east Poland, at the remote Nazi death camp of Sobibor, 300 Jewish prisoners staged a bloody break out. To mark the anniversary, this film travels back Sobibor with the last remaining survivors to reveal their extraordinary story of courage, desperation and determination. The film uses brutally honest drama-reconstruction and first hand testimony to reveal the incredible escape story. The multi-layered plot unfolds like a Hollywood blockbuster - from the last-minute change to the escape plan forced by an unexpected arrival of a train load of SS soldiers, to the systematic luring of individual camp guards to separate locations and different, highly creative deaths, yet every terrible and inspiring moment of this story is absolutely true. duration 56:46   SRND51 TV14-V
  • 4:00 pm
    Pacific Heartbeat [#102H] Under A Jarvis Moon Under a Jarvis Moon is the story of 130 young men from Hawai'i who, from the late 1930s through the early years of World War II, were part of a clandestine mission by the U.S. federal government to occupy desert islands in the middle of the Pacific. The first wave of these colonists were Hawaiian high school students, chosen because government officials assumed Pacific Islanders could best survive the harsh conditions present on the tiny, isolated islands. For the young men, who were unaware of the true purpose of their role as colonists, what ensued is a tale of intrigue, courage, and ultimately, tragedy. Amazingly, these men (four of whom are still alive) are only now being recognized for their sacrifice, and efforts are underway for the United States to officially acknowledge them for serving their country. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 5:00 pm
    Stanford Roundtable [#2013H] Are You Happy Now? The New Science of Happiness And Wellbeing The Roundtable at Stanford University, 2013, is entitled: Are You Happy Now? The new science of happiness and wellbeing. The science of happiness is a growing and intriguing field. Research about what truly makes people happy is not only surprising, but applicable no matter how much money we make or where we live. Join moderator Katie Couric and a panel of experts in psychology, business, neuroscience and design for a Roundtable discussion about the happiness and sense of well being that elude so many, but are sought by all. duration 58:46   TVG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#175H] Included: the story of a chance encounter. John Larson heads out on a reporting trip and discovers a powerful story en route. The young man sitting next to him in coach reveals his immigrant family's success story and their fierce devotion to America. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5347H] * The latest on alleged mismanagement of VA hospitals, the indictment of five Chinese Army officials over cyber spying, analysis Tuesday's primary elections and President Lyndon Johnson's call to make America a 'Great Society' fifty years later. Joining Gwen: Jeff Zeleny, ABC News; Pete Williams, NBC News; Susan Davis, USA Today; Karen Tumulty, Washington Post.
    * The House voted to end the NSA's practice of bulk collecting phone records. USA Today's Susan Davis details how they came to this decision. Pete Williams of NBC News talks about the growing number of states that have overturned bans on same-sex marriage across the country. President Obama nominated San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro to become secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development. ABC News' Jeff Zeleny examines the president's selection and discusses what's next for current HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    Hunger in the Valley of Plenty California's San Joaquin Valley is one of the most productive farm regions on the planet. Yet the people who work and live near those farms can't always access that bounty. duration 27:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#701H] Next Meal: Engineering Food Discover how genetically engineered crops are made, their pros and cons, and what the future might hold for research and regulations such as labeling. In a half-hour special, QUEST Northern California explores genetically engineered crops in the wake of Proposition 37, the November 2012 initiative that would have required foods containing genetically engineered ingredients to be labeled in California. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1307] Central Japan Megan's journey begins in Kyoto, where she explores the city's best flea market, meditates with a Buddhist monk, is entertained by geishas at a banquet and visits both the Fushimi Inari Shinto Shrine and the Toji Buddhist Temple, a World Heritage site. Then it's off to Osaka, where she visits a Cat Cafe and the Kidzania theme park. Megan travels to the home of the Ninja at Iga-Ueno, visits the site of a famous Samurai battle in Sekigahara, sails to the remote island of Sado and witnesses the dramatic Nada Fighting Festival in Himeji. duration 57:22   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3112H] The Gathering Swarms This program looks at some of the most extraordinary swarms on the planet, including a view from inside a locust swarm, mayflies along the Mississippi, 17-year cicadas, and brine fly hatches over Lake Victoria. Superswarms of finch-like quelea in Africa merit attempts at control through assaults on their roosts, while aggressive swarms of silver carp in North American seem able to overcome any kind of restraint. Dangerous swarms of killer bees, however, can be controlled to the point that they can be worn as a human bee suit. But beyond the power of sheer numbers, increasingly complex and organized swarms eventually give rise to swarm intelligence that allows complex decisions to be made. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3902H] Bombing Hitler's Dams In 1943 a squadron of Lancaster bombers staged one of the most audacious raids in history -- destroying two gigantic dams in Germany's industrial heartland and cutting the water supply to arms factories -- with a revolutionary bouncing bomb invented by British engineer Barnes Wallis. Wallis and the pilots of 617 Squadron -- a lively mix of Britons, Australians, Americans and Canadians -- were hailed as heroes and dealt a mighty blow to the German war machine. In this program, NOVA recreates the extreme engineering challenges faced by Wallis and the pilots with the aid of six spectacular experiments. A crack team of experts including dam engineers, explosives specialists, mechanics and aircrew step into the shoes of the Dambusters and attempt to overcome each obstacle in turn. duration 1:55:01   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#220] Dignity Harbor 1 of 9 documentary nominees for the 2012 Student Academy Award, this film chronicles a group of homeless people living in an encampment along the Mississippi River in downtown St. Louis. In the shadow of the Arch, several makeshift communities - Hopeville, Sparta,and Dignity Harbor - are erected when work begins to fill the tunnels under Tucker Boulevard, displacing many homeless. ,br>In this doc, the self-appointed mayor promises a safe environment - women are especially to be welcomed - and the residents work cooperatively to cut wood and build rudimentary shelters. But conflicts inevitably arise, tempers occasionally flare, and everyone struggles to survive the harsh St. Louis winter. Although the utopian dream finally dies for good when the city bulldozes the shantytowns, not all is lost, with several of the residents moving to more permanent housing. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, May 24, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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