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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, April 26, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, April 26, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10915] * Ukraine * Sainthood * Police surveillance * Shields & Brooks * Hamlet around the globe duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#33083] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, investors are on edge as tensions over Ukraine rise. Will today's market decline continue next week? And, is Wall Street finally demanding to see some real profits from Amazon? And when might it deliver? duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3189] Tavis talks with best-selling writer and activist Barbara Ehrenreich. A journalist, historian and social critic, the award-winning writer dissects her latest text, Living with a Wild God. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Ocean Frontiers: The Dawn of a New Era In Ocean Stewardship An inspiring voyage to coral reefs, seaports and watersheds across the country, where unlikely allies-farmers, shippers, scientists, fishermen and conservationists-are working together to sustain the sea and our ocean economies. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1734] INDIA'S INVISIBLE DOMESTICS - From India's impoverished villages, millions of girls and young women flock to the cities - or are forced to go - to find work as domestic servants. Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from New Delhi on the hidden, sometimes almost enslaved workers who endure little legal protection, minimal pay and widespread indifference to their situation and efforts to improve their conditions.
    JERUSALEM THE MOVIE - Reports about Jerusalem often focus on conflicts and tensions. But a stunning new 3D film, Jerusalem, by National Geographic Entertainment, looks instead at the beauty and sacredness of the city. The filmmakers were granted unprecedented access to the city's holiest sites. Jerusalem, which is currently playing in IMAX theaters in the US and around the world, features 3 young women, a Jew, a Muslim and a Christian, who are all from Jerusalem. Kim Lawton spoke with the women during their recent visit to the US. Her report also includes clips from the film.
    CANONIZATION OF POPES JOHN XXIII AND JOHN PAUL II - On Sunday (April 27) at the Vatican, Pope Francis will preside over a double canonization ceremony to elevate Pope John XXIII and Pope John Paul II to sainthood. Bob Abernethy talks with Kim Lawton and Kevin Eckstrom about the legacies of these two new saints and what their canonization means to Catholics and non-Catholics alike.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1044] Small Company Stock Pioneer Chuck Royce In a WT exclusive, Great Investor Charles "Chuck" Royce (Director of Investments, Portfolio Manager, The Royce Funds) warns us not to read too much into recent super-sized stock returns, particularly off the 2009 market lows. He predicts quality companies will once again lead over speculative ones and active managers to overtake passive index strategies. This small cap pioneer, for one, has been doing that for decades. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2307H] The Drying of America- Too Many People, Too Little Water
    An in-depth look into our depleting water supply - the causes and what, if anything, we can do to reverse this trend.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#302] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Seneca Ray Stoddard: An American Original This program explores the life and creative genius of landscape photographer Seneca Ray Stoddard (1843-1917), whose work significantly impacted US environmental public policy, travel and attitudes about the natural world. Over the span of 40 years, Stoddard captured stunning images of a rugged and changing wilderness, including breathtaking scenes of life in the Adirondacks of Upstate New York. Throughout the documentary, professors, historians and photographers discuss Stoddard's rich pictorial legacy. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    American Masters [#2701] A Fierce Green Fire This film is an exploration of the environmental movement - grassroots and global activism spanning 50 years from conservation to climate change. Inspired by the book of the same name by Philip Shabecoff and informed by advisors like Edward O. Wilson, this documentary chronicles the largest movement of the 20th century and one of the keys to the 21st. It brings together all the major parts of environmentalism and connects them. It focuses on activism, people fighting to save their homes, their lives, the future - and succeeding against all odds. The film is directed and written by Mark Kitchell, Academy Award-nominated director of Berkeley in the Sixties, and narrated by Robert Redford, Ashley Judd, Van Jones, Isabel Allende and Meryl Streep. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-V (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1734] INDIA'S INVISIBLE DOMESTICS - From India's impoverished villages, millions of girls and young women flock to the cities - or are forced to go - to find work as domestic servants. Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from New Delhi on the hidden, sometimes almost enslaved workers who endure little legal protection, minimal pay and widespread indifference to their situation and efforts to improve their conditions.
    JERUSALEM THE MOVIE - Reports about Jerusalem often focus on conflicts and tensions. But a stunning new 3D film, Jerusalem, by National Geographic Entertainment, looks instead at the beauty and sacredness of the city. The filmmakers were granted unprecedented access to the city's holiest sites. Jerusalem, which is currently playing in IMAX theaters in the US and around the world, features 3 young women, a Jew, a Muslim and a Christian, who are all from Jerusalem. Kim Lawton spoke with the women during their recent visit to the US. Her report also includes clips from the film.
    CANONIZATION OF POPES JOHN XXIII AND JOHN PAUL II - On Sunday (April 27) at the Vatican, Pope Francis will preside over a double canonization ceremony to elevate Pope John XXIII and Pope John Paul II to sainthood. Bob Abernethy talks with Kim Lawton and Kevin Eckstrom about the legacies of these two new saints and what their canonization means to Catholics and non-Catholics alike.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#316H] Putting The Freeze On Global Warming Divestment - the selling off of stocks and other investments in the name of an urgent cause - played an enormously successful role in helping to bring down the white supremacist, apartheid regime of South Africa. Now, leaders of the movement fighting against the looming catastrophe of global warming - including students on more than 300 American college campuses nationwide - are using the same tactic to persuade investors to take their money out of fossil fuel companies. Foundations, faith groups, pension funds, municipalities and universities are being urged to take the lead; to sell their shares in the polluting industries burning up the earth and reinvest in companies committed to climate change solutions.
    This week, Bill talks with two who helped inspire the new divestment movement. Ellen Dorsey is executive director of the Wallace Global Fund and a catalyst in the coalition of seventeen foundations known as Divest-Invest Philanthropy. Thomas Van Dyck is senior vice president/financial advisor of RBC Wealth Management, and founder and chair of the shareholder advocacy foundation, As You Sow.
    "The primary driver behind the campaign is our belief in the urgency of the climate change issue and the impact that it will have," Ellen Dorsey tells Moyers. "Cataclysmic impacts will only accelerate in the coming years." Thomas van Dyck says, "We are actually going to have to react prior to experiencing the full consequences. We must remember, nature bats last. And we have to react before that happens. "
    Dorsey notes that the fossil fuel industry "is driving the problem, it is funding denial of the problem. It is refusing to advance safe and clean alternatives. And it's shutting down the policy process with campaign contributions and lobbying. And so by putting the target on the fossil fuel industry, the goal is not to have an immediate economic impact on the fossil fuel industry but to isolate it as a moral pariah like apartheid, like tobacco."
    Thomas Van Dyck adds, "There's a solution. Invest in the clean tech broadly defined and the solutions that can help bring out a sustainable economy, a sustainable and just economy for the world. So it's not only just divest. There's actually a place to go with the money."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#244] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    This American Land [#303] Prairie Chickens and Bog Turtles, Watershed Filtering, Bycatch Survival Maintaining extensive tracts of open, well-managed prairie is critical to the conservation of greater prairie chickens, a species of grouse found in parts of 10 states. In Kansas, where 97 percent of the land is privately owned, ranchers are the most important stewards of the prairies, and they get assistance from the Natural Resources Conservation Service to clear their land of invasive trees like the eastern red cedar, improving grassland habitat for prairie chickens as well as for cattle. A similar program helps landowners protect wetland habitat for threatened bog turtles in Delaware and other areas on the East Coast. In an Oregon high school, students design and develop a "bioswale", a strip of land with plants that filter silt, oil and grime out of the runoff from the school's parking lot - "hands-on" learning about pollution, watershed management and environmental impacts. Off the coast of San Diego, marine biologists test a new device for increasing the survival rate of fish caught as bycatch by sport fishermen. Entered in a competition sponsored by the World Wildlife Fund, the SeaQualizer is proving effective as a solution to the problem of barotrauma with bottom-dwelling fish that are released at the surface as bycatch. The expanded bladder prevents the fish from returning to their original depth when released at the surface as bycatch, and mortality is very high. The SeaQualizer employs a non-invasive method of returning fish to depth and is highly effective at increasing the survival rate. "If it can't bite you, it's not interesting," laughs Mississippi State University biologist David Ray, who does very interesting studies on alligators, crocodiles, bats, and flies, among other creatures. Mapping alligator and crocodile genomes is helping scientists with everything from trying to save the odd-looking Indian gharial, to tracing the links between modern reptiles, dinosaurs, and birds. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5343H] * The main focus of President Obama's 4-nation tour of Asia this week was to reassure allies that America remains committed to bolstering security and economic ties to the region. With the backdrop of recent tensions in Japan, South Korea, Malaysia and the Philippines over China's growing assertiveness and the nuclear threat posed by North Korea, Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will examine the president's efforts to reinvigorate US foreign policy in the region.
    * Israel broke off peace negotiations with the Palestinian Authority on Thursday after two main rival Palestinian groups, Fatah and Hamas, signed a surprise reconciliation deal that includes plans for a unity government. Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News will take a closer look at Israel's decision to suspend Middle East peace talks because it - along with the US and European Union - view the Islamist Hamas group as a terrorist organization.
    * At the Supreme Court this week, the justices upheld Michigan's ban on race-based affirmative action policies to promote diversity at public universities. Joan Biskupic of Reuters will examine the impact of the decision as well as two cases argued before the court: a challenge to a state law that prohibits false statements in political campaigns; and whether an upstart venture can legally redirect television signals to portable devises without paying rights fees to broadcasters.
    * Plus, Carrie Johnson of NPR will explain what's behind the Justice Department's plans to make thousands of non-violent, federal prisoners eligible for presidential grants of clemency.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#125H] Cellphone Searches, S.F. Mayor Ed Lee and Brian Copeland's "Not a Genuine Black Man"
    U.S. Supreme Court On Cellphone Searches By Law Enforcement
    In a collision of the law and technology, the U.S. Supreme Court will on Tuesday hear arguments stemming from two cases, one in California, about whether police should be able to conduct warrantless searches of cellphone contents after an arrest. Law enforcement officials say it helps to solve crimes. Civil libertarians and privacy advocates say it violates the 4th amendment's ban on unreasonable searches and seizures. Fifty percent of Americans now carry smartphones loaded with personal data such as text messages, addresses and photos.

    Guests:
    •Professor Rory Little, U.C. Hastings College of the Law
    •Michelle Quinn, San Jose Mercury News

    Further Reporting:
    Are Warrantless Cellphone Searches Constitutional? Court to Decide

    San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee Interview
    Mayor Ed Lee joins Thuy Vu for a discussion about some of the accomplishments and challenges for San Francisco, which include a tech boom, skyrocketing housing prices, the struggle for City College of San Francisco to maintain its accreditation, pedestrian and bike rider safety on the streets, a new plan for a Warriors arena at Mission Bay, and political corruption.

    Further Reporting:
    Ed Lee on Forum: Tech Workers Have the Same Issues as Everyone Else

    Brian Copeland, "Not A Genuine Black Man"
    Comedian and talk show host Brian Copeland knows how it feels to be an outsider. He grew up in San Leandro during the 1970's the only African American student in his high school class of three hundred fifty. As a kid, he weathered physical abuse from his father, discrimination by local police, and efforts by a racist landlord to evict his family from their apartment. He shaped those experiences into a long-running one man show "Not A Genuine Black Man." The tenth anniversary production opens at Berkeley Rep this week and runs through May. Copeland sat down with Scott Shafer to talk about the show, his comedy, and life on the outside looking in.

    Further Reporting:
    Brian Copeland and Marga Gomez Get Impersonal at The Marsh
    Brian Copeland's New Play Inspired By San Leandro Murders
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17115Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2307H] The Drying of America- Too Many People, Too Little Water
    An in-depth look into our depleting water supply - the causes and what, if anything, we can do to reverse this trend.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3218H] TOPICS: President Obama's Asian Pivot; Affirmative Action Dealt a Blow. PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Eleanor Clift, The Daily Beast; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; David Rennie, The Economist. duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#141] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#316H] Putting The Freeze On Global Warming Divestment - the selling off of stocks and other investments in the name of an urgent cause - played an enormously successful role in helping to bring down the white supremacist, apartheid regime of South Africa. Now, leaders of the movement fighting against the looming catastrophe of global warming - including students on more than 300 American college campuses nationwide - are using the same tactic to persuade investors to take their money out of fossil fuel companies. Foundations, faith groups, pension funds, municipalities and universities are being urged to take the lead; to sell their shares in the polluting industries burning up the earth and reinvest in companies committed to climate change solutions.
    This week, Bill talks with two who helped inspire the new divestment movement. Ellen Dorsey is executive director of the Wallace Global Fund and a catalyst in the coalition of seventeen foundations known as Divest-Invest Philanthropy. Thomas Van Dyck is senior vice president/financial advisor of RBC Wealth Management, and founder and chair of the shareholder advocacy foundation, As You Sow.
    "The primary driver behind the campaign is our belief in the urgency of the climate change issue and the impact that it will have," Ellen Dorsey tells Moyers. "Cataclysmic impacts will only accelerate in the coming years." Thomas van Dyck says, "We are actually going to have to react prior to experiencing the full consequences. We must remember, nature bats last. And we have to react before that happens. "
    Dorsey notes that the fossil fuel industry "is driving the problem, it is funding denial of the problem. It is refusing to advance safe and clean alternatives. And it's shutting down the policy process with campaign contributions and lobbying. And so by putting the target on the fossil fuel industry, the goal is not to have an immediate economic impact on the fossil fuel industry but to isolate it as a moral pariah like apartheid, like tobacco."
    Thomas Van Dyck adds, "There's a solution. Invest in the clean tech broadly defined and the solutions that can help bring out a sustainable economy, a sustainable and just economy for the world. So it's not only just divest. There's actually a place to go with the money."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1734] INDIA'S INVISIBLE DOMESTICS - From India's impoverished villages, millions of girls and young women flock to the cities - or are forced to go - to find work as domestic servants. Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from New Delhi on the hidden, sometimes almost enslaved workers who endure little legal protection, minimal pay and widespread indifference to their situation and efforts to improve their conditions.
    JERUSALEM THE MOVIE - Reports about Jerusalem often focus on conflicts and tensions. But a stunning new 3D film, Jerusalem, by National Geographic Entertainment, looks instead at the beauty and sacredness of the city. The filmmakers were granted unprecedented access to the city's holiest sites. Jerusalem, which is currently playing in IMAX theaters in the US and around the world, features 3 young women, a Jew, a Muslim and a Christian, who are all from Jerusalem. Kim Lawton spoke with the women during their recent visit to the US. Her report also includes clips from the film.
    CANONIZATION OF POPES JOHN XXIII AND JOHN PAUL II - On Sunday (April 27) at the Vatican, Pope Francis will preside over a double canonization ceremony to elevate Pope John XXIII and Pope John Paul II to sainthood. Bob Abernethy talks with Kim Lawton and Kevin Eckstrom about the legacies of these two new saints and what their canonization means to Catholics and non-Catholics alike.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#710H] Reawakening Extinct Species New genetic technologies are making it possible for scientists to try to bring back extinct species. Meet researcher Ben Novak at the University of California, Santa Cruz, who is working to revive the passenger pigeon, once the most abundant bird in the world, and Harvard Medical School's George Church, who is trying to engineer a woolly mammoth. It may be possible, but is it right to turn back the clock? duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#317] duration 25:41   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Bitter Seeds Biotechnology is changing the way farming is done all over the world. Advocates believe the New Green Revolution is the only way to provide sufficient food for the world's growing population while opponents raise environmental concerns and fear that GMOs drive small scale farmers off the land. This documentary explores the controversy - from a village in India that uses genetically modified seeds to US government that promote them.
    Bitter Seeds is the final film in Micha X. Peled's Globalization Trilogy, following Store Wars: When Wal-Mart Comes to Town (2001-2003) and China Blue (2007-2012). The films won 18 international awards, aired on KQED and over 30 other TV channels, and screened in more than 100 film festivals. They also connected viewers to NGO action campaigns and encouraged Western consumers to understand their impact on the rest of the world.
    duration 56:41   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Eating Alabama This documentary is a story about why food matters. In search of a simpler life, a young couple returns home to Alabama where they set out to eat the way their grandparents did - locally and seasonally. But as they navigate the agro-industrial gastronomical complex, they soon realize that nearly everything about the food system has changed since farmers once populated their family histories. And the plan to eat only locally-grown food, in-season, upends their lives. The film is a thoughtful and often funny essay on community, the South and sustainability. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 4:00 pm
    Frontline [#3024] Poor Kids These are hard times in the Quad Cities, a great American crossroads along the border of Iowa and Illinois, where the Mississippi River intersects Interstate 80. It's home to John Deere manufacturing and the nation's breadbasket. But it's also an area deeply scarred by the recession. Frontline spent months following three young girls who are growing up against the backdrop of their families' struggles against financial ruin. The result is an intimate portrait of the economic crisis as it's rarely seen, through the eyes of children. At a time when one in five American kids lives below the poverty line, Poor Kids is an unflinching and revealing exploration of what poverty means to children, and to the country's future. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Independent Lens [#1320] Facing The Storm: Story of the American Bison The bison is an enduring symbol of America and yet it stands on the brink of collapse. Cattle ranching, urban sprawl and sport hunting has squeezed the beast from the Great Plains it once dominated. Is there room for the American bison in America anymore? duration 56:43   STEREO TVPG-V (Secondary audio: none)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#167H] Included: a report from the Center for Investigative Reporting and KQED into the wide-scale surveillance developed for police forces. How can the tradeoff between safety and privacy be negotiated as technology gets more and more sophisticated? That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5343H] * The main focus of President Obama's 4-nation tour of Asia this week was to reassure allies that America remains committed to bolstering security and economic ties to the region. With the backdrop of recent tensions in Japan, South Korea, Malaysia and the Philippines over China's growing assertiveness and the nuclear threat posed by North Korea, Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will examine the president's efforts to reinvigorate US foreign policy in the region.
    * Israel broke off peace negotiations with the Palestinian Authority on Thursday after two main rival Palestinian groups, Fatah and Hamas, signed a surprise reconciliation deal that includes plans for a unity government. Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News will take a closer look at Israel's decision to suspend Middle East peace talks because it - along with the US and European Union - view the Islamist Hamas group as a terrorist organization.
    * At the Supreme Court this week, the justices upheld Michigan's ban on race-based affirmative action policies to promote diversity at public universities. Joan Biskupic of Reuters will examine the impact of the decision as well as two cases argued before the court: a challenge to a state law that prohibits false statements in political campaigns; and whether an upstart venture can legally redirect television signals to portable devises without paying rights fees to broadcasters.
    * Plus, Carrie Johnson of NPR will explain what's behind the Justice Department's plans to make thousands of non-violent, federal prisoners eligible for presidential grants of clemency.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#125H] Cellphone Searches, S.F. Mayor Ed Lee and Brian Copeland's "Not a Genuine Black Man"
    U.S. Supreme Court On Cellphone Searches By Law Enforcement
    In a collision of the law and technology, the U.S. Supreme Court will on Tuesday hear arguments stemming from two cases, one in California, about whether police should be able to conduct warrantless searches of cellphone contents after an arrest. Law enforcement officials say it helps to solve crimes. Civil libertarians and privacy advocates say it violates the 4th amendment's ban on unreasonable searches and seizures. Fifty percent of Americans now carry smartphones loaded with personal data such as text messages, addresses and photos.

    Guests:
    •Professor Rory Little, U.C. Hastings College of the Law
    •Michelle Quinn, San Jose Mercury News

    Further Reporting:
    Are Warrantless Cellphone Searches Constitutional? Court to Decide

    San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee Interview
    Mayor Ed Lee joins Thuy Vu for a discussion about some of the accomplishments and challenges for San Francisco, which include a tech boom, skyrocketing housing prices, the struggle for City College of San Francisco to maintain its accreditation, pedestrian and bike rider safety on the streets, a new plan for a Warriors arena at Mission Bay, and political corruption.

    Further Reporting:
    Ed Lee on Forum: Tech Workers Have the Same Issues as Everyone Else

    Brian Copeland, "Not A Genuine Black Man"
    Comedian and talk show host Brian Copeland knows how it feels to be an outsider. He grew up in San Leandro during the 1970's the only African American student in his high school class of three hundred fifty. As a kid, he weathered physical abuse from his father, discrimination by local police, and efforts by a racist landlord to evict his family from their apartment. He shaped those experiences into a long-running one man show "Not A Genuine Black Man." The tenth anniversary production opens at Berkeley Rep this week and runs through May. Copeland sat down with Scott Shafer to talk about the show, his comedy, and life on the outside looking in.

    Further Reporting:
    Brian Copeland and Marga Gomez Get Impersonal at The Marsh
    Brian Copeland's New Play Inspired By San Leandro Murders
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#710H] Reawakening Extinct Species New genetic technologies are making it possible for scientists to try to bring back extinct species. Meet researcher Ben Novak at the University of California, Santa Cruz, who is working to revive the passenger pigeon, once the most abundant bird in the world, and Harvard Medical School's George Church, who is trying to engineer a woolly mammoth. It may be possible, but is it right to turn back the clock? duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1303] East Texas Zay Harding takes roping lessons and experiences the famous Gun Show in Ft. Worth, visits the Book Depository with an eyewitness to the Kennedy assassination in Dallas, travels to the oil fields in Kilgore, stops at the Huntsville State Penitentiary, tours the Johnson Space Center with Alan Bean in Houston and celebrates the 4th of July in Chappell Hill. duration 57:31   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3110] Snow Monkeys In the frigid valleys of Japan's Shiga Highlands, a troop of snow monkeys make their way and raise their families in a complex society of rank and privilege where each knows their place. Their leader is still new to the job and something of a solitary grouch. But one little monkey, innocently unaware of his own lowly social rank, reaches out to this lonely leader, forming a bond with him that manages over time to warm his less than sunny disposition. It is a rare and remarkable gesture that alters both their lives. Changing seasons bring new babies to care for, a profusion of insects and blossoms to eat, family disagreements to squabble over and tragedies to overcome. Mating season brings competition for females as the days grow shorter and colder in a rush toward winter. But with their now confident leader to guide them and their families to shelter and care for them, this troop of snow monkeys is ready to face the world. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4110] Inside Animal Minds: Who's The Smartest? What would it be like to go inside the mind of an animal? We have all gazed into a creature's eyes and wondered: what is it thinking about? What does it really know? Now, the revolutionary science of animal cognition is revealing hard evidence about how animals understand the world around them, uncovering their remarkable problem-solving abilities and exploring the complexity of their powers of communication and even their emotions. In this mini-series, Nova explores these breakthroughs through three iconic creatures: dogs, birds and dolphins. We'll travel into the spectacularly nuanced noses of dogs and wolves, and ask whether their reliance on different senses has shaped their evolution. We'll see through the eyes of a starling in flight and test the tool-using skills of the smartest of birds, the crow. We'll listen in as scientists track dolphins in the Caribbean and elephants on the African savannah, trying to unlock the secrets of animal communication. As we discover how researchers are pushing the animal mind to its limits, we'll uncover surprising similarities to - and differences from - the human mind. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Your Inner Fish [#103H] Your Inner Monkey Our primate progenitors had bodies a lot like those of modern monkeys and spent tens of millions of years living in trees. From them we inherited our versatile hands, amazing vision and capable brains - but also some less beneficial traits, including our bad backs and terrible sense of smell. duration 55:01   SRND51 TVPG
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#206] Plagues and Pleasures on the Salton Sea Once known as the California Riviera, the Salton Sea is now called one of America's worst ecological disasters: a fetid, stagnant, salty lake, that coughs up dead fish and birds by the thousands in frequent die-offs that occur. However, amongst the ruins of this man-made mistake, a few remaining eccentrics (a roadside nudist, a religious folk artist, a Hungarian revolutionary, and real estate speculators) struggle to keep a remodeled version of the original Salton Sea dream alive. Accidentally created by an engineering error in 1905, reworked in the 50's as a world class vacation destination for the rich and famous, suddenly abandoned after a series of hurricanes, floods, and fish die-offs, and finally almost saved by Congressman Sonny Bono, the Salton Sea has a bittersweet past. The film shares these people's stories and their difficulties in keeping their unique community alive, as the nearby cities of Los Angeles and San Diego attempt to take the agricultural water run-off that barely sustains the Salton Sea. While covering the historical, economic, political, and environmental issues that face the Sea, this program offers an offbeat portrait of the peculiar and individualistic people who populate its shores. It is an epic western tale of fantastic real estate ventures and failed boomtowns, inner-city gangs fleeing to white small town America, and the subjective notion of success and failure amidst the ruins of the past. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, April 26, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED DT9s Over the Air: beginning Wed 7/09

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) The PSIP Info part of our Over the Air (OTA) signal for KQED DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3 dropped out of our overall signal early Wednesday 7/09. Once PSIP was restored most OTA receivers moved our signal back to the correct channel locations. However, for some viewers, it appears as if they have lost […]

    • KQED FM 88.1 translator off air Tues 6/03

      The Martinez translator for KQED-FM will be off the air all day Tuesday June 3rd. We are rebuilding the 25 year old site with all new antennas and cabling. This should only affect people listening on 88.1MHz in the Martinez/Benicia area.

    • KQET planned overnight outage: early Tues 5/13

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET’s Over The Air (OTA) signal will shut down late May 12/early Tues 5/13 shortly after midnight to allow for extensive electrical maintenance work at the transmitter. Engineers will do their best to complete the work by 6am Tuesday morning. This will affect OTA viewers of the DT25 channels, and signal providers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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