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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, April 20, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, April 20, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#218] Deputized In the aftermath of a senseless hate crime, an all-American town finds itself desperately seeking answers: What really killed Marcelo Lucero? In a deceptively peaceful Long Island town just before midnight on November 8, 2008, 37-year-old Ecuadorian immigrant Marcelo Lucero is assaulted by a group of teenaged boys cruising the streets "beaner-hopping," a term used to describe the decade-long ritual of attacking Latinos for sport. The adolescent ?game? comes to an end with the fatal stabbing of Lucero, exposing a thinly veiled systemic intolerance for immigrants. Seventeen-year-old Jeffery Conroy, a popular high school athlete, is sentenced to 25-years for a hate crime, while the other teens get 5 to 8-years behind bars. duration 1:00:17   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Visa Dream This program tells the touching story of one family's experience gaining entry into the United States. Representatives from the US Consulate demystify the visa process and illuminate the reasons why they approve some applications - and deny others. The film's main characters are Ramon and Aurora Chavez, an elderly couple living in Jalisco, Mexico, who have not seen their children in 16 years. They are a family divided, connected only by photo albums and phone calls.
    The daughters may not visit Mexico because they do not possess the necessary documents; going there would mean forever leaving behind their spouses, children, homes and lives. One daughter tearfully explains the hardships many immigrant families endure as a result of this prolonged separation. Ramon, the patriarch of the family, would rather live in Mexico but he longs to reunite with his family, who live 2500 miles away in Los Angeles. In order to visit, they must secure a tourist visa, an expensive and difficult proposition.
    Previous attempts proved unsuccessful but the Chavezes decide to try again after years of postponement. A camera crew follows them step-by-step through the application process, which begins at the US Consulate two hours away in Guadalajara.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Sousa on the Rez: Marching to the Beat of a Different Drum Native American music may not conjure images of tubas, trumpets and John Phillip Sousa marches. Yet this vibrant musical tradition has been a part of Native American culture for more than 100 years. This program traces the origins of the 4 remaining multi-generational, community-based tribal bands: the Iroquois Indian Band from upstate New York, the Fort Mojave Tribal Band from Needles, Calif., the Zuni Pueblo Band from northwestern New Mexico and the Navajo Nation Band from Arizona. Combining profiles of contemporary bands with fresh historical research, it offers an unexpected and engaging picture of this little-known aspect of the Native music scene. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#304] Digital Citizens & Improving Practice In our first half hour, we'll see how students are becoming "Super Digital Citizens" as they learn how to use the Internet responsibly - then, we'll switch gears and too see new ways teachers are working to improve their practice. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#315H] What The One Percent Don't Want You to Know The book that's the talk of academia and the media world isn't a political or celebrity tell-all or the work of a self-help guru. Capital in the Twenty-First Century, by Thomas Piketty, a 42-year-old who teaches at the Paris School of Economics, is an exhaustive study of the history and future of capitalism that confirms what many have believed for a long time - that we have returned to a Gilded Age of extreme income inequality in which vast wealth is more and more concentrated in the hands of a very few, while wages remain stagnant for those workers still managing to hold onto a job.
    This week, Bill Moyers talks with Nobel Prize-winning economist and New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, who has described the book as "a magnificent, sweeping meditation on inequality that will change both the way we think about society and the way we do economics."
    In the latest issue of The New York Review of Books, Krugman writes, "At a time when the concentration of wealth and income in the hands of a few has resurfaced as a central political issue, Piketty doesn't just offer invaluable documentation of what is happening, with unmatched historical depth. He also offers what amounts to a unified field theory of inequality." But, Krugman notes, the book "makes it clear that public policy can make an enormous difference, that even if the underlying economic conditions point toward extreme inequality, what Piketty calls 'a drift toward oligarchy' can be halted and even reversed if the body politic so chooses."
    Paul Krugman teaches economics and international affairs at Princeton, and will become a professor at the City University of New York's Graduate Center and a distinguished scholar at CUNY's Luxembourg Income Study Center.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Asia This Week [#403] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5342H] Diplomats from Russia, Ukraine, the US and European Union met in Geneva, Switzerland on Thursday to work on a plan to de-escalate the tense situation that has roiled Ukraine since the toppling of its pro-Moscow president in February. These were the first face-to-face meetings between Russian and Ukrainian diplomats since pockets of eastern Ukraine came under pro-Russian control. While Secretary of State John Kerry announced that the US and other Western nations are considering new economic sanctions to impose on Russia, the Obama administration is preparing to authorize a limited shipment of non-lethal aid to Ukrainian forces. Peter Baker of The New York Times will have the latest on the evolving role the US is playing in the high-level talks to find a diplomatic solution to end the deepening crisis in Ukraine.
    This week Americans paused to honor and remember the victims of the Boston Marathon bombing one year later. Meanwhile, lawyers for alleged bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev were in court this week arguing that some of the federal charges against their client should be dropped. Pete Williams of NBC News will take a closer look at the issue of domestic terrorism and concerns within the law enforcement community that incidents like the Boston bombings or last weekends shooting rampage at two Jewish-run facilities in Kansas are an emerging threat.
    The midterm elections may be seven months away but the fund-raising activities are in high gear. Matea Gold of The Washington Post will explain what's fueling the surge in political donations and why independent political groups could play a greater role in this year's midterm contests.
    Plus Molly Ball of The Atlantic will explain how Senator Rand Paul is attempting to rally support for a potential 2016 White House run by satisfying the conservative grassroots while also calling for a broader Republican Party.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3217H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#140] * Mike McFaul, Former US Ambassador to Russia * Yulia Marushevska on Ukraine * Saad Mohseni discusses elections in Afghanistan * Mike Allen of Politico on the week in politics * Tyler Hicks, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography * Kristen Wiig on her newest film Hateship Loveship duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3216] Moldova: Next Tug-Of-War Between Russian and Eu? MOLDOVA: TUG-OF-WAR OVER EUROPE'S POOREST COUNTRY - The political conflict over Ukraine is also threatening to spill over into Moldova. Russia and Romania are already currying favor with the country's citizens. Like in Ukraine, opinion is split in the former Soviet country. While many Moldovans want to see closer relations with the European Union, others feel an affinity to Russia. Until now Russia has been the only country Moldovans could travel to without a visa. The EU recently decided to lift certain visa restrictions, however. Next-door Romania, meanwhile, wants to go a step further and secure unification with Moldova; EU passports are already being issued to Moldovan citizens with Romanian roots.
    FRANCE: THE RESURGENCE OF ANTI-SEMITISM - France is home to 600,000 Jews. The number of that population leaving the country has doubled. With many feeling that anti-Semitism has become socially acceptable, the number of Jews leaving France for good in 2014 is expected to reach 5000. Most of them will be headed for Israel. The country has seen a rise in anti-Semitic attacks, and over half of the community feels under threat. According to a survey for the EU, 46% of French Jews are considering emigrating.
    SPAIN: THE DEADLY FENCE OF MELILLA - Following the massive influx of refugees to the Italian island of Lampedusa, the Spanish enclave of Melilla is also coming under growing pressure. The Spanish territory of Melilla on the coast of North Africa, has been facing waves of refugees in recent weeks. Most come from countries such as Cameroon or the Ivory Coast. After evading Moroccan and Spanish police they have to scale fences up to 7 meters high to reach Melilla. Their ultimate destination is mainland Europe - but they are not exactly welcome in Spain, which serves as a transit country.
    AUSTRIA: THE YOUNG FOREIGN MINISTER - Sebastian Kurz is the youngest foreign minister in the European Union. Austria's highest-ranking diplomat was 27 when appointed. The Austrian foreign minister is used to criticism on account of his age. He was 25 and still a law student when he became undersecretary for integration. Kurz has ambitious plans for his time in office. He wants to see Austria assuming an active mediator role in the Ukraine conflict, and reassessing its development policy. Further plans include improved cooperation with the western Balkans, all while representing his country's interests on the diplomatic stage.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#218] Deputized In the aftermath of a senseless hate crime, an all-American town finds itself desperately seeking answers: What really killed Marcelo Lucero? In a deceptively peaceful Long Island town just before midnight on November 8, 2008, 37-year-old Ecuadorian immigrant Marcelo Lucero is assaulted by a group of teenaged boys cruising the streets "beaner-hopping," a term used to describe the decade-long ritual of attacking Latinos for sport. The adolescent ?game? comes to an end with the fatal stabbing of Lucero, exposing a thinly veiled systemic intolerance for immigrants. Seventeen-year-old Jeffery Conroy, a popular high school athlete, is sentenced to 25-years for a hate crime, while the other teens get 5 to 8-years behind bars. duration 1:00:17   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Visa Dream This program tells the touching story of one family's experience gaining entry into the United States. Representatives from the US Consulate demystify the visa process and illuminate the reasons why they approve some applications - and deny others. The film's main characters are Ramon and Aurora Chavez, an elderly couple living in Jalisco, Mexico, who have not seen their children in 16 years. They are a family divided, connected only by photo albums and phone calls.
    The daughters may not visit Mexico because they do not possess the necessary documents; going there would mean forever leaving behind their spouses, children, homes and lives. One daughter tearfully explains the hardships many immigrant families endure as a result of this prolonged separation. Ramon, the patriarch of the family, would rather live in Mexico but he longs to reunite with his family, who live 2500 miles away in Los Angeles. In order to visit, they must secure a tourist visa, an expensive and difficult proposition.
    Previous attempts proved unsuccessful but the Chavezes decide to try again after years of postponement. A camera crew follows them step-by-step through the application process, which begins at the US Consulate two hours away in Guadalajara.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    QUEST [#709H] Wolves, Seeds and Snapshots Discover why wolves and other feared predators in Washington state are an essential part of the ecosystem; find out how saving seeds in the Midwest is preserving food diversity; and meet a Great Plains photographer documenting the wild nature of our iconic landscapes. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Asia Biz Forecast [#503] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1043] Financial Legend Ken Heebner An exclusive interview with legendary stock picker Ken Heebner, CGM Focus Fund's long-time portfolio manager, who reveals what big bets he is making now. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#307H] Ric Edelman has some credit-worthy advice for a woman who is just starting out and has no credit history. How do you know that you are saving the right amount to fund your Golden Years? Listen to what Ric says about that. You may have heard about 3D printing but what is 4D printing, and how can you profit from it? Ric talks with Avi Reichental, a leading 4D printing expert. And change is inevitable, that's just a fact of life, but in The Other Side of Money Jean Edelman explains how change is also good. All that and much more in this edition of The Truth about Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    This American Land [#302] Artificial Bat Cave, Rocky Mountain Gas, Backpacking with Llamas There comes a point during a wildlife crisis when scientists are compelled to stop studying, and do something. That's what prompted researchers who have been studying the deadly white nose fungus in bats to develop the idea of an artificial bat cave. Built right next to a huge natural cave, this underground Tennessee facility was built to try to slow the spread of the disease. After bats leave following their hibernation, the human-built cave can be disinfected. Experts say white nose disease is likely to be the worst wildlife disaster of our time, and that the human-built bat cave is an experiment that must continue. Rich deposits of oil shale in Colorado's Garfield County are yielding huge amounts of natural gas and oil for energy companies, but local residents are pushing back against intrusive air and water pollution, noise and traffic from drilling and hydraulic fracturing ("fracking"). Residents in communities like Rifle, Parachute and Battlement Mesa argue that oil and gas operations have gone out of control, and they're demanding more regulation of the industry to protect their homes and lands. In central Colorado's North Fork Valley, amid dozens of organic farms, orchards and ranches, the federal government has shelved plans to lease thousands of acres of public lands for oil and gas drilling. It was a victory for local residents, who came out overwhelmingly against the idea of drilling, saying it threatens a new economy rooted in tourism, wineries, and organic produce. Like the backcountry but can't carry a heavy pack? Try a llama! Monica Drost and her friends have been backpacking together since they were in college. But now, in their 50s, they can't carry their loaded packs anymore. Luckily, they found a llama outfitter and can now enjoy the Oregon wilderness without the aches and pains. Monarch butterflies, up to two billion of them, have to fly hundreds of miles to get to their wintering site in Mexico. So even a tiny impact on their migration ability could mean the difference between survival and death. Researchers study how long-distance migration in flying animals may also affect the spread and evolution of infectious disease. These beautiful insects face many threats, including habitat destruction but their winter home is one of the most stunningly beautiful sights in nature! duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3217H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5342H] Diplomats from Russia, Ukraine, the US and European Union met in Geneva, Switzerland on Thursday to work on a plan to de-escalate the tense situation that has roiled Ukraine since the toppling of its pro-Moscow president in February. These were the first face-to-face meetings between Russian and Ukrainian diplomats since pockets of eastern Ukraine came under pro-Russian control. While Secretary of State John Kerry announced that the US and other Western nations are considering new economic sanctions to impose on Russia, the Obama administration is preparing to authorize a limited shipment of non-lethal aid to Ukrainian forces. Peter Baker of The New York Times will have the latest on the evolving role the US is playing in the high-level talks to find a diplomatic solution to end the deepening crisis in Ukraine.
    This week Americans paused to honor and remember the victims of the Boston Marathon bombing one year later. Meanwhile, lawyers for alleged bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev were in court this week arguing that some of the federal charges against their client should be dropped. Pete Williams of NBC News will take a closer look at the issue of domestic terrorism and concerns within the law enforcement community that incidents like the Boston bombings or last weekends shooting rampage at two Jewish-run facilities in Kansas are an emerging threat.
    The midterm elections may be seven months away but the fund-raising activities are in high gear. Matea Gold of The Washington Post will explain what's fueling the surge in political donations and why independent political groups could play a greater role in this year's midterm contests.
    Plus Molly Ball of The Atlantic will explain how Senator Rand Paul is attempting to rally support for a potential 2016 White House run by satisfying the conservative grassroots while also calling for a broader Republican Party.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#124H] Bay Bridge Corrosion, Silicon Valley Earnings and Bringing Back Extinct Species
    Bay Bridge Corrosion
    Elected officials are calling for an independent examination of corrosion on a critical part of the new eastern span of the Bay Bridge. An investigation by The Sacramento Bee found that some of the most vulnerable and vital sections of the bridge's suspension system are rusting. Scott Shafer hears from Charles Piller, who broke the story.

    Guests:
    • Charles Piller, Sacramento Bee investigative reporter

    Further Reporting:
    Outgoing Official: Caltrans Should Have Reported Bay Bridge Leaks Earlier
    Report Blasts Caltrans for Handling of Bay Bridge Construction Problems
    More Bay Bridge stories on KQED's NewsFix

    Silicon Valley Earnings
    It's corporate earnings season and the spotlight is on Silicon Valley, where many tech companies reported record profits last year. Yahoo! and Intel are among the companies that beat Wall Street expectations, while others, including Google, fell short. Is another bubble in the making, and is economic prosperity trickling down?

    Guests:
    • Jeremy Owens, San Jose Mercury News online business editor
    • Steve Wright, Silicon Valley Leadership Group senior vice president

    De-Extinction: Bringing Back the Passenger Pigeon
    Scientists are investigating new genetic technologies that could bring back extinct species, from the wooly mammoth to what was once the most abundant bird in the world, the passenger pigeon. Bringing species back might be a way to correct past mistakes or even to help endangered species, but just because we can, should we?

    Don't miss the half-hour documentary Reawakening Extinct Species, premiering April 23, 2014 at 7:30 p.m.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#315H] What The One Percent Don't Want You to Know The book that's the talk of academia and the media world isn't a political or celebrity tell-all or the work of a self-help guru. Capital in the Twenty-First Century, by Thomas Piketty, a 42-year-old who teaches at the Paris School of Economics, is an exhaustive study of the history and future of capitalism that confirms what many have believed for a long time - that we have returned to a Gilded Age of extreme income inequality in which vast wealth is more and more concentrated in the hands of a very few, while wages remain stagnant for those workers still managing to hold onto a job.
    This week, Bill Moyers talks with Nobel Prize-winning economist and New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, who has described the book as "a magnificent, sweeping meditation on inequality that will change both the way we think about society and the way we do economics."
    In the latest issue of The New York Review of Books, Krugman writes, "At a time when the concentration of wealth and income in the hands of a few has resurfaced as a central political issue, Piketty doesn't just offer invaluable documentation of what is happening, with unmatched historical depth. He also offers what amounts to a unified field theory of inequality." But, Krugman notes, the book "makes it clear that public policy can make an enormous difference, that even if the underlying economic conditions point toward extreme inequality, what Piketty calls 'a drift toward oligarchy' can be halted and even reversed if the body politic so chooses."
    Paul Krugman teaches economics and international affairs at Princeton, and will become a professor at the City University of New York's Graduate Center and a distinguished scholar at CUNY's Luxembourg Income Study Center.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1733] ATROCITIES IN MYANMAR - At one level, the former nation of Burma is moving slowly toward a free society. At the same time, as Lucky Severson reports, there is continuing mob persecution of Myanmar's minority Rohingya Muslims, just 2.5% of the country's 60 million people. And those committing what one observer calls "incredible brutality" are Buddhists, despite their teachings' non-violence.
    JESUS AND RESURRECTION - Jesus: A Pilgrimage, the new book by prominent Roman Catholic priest Rev. James Martin SJ, has been on the New York Times bestsellers' list for the past month. The book attempts to combine historical and theological perspectives about Jesus with Martin's own spiritual insights. With the world's more than 2 billion Christians celebrating Easter, Kim Lawton talks to Martin about why he believes the resurrection is central to their faith.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 pm
    QUEST [#709H] Wolves, Seeds and Snapshots Discover why wolves and other feared predators in Washington state are an essential part of the ecosystem; find out how saving seeds in the Midwest is preserving food diversity; and meet a Great Plains photographer documenting the wild nature of our iconic landscapes. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Miller Center's American Forum [#2104] Fear Itself: Lessons From the Grand But Cynical Bargain Behind the New Deal Historian Ira Katznelson says that during the 1930s and 1940s, American democracy was rescued by the New Deal, and that programs like Social Security powerfully reshaped American society and created a great global power. But he says the deal behind the New Deal was distorted by a band of Southern lawmakers who forced FDR to agree to a bargain that would safeguard racial segregation for another three decades. His new book is, Fear Itself: The New Deal and the Origins of Our Time. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1302] Globe Trekker Food Hour: Spice Trails Merrilees Parker, Padma Lakshmi, Tyler Florence and Peter Gordon travel the world to see how control of the spice trails has made great cities and destroyed ancient civilizations. Our guides travel from the Molucca Islands of Indonesia, the original home of cloves and nutmeg, to the Indian province of Kerala, with its native pepper and cardamom. Leaving behind Sri Lanka's sublime cinnamon, they cross the oceans on Arab dhows, Chinese treasure junks and Portuguese caravels, in search of the world's flavor. Other stops along the trail include Venice, Beirut, Cairo, China, Spain and the Caribbean. Viewers will discover the secret spice blends that define the great cuisines of the world, including Jamaican jerk seasoning, Indian garam masala, Chinese 5-spice powder and Middle Eastern harissa. duration 57:32   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Nature [#3109] Touching The Wild Joe Hutto's idea of research is anything but normal, dedicating seven years of his life to becoming a wild mule deer. The herd would ordinarily run from any human but, incredibly, these keenly intelligent animals come to regard this stranger as one of their own. Accepted by the matriarch, he walks among them, is even groomed by them, and can lie with a pregnant doe talking to its unborn fawns. As he crosses the species divide, Joe is tapping into a new understanding about these elusive animals, literally entering a deer society. The captivating joy he feels for his new family is nothing short of infectious, but this human predator also learns to see the world from the point of view of prey -- and it's an experience that will ultimately rock him to his very core; sharing their world so personally finally takes a toll that sends him back to his own kind. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    Nova [#4109] Inside Animal Minds: Dogs & Super Senses What would it be like to go inside the mind of an animal? We have all gazed into a creature's eyes and wondered: what is it thinking about? What does it really know? Now, the revolutionary science of animal cognition is revealing hard evidence about how animals understand the world around them, uncovering their remarkable problem-solving abilities and exploring the complexity of their powers of communication and even their emotions. In this mini-series, NOVA explores these breakthroughs through three iconic creatures: dogs, birds and dolphins. We'll travel into the spectacularly nuanced noses of dogs and wolves, and ask whether their reliance on different senses has shaped their evolution. We'll see through the eyes of a starling in flight and test the tool-using skills of the smartest of birds, the crow. We'll listen in as scientists track dolphins in the Caribbean and elephants on the African savannah, trying to unlock the secrets of animal communication. As we discover how researchers are pushing the animal mind to its limits, we'll uncover surprising similarities to -- and differences from -- the human mind. What is it like to be a dog, a shark or a bird? This question is now getting serious attention from scientists who study animal senses. Humans rely on smell, sight, taste, touch and sound; other animals have super-powered versions of these senses, and a few have extra senses we don't have at all. From a dog that seems to use smell to tell time to a dolphin that can "see" with its ears, discover how animals use their senses in ways we humans can barely imagine. But it's not just the senses that are remarkable - it's the brains that process them. NOVA goes into the minds of animals to "see" the world in an entirely new way. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Your Inner Fish [#102] Your Inner Reptile A key moment in our evolutionary saga occurred 200 million years ago, when the ferocious reptile-like animals that roamed the Earth were in the process of evolving into shrew-like mammals. But our reptilian ancestors left their mark on many parts of the human body, including our skin, teeth and ears. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#166H] Included: Rick Karr reports from Denver, Colorado, where after the 2008 financial crisis, some small business owners lost the close relationship they had with their local banks. Instead they found themselves doing business with strangers who didn't have a vested interest in making sure they were successful. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#124H] Bay Bridge Corrosion, Silicon Valley Earnings and Bringing Back Extinct Species
    Bay Bridge Corrosion
    Elected officials are calling for an independent examination of corrosion on a critical part of the new eastern span of the Bay Bridge. An investigation by The Sacramento Bee found that some of the most vulnerable and vital sections of the bridge's suspension system are rusting. Scott Shafer hears from Charles Piller, who broke the story.

    Guests:
    • Charles Piller, Sacramento Bee investigative reporter

    Further Reporting:
    Outgoing Official: Caltrans Should Have Reported Bay Bridge Leaks Earlier
    Report Blasts Caltrans for Handling of Bay Bridge Construction Problems
    More Bay Bridge stories on KQED's NewsFix

    Silicon Valley Earnings
    It's corporate earnings season and the spotlight is on Silicon Valley, where many tech companies reported record profits last year. Yahoo! and Intel are among the companies that beat Wall Street expectations, while others, including Google, fell short. Is another bubble in the making, and is economic prosperity trickling down?

    Guests:
    • Jeremy Owens, San Jose Mercury News online business editor
    • Steve Wright, Silicon Valley Leadership Group senior vice president

    De-Extinction: Bringing Back the Passenger Pigeon
    Scientists are investigating new genetic technologies that could bring back extinct species, from the wooly mammoth to what was once the most abundant bird in the world, the passenger pigeon. Bringing species back might be a way to correct past mistakes or even to help endangered species, but just because we can, should we?

    Don't miss the half-hour documentary Reawakening Extinct Species, premiering April 23, 2014 at 7:30 p.m.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#315H] What The One Percent Don't Want You to Know The book that's the talk of academia and the media world isn't a political or celebrity tell-all or the work of a self-help guru. Capital in the Twenty-First Century, by Thomas Piketty, a 42-year-old who teaches at the Paris School of Economics, is an exhaustive study of the history and future of capitalism that confirms what many have believed for a long time - that we have returned to a Gilded Age of extreme income inequality in which vast wealth is more and more concentrated in the hands of a very few, while wages remain stagnant for those workers still managing to hold onto a job.
    This week, Bill Moyers talks with Nobel Prize-winning economist and New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, who has described the book as "a magnificent, sweeping meditation on inequality that will change both the way we think about society and the way we do economics."
    In the latest issue of The New York Review of Books, Krugman writes, "At a time when the concentration of wealth and income in the hands of a few has resurfaced as a central political issue, Piketty doesn't just offer invaluable documentation of what is happening, with unmatched historical depth. He also offers what amounts to a unified field theory of inequality." But, Krugman notes, the book "makes it clear that public policy can make an enormous difference, that even if the underlying economic conditions point toward extreme inequality, what Piketty calls 'a drift toward oligarchy' can be halted and even reversed if the body politic so chooses."
    Paul Krugman teaches economics and international affairs at Princeton, and will become a professor at the City University of New York's Graduate Center and a distinguished scholar at CUNY's Luxembourg Income Study Center.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    Local USA [#108] Death and Dying An uplifting meditation on death and dying with stories that prepares us for the journey. An embalmer in Toledo, Ohio prepares a deceased person with the precision and attention of an artist; a dying Brooklyn woman prepares for her final journey with dignity, grace and a dinner party; a teenage hospice volunteer shares advice from his patients and his experience growing up amidst a landscape of violence and death in Brooklyn, New York; and observations from an urban Memphis, Tennessee philosopher. duration 27:09   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    Global Voices [#520] Family Portrait In Black and White lga Nenya, from a small Ukrainian town, is raising 16 black orphans in a country of Slavic blue-eyed blondes. The reality of growing up as a bi-racial child in Eastern Europe - a rare and truly visible minority - is not for the faint of heart. These children always have to be on guard against the world that surrounds them. duration 53:38   STEREO
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3109] Touching The Wild Joe Hutto's idea of research is anything but normal, dedicating seven years of his life to becoming a wild mule deer. The herd would ordinarily run from any human but, incredibly, these keenly intelligent animals come to regard this stranger as one of their own. Accepted by the matriarch, he walks among them, is even groomed by them, and can lie with a pregnant doe talking to its unborn fawns. As he crosses the species divide, Joe is tapping into a new understanding about these elusive animals, literally entering a deer society. The captivating joy he feels for his new family is nothing short of infectious, but this human predator also learns to see the world from the point of view of prey -- and it's an experience that will ultimately rock him to his very core; sharing their world so personally finally takes a toll that sends him back to his own kind. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Pacific Heartbeat [#303] Hula: The Merrie Monarch's Golden Celebration This program takes a behind-the-scenes look at preparations for the 50th annual Merrie Monarch Festival in Hilo, Hawaii. The Festival is Hawaii's most significant cultural event and showcases the ancient art of hula for a global audience. This program highlights the hard work, dedication and spirit of the Festival participants. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#413] The Mosquito Problem and Other Stories A small town and its hopeful citizens are about to embark on a bright new journey. Massive rusty cranes, foreign investors, and the joyful chants of cheerleaders carry the dream of a great nuclear future. Disturbed only by gigantic stinging mosquitoes, the townsfolk celebrate the atomic hurray by engraving the nuclear power plant logo on buildings and soup bowls. Amidst the apparent atomic prosperity, lies a past that no one wants to remember. An island holding terrifying secrets. Stories of shocking and horrible crimes loom on the city just like the dark clouds of mosquitoes descending on its citizens. duration 54:07   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Global Voices [#520] Family Portrait In Black and White lga Nenya, from a small Ukrainian town, is raising 16 black orphans in a country of Slavic blue-eyed blondes. The reality of growing up as a bi-racial child in Eastern Europe - a rare and truly visible minority - is not for the faint of heart. These children always have to be on guard against the world that surrounds them. duration 53:38   STEREO
Sunday, April 20, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED all channels, planned overnight maintenance: early Fri 12/19 midnight-6am

      (this includes all DT9, DT54 and DT25 channels, along with all paid services) We will be doing upgrade and maintenance work in our Master Control area during the overnight hours of late Thurs/early Fri 12/19. Work will begin shortly after midnight early Friday, which may last until 6am, though we hope to finish earlier. This […]

    • KQED Plus OTA ? Optimistically planned maintenance: Fri 12/05 mid-morning

      (DT54.1 thru 54.5) Assuming that the weather and road conditions permit, we plan to do a bit of maintenance on our KQEH transmitter the morning of Friday 12/05… hopefully 10am-11am-ish, but could be a bit later. Most of the work should not affect the outgoing signal, but there will need to be a cable swap […]

    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too