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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, April 19, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, April 19, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10910] * Ukraine * Nevada ranchers * Venezuela: after Chavez * Shields & Brooks * Gabriel Garcia Marquez duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#33078] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, a special "spring thaw" edition that examines whether the winter doldrums are gone and the economy is ready to grow. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3184] Tavis talks with best-selling novelist Jackie Collins. The uber-successful writer reflects on her longevity as a novelist and previews her 7th book featuring the popular Lucky Santangelo character. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Coexist Coexist reveals an unprecedented experiment in government mandated reconciliation following the genocide in Rwanda. Through the stories of people who committed murder and those who survived viewers will hear inspirational stories of forgiveness and the challenges former enemies encounter in the face of unimaginable pain. duration 56:46   STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1733] ATROCITIES IN MYANMAR - At one level, the former nation of Burma is moving slowly toward a free society. At the same time, as Lucky Severson reports, there is continuing mob persecution of Myanmar's minority Rohingya Muslims, just 2.5% of the country's 60 million people. And those committing what one observer calls "incredible brutality" are Buddhists, despite their teachings' non-violence.
    JESUS AND RESURRECTION - Jesus: A Pilgrimage, the new book by prominent Roman Catholic priest Rev. James Martin SJ, has been on the New York Times bestsellers' list for the past month. The book attempts to combine historical and theological perspectives about Jesus with Martin's own spiritual insights. With the world's more than 2 billion Christians celebrating Easter, Kim Lawton talks to Martin about why he believes the resurrection is central to their faith.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1043] Financial Legend Ken Heebner An exclusive interview with legendary stock picker Ken Heebner, CGM Focus Fund's long-time portfolio manager, who reveals what big bets he is making now. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2306H] * Confidence Code: Interview with Katty Kay and Claire Shipman * Young Women See Sexual Assault as Normal * Sarah Bessey and her Book "Jesus Feminist"
    Panelists: Progressive Magazine Editor-in-chief Ruth Conniff, Former EEOC Chair Cari Dominguez, Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), The Heritage Foundation's Genevieve Wood
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#302] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Young Lincoln This documentary examines how the joys and trials of Abraham Lincoln's boyhood years formed his personality, shaped his early political notions and molded his character. It features several notable historians who share their insight on this little-known chapter in Lincoln's life and legacy, and focuses on Lincoln's close bonds with his family, and the numerous personal tragedies that he was forced to endure during his formative years. His childhood experiences would shaped his attitudes, molded his character and cast a dark shadow of depression that would remain deeply ingrained in him throughout his life. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 5:30 am
    The Address This film showcases the Greenwood School in Putney, Vermont - where students grappling with an array of learning challenges use the Gettysburg Address as a tool for success. Each student is tasked with memorizing Abraham Lincoln's 10-sentence masterpiece, and at year's end, recite it before their classmates and teachers. The film uses the contemporary story to reveal the history, context and importance of one of the greatest speeches in US history. duration 1:26:56   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1733] ATROCITIES IN MYANMAR - At one level, the former nation of Burma is moving slowly toward a free society. At the same time, as Lucky Severson reports, there is continuing mob persecution of Myanmar's minority Rohingya Muslims, just 2.5% of the country's 60 million people. And those committing what one observer calls "incredible brutality" are Buddhists, despite their teachings' non-violence.
    JESUS AND RESURRECTION - Jesus: A Pilgrimage, the new book by prominent Roman Catholic priest Rev. James Martin SJ, has been on the New York Times bestsellers' list for the past month. The book attempts to combine historical and theological perspectives about Jesus with Martin's own spiritual insights. With the world's more than 2 billion Christians celebrating Easter, Kim Lawton talks to Martin about why he believes the resurrection is central to their faith.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#315H] What The One Percent Don't Want You to Know The book that's the talk of academia and the media world isn't a political or celebrity tell-all or the work of a self-help guru. Capital in the Twenty-First Century, by Thomas Piketty, a 42-year-old who teaches at the Paris School of Economics, is an exhaustive study of the history and future of capitalism that confirms what many have believed for a long time - that we have returned to a Gilded Age of extreme income inequality in which vast wealth is more and more concentrated in the hands of a very few, while wages remain stagnant for those workers still managing to hold onto a job.
    This week, Bill Moyers talks with Nobel Prize-winning economist and New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, who has described the book as "a magnificent, sweeping meditation on inequality that will change both the way we think about society and the way we do economics."
    In the latest issue of The New York Review of Books, Krugman writes, "At a time when the concentration of wealth and income in the hands of a few has resurfaced as a central political issue, Piketty doesn't just offer invaluable documentation of what is happening, with unmatched historical depth. He also offers what amounts to a unified field theory of inequality." But, Krugman notes, the book "makes it clear that public policy can make an enormous difference, that even if the underlying economic conditions point toward extreme inequality, what Piketty calls 'a drift toward oligarchy' can be halted and even reversed if the body politic so chooses."
    Paul Krugman teaches economics and international affairs at Princeton, and will become a professor at the City University of New York's Graduate Center and a distinguished scholar at CUNY's Luxembourg Income Study Center.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#243] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    This American Land [#302] Artificial Bat Cave, Rocky Mountain Gas, Backpacking with Llamas There comes a point during a wildlife crisis when scientists are compelled to stop studying, and do something. That's what prompted researchers who have been studying the deadly white nose fungus in bats to develop the idea of an artificial bat cave. Built right next to a huge natural cave, this underground Tennessee facility was built to try to slow the spread of the disease. After bats leave following their hibernation, the human-built cave can be disinfected. Experts say white nose disease is likely to be the worst wildlife disaster of our time, and that the human-built bat cave is an experiment that must continue. Rich deposits of oil shale in Colorado's Garfield County are yielding huge amounts of natural gas and oil for energy companies, but local residents are pushing back against intrusive air and water pollution, noise and traffic from drilling and hydraulic fracturing ("fracking"). Residents in communities like Rifle, Parachute and Battlement Mesa argue that oil and gas operations have gone out of control, and they're demanding more regulation of the industry to protect their homes and lands. In central Colorado's North Fork Valley, amid dozens of organic farms, orchards and ranches, the federal government has shelved plans to lease thousands of acres of public lands for oil and gas drilling. It was a victory for local residents, who came out overwhelmingly against the idea of drilling, saying it threatens a new economy rooted in tourism, wineries, and organic produce. Like the backcountry but can't carry a heavy pack? Try a llama! Monica Drost and her friends have been backpacking together since they were in college. But now, in their 50s, they can't carry their loaded packs anymore. Luckily, they found a llama outfitter and can now enjoy the Oregon wilderness without the aches and pains. Monarch butterflies, up to two billion of them, have to fly hundreds of miles to get to their wintering site in Mexico. So even a tiny impact on their migration ability could mean the difference between survival and death. Researchers study how long-distance migration in flying animals may also affect the spread and evolution of infectious disease. These beautiful insects face many threats, including habitat destruction but their winter home is one of the most stunningly beautiful sights in nature! duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5342H] Diplomats from Russia, Ukraine, the US and European Union met in Geneva, Switzerland on Thursday to work on a plan to de-escalate the tense situation that has roiled Ukraine since the toppling of its pro-Moscow president in February. These were the first face-to-face meetings between Russian and Ukrainian diplomats since pockets of eastern Ukraine came under pro-Russian control. While Secretary of State John Kerry announced that the US and other Western nations are considering new economic sanctions to impose on Russia, the Obama administration is preparing to authorize a limited shipment of non-lethal aid to Ukrainian forces. Peter Baker of The New York Times will have the latest on the evolving role the US is playing in the high-level talks to find a diplomatic solution to end the deepening crisis in Ukraine.
    This week Americans paused to honor and remember the victims of the Boston Marathon bombing one year later. Meanwhile, lawyers for alleged bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev were in court this week arguing that some of the federal charges against their client should be dropped. Pete Williams of NBC News will take a closer look at the issue of domestic terrorism and concerns within the law enforcement community that incidents like the Boston bombings or last weekends shooting rampage at two Jewish-run facilities in Kansas are an emerging threat.
    The midterm elections may be seven months away but the fund-raising activities are in high gear. Matea Gold of The Washington Post will explain what's fueling the surge in political donations and why independent political groups could play a greater role in this year's midterm contests.
    Plus Molly Ball of The Atlantic will explain how Senator Rand Paul is attempting to rally support for a potential 2016 White House run by satisfying the conservative grassroots while also calling for a broader Republican Party.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#124H] Bay Bridge Corrosion, Silicon Valley Earnings and Bringing Back Extinct Species
    Bay Bridge Corrosion
    Elected officials are calling for an independent examination of corrosion on a critical part of the new eastern span of the Bay Bridge. An investigation by The Sacramento Bee found that some of the most vulnerable and vital sections of the bridge's suspension system are rusting. Scott Shafer hears from Charles Piller, who broke the story.

    Guests:
    • Charles Piller, Sacramento Bee investigative reporter

    Further Reporting:
    Outgoing Official: Caltrans Should Have Reported Bay Bridge Leaks Earlier
    Report Blasts Caltrans for Handling of Bay Bridge Construction Problems
    More Bay Bridge stories on KQED's NewsFix

    Silicon Valley Earnings
    It's corporate earnings season and the spotlight is on Silicon Valley, where many tech companies reported record profits last year. Yahoo! and Intel are among the companies that beat Wall Street expectations, while others, including Google, fell short. Is another bubble in the making, and is economic prosperity trickling down?

    Guests:
    • Jeremy Owens, San Jose Mercury News online business editor
    • Steve Wright, Silicon Valley Leadership Group senior vice president

    De-Extinction: Bringing Back the Passenger Pigeon
    Scientists are investigating new genetic technologies that could bring back extinct species, from the wooly mammoth to what was once the most abundant bird in the world, the passenger pigeon. Bringing species back might be a way to correct past mistakes or even to help endangered species, but just because we can, should we?

    Don't miss the half-hour documentary Reawakening Extinct Species, premiering April 23, 2014 at 7:30 p.m.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17108Z] duration 28:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2306H] * Confidence Code: Interview with Katty Kay and Claire Shipman * Young Women See Sexual Assault as Normal * Sarah Bessey and her Book "Jesus Feminist"
    Panelists: Progressive Magazine Editor-in-chief Ruth Conniff, Former EEOC Chair Cari Dominguez, Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), The Heritage Foundation's Genevieve Wood
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3217H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#140] * Mike McFaul, Former US Ambassador to Russia * Yulia Marushevska on Ukraine * Saad Mohseni discusses elections in Afghanistan * Mike Allen of Politico on the week in politics * Tyler Hicks, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography * Kristen Wiig on her newest film Hateship Loveship duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#315H] What The One Percent Don't Want You to Know The book that's the talk of academia and the media world isn't a political or celebrity tell-all or the work of a self-help guru. Capital in the Twenty-First Century, by Thomas Piketty, a 42-year-old who teaches at the Paris School of Economics, is an exhaustive study of the history and future of capitalism that confirms what many have believed for a long time - that we have returned to a Gilded Age of extreme income inequality in which vast wealth is more and more concentrated in the hands of a very few, while wages remain stagnant for those workers still managing to hold onto a job.
    This week, Bill Moyers talks with Nobel Prize-winning economist and New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, who has described the book as "a magnificent, sweeping meditation on inequality that will change both the way we think about society and the way we do economics."
    In the latest issue of The New York Review of Books, Krugman writes, "At a time when the concentration of wealth and income in the hands of a few has resurfaced as a central political issue, Piketty doesn't just offer invaluable documentation of what is happening, with unmatched historical depth. He also offers what amounts to a unified field theory of inequality." But, Krugman notes, the book "makes it clear that public policy can make an enormous difference, that even if the underlying economic conditions point toward extreme inequality, what Piketty calls 'a drift toward oligarchy' can be halted and even reversed if the body politic so chooses."
    Paul Krugman teaches economics and international affairs at Princeton, and will become a professor at the City University of New York's Graduate Center and a distinguished scholar at CUNY's Luxembourg Income Study Center.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1733] ATROCITIES IN MYANMAR - At one level, the former nation of Burma is moving slowly toward a free society. At the same time, as Lucky Severson reports, there is continuing mob persecution of Myanmar's minority Rohingya Muslims, just 2.5% of the country's 60 million people. And those committing what one observer calls "incredible brutality" are Buddhists, despite their teachings' non-violence.
    JESUS AND RESURRECTION - Jesus: A Pilgrimage, the new book by prominent Roman Catholic priest Rev. James Martin SJ, has been on the New York Times bestsellers' list for the past month. The book attempts to combine historical and theological perspectives about Jesus with Martin's own spiritual insights. With the world's more than 2 billion Christians celebrating Easter, Kim Lawton talks to Martin about why he believes the resurrection is central to their faith.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#709H] Wolves, Seeds and Snapshots Discover why wolves and other feared predators in Washington state are an essential part of the ecosystem; find out how saving seeds in the Midwest is preserving food diversity; and meet a Great Plains photographer documenting the wild nature of our iconic landscapes. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#316] duration 25:41   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    POV [#2411] If A Tree Falls: A Story of the Earth Liberation Front This program explores two of America's most pressing issues -- environmentalism and terrorism -- by lifting the veil on a radical environmental group the FBI calls the country's "number one domestic terrorism threat." Daniel McGowan, a former member of the Earth Liberation Front, faces life in prison for two multimillion dollar arsons against Oregon timber companies. What turned this working- class kid from Queens into an eco-warrior? Producer Marshall Curry provides a provocative account that is part coming-of-age story, part cautionary tale and part cops- and-robbers thriller. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Wilderness: The Great Debate For 40 years, the American West has been the nation's battleground for the preservation of wild lands. This one hour documentary explores a host of environmental issues in the American West. Robert Redford joins a cast of leading experts and activists on both sides of this complex conversation on the future of land management in American West and its affect on the planet. The program is narrated by Peter Coyote. duration 56:40   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 pm
    The Address This film showcases the Greenwood School in Putney, Vermont - where students grappling with an array of learning challenges use the Gettysburg Address as a tool for success. Each student is tasked with memorizing Abraham Lincoln's 10-sentence masterpiece, and at year's end, recite it before their classmates and teachers. The film uses the contemporary story to reveal the history, context and importance of one of the greatest speeches in US history. duration 1:26:56   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#165H] Included: a look at a revolutionary class of drugs called "biologics. " Americans have been paying more for their benefits than patients in Europe or Asia because the "generic" versions or "biosimilars" have not hit the US market. Dr. Emily Senay looks into why there's a delay and when American consumers can expect discounts. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5342H] Diplomats from Russia, Ukraine, the US and European Union met in Geneva, Switzerland on Thursday to work on a plan to de-escalate the tense situation that has roiled Ukraine since the toppling of its pro-Moscow president in February. These were the first face-to-face meetings between Russian and Ukrainian diplomats since pockets of eastern Ukraine came under pro-Russian control. While Secretary of State John Kerry announced that the US and other Western nations are considering new economic sanctions to impose on Russia, the Obama administration is preparing to authorize a limited shipment of non-lethal aid to Ukrainian forces. Peter Baker of The New York Times will have the latest on the evolving role the US is playing in the high-level talks to find a diplomatic solution to end the deepening crisis in Ukraine.
    This week Americans paused to honor and remember the victims of the Boston Marathon bombing one year later. Meanwhile, lawyers for alleged bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev were in court this week arguing that some of the federal charges against their client should be dropped. Pete Williams of NBC News will take a closer look at the issue of domestic terrorism and concerns within the law enforcement community that incidents like the Boston bombings or last weekends shooting rampage at two Jewish-run facilities in Kansas are an emerging threat.
    The midterm elections may be seven months away but the fund-raising activities are in high gear. Matea Gold of The Washington Post will explain what's fueling the surge in political donations and why independent political groups could play a greater role in this year's midterm contests.
    Plus Molly Ball of The Atlantic will explain how Senator Rand Paul is attempting to rally support for a potential 2016 White House run by satisfying the conservative grassroots while also calling for a broader Republican Party.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#124H] Bay Bridge Corrosion, Silicon Valley Earnings and Bringing Back Extinct Species
    Bay Bridge Corrosion
    Elected officials are calling for an independent examination of corrosion on a critical part of the new eastern span of the Bay Bridge. An investigation by The Sacramento Bee found that some of the most vulnerable and vital sections of the bridge's suspension system are rusting. Scott Shafer hears from Charles Piller, who broke the story.

    Guests:
    • Charles Piller, Sacramento Bee investigative reporter

    Further Reporting:
    Outgoing Official: Caltrans Should Have Reported Bay Bridge Leaks Earlier
    Report Blasts Caltrans for Handling of Bay Bridge Construction Problems
    More Bay Bridge stories on KQED's NewsFix

    Silicon Valley Earnings
    It's corporate earnings season and the spotlight is on Silicon Valley, where many tech companies reported record profits last year. Yahoo! and Intel are among the companies that beat Wall Street expectations, while others, including Google, fell short. Is another bubble in the making, and is economic prosperity trickling down?

    Guests:
    • Jeremy Owens, San Jose Mercury News online business editor
    • Steve Wright, Silicon Valley Leadership Group senior vice president

    De-Extinction: Bringing Back the Passenger Pigeon
    Scientists are investigating new genetic technologies that could bring back extinct species, from the wooly mammoth to what was once the most abundant bird in the world, the passenger pigeon. Bringing species back might be a way to correct past mistakes or even to help endangered species, but just because we can, should we?

    Don't miss the half-hour documentary Reawakening Extinct Species, premiering April 23, 2014 at 7:30 p.m.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#709H] Wolves, Seeds and Snapshots Discover why wolves and other feared predators in Washington state are an essential part of the ecosystem; find out how saving seeds in the Midwest is preserving food diversity; and meet a Great Plains photographer documenting the wild nature of our iconic landscapes. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1302] Globe Trekker Food Hour: Spice Trails Merrilees Parker, Padma Lakshmi, Tyler Florence and Peter Gordon travel the world to see how control of the spice trails has made great cities and destroyed ancient civilizations. Our guides travel from the Molucca Islands of Indonesia, the original home of cloves and nutmeg, to the Indian province of Kerala, with its native pepper and cardamom. Leaving behind Sri Lanka's sublime cinnamon, they cross the oceans on Arab dhows, Chinese treasure junks and Portuguese caravels, in search of the world's flavor. Other stops along the trail include Venice, Beirut, Cairo, China, Spain and the Caribbean. Viewers will discover the secret spice blends that define the great cuisines of the world, including Jamaican jerk seasoning, Indian garam masala, Chinese 5-spice powder and Middle Eastern harissa. duration 57:32   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3109] Touching The Wild Joe Hutto's idea of research is anything but normal, dedicating seven years of his life to becoming a wild mule deer. The herd would ordinarily run from any human but, incredibly, these keenly intelligent animals come to regard this stranger as one of their own. Accepted by the matriarch, he walks among them, is even groomed by them, and can lie with a pregnant doe talking to its unborn fawns. As he crosses the species divide, Joe is tapping into a new understanding about these elusive animals, literally entering a deer society. The captivating joy he feels for his new family is nothing short of infectious, but this human predator also learns to see the world from the point of view of prey -- and it's an experience that will ultimately rock him to his very core; sharing their world so personally finally takes a toll that sends him back to his own kind. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4109] Inside Animal Minds: Dogs & Super Senses What would it be like to go inside the mind of an animal? We have all gazed into a creature's eyes and wondered: what is it thinking about? What does it really know? Now, the revolutionary science of animal cognition is revealing hard evidence about how animals understand the world around them, uncovering their remarkable problem-solving abilities and exploring the complexity of their powers of communication and even their emotions. In this mini-series, NOVA explores these breakthroughs through three iconic creatures: dogs, birds and dolphins. We'll travel into the spectacularly nuanced noses of dogs and wolves, and ask whether their reliance on different senses has shaped their evolution. We'll see through the eyes of a starling in flight and test the tool-using skills of the smartest of birds, the crow. We'll listen in as scientists track dolphins in the Caribbean and elephants on the African savannah, trying to unlock the secrets of animal communication. As we discover how researchers are pushing the animal mind to its limits, we'll uncover surprising similarities to -- and differences from -- the human mind. What is it like to be a dog, a shark or a bird? This question is now getting serious attention from scientists who study animal senses. Humans rely on smell, sight, taste, touch and sound; other animals have super-powered versions of these senses, and a few have extra senses we don't have at all. From a dog that seems to use smell to tell time to a dolphin that can "see" with its ears, discover how animals use their senses in ways we humans can barely imagine. But it's not just the senses that are remarkable - it's the brains that process them. NOVA goes into the minds of animals to "see" the world in an entirely new way. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Your Inner Fish [#102] Your Inner Reptile A key moment in our evolutionary saga occurred 200 million years ago, when the ferocious reptile-like animals that roamed the Earth were in the process of evolving into shrew-like mammals. But our reptilian ancestors left their mark on many parts of the human body, including our skin, teeth and ears. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#218] Deputized In the aftermath of a senseless hate crime, an all-American town finds itself desperately seeking answers: What really killed Marcelo Lucero? In a deceptively peaceful Long Island town just before midnight on November 8, 2008, 37-year-old Ecuadorian immigrant Marcelo Lucero is assaulted by a group of teenaged boys cruising the streets "beaner-hopping," a term used to describe the decade-long ritual of attacking Latinos for sport. The adolescent ?game? comes to an end with the fatal stabbing of Lucero, exposing a thinly veiled systemic intolerance for immigrants. Seventeen-year-old Jeffery Conroy, a popular high school athlete, is sentenced to 25-years for a hate crime, while the other teens get 5 to 8-years behind bars. duration 1:00:17   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, April 19, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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