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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

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KQED World: Sunday, April 6, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, April 6, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#217] Town Hall This episode casts an unflinching eye at Katy and John, two Tea Party activists from the battleground state of Pennsylvania who believe America's salvation lies in a return to true conservative values. In Katy, we see a political novice rocketed to media stardom after a sensational confrontation at a town hall meeting with her senator. A young stay-at-home mom turned Tea Party spokesperson, she is gifted a new identity, steeled by the voices of conservative media. For John, a retired former businessman and lifelong Republican living in one of the poorest cities in the country, the America he knows is slipping away. Heading up a local Tea Party group is his last, best chance at stanching the changes he is witnessing all around him, but unable to afford his aging mother's health care, John has to make difficult decisions that reveal the complicated relationship between his principles and the demands of his life. duration 1:16:19   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Out of Order Now more than ever, American citizens are discontented and disillusioned with national politics, with approval ratings for Congress consistently ranking low regardless of the party in power. Senior politicians also note the disappearance of the collegiality they once shared with peers of differing political ideologies. As a result, the ability to discuss issues from varying points of view and negotiate solutions, appears to be fading from the American political process.
    Among many topics, this program addresses the decline in civil discourse and the news media's role in it, partisan gridlock, gerrymandering, vanishing commitment to reasonable compromise, the vilification of moderates and declining civic engagement. It relies on interviews with a broad range of political experts and observers from journalists, academics and political strategists to senior elected officials. They include: journalist Bob Schieffer (CBS News), Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA), Sen. Susan Collins (R-MA), Fmr Sen. Evan Bayh (D-IN), Fmr Sen. Alan Simpson (R-WY), Fmr Sen. John Warner (R-VA) .
    duration 27:17   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#302] Common Core Prek - 12 We'll start with Pre-K math students and finish up with high school English students as we explore the many ways Common Core is being integrated into classrooms-in both math and ELA the emphasis is teaching students how to think. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#313H] All Work and No Pay You've heard about the wave of protests against fast food chains like McDonald's and Burger King where employees are forced to live on next to nothing. Workers in regular, sit-down restaurants are also penalized. Back in 1991, the National Restaurant Association - often called "the other NRA" - passed around enough campaign contributions to persuade Congress to set the Federal minimum wage for waiters, busboys, and bartenders at only $2.13 an hour. They claim that tips are additional income that makes up the difference. But tips are random and often meager. Restaurant workers struggling to earn a living are twice as likely to be on public assistance.
    This week, Bill Moyers talks with Saru Jayaraman, co-founder and co-director of ROC-United - the Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, whose 13, 000 members across the country are fighting for better wages and working conditions. Because ROC has been making headway, they've got powerful enemies, including Rick Berman, a Washington-based lawyer and PR man, dubbed "Dr. Evil" by 60 Minutes, who specializes in industry-funded attack campaigns against health and safety regulations, the minimum wage and organized labor.
    "In any other context, what is it called when an employer practically doesn't pay their workers, full-time workers? It's called slavery," Saru Jayaraman tells Moyers. "So how is it that a major industry has basically convinced America, convinced Congress, that they practically shouldn't have to pay their workers at all? It's purely money and power. And their control over our legislators."
    But she remains hopeful: "There's nothing that people cannot achieve once they expose those forces and once they resist. We can actually overcome even the most hardened, monied lobbyists in Washington, DC, or in states around the country. Because ultimately, if we are a true democracy, we cannot cede our democratic powers to these people."
    Saru Jayaraman is also director of the Food Labor Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley and the author of Behind the Kitchen Door.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Asia This Week [#401] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5340H] * The Supreme Court rejected the overall limits on how much individuals can donate; the implementation and politics of the Affordable Care Act; and why two powerful GOP congressmen, Rep. Mike Rogers and Rep. Dave Camp, have chosen not to seek re-election. Joining Gwen: Jeff Zeleny, ABC News; Matea Gold, The Washington Post; Pete Williams, NBC News; John Dickerson, Slate Magazine.
    * Sen. Dianne Feinstein and the Senate Intelligence Committee are pushing to declassify a CIA report on the use of torture. And while Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid continues to attack conservative billionaires and Super PAC funders Charles and David Koch, The Washington Post's Matea Gold digs deeper into the Koch Brothers background and influence in the GOP. Plus, looking forward to the 2016 presidential election, is Jeb Bush the best choice for the Republican Party?
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3215H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#138] * Jim Boeheim on the NCAA Final Four * Mike Allen of Politico on the week in politics * Michael Lewis discusses his book about High-Frequency trading: Flash Boys A Wall Street Revolt * Maggie Betts on her film: Engram * Bryan Cranston talks about playing President Lyndon Johnson in the new Broadway play: All the Way duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 am
    European Journal [#3214] World's Oldest Bank On Brink of Collapse ITALY: THE FALLEN BANK - Monte dei Paschi di Siena is the world's oldest bank, and it is on the verge of collapse. This development has plunged Siena into crisis. For more than 500 years, Monte dei Paschi presided over the city. For generations, the venerable bank helped fund charities and civic works, including the famed Palio horse races. In 2012 it was revealed that the bank had strained its finances past their limit and had been concealing major losses totaling 20 billion Euros. Now the city, which had a major stake in the foundation that was the bank's main shareholder, is facing possible bankruptcy. And it fears that the scandal may harm Siena's chances to be a 2019 European Capital of Culture.
    BULGARIA: YOUNG PEOPLE BATTLE CORRUPTION - For the past year, many Bulgarians have been calling upon their government to resign, and urging an end to nepotism and corruption. The "children of the transition", as they call themselves, are determined to continue their activism. They are urging young people who are considering emigration to stay and seek change. The student-led protests have wide support from the many Bulgarians who say their political elite are hopelessly corrupt and the economy is run by a clan of oligarchs. The controversial coalition government of Prime Minister Plamen Oresharski has faced 3 votes of no-confidence in just 5 months.
    SWITZERLAND: WILL LUXURY TOURISM DESTROY THE ALPS? - An Egyptian investor plans to open the largest ski resort in the Alps in the sleepy town of Andermatt. Time seems to have stood still in Andermatt. But that may soon be a distant memory. Several months ago, an ultramodern luxury hotel opened there. And if Egyptian investor Samih Sawiris has his way, it will soon be joined by scores of similar hotels and vacation apartments. Sawiris launched his plan after he bought land vacated by the Swiss army, which for decades had been the mainstay of the local economy. Many in Andermatt are hoping that the town will one day rival Davos or St Moritz for Alpine glamour. But not everyone here shares that vision of the future.
    SPAIN: MADRID'S CLEAN SWEEP - Madrid's street performers are facing a new challenge. A new noise reduction law pushed through by the mayor now requires them to pass an audition to obtain a permit. According to the city, one-third of the musicians didn't pass muster at the auditions. Those that did also have to follow new rules, including remaining at least 75 meters away from other buskers. Madrid's mayor, Ana Botella, has also called for a ban on downtown protests. She has been sharply criticized for these moves and some even say she is more repressive than General Franco.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#217] Town Hall This episode casts an unflinching eye at Katy and John, two Tea Party activists from the battleground state of Pennsylvania who believe America's salvation lies in a return to true conservative values. In Katy, we see a political novice rocketed to media stardom after a sensational confrontation at a town hall meeting with her senator. A young stay-at-home mom turned Tea Party spokesperson, she is gifted a new identity, steeled by the voices of conservative media. For John, a retired former businessman and lifelong Republican living in one of the poorest cities in the country, the America he knows is slipping away. Heading up a local Tea Party group is his last, best chance at stanching the changes he is witnessing all around him, but unable to afford his aging mother's health care, John has to make difficult decisions that reveal the complicated relationship between his principles and the demands of his life. duration 1:16:19   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    QUEST [#708H] Bikes, Bugs and Fashionistas Go behind the scenes with a North Carolina inventor building sun-powered "carcycles;" meet an Ohio engineer transforming flies into fishmeal; and visit a Nebraska textile engineer converting corn husks into fashion. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Asia Biz Forecast [#501] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1041] Greatest Financial Challenges WT features Jonathan Clements and Jason Zweig, two top personal finance journalists both now at The Wall Street Journal, who tackle the three greatest financial challenges facing Americans. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#305H] Ric Edelman educates a father on fiscal responsibility, and whether it's smarter to fund his kid's college or his own retirement. And a real estate investor with a bucketful of cash wants to know the best way to invest it. Plus astronaut, Dan Barry explains the secret to immortality - it's a giant leap for mankind. And in The Other Side of Money Jean Edelman explains the benefits of a good mental work-out. All that and much more on this episode of Truth about Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Great Decisions In Foreign Policy [#508] Economic Statecraft America is broadening its foreign policy to intensify its economic engagement in the world. Economic Statecraft means both harnessing global economic forces to advance America's foreign policy and employing the tools of foreign policy and strategic global partnerships to shore up our economic strength. duration 26:48   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3215H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5340H] * The Supreme Court rejected the overall limits on how much individuals can donate; the implementation and politics of the Affordable Care Act; and why two powerful GOP congressmen, Rep. Mike Rogers and Rep. Dave Camp, have chosen not to seek re-election. Joining Gwen: Jeff Zeleny, ABC News; Matea Gold, The Washington Post; Pete Williams, NBC News; John Dickerson, Slate Magazine.
    * Sen. Dianne Feinstein and the Senate Intelligence Committee are pushing to declassify a CIA report on the use of torture. And while Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid continues to attack conservative billionaires and Super PAC funders Charles and David Koch, The Washington Post's Matea Gold digs deeper into the Koch Brothers background and influence in the GOP. Plus, looking forward to the 2016 presidential election, is Jeb Bush the best choice for the Republican Party?
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#123H] State Sen. Leland Yee Indicted, 'Weed Land' and Poking Fun at Silicon Valley
    State Sen. Leland Yee Indicted by Federal Grand Jury
    A federal grand jury has indicted State Sen. Leland Yee, former San Francisco School Board President Keith Jackson and 27 other defendants charging them with crimes including firearms trafficking, money laundering and public corruption. The indictment formalizes federal charges first announced last week. Yee has hired a new attorney and is expected to make his first court appearance next week. Jackson was released on bail Thursday evening. Meanwhile, the capture of Chinatown gang figure Raymond "Shrimp Boy" Chow has not eased fears among business owners in the neighborhood.

    Guests:
    •Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group
    •Linda Yee, KPIX

    Further Reporting:
    Leland Yee, Keith Jackson Indicted by Federal Grand Jury
    Money Talks: The FBI's Bribe Strategy in Yee, Calderon Cases
    A Reporter's Guide to the FBI Affidavit on State Sen. Leland Yee

    'Weed Land'
    It's been nearly 20 years since California became the first state to legalize medical marijuana. In recent years, the number of dispensaries has exploded with more than 200 operating in the Bay Area alone and crop production is booming. The billion-dollar industry is largely unregulated in the state and illegal under federal law. A recent poll shows Californians are divided on legalization. Scott Shafer speaks with Sacramento Bee senior writer Peter Hecht, whose new book "Weed Land" explores the highs and lows of the cannabis industry.

    Further Reporting:
    Forum: How Pot Went Legit
    KQED Special: Republic of Cannabis

    Poking Fun at Silicon Valley
    The quirks of the high-tech lifestyle are easy fodder for humor. The new HBO series "Silicon Valley," premiering Sunday, serves up a parody of the region. Series co-creator Mike Judge's new show features a collection of awkward, geeky characters who think they've come up with the next big app. But underlying the humor are some serious issues for local residents. We take a look at the funny and not-so-funny aspects of Silicon Valley culture including tech's emphasis on youth, and the ongoing backlash against the Google bus invasion.

    Guests:
    •Steve Goldbloom, "Everything But The News," PBS Digital Studios & ITVS
    •Aarti Shahani, KQED News Contributor

    Further Reporting:
    Best Silicon Valley Satires
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#313H] All Work and No Pay You've heard about the wave of protests against fast food chains like McDonald's and Burger King where employees are forced to live on next to nothing. Workers in regular, sit-down restaurants are also penalized. Back in 1991, the National Restaurant Association - often called "the other NRA" - passed around enough campaign contributions to persuade Congress to set the Federal minimum wage for waiters, busboys, and bartenders at only $2.13 an hour. They claim that tips are additional income that makes up the difference. But tips are random and often meager. Restaurant workers struggling to earn a living are twice as likely to be on public assistance.
    This week, Bill Moyers talks with Saru Jayaraman, co-founder and co-director of ROC-United - the Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, whose 13, 000 members across the country are fighting for better wages and working conditions. Because ROC has been making headway, they've got powerful enemies, including Rick Berman, a Washington-based lawyer and PR man, dubbed "Dr. Evil" by 60 Minutes, who specializes in industry-funded attack campaigns against health and safety regulations, the minimum wage and organized labor.
    "In any other context, what is it called when an employer practically doesn't pay their workers, full-time workers? It's called slavery," Saru Jayaraman tells Moyers. "So how is it that a major industry has basically convinced America, convinced Congress, that they practically shouldn't have to pay their workers at all? It's purely money and power. And their control over our legislators."
    But she remains hopeful: "There's nothing that people cannot achieve once they expose those forces and once they resist. We can actually overcome even the most hardened, monied lobbyists in Washington, DC, or in states around the country. Because ultimately, if we are a true democracy, we cannot cede our democratic powers to these people."
    Saru Jayaraman is also director of the Food Labor Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley and the author of Behind the Kitchen Door.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1731] NEW CALVINISM - In many Southern Baptist churches there is a revival of interest in Calvinism, the strict theology of the 16th century reformer John Calvin, whose beliefs had great influence on colonial America. Gradually, since then, Calvinism's emphasis on sin and pre-destination gave way to other beliefs, but now, as Bob Faw reports, Calvinism's absolute certainty is attracting new followers, especially among young people.
    BIBLICAL EPICS - 2014 has been called Hollywood's year of Biblical epics. From Son of God to Noah and others to come, top film makers are tackling Bible stories. Many are already reaping box office rewards. But what are the potential pitfalls? Kim Lawton went to Los Angeles to talk with Noah director Darren Aronofsky, Son of God producer Mark Burnett, film actors and analysts about the challenges of adopting sacred stories for the big screen.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 pm
    QUEST [#708H] Bikes, Bugs and Fashionistas Go behind the scenes with a North Carolina inventor building sun-powered "carcycles;" meet an Ohio engineer transforming flies into fishmeal; and visit a Nebraska textile engineer converting corn husks into fashion. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Miller Center's American Forum [#2102] Jefferson's Slaves: Controversy Over a Harsh New Portrait of the Founder Henry Wiencek, a nationally prominent historian of colonial slaver, discusses his controversial new book, Master of the Mountain: Thomas Jefferson and His Slaves. Wiencek challenges some conventional scholarly analysis of Jefferson and slavery, based on new information from archaeological work at Monticello and a fresh reading of Jefferson's papers. Host Douglas Blackmon challenges Wiencek on some of his interpretations and presents counter arguments. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1223] Paris City Guide 2 Justine and Adela travel to the City of Light. Justine strolls through the Luxembourg Gardens, discovers eclectic artwork and uncovers culinary secrets at the Cordon Bleu. Adela wanders through the Musee d'Orsay, visits a gay boulangerie in the Marais, and chats with British designer Vivienne Westwood at the couture shows. Touring the Palace of Versailles, she learns about Marie Antoinette and back in Paris, she follows the controversial queen's path to the guillotine. Adela's trip is complete with a glimpse of the Mona Lisa, a ride up the Eiffel Tower and a visit to the Moulin Rouge. duration 57:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Nature [#2601#] White Falcon, White Wolf On Canada's remote Ellesmere Island, where June is spring, July is summer and August is already autumn, the race is on for two remarkable species to raise their families. The white gyr falcon is enormous, the largest and most powerful falcon in the world. Yet last summer, the nesting falcon pair here failed to raise any young. The rare Arctic wolves rely on every member of the pack to chase and bring down the prey that keeps them alive. Last year was good to them, and they raised three cubs. But for the wolves and the falcons, as well for as the snowy owls, musk oxen, lemmings, Arctic foxes and hares who share this fragile ecosystem with them, fortunes are always precarious. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG
  • 4:00 pm
    Nova [#4107H] Wild Predator Invasion Over the last few centuries we have shot, trapped and skinned the predators that formerly thrived at the top of the food chain in the wild. Wild bears, wolves and big cats are all in retreat, and a growing number of scientists are discovering that by eliminating predators, we have changed the environment. Removing predators from the wild has thrown ecosystems off-kilter, triggering domino effects that scientists are just beginning to understand. In "Wild Predator Invasion," NOVA follows scientists who are trying out a simple but controversial solution: returning apex predators --like wolves, bears, and panthers -- to their natural environments. Can these newly reintroduced predators restore the natural balance of their ecosystems without threatening the humans who live among them? duration 56:16   STEREO TVPG
  • 5:00 pm
    Secrets of the Dead [#1303] Carthage's Lost Warriors Carthage, the proud capital of the vast Carthaginian Empire, is ablaze. Marauding Romans are mercilessly slaughtering and pillaging. Any survivors face a terrifying fate as slaves on Roman galleys or in their quarries. Escaping the bloody carnage is impossible... or is it? Could some of the once-mighty Carthaginians have got away? And even more incredibly -- could they have turned west on an epic journey across the vast Atlantic Ocean to new shores? Did they set foot in South America, long before Columbus ever walked the face of the Earth? duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-V (Secondary audio: none)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#162H] Included: a report from Mexico, a place often in the headlines for its brutal drug war. Martin Fletcher shows a different side of the country: its burgeoning economy. Some economists call it the "Aztec Tiger" - Mexico's now the third biggest trading partner with the US. But with poverty afflicting half of the country's 120 million people, future economic growth is no guarantee. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#123H] State Sen. Leland Yee Indicted, 'Weed Land' and Poking Fun at Silicon Valley
    State Sen. Leland Yee Indicted by Federal Grand Jury
    A federal grand jury has indicted State Sen. Leland Yee, former San Francisco School Board President Keith Jackson and 27 other defendants charging them with crimes including firearms trafficking, money laundering and public corruption. The indictment formalizes federal charges first announced last week. Yee has hired a new attorney and is expected to make his first court appearance next week. Jackson was released on bail Thursday evening. Meanwhile, the capture of Chinatown gang figure Raymond "Shrimp Boy" Chow has not eased fears among business owners in the neighborhood.

    Guests:
    •Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group
    •Linda Yee, KPIX

    Further Reporting:
    Leland Yee, Keith Jackson Indicted by Federal Grand Jury
    Money Talks: The FBI's Bribe Strategy in Yee, Calderon Cases
    A Reporter's Guide to the FBI Affidavit on State Sen. Leland Yee

    'Weed Land'
    It's been nearly 20 years since California became the first state to legalize medical marijuana. In recent years, the number of dispensaries has exploded with more than 200 operating in the Bay Area alone and crop production is booming. The billion-dollar industry is largely unregulated in the state and illegal under federal law. A recent poll shows Californians are divided on legalization. Scott Shafer speaks with Sacramento Bee senior writer Peter Hecht, whose new book "Weed Land" explores the highs and lows of the cannabis industry.

    Further Reporting:
    Forum: How Pot Went Legit
    KQED Special: Republic of Cannabis

    Poking Fun at Silicon Valley
    The quirks of the high-tech lifestyle are easy fodder for humor. The new HBO series "Silicon Valley," premiering Sunday, serves up a parody of the region. Series co-creator Mike Judge's new show features a collection of awkward, geeky characters who think they've come up with the next big app. But underlying the humor are some serious issues for local residents. We take a look at the funny and not-so-funny aspects of Silicon Valley culture including tech's emphasis on youth, and the ongoing backlash against the Google bus invasion.

    Guests:
    •Steve Goldbloom, "Everything But The News," PBS Digital Studios & ITVS
    •Aarti Shahani, KQED News Contributor

    Further Reporting:
    Best Silicon Valley Satires
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#313H] All Work and No Pay You've heard about the wave of protests against fast food chains like McDonald's and Burger King where employees are forced to live on next to nothing. Workers in regular, sit-down restaurants are also penalized. Back in 1991, the National Restaurant Association - often called "the other NRA" - passed around enough campaign contributions to persuade Congress to set the Federal minimum wage for waiters, busboys, and bartenders at only $2.13 an hour. They claim that tips are additional income that makes up the difference. But tips are random and often meager. Restaurant workers struggling to earn a living are twice as likely to be on public assistance.
    This week, Bill Moyers talks with Saru Jayaraman, co-founder and co-director of ROC-United - the Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, whose 13, 000 members across the country are fighting for better wages and working conditions. Because ROC has been making headway, they've got powerful enemies, including Rick Berman, a Washington-based lawyer and PR man, dubbed "Dr. Evil" by 60 Minutes, who specializes in industry-funded attack campaigns against health and safety regulations, the minimum wage and organized labor.
    "In any other context, what is it called when an employer practically doesn't pay their workers, full-time workers? It's called slavery," Saru Jayaraman tells Moyers. "So how is it that a major industry has basically convinced America, convinced Congress, that they practically shouldn't have to pay their workers at all? It's purely money and power. And their control over our legislators."
    But she remains hopeful: "There's nothing that people cannot achieve once they expose those forces and once they resist. We can actually overcome even the most hardened, monied lobbyists in Washington, DC, or in states around the country. Because ultimately, if we are a true democracy, we cannot cede our democratic powers to these people."
    Saru Jayaraman is also director of the Food Labor Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley and the author of Behind the Kitchen Door.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    Local USA [#107] Beehive Spirits Utah is not exactly the first place you think of when talking about alcohol and liquor. But since the early days of prohibition, The Beehive State has a unique foray into distilling spirits. We retrace Utah's fight for and against alcohol with a look at the characters keeping it alive today. duration 27:25   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    Cuban Missile Crisis: Three Men Go to War This film tells the inside story of the Cuban Missile Crisis, exploring how in October 1962 the earth teetered on the very brink of nuclear holocaust. The documentary brings to life the three central characters John F. Kennedy, Fidel Castro and Nikita Khrushchev, and explores how the world's most powerful men fell into an abyss of their own making and what courage and luck it took to climb out again. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2601] White Falcon, White Wolf On Canada's remote Ellesmere Island, where June is spring, July is summer and August is already autumn, the race is on for two remarkable species to raise their families. The white gyr falcon is enormous, the largest and most powerful falcon in the world. Yet last summer, the nesting falcon pair here failed to raise any young. The rare Arctic wolves rely on every member of the pack to chase and bring down the prey that keeps them alive. Last year was good to them, and they raised three cubs. But for the wolves and the falcons, as well for as the snowy owls, musk oxen, lemmings, Arctic foxes and hares who share this fragile ecosystem with them, fortunes are always precarious. duration 55:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 10:00 pm
    Pacific Heartbeat [#301] Pure Caz: Music of the Brothers Cazimero Legendary musicians Robert and Roland Cazimero of the The Brothers Cazimero perform an enchanting array of original compositions and island standards. Also featured are reflections from the brothers and their friends on their childhood, their illustrious careers, and their perspectives on Hawaiian music from the past to the present. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#411] Cuba: An African Odyssey Part 1 From Che Guevara's military campaign to avenge Lumumba in the Congo up to the fall of apartheid in South Africa, 300,000 Cubans fought alongside African revolutionaries, this program is the previously untold story of Cuba's support for African revolutions, one of the Cold War's most vigorous contests over resources and ideology. duration 56:12   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Cuban Missile Crisis: Three Men Go to War This film tells the inside story of the Cuban Missile Crisis, exploring how in October 1962 the earth teetered on the very brink of nuclear holocaust. The documentary brings to life the three central characters John F. Kennedy, Fidel Castro and Nikita Khrushchev, and explores how the world's most powerful men fell into an abyss of their own making and what courage and luck it took to climb out again. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
Sunday, April 6, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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