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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, March 16, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, March 16, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#108] My Louisiana Love This film traces a young woman's quest to find a place in her Native American community as it reels from decades of environmental degradation. Monique Verdin returns to Southeast Louisiana to reunite with her Houma Indian family. But soon she sees that her people's traditional way of life is threatened by a cycle of man-made environmental crises. Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil leak are just the latest rounds in this century-old cycle that is forcing Monique's clan to adapt in new ways. Monique must overcome the loss of her house, her father, and her partner, and redefine the meaning of home. duration 1:17:09   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Native Waters: A Chitimacha Recollection The Chitimacha, the 1000-member tribe known as "the People of Many Waters," are heirs to an unbroken 8000-year past. Living off the bounty of Louisiana's Atchafalaya Basin, one of the richest inland estuaries on the continent, this indigenous nation persists and rejuvenates its culture despite gradually losing its ancestral territory to environmental and man-made forces. This program journeys into sacred places of the Atchafalaya Basin with author Roger Stouff, the son of the last chief of the Chitimacha Indians and a keeper of his family's oral tradition. Stouff shares native stories, beliefs and perspectives about this often overlooked people. An avid fly-fisherman, Stouff laments the certain demise of the river basin, the depletion of its sacred fishing and hunting grounds and the painful "vanishings" of the time-honored Chitimacha way of life. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#213] Reading Fundamentals Reading Fundamentals: We'll spend the hour in two fifth classrooms where the emphasis is on building strong reading skills and meeting students at their level. Meet two inspirational teachers who believe you can inspire students to be readers by giving them choice, one-on-one guidance, and affirmation. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#310H] No Escaping Dragnet Nation This week: as Edward Snowden, the NSA whistleblower and Senator Dianne Feinstein, usually a staunch defender of the intelligence community, loudly and publicly speak out against the intrusion of internet spying, Bill talks with investigative reporter Julia Angwin, author of Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance. Her book chronicles a cyberworld of indiscriminate tracking, where government and business are stockpiling data about us at an unprecedented pace. Today's headlines make Angwin's findings even more relevant and powerful.
    Julia Angwin set out to see if she could escape the dragnets that were secretly collecting even the most mundane details of her everyday life. She told Google good-bye, unfriended Facebook, unlinked from LinkedIn - and discovered just how difficult it is to untether the electronic umbilical cord and escape scrutiny. Reporters are a prime target for internet snooping, says Angwin, "Journalists are the canary in the coal mine. We're the first ones to seriously feel the impact of total surveillance, which means we can't protect our sources. But what happens next? What happens next is we're not good watch dogs for democracy. And that's a very worrisome situation. "
    She wondered whether government snooping is the price of security: "I thought, 'Okay, let's see, maybe this is really worth it. Maybe we're going to find out that we're really safe.' So I looked at all the literature about government surveillance and crime and how much does it work. And what I found is, it's not particularly effective."
    Julia Angwin, a Pulitzer Prize winning reporter, covered the business and technology beat at The Wall Street Journal for thirteen years, and is now working for the independent news organization ProPublica.
    duration 24:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Asia This Week [#350] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5337H] * The standoff between Russia and the Ukraine government over the disputed Crimea region continues to intensify. This weekend citizens of Crimea will vote on a referendum to decide if they should secede from Ukraine and become part of Russia. In a sign of solidarity, President Obama hosted the acting Ukrainian prime minister at the White House on Wednesday and warned Russian President Vladimir Putin to end Russia's military incursion in Ukraine or "pay a cost." Secretary of State John Kerry will meet with Russia's foreign minister on Friday in an attempt to de-escalate the situation and stop the referendum. Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News will have analysis of the eleventh-hour attempt by the U.S. and European allies to reach a diplomatic solution to end the crisis in Ukraine.
    * The Justice Department is investigating the stunning charges by Senate Intelligence Committee Chairwoman Dianne Feinstein that the CIA conducted unauthorized searches of Senate computers. During a nearly 50-minute speech on the Senate floor, Feinstein accused the CIA of interfering with the congressional investigation into the agency's possible use of torture. CIA Director John Brennan rejected the allegations and insisted the agency is fully cooperating with the congressional probe. Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post will have the latest on this escalating public dispute between Senator Feinstein and the agency she has long supported.
    * In Florida, Republican David Jolly edged out Democrat Alex Sink to win a special House election to succeed the late Rep. Bill Young (R). The victory has energized the GOP because Jolly focused much of his campaign on the promise to repeal the Affordable Care Act. For Democrats it was a sobering loss because the former lobbyist won in a district that Barack Obama carried in 2008 and 2012. Susan Davis of USA Today returns from Florida to explain why Republicans and Democrats can't agree on the national significance of this race heading into the 2014 midterms.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3212H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#135] * Cardinal Dolan on Pope Francis' first year * Mike Allen of Politico on the week in politics * Chef Ferran Adria * Catherine Deneuve on her latest film, On My Way duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 am
    European Journal [#3211] duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#108] My Louisiana Love This film traces a young woman's quest to find a place in her Native American community as it reels from decades of environmental degradation. Monique Verdin returns to Southeast Louisiana to reunite with her Houma Indian family. But soon she sees that her people's traditional way of life is threatened by a cycle of man-made environmental crises. Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil leak are just the latest rounds in this century-old cycle that is forcing Monique's clan to adapt in new ways. Monique must overcome the loss of her house, her father, and her partner, and redefine the meaning of home. duration 1:17:09   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Changing Seas [#504H] Reefs of Rangiroa Scientists with the Global Reef Expedition are on a six year mission to study remote coral reefs around the world. While in French Polynesia, the experts conduct extensive habitat mapping to create one of a kind seafloor atlases. Scientists also assess the health of the reefs to compare and contrast the resilience of reef systems over a large geographical area. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Asia Biz Forecast [#450] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1038] Fed Centennial Special Is the recent 100th anniversary of the creation of the Federal Reserve (December 23, 1913) a cause for celebration or condemnation? Two financial historians James Grant and Richard Sylla debate the benefits and dangers of the Fed on this week's WT. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#302H] Financial advisor Ric Edelman offers a life preserver to a homeowner who is underwater on her mortgage. Ric also provides financial basic training to troops at Fort Belvoir. And Avi Reichental, an expert in 3D printing drafts a blueprint on how consumers and investors can take advantage of this cutting edge technology. Jean Edelman shows us that while money can't buy happiness, finding joy in the little things can be priceless. All that and much more on this episode of Truth about Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Great Decisions In Foreign Policy [#505] Energy Independence For decades, American presidents have issued a call to make America energy independent. It's an ambitious goal - but one that looks increasingly possible as technological advancements in extraction methods come to the forefront. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3212H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5337H] * The standoff between Russia and the Ukraine government over the disputed Crimea region continues to intensify. This weekend citizens of Crimea will vote on a referendum to decide if they should secede from Ukraine and become part of Russia. In a sign of solidarity, President Obama hosted the acting Ukrainian prime minister at the White House on Wednesday and warned Russian President Vladimir Putin to end Russia's military incursion in Ukraine or "pay a cost." Secretary of State John Kerry will meet with Russia's foreign minister on Friday in an attempt to de-escalate the situation and stop the referendum. Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News will have analysis of the eleventh-hour attempt by the U.S. and European allies to reach a diplomatic solution to end the crisis in Ukraine.
    * The Justice Department is investigating the stunning charges by Senate Intelligence Committee Chairwoman Dianne Feinstein that the CIA conducted unauthorized searches of Senate computers. During a nearly 50-minute speech on the Senate floor, Feinstein accused the CIA of interfering with the congressional investigation into the agency's possible use of torture. CIA Director John Brennan rejected the allegations and insisted the agency is fully cooperating with the congressional probe. Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post will have the latest on this escalating public dispute between Senator Feinstein and the agency she has long supported.
    * In Florida, Republican David Jolly edged out Democrat Alex Sink to win a special House election to succeed the late Rep. Bill Young (R). The victory has energized the GOP because Jolly focused much of his campaign on the promise to repeal the Affordable Care Act. For Democrats it was a sobering loss because the former lobbyist won in a district that Barack Obama carried in 2008 and 2012. Susan Davis of USA Today returns from Florida to explain why Republicans and Democrats can't agree on the national significance of this race heading into the 2014 midterms.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#120H] State Republican Convention Kicks Off and Will Affirmative Action Return to California Universities?
    California Republican Convention Kicks Off
    California Republicans have their work cut out for them as they gather this weekend in Burlingame for the state convention: they hold no statewide offices, their share of registered voters has shrunk to less than 30 percent and they have minimal power in Sacramento. The party's new chair, former State Senator Jim Brulte, wants to rebuild the GOP from the ground up, a job he says could take up to a decade.

    Guests:
    •Hector Barajas, GOP strategist
    •Scott Detrow, KQED Sacramento bureau chief

    Further Reporting:
    California Republicans Plot a Return to Relevance
    Forum: The Future of the GOP

    Will Affirmative Action Return to California Universities?
    Since the passage of Proposition 209 in 1996, it has been illegal for California's public universities to consider race, ethnicity and gender during the admission process. Following the passage of the law, UC Berkeley saw a 49 percent drop in admission offers to African-American students, and other University of California schools saw the numbers of African-American, Latino and Native-American students decline. Now State Senator Ed Hernandez (D- West Covina) wants to amend parts of Prop 209. His measure passed the State Senate last January, and if passed by the Assembly, would be put before voters this November. It's been met with vocal opposition, particularly among Asian-Americans.

    Guests:
    •Ed Hernandez, State Senator (D- West Covina)
    •Emil Guillermo, Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund
    •Evan Low, Campbell city councilmember and former mayor
    •Aimee Allison, senior vice president of PowerPAC

    Further Reporting:
    Sen. Hernandez Wants to Bring Affirmative Action Back to State's Voters
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#310H] No Escaping Dragnet Nation This week: as Edward Snowden, the NSA whistleblower and Senator Dianne Feinstein, usually a staunch defender of the intelligence community, loudly and publicly speak out against the intrusion of internet spying, Bill talks with investigative reporter Julia Angwin, author of Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance. Her book chronicles a cyberworld of indiscriminate tracking, where government and business are stockpiling data about us at an unprecedented pace. Today's headlines make Angwin's findings even more relevant and powerful.
    Julia Angwin set out to see if she could escape the dragnets that were secretly collecting even the most mundane details of her everyday life. She told Google good-bye, unfriended Facebook, unlinked from LinkedIn - and discovered just how difficult it is to untether the electronic umbilical cord and escape scrutiny. Reporters are a prime target for internet snooping, says Angwin, "Journalists are the canary in the coal mine. We're the first ones to seriously feel the impact of total surveillance, which means we can't protect our sources. But what happens next? What happens next is we're not good watch dogs for democracy. And that's a very worrisome situation. "
    She wondered whether government snooping is the price of security: "I thought, 'Okay, let's see, maybe this is really worth it. Maybe we're going to find out that we're really safe.' So I looked at all the literature about government surveillance and crime and how much does it work. And what I found is, it's not particularly effective."
    Julia Angwin, a Pulitzer Prize winning reporter, covered the business and technology beat at The Wall Street Journal for thirteen years, and is now working for the independent news organization ProPublica.
    duration 24:30   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1728] GUN VIOLENCE AND THE FAITH COMMUNITY - This weekend, congregations across the nation are holding special services to pray for an end to gun violence. In the wake of the tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, and other mass shootings, a growing interfaith movement has been mobilizing for new gun restrictions. Kim Lawton reports on the movement and also talks with faith-based activists who are opposing any new gun control laws. (Originally aired November 15, 2013).
    THE LIFE OF DOROTHY DAY - A radical who was arrested often for her protests against war and injustice, Dorothy Day converted to become a devout Catholic and a champion of the poor. She founded the Catholic Worker movement in 1933 and its soup kitchens continue to operate around the world. The US Catholic bishops have unanimously endorsed an investigation into whether she should be named a saint. Deborah Potter examines the life of this woman, who Cardinal Timothy Dolan of New York says is indeed "a saint for our times." (Originally aired February 8, 2013).
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 pm
    Changing Seas [#504H] Reefs of Rangiroa Scientists with the Global Reef Expedition are on a six year mission to study remote coral reefs around the world. While in French Polynesia, the experts conduct extensive habitat mapping to create one of a kind seafloor atlases. Scientists also assess the health of the reefs to compare and contrast the resilience of reef systems over a large geographical area. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Miller Center's American Forum [#2010] duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1220] Madrid City Guide Adela visits exciting Madrid, taking in the artwork at the Prado, "El Rastro," the city's famous flea market, Spanish Civil War landmarks and samples the fabulous cuisine. She also takes excursions to nearby El Escorial, the Roman aqueducts of Segovia and the charming hillside town of Toledo. duration 56:22   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Nature [#2811] Survivors of the Firestorm The bush fires that tore through the Australian state of Victoria in February 2009 incinerated over a million acres of land, including key mountain ash forest ecosystems. Fires are a natural force of nature which spur regeneration, but the immediate aftermath of this giant firestorm was devastation. Kangaroos and koalas, wombats and wallabies, endangered possums and gliders, lizards, echidnas, birds of all kinds, and even fish that lived among these eucalypts were overcome by the flames. Millions died. But burned and traumatized survivors tenderly nursed back to health at wildlife hospitals showed a remarkable ability to bounce back, and the environment an extraordinary capacity for healing. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    Nova [#3807H] Crash of Flight 447 On June 1st, 2009, Flight AF447, an Air France Airbus A330 flying from Rio de Janeiro to Paris, disappeared over the Atlantic Ocean with the loss of all 228 lives. How could a state-of-the-art airliner with elaborate electronic safety and navigation features and a faultless safety record simply vanish without trace? NOVA assembles a team of seasoned pilots, engineers and safety experts to examine the evidence that emerged in the weeks following this horrific disaster. What led Flight 447's crew to fly straight into a towering thunderstorm? With expert testimony, satellite weather images, and messages transmitted by the doomed plane's computer system, NOVA pieces together the fatal chain of events. At the climax of the show, NOVA takes an experienced crew into the cockpit of an Airbus simulator and reconstructs the sudden emergency that confronted Flight 447's pilots. This unique forensic approach to the mystery leads to chilling new insights on the challenges that the pilots faced on that stormy June night, and raises troubling questions about the increasing role of automation in today's state-of-the-art airliners. duration 54:56   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 5:00 pm
    History Detectives [#707] * Hindenburg Artifact - A Hoboken, New Jersey, man has a palm-sized, army-green metal box that looks like an instrument panel. Beneath a shattered plastic covering is a sliding, numbered scale; knobs on each end move a lever across the scale. German writing indicates the country of origin. Might this instrument have been recovered from the crash site of the Hindenburg in Lakehurst, New Jersey? Family lore says that a distant relative was among the many bystanders plucking souvenirs from the wreckage of the terrifying disaster. Chemicals from the fire or balloon envelope gas would have evaporated 10 minutes after the explosion, but the broken plastic can be tested for age and heat distress with forensic analysis of the instrument. Elyse Luray travels to Atlanta and the New Jersey landing site of the ill-fated zeppelin to determine if the instrument panel is in fact from the horrifying crash.
    * John Adams Book - A woman in Littleton, New Hampshire, inherited her husband's aunt's belongings, which include a curious late-18th-century book titled Trials of Patriots. It contains what appears to be President John Adams' signature in three places, and includes an inscription, "Charles Adams from His Father, 1794." The book is a collection of trial transcripts chronicling the sedition trials of Irish and Scottish radicals. If the book is indeed from Adams to his son, it could reveal pivotal clues about the inner-workings of this presidential family. In Boston and John Adams' hometown of Quincy, Massachusetts, Gwendolyn Wright examines the Adams family's correspondence and conflict as they balanced home life with public service.
    * Birthplace of Hip Hop - A hip-hop enthusiast from New York City has always heard that 1520 Sedgwick Avenue in the Bronx is the birthplace of hip-hop. The story goes that on August 11, 1973, DJ Kool Herc, a building resident, was entertaining at his sister's back-to-school party and tried something new on the turntable: he extended an instrumental beat (breaking or scratching) to let people dance longer (breakdancing) and began MC'ing (rapping) during the extended breakdancing. This, the contributor believes, marked the birth of hip-hop. The music led to an entire cultural movement that's altered generational thinking - from politics and race to art and language. Tukufu Zuberi sets out to examine an inner-city environment that helped lay the foundation for a cultural revolution.
    duration 56:05   STEREO TVG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#156H] Included: Our nation's prosperity depends on staying competitive in the global economy. Standing in the way, however, is a "skills gap" - some 40% of US businesses say they can't find qualified workers. We take a look at one Chicago-area effort to bridge the gap between what schools teach and what businesses want in math skills. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#120H] State Republican Convention Kicks Off and Will Affirmative Action Return to California Universities?
    California Republican Convention Kicks Off
    California Republicans have their work cut out for them as they gather this weekend in Burlingame for the state convention: they hold no statewide offices, their share of registered voters has shrunk to less than 30 percent and they have minimal power in Sacramento. The party's new chair, former State Senator Jim Brulte, wants to rebuild the GOP from the ground up, a job he says could take up to a decade.

    Guests:
    •Hector Barajas, GOP strategist
    •Scott Detrow, KQED Sacramento bureau chief

    Further Reporting:
    California Republicans Plot a Return to Relevance
    Forum: The Future of the GOP

    Will Affirmative Action Return to California Universities?
    Since the passage of Proposition 209 in 1996, it has been illegal for California's public universities to consider race, ethnicity and gender during the admission process. Following the passage of the law, UC Berkeley saw a 49 percent drop in admission offers to African-American students, and other University of California schools saw the numbers of African-American, Latino and Native-American students decline. Now State Senator Ed Hernandez (D- West Covina) wants to amend parts of Prop 209. His measure passed the State Senate last January, and if passed by the Assembly, would be put before voters this November. It's been met with vocal opposition, particularly among Asian-Americans.

    Guests:
    •Ed Hernandez, State Senator (D- West Covina)
    •Emil Guillermo, Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund
    •Evan Low, Campbell city councilmember and former mayor
    •Aimee Allison, senior vice president of PowerPAC

    Further Reporting:
    Sen. Hernandez Wants to Bring Affirmative Action Back to State's Voters
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#310H] No Escaping Dragnet Nation This week: as Edward Snowden, the NSA whistleblower and Senator Dianne Feinstein, usually a staunch defender of the intelligence community, loudly and publicly speak out against the intrusion of internet spying, Bill talks with investigative reporter Julia Angwin, author of Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance. Her book chronicles a cyberworld of indiscriminate tracking, where government and business are stockpiling data about us at an unprecedented pace. Today's headlines make Angwin's findings even more relevant and powerful.
    Julia Angwin set out to see if she could escape the dragnets that were secretly collecting even the most mundane details of her everyday life. She told Google good-bye, unfriended Facebook, unlinked from LinkedIn - and discovered just how difficult it is to untether the electronic umbilical cord and escape scrutiny. Reporters are a prime target for internet snooping, says Angwin, "Journalists are the canary in the coal mine. We're the first ones to seriously feel the impact of total surveillance, which means we can't protect our sources. But what happens next? What happens next is we're not good watch dogs for democracy. And that's a very worrisome situation. "
    She wondered whether government snooping is the price of security: "I thought, 'Okay, let's see, maybe this is really worth it. Maybe we're going to find out that we're really safe.' So I looked at all the literature about government surveillance and crime and how much does it work. And what I found is, it's not particularly effective."
    Julia Angwin, a Pulitzer Prize winning reporter, covered the business and technology beat at The Wall Street Journal for thirteen years, and is now working for the independent news organization ProPublica.
    duration 24:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    Local USA [#116] Immigration: on the Border Stories from Arizona and California. Issues on immigration - from both sides of the fence; the treacherous conditions migrants face while trying to cross into the United States;danger for the children of immigrants who are left behind; and the vigilante Americans who patrol the border. duration 27:00   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    War Zone/Comfort Zone Women account for roughly 14 percent of the active-duty U.S. military and more than 24 percent of the National Guard, yet they often receive less than a hero's welcome upon their return to civilian life. Many face poverty, homelessness and joblessness; deal with the psychological and physiological effects of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder from military sexual trauma and combatrelated injuries; and often receive poor service from a Veterans Administration ill-equipped and, in some cases, unwilling to help them. The Emmy? -nominated documentary WAR ZONE/COMFORT ZONE uncovers the plight of these veterans through the intense and personal stories of four women veterans coping with life after their military service. Each seeks a sense of normalcy and peace without the benefit of a comprehensive support system. WAR ZONE/COMFORT ZONE weaves together intimate interviews with the story of two women - Shalini Madaras and Joy Kiss - struggling to establish transitional housing for homeless female veterans in Bridgeport, Connecticut, despite virulent community opposition. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2811] Survivors of the Firestorm The bush fires that tore through the Australian state of Victoria in February 2009 incinerated over a million acres of land, including key mountain ash forest ecosystems. Fires are a natural force of nature which spur regeneration, but the immediate aftermath of this giant firestorm was devastation. Kangaroos and koalas, wombats and wallabies, endangered possums and gliders, lizards, echidnas, birds of all kinds, and even fish that lived among these eucalypts were overcome by the flames. Millions died. But burned and traumatized survivors tenderly nursed back to health at wildlife hospitals showed a remarkable ability to bounce back, and the environment an extraordinary capacity for healing. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Transformative Chefs Hosted by Alison Stewart, this program features captivating conversations with acclaimed chefs Lidia Bastianich, Marcus Samuelsson and Ming Tsai about their life and work. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#408] Working Mom A woman returns home to her children in Bolivia after 15 years to find they've become strangers. A divorced mother of two returns to her home and children in Bolivia after 15 years of struggling for a better life in Israel, only to find her family members have become strangers. A Working Mom is a story that demonstrates the extremes that individuals will go to in order to save their families - sometimes saving and losing them in the same act. duration 1:16:29   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 am
    Best Friends: The Power of Sisterhood This moving documentary celebrates the uniquely powerful bond between women friends. It features heartfelt reflections - from humorous to joyful to poignant - from women spanning the generations: childhood friends, college friends, neighbors and colleagues. Despite embarking on separate paths, these women have maintained friendships based on mutual respect and encouragement. Actress and author Jamie Lee Curtis also discusses the importance of girlfriends in her life. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
Sunday, March 16, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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