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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, March 8, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, March 8, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10880] * Gen. Dempsey * Shields & Gerson * Miles O'Brien duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#33048] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, hiring was surprisingly strong in February. Is it a sign the economy is not only growing, but also accelerating? And, our Market Monitor guest tonight explains why buying defensive stocks may be your best offense. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3154] Tavis talks with med student-turned-megaselling singer-songwriter Emeli Sande. The British-born singer-songwriter shares her feelings about her success in dominating the airways and the British and European charts. Tavis also chats with steel guitar great Robert Randolph, who plays one of the most difficult musical instruments there is - the pedal steel guitar - tells how he perfected his artistry. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Julia Robinson and Hilbert's Tenth Problem Narrated by actress Danica McKellar, this documentary presents the inspiring life story of the pioneering American mathematician Julia Robinson (1919-1985) and charts her major contribution to solving one of the 20th century's most vexing mathematical questions - Hilbert's Tenth. It is pieced together by a wide array of archival footage, stills and recordings, recollections from other mathematicians - including the three others responsible for solving H10 - and warm reminiscences by her sister/biographer, Constance Reid. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1727] PREDICTING VIOLENCE - Adrian Raine, chair of the Criminology Department at the University of Pennsylvania, has studied the brain scans of violent killers for the last 35 years. In his controversial book, The Anatomy of Violence: The Biological Roots of Crime, Raine proposes that brain scans can be used not only to predict violence but prevent it. But, as Lucky Severson reports, Raine's research raises ethical issues. Paul Wolpe, the director of Emory University's Center for Ethics, says he "cannot think of anything more dangerous" than Raine's policy recommendations. (Originally aired November 1, 2013)
    NYC RELIGIONS - New York has been called the most secular city in America, but a project called "A Journey Through NYC Religions" is attempting to disprove that. The group is documenting every religious site in the five boroughs, street by street, alleyway by alleyway. Since 2010, they've visited more than 6,500 houses of worship. Kim Lawton talks with project founder Tony Carnes and follows along on their journey. (Originally aired February 22, 2013)
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1037] Global Real Estate WT explores investment opportunities in global real estate. Jason Wolf of top-performing Third Avenue Real Estate Value Fund and award-winning wealth manager Gregg Fisher explain why they are buying properties overseas. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2231H] Special Documentary on the Welcoming Committees of LGBTQ Open and Affirming Churches (repeat) duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#219] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Makers: Women Who Make America [#101H] This comprehensive and innovative series tells the compelling story of women's advancement in America over the past 50 years. It is a revolution that has unfolded in public and private, on grand stages like the US Supreme Court and Congress, and humbler ones like the boardroom and the bedroom. The 3-hour series features the stories of those who led the fight, those who opposed it and those - both famous and unknown - caught up in its wake. Meryl Streep narrates the program, which features commentary and the stories of Hillary Clinton and Condoleezza Rice, Oprah Winfrey and Katie Couric, and Gloria Steinem and Phyllis Schlafly, among others. duration 56:46   STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Makers: Women Who Make America [#102H] See description in part 1. duration 56:46   STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1727] PREDICTING VIOLENCE - Adrian Raine, chair of the Criminology Department at the University of Pennsylvania, has studied the brain scans of violent killers for the last 35 years. In his controversial book, The Anatomy of Violence: The Biological Roots of Crime, Raine proposes that brain scans can be used not only to predict violence but prevent it. But, as Lucky Severson reports, Raine's research raises ethical issues. Paul Wolpe, the director of Emory University's Center for Ethics, says he "cannot think of anything more dangerous" than Raine's policy recommendations. (Originally aired November 1, 2013)
    NYC RELIGIONS - New York has been called the most secular city in America, but a project called "A Journey Through NYC Religions" is attempting to disprove that. The group is documenting every religious site in the five boroughs, street by street, alleyway by alleyway. Since 2010, they've visited more than 6,500 houses of worship. Kim Lawton talks with project founder Tony Carnes and follows along on their journey. (Originally aired February 22, 2013)
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#309H] The Dog Whistle Politics of Race, Part 2 This week, more from author and legal scholar Ian Haney Lopez as he talks further with Bill about dog whistle politics - code words that use race to turn Americans against each other. Politicians manipulate deep prejudice to rouse hostility against minorities and the government, and summon support for policies that make economic inequality even worse.
    According to Haney Lopez, "This use of race has allowed an extreme faction of conservatives, those most dedicated to the power of big money, to the power of corporations to not only hijack American democracy, but to hijack the Republican Party."
    He reviews the use of the dog whistle in recent political history, from the "Southern strategy" developed by Republicans in the 60s and Democratic President Bill Clinton's welfare reform and anti-crime policies, to the tea party movement - which he says has legitimate issues but has "accepted the conservative line that was happened in their lives is really the fault of minorities" - and current attacks on President Obama's Affordable Care Act: "The subtext is, 'Here comes a black man who exemplifies the way in which the Federal government is now by and for minorities.'"
    "Dog whistling" is going to evolve, Haney Lopez says "in a way that brings in certain portions of the Latino population, certain portions of the Asian population, that's what it's likely to do. Unless we start addressing this within minority communities, but also in terms of national politics, we should expect these sorts of racial provocations to continue to define our politics for the next decade, 2 decades, 3 decades."
    Ian Haney Lopez, a professor of law at the University of California, Berkeley, is a senior fellow at the policy analysis and advocacy group, Demos.
    duration 24:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#237] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    Great Decisions In Foreign Policy [#504] Islamic Extremism In Africa After a decade of fighting Western forces in Iraq and Afghanistan, militant Islamic groups have headed to Africa establishing a new base of operations for "global jihad." America is left with a dilemma-how to encourage the fledgling democracies while quashing the dangerous radicals they harbor. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5336H] * President Obama has ramped up pressure on Russia to de-escalate the growing tensions in Ukraine by signing an executive order that imposes visa restrictions and other sanctions against Moscow. On Thursday the president also denounced a referendum by the Crimean parliament to break away from Ukraine to join the Russian Federation calling the move a violation of international law. The Crimea region has been at the center of a tense power struggle between the new Ukrainian government and Russian President Vladamir Putin since the fall of former Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych last month. Peter Baker of The New York Times and Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times have the latest on US efforts to broker a diplomatic solution to resolve the Ukraine crisis and analysis of why it's important to America's interests.
    * A parade of 2016 White House hopefuls - Ted Cruz, Chris Christie, Rand Paul and Marco Rubio - are among the GOP luminaries who will be testing their stump speeches at this week's Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Maryland. The gathering is also an opportunity for Republicans to work on framing their message and policy priorities heading into this year's midterm elections. GOP party leaders are also expected to work on addressing the intra-party divide between establishment conservatives and tea party members. Gloria Borger of CNN reports on the Republican's priorities heading into the fall midterms and which aspiring presidential contender may have the strongest message to rally the base and be the next GOP nominee.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#119H] Democratic Party Convention Opens, Big Brother on Pause in Oakland and Silicon Valley Thirsty for Recycled Water
    Democratic Party Convention Opens
    Democrats gather for their state convention in Los Angeles this weekend. The party holds both U.S. Senate seats and every statewide office from governor on down, in contrast with the Republican Party, which is attempting to rebrand itself in California. Still, there's plenty for Democrats to be concerned about, starting with a series of recent political scandals that cost them their two-thirds majority in the state Senate. Scott Shafer leads a discussion about what's at stake and the challenges ahead for the party.

    Guests:
    Scott Detrow, KQED Sacramento bureau chief
    Chris Lehane, Democratic Strategist, Fabiani and Lehane

    Big Brother on Pause in Oakland
    After a fierce debate over privacy, the Oakland City Council voted this week to scale back deployment of a controversial program for citywide surveillance. The Domain Awareness Center will now monitor only the city's airport and the port. At the heart of the debate is whether the use of new technologies — from street and police cameras to the new wearable computing device "Google Glass" — constitutes an invasion of privacy. Thuy Vu leads a discussion.

    Guests:
    Aarti Shahani, KQED News reporter
    Ali Winston, freelance journalist

    Further Reporting:
    Oakland Approves Scaled-Back Version of Disputed Surveillance Center
    Forum: Oakland Shrinks Scope of Controversial Surveillance Center

    Silicon Valley Thirsty for Recycled Water
    As Northern California's drought continues, the recent rain brought more hope than relief. Last week, Gov. Jerry Brown signed legislation that could provide millions for water conservation efforts and to expand the use of recycled water statewide. Silicon Valley has a head start on that front, with a new $70 million facility, set to open in June, that can purify up to eight million gallons of treated sewage water a day. KQED Science editor Craig Miller reports.

    Further Reporting:
    San Jose's New Plant Transforms Sewage Into 'Really Clean' Water
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17066Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2231H] Special Documentary on the Welcoming Committees of LGBTQ Open and Affirming Churches (repeat) duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3211H] TOPICS: Ukraine Crisis; Budget Battle; CPAC Pow-Wow. PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Eleanor Clift, The Daily Beast; Mort Zuckerman, US New & World Report; Susan Ferrechio, The Washington Examiner. duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#134] * The crisis in Ukraine with Robert Gates, Henry Kissinger & Tom Donilon * Mike Allen of Politico on the week in politics * Annette Bening on her latest film The Face of Love * Wes Anderson on directing The Grand Budapest Hotel * Nancy Gibbs, Time Managing Editor and Senior Editor Jonathan Woods discuss The Top of America duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#309H] The Dog Whistle Politics of Race, Part 2 This week, more from author and legal scholar Ian Haney Lopez as he talks further with Bill about dog whistle politics - code words that use race to turn Americans against each other. Politicians manipulate deep prejudice to rouse hostility against minorities and the government, and summon support for policies that make economic inequality even worse.
    According to Haney Lopez, "This use of race has allowed an extreme faction of conservatives, those most dedicated to the power of big money, to the power of corporations to not only hijack American democracy, but to hijack the Republican Party."
    He reviews the use of the dog whistle in recent political history, from the "Southern strategy" developed by Republicans in the 60s and Democratic President Bill Clinton's welfare reform and anti-crime policies, to the tea party movement - which he says has legitimate issues but has "accepted the conservative line that was happened in their lives is really the fault of minorities" - and current attacks on President Obama's Affordable Care Act: "The subtext is, 'Here comes a black man who exemplifies the way in which the Federal government is now by and for minorities.'"
    "Dog whistling" is going to evolve, Haney Lopez says "in a way that brings in certain portions of the Latino population, certain portions of the Asian population, that's what it's likely to do. Unless we start addressing this within minority communities, but also in terms of national politics, we should expect these sorts of racial provocations to continue to define our politics for the next decade, 2 decades, 3 decades."
    Ian Haney Lopez, a professor of law at the University of California, Berkeley, is a senior fellow at the policy analysis and advocacy group, Demos.
    duration 24:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1727] PREDICTING VIOLENCE - Adrian Raine, chair of the Criminology Department at the University of Pennsylvania, has studied the brain scans of violent killers for the last 35 years. In his controversial book, The Anatomy of Violence: The Biological Roots of Crime, Raine proposes that brain scans can be used not only to predict violence but prevent it. But, as Lucky Severson reports, Raine's research raises ethical issues. Paul Wolpe, the director of Emory University's Center for Ethics, says he "cannot think of anything more dangerous" than Raine's policy recommendations. (Originally aired November 1, 2013)
    NYC RELIGIONS - New York has been called the most secular city in America, but a project called "A Journey Through NYC Religions" is attempting to disprove that. The group is documenting every religious site in the five boroughs, street by street, alleyway by alleyway. Since 2010, they've visited more than 6,500 houses of worship. Kim Lawton talks with project founder Tony Carnes and follows along on their journey. (Originally aired February 22, 2013)
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    Changing Seas [#503H] Creatures of the Deep In the cold, deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico, little-known animals spend their entire lives far removed from our human world. Until now, little research has been conducted on these creatures of the deep, keeping much of their lives a mystery. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#310] duration 25:41   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Makers: Women Who Make America [#101H] This comprehensive and innovative series tells the compelling story of women's advancement in America over the past 50 years. It is a revolution that has unfolded in public and private, on grand stages like the US Supreme Court and Congress, and humbler ones like the boardroom and the bedroom. The 3-hour series features the stories of those who led the fight, those who opposed it and those - both famous and unknown - caught up in its wake. Meryl Streep narrates the program, which features commentary and the stories of Hillary Clinton and Condoleezza Rice, Oprah Winfrey and Katie Couric, and Gloria Steinem and Phyllis Schlafly, among others. duration 56:46   STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Makers: Women Who Make America [#102H] See description in part 1. duration 56:46   STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    Makers: Women Who Make America [#103H] See description in part 1. duration 56:46   STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 5:00 pm
    Frontline [#2910H] Money & March Madness / Ai Weiwei / Bradley Manning Frontline continues its new monthly magazine program with the lead story "Money and March Madness," an inside look at the multi-billion dollar business of the NCAA and its brand of amateur college sports. In this investigation, correspondent Lowell Bergman gains access to Sonny Vaccaro, a former marketing executive at Nike, Adidas and Reebok, who helped bring about the rapid commercialization of college basketball. Vaccaro's success made coaches, administrators and companies rich. But the players remain at the mercy of the NCAA, which, despite a new $10.8 billion contract for its basketball tournament, has continued to insist that the athletes don't get paid. Now, Vaccaro has left the business world and he's spearheading a class-action lawsuit that aims to ensure that players get a piece of the action.

    Also in this newsmagazine hour, an intimate portrait of a man who's sometimes called China's Andy Warhol - Ai Weiwei. He's a global art star who's now using his international renown, along with a video camera and a growing underground Twitter following, to push the boundaries of freedom in today's China.

    Later in the hour, as the fall-out from WikiLeak's continues, an exclusive interview with Private Bradley Manning's father, who speaks out for the first time about his son's upbringing and troubled youth, Manning's time in the Army and why he still believes his son did not hand over the largest cache ever of classified documents to the whistle-blowing site.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#153H] Included: In an unlikely alliance, natural gas companies and environmentalists have decided to work together to make fracking safer. Rick Karr travels to Pennsylvania to explore the tensions this has created among environmental groups. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5336H] * President Obama has ramped up pressure on Russia to de-escalate the growing tensions in Ukraine by signing an executive order that imposes visa restrictions and other sanctions against Moscow. On Thursday the president also denounced a referendum by the Crimean parliament to break away from Ukraine to join the Russian Federation calling the move a violation of international law. The Crimea region has been at the center of a tense power struggle between the new Ukrainian government and Russian President Vladamir Putin since the fall of former Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych last month. Peter Baker of The New York Times and Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times have the latest on US efforts to broker a diplomatic solution to resolve the Ukraine crisis and analysis of why it's important to America's interests.
    * A parade of 2016 White House hopefuls - Ted Cruz, Chris Christie, Rand Paul and Marco Rubio - are among the GOP luminaries who will be testing their stump speeches at this week's Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Maryland. The gathering is also an opportunity for Republicans to work on framing their message and policy priorities heading into this year's midterm elections. GOP party leaders are also expected to work on addressing the intra-party divide between establishment conservatives and tea party members. Gloria Borger of CNN reports on the Republican's priorities heading into the fall midterms and which aspiring presidential contender may have the strongest message to rally the base and be the next GOP nominee.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#119H] Democratic Party Convention Opens, Big Brother on Pause in Oakland and Silicon Valley Thirsty for Recycled Water
    Democratic Party Convention Opens
    Democrats gather for their state convention in Los Angeles this weekend. The party holds both U.S. Senate seats and every statewide office from governor on down, in contrast with the Republican Party, which is attempting to rebrand itself in California. Still, there's plenty for Democrats to be concerned about, starting with a series of recent political scandals that cost them their two-thirds majority in the state Senate. Scott Shafer leads a discussion about what's at stake and the challenges ahead for the party.

    Guests:
    Scott Detrow, KQED Sacramento bureau chief
    Chris Lehane, Democratic Strategist, Fabiani and Lehane

    Big Brother on Pause in Oakland
    After a fierce debate over privacy, the Oakland City Council voted this week to scale back deployment of a controversial program for citywide surveillance. The Domain Awareness Center will now monitor only the city's airport and the port. At the heart of the debate is whether the use of new technologies — from street and police cameras to the new wearable computing device "Google Glass" — constitutes an invasion of privacy. Thuy Vu leads a discussion.

    Guests:
    Aarti Shahani, KQED News reporter
    Ali Winston, freelance journalist

    Further Reporting:
    Oakland Approves Scaled-Back Version of Disputed Surveillance Center
    Forum: Oakland Shrinks Scope of Controversial Surveillance Center

    Silicon Valley Thirsty for Recycled Water
    As Northern California's drought continues, the recent rain brought more hope than relief. Last week, Gov. Jerry Brown signed legislation that could provide millions for water conservation efforts and to expand the use of recycled water statewide. Silicon Valley has a head start on that front, with a new $70 million facility, set to open in June, that can purify up to eight million gallons of treated sewage water a day. KQED Science editor Craig Miller reports.

    Further Reporting:
    San Jose's New Plant Transforms Sewage Into 'Really Clean' Water
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:30 pm
    Changing Seas [#503H] Creatures of the Deep In the cold, deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico, little-known animals spend their entire lives far removed from our human world. Until now, little research has been conducted on these creatures of the deep, keeping much of their lives a mystery. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1219] Globe Trekker Food Hour: Lebanon The rich soil and varied history of Lebanon have resulted in a world-class cuisine. Merrilees Parker travels to the capital of Beirut and then in to the countryside of Lebanon to learn more about its people, their culture and their cuisine. duration 56:05   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2701] Cloud: Challenge of the Stallions The returning saga of Cloud, the wild, white stallion finds us back in the Arrowhead Mountains of Montana. Cloud is now a confident band stallion in his prime. As he rules the mountains, gathering mares and expanding his reign, the story turns to his two sons. Bolder is his by birth -- beautiful and golden, the success of his father and grandfather flowing in his veins. Flint, sired by another stallion, is the colt Cloud raised. Now, Bolder has gathered some mares of his own while Flint has joined a group of bachelor stallions, young guns roaming the mountains. Who will rise to challenge the mighty Cloud? Will nature or nurture produce the next great stallion of the Arrowheads? duration 55:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3710H] Mt. St. Helens Back from the Dead When Mount St. Helens erupted in 1980, every living thing in the blast zone was buried beneath 300 feet of avalanche debris, covered with steaming mud and, finally, topped with a superheated layer of frothy rock from deep within the earth. It seemed as though Mount St. Helens might remain a wasteland forever. When biologist Charlie Crisafulli first flew over the disaster zone, finding no sign of life, little did he realize that his own life would be forever changed. Crisafulli has remained at the site for 27 years, documenting the dramatic return of plant and animal life to the barren landscape and pioneering a new understanding of the interaction between geologic forces and the life surrounding the mountain. Nova brings viewers on a journey of a landscape brought back from the dead. duration 55:01   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 11:00 pm
    Life On Fire [#102H] Volcano Doctors Whether the Philippines, Papua New Guinea, Colombia, Chile, Italy or Iceland, each of these countries is home to active volcanoes that are a threat to the populations settled at their feet. Every day, lava, ash, gas, bombs and avalanches are likely to slide down the gaping mouths of the rock giants. To avoid disasters, volcanologists are asked to anticipate and warn. They are asked to be prophets and to know how to analyze the volcanoes' slightest tremors. Around the world, these volcano doctors use their tools and knowledge to try to protect those who live beneath the Earth's fire. duration 55:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#203] The Medicine Game This program shares the remarkable journey of two brothers from the Onondaga Nation driven by a single goal; to beat the odds and play lacrosse for national powerhouse Syracuse University. The obstacles in their way are frequent and daunting. In their darkest hour, and with their dreams crumbling around them, the boys must look to their family and to their Native teachings for guidance and stability. It is their search for identity that transitions this film from a playful coming of age story, into an important study of modern Native American life. It follows their story over the next six years as they struggle to rebuild their friendship, rescue a fading childhood dream, and gain a more resolute understanding of their identity and culture, both as athletes and the next generation of the Onondaga people. duration 1:26:39   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, March 8, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too