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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, March 2, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, March 2, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#211] Drivers Wanted This program reveals the impossibly eclectic community inhabiting a taxi garage in Queens, New York. Each day, a million New Yorkers depend on the anonymous faces behind the wheels, the men who tirelessly drive the city that doesn't sleep. The film follows Eric, a new immigrant from China with a fresh start in America. With dreams of his own business, and a wife and two young sons to support, he turns to a simple job - driving a taxicab. But the easy route proves to be a Herculean struggle for Eric, who can neither speak the language of his customers nor navigate the city's 6,174 miles of streets. Along for Eric's ride, we meet classic New York personalities, including the city's oldest taxi driver, the rumored inspiration behind Danny DeVito's Louie DePalma, and a melting pot of immigrants with dreams of making it in America. duration 54:16   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Carhenge: Genius Or Junk? Outside Alliance, Nebraska, a whimsical monument rises from the desolate prairie. Fashioned from 38 spray-painted vintage automobiles stacked and buried upright, the structure known as Carhenge faithfully replicates its British counterpart, Stonehenge. This humorous documentary examines how this quirky monument challenged one community's definition of art, freedom of expression and appropriate land use. It charts sculptor Jim Reinders' efforts to save his creation from being dismantled. In addition, scholars, historians and artists provide insight into how this public art installation continues to beckon bemused visitors to this small Midwestern town each year. duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 1:30 am
    Indian Motorcycle Memories With a wealth of vintage photos and film footage, this program goes back to the daredevil days of the 1920s to explore the mystique of these classic American racing bikes. Tracing the history of the Indian Motorcycle Company from its humble beginnings to its phenomenal worldwide success, and to its unexpected troubles after World War I, the program shows how the company persevered and the motorcycle's reputation for style, engineering and durability lived on. The documentary concludes with a look at the contemporary Indian motorcycle community - a mixture of old and new fans who keep the memories alive and the old engines revving. duration 28:54   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#310] Making Math & History Come Alive We'll spend the hour in seven classrooms as teachers make math and history come alive while aligning their lessons to the Common Core. We'll visit student-focused math classes and then see students explore ancient civilizations, the French Revolution, and the American Declaration of Independence. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#308H] Ian Haney Lopez on the Dog Whistle Politics of Race Author and legal scholar Ian Haney Lopez joins Bill to talk about dog whistle politics and how racism has changed in America since the civil rights era. The dog whistle of racism, says Ian Haney Lopez, is "the dark magic" by which middle-class voters have been seduced to vote against their own economic interests. Politicians have mastered the use of dog whistles - code words that turn Americans against each other while turning America over to plutocrats.
    And yet, "Dog whistle politics doesn't come out of animus at all." Lopez tells Moyers. "It doesn't come out of some desire to hurt minorities. It comes out of a desire to win votes. And in that sense, I want to start using the term strategic racism. It's racism as a strategy. It's cold, it's calculating, it's considered, it's the decision to achieve one's own ends, here winning votes, by stirring racial animosity."
    "And here's a hard, difficult truth. Most racists are good people," he claims. "They're not sick. They're not ruled by anger or raw emotion or hatred. They are complicated people reared in complicated societies. They're fully capable of generosity, of empathy, of real kindness. But because of the idea systems in which they're reared, they're also capable of dehumanizing others and occasionally of brutal violence."
    Ian Haney Lopez, a professor of law at the University of California, Berkeley, is a senior fellow at the policy analysis and advocacy group, Demos.
    duration 24:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Asia This Week [#348] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5335H] In the aftermath of the uprising in Kiev that drove Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych from power, a new interim government started to take shape this week. The new prime minister said Ukraine's future lies in the European Union and the Obama administration has begun working with the EU on a bailout for Ukraine. But Russian President Vladamir Putin's decision to launch military exercises near the Ukraine border has prompted questions on how much strength Russia might exert over the political direction of its neighbor. Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News will report on new concerns about the power struggle and the competing forces trying to reshape the former Soviet territory.
    Equal rights for gay Americans continue to be a hot-button topic across America. This week alone Attorney General Eric Holder urged state attorneys general not to defend same-sex marriage bans in their states if they believe the laws are discriminatory. In Texas a federal judge struck down the state's gay-marriage ban while in Kentucky a federal judge ordered the state to recognize same-sex marriages performed outside the state. In Arizona Republican Governor Jan Brewer vetoed a bill that would have allowed business owners to refuse service to gay individuals on religious grounds. Pete Williams of NBC News will examine the latest fronts in the battle to protect the LGBT community.
    Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post will report on the retirement of Rep. John Dingell, the longest serving member of Congress, and why after nearly 60 years of service the Michigan Democrat said, "I find serving in the House to be obnoxious."
    President Obama announced the new "My Brother's Keeper" program, a new administration initiative that partners government with businesses and philanthropic organizations to address the problems of minority youth. Michael Scherer of Time Magazine will take a closer look at how this public-private partnership will help create more opportunities for young men of color.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3210H] TOPICS: - Russia Ramps Up; - Hagel's High-Tech Military. PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Eleanor Clift, The Daily Beast; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Guy Taylor, Washington Times. duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#133H] * David Kirkpatrick on Egypt * Eric Schmidt & Jared Cohen discuss New Digital Age Grants * David Zwirner on contemporary art * Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson * Melena Ryzik previews this weekend's Academy Awards duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3209] Overthrow In Ukraine, Enormous Problems Ahead UKRAINE: OVERTHROW - In Ukraine, after weeks of protests, the opposition is back in center stage. An arrest warrant has now been issued for Viktor Yanukovych, still president of the country a few days ago. Yanukovych's ouster was preceded by bloody confrontations on Kiev's Independence Square. The situation escalated after several demonstrators were shot dead. Only after efforts at mediation by several EU foreign ministers could the violence be stopped. Yanukovych fled and the imprisoned opposition politician Yulia Tymoshenko was released. But Ukraine faces enormous problems. The country is teetering on the brink of bankruptcy. Russia has suspended part of a financial aid package, but the International Monetary Fund, European Union and US have now promised billions in aid.
    TURKEY: THE DREAM OF BEING A REFEREE - The conservative southeast of Turkey is far from being a bastion of female equality. So it's quite a sensation when individual women find a voice, even on the football pitch. A young Kurd has now managed to become the region's first female professional referee. The young physical education teacher has had her license for just half a year. She sees herself as a pioneer and wants to contribute to change. On the other hand, she has to endure both distrust and pressure. In all of Turkey, women's football is a relatively new sport, and across the country there are only a handful of female referees.
    NORTHERN IRELAND: UNDERCOVER FORCE - During the Troubles in Northern Ireland, Britain deployed a controversial secret unit, said to have shot dead members of the armed Catholic IRA and covered up murders by the pro-British paramilitary group the UVF, according to an increasing number of witness statements. This death squad operated into the 1970s, eliminating targeted IRA members. Members of the unit, the Military Reaction Force, have now confirmed that themselves. Force members were said to have worked undercover, camouflaged as trash collectors, street sweepers and homeless people in the Catholic districts. 40 men are said to have belonged to the force. More and more relatives of victims are now demanding their cases be re-heard. In Britain an amnesty for such crimes, committed before the Good Friday Agreement, has been under discussion for months.
    SPAIN: A HOME FROM HOME FOR STAR-GAZERS (SERIES: EUROPE BY NIGHT) - Among the many attractions to behold on La Palma is the island's observatory. It's the most popular site in Europe among amateur astronomers. Astronomy tourism is such a big deal on the island that the authorities have even passed special regulations for street lighting and other pollutants of the air; excessive light levels render the stars invisible. Four years ago the world's largest optical telescope was inaugurated on the highest mountain of La Palmas - guaranteeing outstanding views of outer space.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#211] Drivers Wanted This program reveals the impossibly eclectic community inhabiting a taxi garage in Queens, New York. Each day, a million New Yorkers depend on the anonymous faces behind the wheels, the men who tirelessly drive the city that doesn't sleep. The film follows Eric, a new immigrant from China with a fresh start in America. With dreams of his own business, and a wife and two young sons to support, he turns to a simple job - driving a taxicab. But the easy route proves to be a Herculean struggle for Eric, who can neither speak the language of his customers nor navigate the city's 6,174 miles of streets. Along for Eric's ride, we meet classic New York personalities, including the city's oldest taxi driver, the rumored inspiration behind Danny DeVito's Louie DePalma, and a melting pot of immigrants with dreams of making it in America. duration 54:16   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Focus On Europe [#3209] Overthrow In Ukraine, Enormous Problems Ahead UKRAINE: OVERTHROW - In Ukraine, after weeks of protests, the opposition is back in center stage. An arrest warrant has now been issued for Viktor Yanukovych, still president of the country a few days ago. Yanukovych's ouster was preceded by bloody confrontations on Kiev's Independence Square. The situation escalated after several demonstrators were shot dead. Only after efforts at mediation by several EU foreign ministers could the violence be stopped. Yanukovych fled and the imprisoned opposition politician Yulia Tymoshenko was released. But Ukraine faces enormous problems. The country is teetering on the brink of bankruptcy. Russia has suspended part of a financial aid package, but the International Monetary Fund, European Union and US have now promised billions in aid.
    TURKEY: THE DREAM OF BEING A REFEREE - The conservative southeast of Turkey is far from being a bastion of female equality. So it's quite a sensation when individual women find a voice, even on the football pitch. A young Kurd has now managed to become the region's first female professional referee. The young physical education teacher has had her license for just half a year. She sees herself as a pioneer and wants to contribute to change. On the other hand, she has to endure both distrust and pressure. In all of Turkey, women's football is a relatively new sport, and across the country there are only a handful of female referees.
    NORTHERN IRELAND: UNDERCOVER FORCE - During the Troubles in Northern Ireland, Britain deployed a controversial secret unit, said to have shot dead members of the armed Catholic IRA and covered up murders by the pro-British paramilitary group the UVF, according to an increasing number of witness statements. This death squad operated into the 1970s, eliminating targeted IRA members. Members of the unit, the Military Reaction Force, have now confirmed that themselves. Force members were said to have worked undercover, camouflaged as trash collectors, street sweepers and homeless people in the Catholic districts. 40 men are said to have belonged to the force. More and more relatives of victims are now demanding their cases be re-heard. In Britain an amnesty for such crimes, committed before the Good Friday Agreement, has been under discussion for months.
    SPAIN: A HOME FROM HOME FOR STAR-GAZERS (SERIES: EUROPE BY NIGHT) - Among the many attractions to behold on La Palma is the island's observatory. It's the most popular site in Europe among amateur astronomers. Astronomy tourism is such a big deal on the island that the authorities have even passed special regulations for street lighting and other pollutants of the air; excessive light levels render the stars invisible. Four years ago the world's largest optical telescope was inaugurated on the highest mountain of La Palmas - guaranteeing outstanding views of outer space.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 am
    Changing Seas [#502H] Sunken Stories In the Florida Keys, divers from around the country learn how to map shipwrecks and apply their skills on a mysterious 19th Century slave ship. When diving isn't possible, professional explorers use high-tech tools to scan objects buried beneath the seafloor. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Asia Biz Forecast [#448] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1036] The New Retirement Conversation This week's WT guides you through the new retirement conversation. With traditional pension funds rapidly disappearing, what are the new building blocks for a secure retirement? Personal finance experts Mary Beth Franklin and Kim Lankford discuss the essentials and explain why insurance could become the next big retirement tool. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#326H] Financial Planner Ric Edelman tells us how we can improve our credit score. Plus, if you're just starting out professionally how can you stand out from the college graduate crowd? And Jean Edelman gives her insights on finding the perfect job. All that and more on this edition of The Truth About Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Great Decisions In Foreign Policy [#503] Turkey and the Middle East The U.S. and European powers need Turkey's support in their efforts to navigate Middle Eastern politics amid the Syrian conflict, Iran's nuclear ambitions and even the ever-present conflict between Israelis and Palestinians. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3210H] TOPICS: - Russia Ramps Up; - Hagel's High-Tech Military. PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Eleanor Clift, The Daily Beast; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Guy Taylor, Washington Times. duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5335H] In the aftermath of the uprising in Kiev that drove Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych from power, a new interim government started to take shape this week. The new prime minister said Ukraine's future lies in the European Union and the Obama administration has begun working with the EU on a bailout for Ukraine. But Russian President Vladamir Putin's decision to launch military exercises near the Ukraine border has prompted questions on how much strength Russia might exert over the political direction of its neighbor. Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News will report on new concerns about the power struggle and the competing forces trying to reshape the former Soviet territory.
    Equal rights for gay Americans continue to be a hot-button topic across America. This week alone Attorney General Eric Holder urged state attorneys general not to defend same-sex marriage bans in their states if they believe the laws are discriminatory. In Texas a federal judge struck down the state's gay-marriage ban while in Kentucky a federal judge ordered the state to recognize same-sex marriages performed outside the state. In Arizona Republican Governor Jan Brewer vetoed a bill that would have allowed business owners to refuse service to gay individuals on religious grounds. Pete Williams of NBC News will examine the latest fronts in the battle to protect the LGBT community.
    Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post will report on the retirement of Rep. John Dingell, the longest serving member of Congress, and why after nearly 60 years of service the Michigan Democrat said, "I find serving in the House to be obnoxious."
    President Obama announced the new "My Brother's Keeper" program, a new administration initiative that partners government with businesses and philanthropic organizations to address the problems of minority youth. Michael Scherer of Time Magazine will take a closer look at how this public-private partnership will help create more opportunities for young men of color.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#118H] Bay Bridge Concerns, Beef With a Petaluma Slaughterhouse and Finding Hidden Genius
    Questions Persist Over Bay Bridge Safety
    Caltrans officials admitted for the first time at a hearing this week that concerns brought up by two local scientists over testing of bolts and rods on the new Bay Bridge span may be valid. As the longest and most expensive public works project in California history, with a $6.4 billion price tag, questions persist over leaking and corrosion from the rain and misalignment of sections of the road deck. Caltrans remains confident in the integrity of the structure. Thuy Vu moderates a discussion.

    Further Reporting:
    New Bay Bridge Span Safe Despite Problems, Officials Say

    Guests:
    Mark DeSaulnier, California State Senator, D-Concord
    Jaxon Van Derbeken, San Francisco Chronicle reporter
    Charles Piller, Sacramento Bee reporter
    Brian Maroney, chief bridge design engineer

    Local Ranchers Have a Beef with Petaluma Slaughterhouse
    A federal investigation into whether the Petaluma slaughterhouse Rancho Feeding Corp. distributed tainted beef is raising questions about food safety. It has also put the squeeze on area ranchers who are now without a local slaughterhouse for their meat. KQED News reporter Mina Kim discusses the story with Scott Shafer.

    Further Reporting:
    USDA Inspector: Supervisors Ignored Reports of Trouble at Petaluma Slaughterhouse

    Finding Hidden Genius
    President Obama launched a new initiative Thursday aimed at empowering young men of color. Among the community leaders advising the White House is Kalimah Priforce, a head mentor at The Hidden Genius Project in Oakland — a program where high school students learn computer languages and build apps to solve their everyday problems. The goal is to recruit more African-Americans into the high tech sector — one of the few parts of the economy that's booming, but also lagging in diversity. Aarti Shahani reports.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#308H] Ian Haney Lopez on the Dog Whistle Politics of Race Author and legal scholar Ian Haney Lopez joins Bill to talk about dog whistle politics and how racism has changed in America since the civil rights era. The dog whistle of racism, says Ian Haney Lopez, is "the dark magic" by which middle-class voters have been seduced to vote against their own economic interests. Politicians have mastered the use of dog whistles - code words that turn Americans against each other while turning America over to plutocrats.
    And yet, "Dog whistle politics doesn't come out of animus at all." Lopez tells Moyers. "It doesn't come out of some desire to hurt minorities. It comes out of a desire to win votes. And in that sense, I want to start using the term strategic racism. It's racism as a strategy. It's cold, it's calculating, it's considered, it's the decision to achieve one's own ends, here winning votes, by stirring racial animosity."
    "And here's a hard, difficult truth. Most racists are good people," he claims. "They're not sick. They're not ruled by anger or raw emotion or hatred. They are complicated people reared in complicated societies. They're fully capable of generosity, of empathy, of real kindness. But because of the idea systems in which they're reared, they're also capable of dehumanizing others and occasionally of brutal violence."
    Ian Haney Lopez, a professor of law at the University of California, Berkeley, is a senior fellow at the policy analysis and advocacy group, Demos.
    duration 24:30   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1726H] SOLITARY CONFINEMENT - The debate over whether some prisoners should be locked up by themselves heated up this week as a Senate subcommittee held hearings on the practice and the New York State prison system agreed to new guidelines for the maximum length of time prisoners may be placed in solitary. Meanwhile, a growing faith-based movement says the abuse of solitary confinement violates religious values. In the US there are an estimated 80.000 prisoners now locked up in small cells, 23 hours a day, sometimes for more than 40 years. Lucky Severson reports on those who say solitary is unChristian and does more harm than good. Against them are corrections officers and others who insist solitary is necessary to protect guards and other prisoners from the most violent. Severson also interviews Bobby Dellelo who spent 5 years in solitary and talks about the anger and rage it provoked, and with Mississippi's Corrections Director Christopher Epps, who removed two-thirds of Mississippi's prisoners in solitary and saw violence go down 40%. (Previously aired on October 11, 2013)
    JOURNEY OF THE REAL PHILOMENA - At Sunday's Academy Awards, the movie "Philomena" is up for 4 Oscars, including best picture. It's based on the true story of a Catholic teenager in Ireland who became pregnant outside of marriage in the 1950s and was forced by nuns to give up her son for adoption. The movie depicts her search for him decades later, helped by a British journalist. Kim Lawton talks with the inspiration for the film, Philomena Lee and her daughter, Jane Libberton, about Philomena's journey overcoming bitterness and shame.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 pm
    Changing Seas [#502H] Sunken Stories In the Florida Keys, divers from around the country learn how to map shipwrecks and apply their skills on a mysterious 19th Century slave ship. When diving isn't possible, professional explorers use high-tech tools to scan objects buried beneath the seafloor. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Miller Center's American Forum [#2008] duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1218] Nigeria Adela Ucar kicks off her visit in the capital of Lagos, an anarchic and electric city with a vital night life. Next she journeys to Yoruba Land in the southwest, thought to be the site of the Queen of Sheba's tomb. Adela later meets witch doctors in Oyo, travels to the historic walled cities in the north, hunts for bargains in the ancient Kurmi Market, visits the traditional Fulani village of Chafe and encounters a rare mountain gorilla in Nigeria's eastern highlands. duration 57:53   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Nature [#3107#] Ireland's Wild River The Shannon is Ireland's greatest geographical landmark and the longest river. It is both a barrier and highway -- a silver ribbon holding back the rugged landscapes of the west from the gentler plains to the east. On its journey south, the Shannon passes through a huge palette of rural landscapes; where on little-known backwaters, Ireland's wild animals and plants still thrive as almost nowhere else. For a year, wildlife cameraman Colin Stafford-Johnson lives on the river -- camping on its banks, exploring its countless tributaries in a traditional canoe, following the river from dawn to dusk through the four seasons, on a quest to film the natural history of the Shannon as it has never been seen or heard or experienced before. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    Nova [#4016#] Ground Zero Supertower Nova returns to Ground Zero to witness the final chapter in an epic story of engineering, innovation, and the perseverance of the human spirit: the completion of One World Trade Center, the skyscraper rising up 104 stories and 1,776 feet from the site where the Twin Towers once stood. In this update of Nova's "Engineering Ground Zero, " which featured behind-the-scenes access to the struggles of the engineers and architects working at 1 WTC and the National September 11 Memorial and Museum, Nova goes inside the construction of the new tower's final floors and the installation of its soaring, 800-ton spire and beacon. But 1 WTC isn't the only engineering marvel taking shape here: Nova goes underground to see the construction of a multi-billion dollar transit center whose sweeping, sinuous design is said to be inspired by the shape of a bird being released from a child's hand. Will the buildings be completed on time under competing business, environmental, and safety demands? And will the final product be a fitting site for national remembrance? duration 56:46   STEREO TV14
  • 5:00 pm
    John Portman: A Life of Building This program examines the work and legacy of one of the world's most daring and influential architects. Over the last 45 years, John Portman's iconic urban structures and eye-popping interiors steadily rose in 60 cities across four continents, helping redefine cityscapes in the United States and skylines in Asia. Once considered a maverick because he eschewed long-accepted industry standards, critics and leading architecture schools now fully embrace Portman's design approach, which emphasizes function, purpose and sensory experience.
    This documentary showcases Portman's buildings using dramatic time-lapse footage. It also features interviews with Portman, architecture critic Paul Goldberg (The New Yorker), Harvard professors Mack Scogin and Michael Hays, business associates Mickey Steinberg and A.J. Robinson, architect Jacque Robertson, art critic Robert Craig and Portman's children.
    duration 56:14   STEREO TVG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#151H] Included: Is there a way to avoid costly medical malpractice lawsuits? We take a look at the system in Denmark, where patients' cases are decided by an independent panel rather than a judge in a courtroom, creating a system that supporters say is better for doctors and injured-patients alike. duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#118H] Bay Bridge Concerns, Beef With a Petaluma Slaughterhouse and Finding Hidden Genius
    Questions Persist Over Bay Bridge Safety
    Caltrans officials admitted for the first time at a hearing this week that concerns brought up by two local scientists over testing of bolts and rods on the new Bay Bridge span may be valid. As the longest and most expensive public works project in California history, with a $6.4 billion price tag, questions persist over leaking and corrosion from the rain and misalignment of sections of the road deck. Caltrans remains confident in the integrity of the structure. Thuy Vu moderates a discussion.

    Further Reporting:
    New Bay Bridge Span Safe Despite Problems, Officials Say

    Guests:
    Mark DeSaulnier, California State Senator, D-Concord
    Jaxon Van Derbeken, San Francisco Chronicle reporter
    Charles Piller, Sacramento Bee reporter
    Brian Maroney, chief bridge design engineer

    Local Ranchers Have a Beef with Petaluma Slaughterhouse
    A federal investigation into whether the Petaluma slaughterhouse Rancho Feeding Corp. distributed tainted beef is raising questions about food safety. It has also put the squeeze on area ranchers who are now without a local slaughterhouse for their meat. KQED News reporter Mina Kim discusses the story with Scott Shafer.

    Further Reporting:
    USDA Inspector: Supervisors Ignored Reports of Trouble at Petaluma Slaughterhouse

    Finding Hidden Genius
    President Obama launched a new initiative Thursday aimed at empowering young men of color. Among the community leaders advising the White House is Kalimah Priforce, a head mentor at The Hidden Genius Project in Oakland — a program where high school students learn computer languages and build apps to solve their everyday problems. The goal is to recruit more African-Americans into the high tech sector — one of the few parts of the economy that's booming, but also lagging in diversity. Aarti Shahani reports.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#308H] Ian Haney Lopez on the Dog Whistle Politics of Race Author and legal scholar Ian Haney Lopez joins Bill to talk about dog whistle politics and how racism has changed in America since the civil rights era. The dog whistle of racism, says Ian Haney Lopez, is "the dark magic" by which middle-class voters have been seduced to vote against their own economic interests. Politicians have mastered the use of dog whistles - code words that turn Americans against each other while turning America over to plutocrats.
    And yet, "Dog whistle politics doesn't come out of animus at all." Lopez tells Moyers. "It doesn't come out of some desire to hurt minorities. It comes out of a desire to win votes. And in that sense, I want to start using the term strategic racism. It's racism as a strategy. It's cold, it's calculating, it's considered, it's the decision to achieve one's own ends, here winning votes, by stirring racial animosity."
    "And here's a hard, difficult truth. Most racists are good people," he claims. "They're not sick. They're not ruled by anger or raw emotion or hatred. They are complicated people reared in complicated societies. They're fully capable of generosity, of empathy, of real kindness. But because of the idea systems in which they're reared, they're also capable of dehumanizing others and occasionally of brutal violence."
    Ian Haney Lopez, a professor of law at the University of California, Berkeley, is a senior fellow at the policy analysis and advocacy group, Demos.
    duration 24:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    Local USA [#115] Immigration: Home The immigration trail to Nashville, Tennessee; Bhutan refugees who come for religious freedom; the relocation and adaptation of Somalians; and the flourishing professionals in the Kurdish community. duration 27:08   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    America Reframed [#211] Drivers Wanted This program reveals the impossibly eclectic community inhabiting a taxi garage in Queens, New York. Each day, a million New Yorkers depend on the anonymous faces behind the wheels, the men who tirelessly drive the city that doesn't sleep. The film follows Eric, a new immigrant from China with a fresh start in America. With dreams of his own business, and a wife and two young sons to support, he turns to a simple job - driving a taxicab. But the easy route proves to be a Herculean struggle for Eric, who can neither speak the language of his customers nor navigate the city's 6,174 miles of streets. Along for Eric's ride, we meet classic New York personalities, including the city's oldest taxi driver, the rumored inspiration behind Danny DeVito's Louie DePalma, and a melting pot of immigrants with dreams of making it in America. duration 54:16   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3107#] Ireland's Wild River The Shannon is Ireland's greatest geographical landmark and the longest river. It is both a barrier and highway -- a silver ribbon holding back the rugged landscapes of the west from the gentler plains to the east. On its journey south, the Shannon passes through a huge palette of rural landscapes; where on little-known backwaters, Ireland's wild animals and plants still thrive as almost nowhere else. For a year, wildlife cameraman Colin Stafford-Johnson lives on the river -- camping on its banks, exploring its countless tributaries in a traditional canoe, following the river from dawn to dusk through the four seasons, on a quest to film the natural history of the Shannon as it has never been seen or heard or experienced before. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross [#105B] Rise! (1940-1968) Rise! examines the long road to civil rights, when the deep contradictions in American society finally became unsustainable. Beginning in World War II, African Americans who helped fight fascism abroad came home to face the same old racial violence. But this time, mass media-from print to radio and TV-broadcast that injustice to the world, planting seeds of resistance. And the success of black entrepreneurs and entertainers fueled African American hopes and dreams. In December 1955, Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white man on a city bus in Montgomery, Alabama, heralding the dawn of a new movement of quiet resistance, with the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as its public face. Before long, masses of African Americans practiced this nonviolent approach at great personal risk to integrate public schools, lunch counters and more. As the civil rights movement scored one historic victory after another, non-violence was still all too often met with violence-until finally, enough was enough. By 1968, Dr. King, the apostle of non-violence, would be assassinated, unleashing a new call for "Black Power" across the country. duration 1:23:03   STEREO TVPG-V (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#406] Shayfeen.Com Get an intimate look at the 2005 multi-party elections in Egypt through the eyes of 3 women working to assure the election's legitimacy. The women provide unprecedented access to activists operating in and around the highest levels of both government and opposition groups. duration 54:03   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Global Voices [#528] Welcome to the World Is it worse to be born poor than to die poor? 130 million babies are born each year, and not one of them decides where they?ll be born or how they'll live. In Cambodia, you're likely to be born to a family living on less than $1/day. In Sierra Leone chances of surviving the first year are half those of the worldwide average Brian Hill takes a worldwide trip to meet the newest generation - In the US Starr's new baby could well be one more of 1.6 million homeless children now living in the streets. duration 56:46   STEREO
Sunday, March 2, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too