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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, March 1, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, March 1, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10875H] * Ukraine * Inside Fukushima * Future of Bitcoin * Shields & Brooks duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#33043H] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, today's big gains vanished on rising tensions in Ukraine. How concerned should investors be? And, Apple CEO Tim Cook fielding questions on everything from new products to potential acquisitions at its annual meeting. But were shareholders satisfied? duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3149] Tavis talks with Oscar- and Emmy-winning actor-producer and humanitarian Forest Whitaker, who previews his latest film, the psychological thriller Repentance, and comments on the work of his foundation. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    America Revealed [#104H] Made in the U.S.A. This episode examines how American industry creates, whether it's a simple cardboard box, a sleek new car, a jumbo jet or a tiny silicon chip, and how supply and demand, manufacturing and assembly are interconnected. duration 53:46   SRND51 TVG
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1726H] SOLITARY CONFINEMENT - The debate over whether some prisoners should be locked up by themselves heated up this week as a Senate subcommittee held hearings on the practice and the New York State prison system agreed to new guidelines for the maximum length of time prisoners may be placed in solitary. Meanwhile, a growing faith-based movement says the abuse of solitary confinement violates religious values. In the US there are an estimated 80.000 prisoners now locked up in small cells, 23 hours a day, sometimes for more than 40 years. Lucky Severson reports on those who say solitary is unChristian and does more harm than good. Against them are corrections officers and others who insist solitary is necessary to protect guards and other prisoners from the most violent. Severson also interviews Bobby Dellelo who spent 5 years in solitary and talks about the anger and rage it provoked, and with Mississippi's Corrections Director Christopher Epps, who removed two-thirds of Mississippi's prisoners in solitary and saw violence go down 40%. (Previously aired on October 11, 2013)
    JOURNEY OF THE REAL PHILOMENA - At Sunday's Academy Awards, the movie "Philomena" is up for 4 Oscars, including best picture. It's based on the true story of a Catholic teenager in Ireland who became pregnant outside of marriage in the 1950s and was forced by nuns to give up her son for adoption. The movie depicts her search for him decades later, helped by a British journalist. Kim Lawton talks with the inspiration for the film, Philomena Lee and her daughter, Jane Libberton, about Philomena's journey overcoming bitterness and shame.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1036] The New Retirement Conversation This week's WT guides you through the new retirement conversation. With traditional pension funds rapidly disappearing, what are the new building blocks for a secure retirement? Personal finance experts Mary Beth Franklin and Kim Lankford discuss the essentials and explain why insurance could become the next big retirement tool. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2251H] (repeat) A special documentary edition of TTC featuring the New Americans. We are in Southern California where we are going to introduce you to the new Americans and the emerging industry that is growing up around them. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asia Insight [#124] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    American Masters [#2606] Alice Walker: Beauty In Truth Most famous for her seminal novel "The Color Purple," writer / activist Alice Walker celebrates her 70th birthday. Born February 9, 1944, into a family of sharecroppers in rural Georgia, her life unfolded during the violent racism and seismic social changes of mid-20th century America. Her mother, poverty and participation in the Civil Rights Movement were the formative influences on her consciousness, becoming the inherent themes in her writing. The first African-American woman to win a Pulitzer Prize for Literature, Walker continues to shine a light on global human rights issues. Her dramatic life is told with poetry and lyricism, and includes interviews with Steven Spielberg, Danny Glover, Quincy Jones, Howard Zinn, Gloria Steinem, Sapphire, and Walker herself. 90 minutes. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG-L (Secondary audio: none)
  • MORNING
  • 6:30 am
    Lost Years of Zora Neale Hurston Writer, folklorist and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston, a celebrated (and sometimes controversial) figure of the Harlem Renaissance, first rose to prominence with Mules and Men (1935) and cemented her reputation soon after with her 1937 masterwork, Their Eyes Were Watching God. However, few know about the woman behind this widely read and highly acclaimed novel - particularly the last 10 years of her life.
    This program delves into the writer's life, work and philosophies, concentrating on her very productive but often overlooked, final decade. Interviews with Hurston experts and colleagues, letters from Hurston, and archival photographs piece together this fascinating chapter in the life of an American literary icon.
    duration 26:48   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1726H] SOLITARY CONFINEMENT - The debate over whether some prisoners should be locked up by themselves heated up this week as a Senate subcommittee held hearings on the practice and the New York State prison system agreed to new guidelines for the maximum length of time prisoners may be placed in solitary. Meanwhile, a growing faith-based movement says the abuse of solitary confinement violates religious values. In the US there are an estimated 80.000 prisoners now locked up in small cells, 23 hours a day, sometimes for more than 40 years. Lucky Severson reports on those who say solitary is unChristian and does more harm than good. Against them are corrections officers and others who insist solitary is necessary to protect guards and other prisoners from the most violent. Severson also interviews Bobby Dellelo who spent 5 years in solitary and talks about the anger and rage it provoked, and with Mississippi's Corrections Director Christopher Epps, who removed two-thirds of Mississippi's prisoners in solitary and saw violence go down 40%. (Previously aired on October 11, 2013)
    JOURNEY OF THE REAL PHILOMENA - At Sunday's Academy Awards, the movie "Philomena" is up for 4 Oscars, including best picture. It's based on the true story of a Catholic teenager in Ireland who became pregnant outside of marriage in the 1950s and was forced by nuns to give up her son for adoption. The movie depicts her search for him decades later, helped by a British journalist. Kim Lawton talks with the inspiration for the film, Philomena Lee and her daughter, Jane Libberton, about Philomena's journey overcoming bitterness and shame.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#308H] Ian Haney Lopez on the Dog Whistle Politics of Race Author and legal scholar Ian Haney Lopez joins Bill to talk about dog whistle politics and how racism has changed in America since the civil rights era. The dog whistle of racism, says Ian Haney Lopez, is "the dark magic" by which middle-class voters have been seduced to vote against their own economic interests. Politicians have mastered the use of dog whistles - code words that turn Americans against each other while turning America over to plutocrats.
    And yet, "Dog whistle politics doesn't come out of animus at all." Lopez tells Moyers. "It doesn't come out of some desire to hurt minorities. It comes out of a desire to win votes. And in that sense, I want to start using the term strategic racism. It's racism as a strategy. It's cold, it's calculating, it's considered, it's the decision to achieve one's own ends, here winning votes, by stirring racial animosity."
    "And here's a hard, difficult truth. Most racists are good people," he claims. "They're not sick. They're not ruled by anger or raw emotion or hatred. They are complicated people reared in complicated societies. They're fully capable of generosity, of empathy, of real kindness. But because of the idea systems in which they're reared, they're also capable of dehumanizing others and occasionally of brutal violence."
    Ian Haney Lopez, a professor of law at the University of California, Berkeley, is a senior fellow at the policy analysis and advocacy group, Demos.
    duration 24:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#236] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    Great Decisions In Foreign Policy [#503] Turkey and the Middle East The U.S. and European powers need Turkey's support in their efforts to navigate Middle Eastern politics amid the Syrian conflict, Iran's nuclear ambitions and even the ever-present conflict between Israelis and Palestinians. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5335H] In the aftermath of the uprising in Kiev that drove Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych from power, a new interim government started to take shape this week. The new prime minister said Ukraine's future lies in the European Union and the Obama administration has begun working with the EU on a bailout for Ukraine. But Russian President Vladamir Putin's decision to launch military exercises near the Ukraine border has prompted questions on how much strength Russia might exert over the political direction of its neighbor. Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News will report on new concerns about the power struggle and the competing forces trying to reshape the former Soviet territory.
    Equal rights for gay Americans continue to be a hot-button topic across America. This week alone Attorney General Eric Holder urged state attorneys general not to defend same-sex marriage bans in their states if they believe the laws are discriminatory. In Texas a federal judge struck down the state's gay-marriage ban while in Kentucky a federal judge ordered the state to recognize same-sex marriages performed outside the state. In Arizona Republican Governor Jan Brewer vetoed a bill that would have allowed business owners to refuse service to gay individuals on religious grounds. Pete Williams of NBC News will examine the latest fronts in the battle to protect the LGBT community.
    Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post will report on the retirement of Rep. John Dingell, the longest serving member of Congress, and why after nearly 60 years of service the Michigan Democrat said, "I find serving in the House to be obnoxious."
    President Obama announced the new "My Brother's Keeper" program, a new administration initiative that partners government with businesses and philanthropic organizations to address the problems of minority youth. Michael Scherer of Time Magazine will take a closer look at how this public-private partnership will help create more opportunities for young men of color.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#118H] Bay Bridge Concerns, Beef With a Petaluma Slaughterhouse and Finding Hidden Genius
    Questions Persist Over Bay Bridge Safety
    Caltrans officials admitted for the first time at a hearing this week that concerns brought up by two local scientists over testing of bolts and rods on the new Bay Bridge span may be valid. As the longest and most expensive public works project in California history, with a $6.4 billion price tag, questions persist over leaking and corrosion from the rain and misalignment of sections of the road deck. Caltrans remains confident in the integrity of the structure. Thuy Vu moderates a discussion.

    Further Reporting:
    New Bay Bridge Span Safe Despite Problems, Officials Say

    Guests:
    Mark DeSaulnier, California State Senator, D-Concord
    Jaxon Van Derbeken, San Francisco Chronicle reporter
    Charles Piller, Sacramento Bee reporter
    Brian Maroney, chief bridge design engineer

    Local Ranchers Have a Beef with Petaluma Slaughterhouse
    A federal investigation into whether the Petaluma slaughterhouse Rancho Feeding Corp. distributed tainted beef is raising questions about food safety. It has also put the squeeze on area ranchers who are now without a local slaughterhouse for their meat. KQED News reporter Mina Kim discusses the story with Scott Shafer.

    Further Reporting:
    USDA Inspector: Supervisors Ignored Reports of Trouble at Petaluma Slaughterhouse

    Finding Hidden Genius
    President Obama launched a new initiative Thursday aimed at empowering young men of color. Among the community leaders advising the White House is Kalimah Priforce, a head mentor at The Hidden Genius Project in Oakland — a program where high school students learn computer languages and build apps to solve their everyday problems. The goal is to recruit more African-Americans into the high tech sector — one of the few parts of the economy that's booming, but also lagging in diversity. Aarti Shahani reports.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17059Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2251H] (repeat) A special documentary edition of TTC featuring the New Americans. We are in Southern California where we are going to introduce you to the new Americans and the emerging industry that is growing up around them. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3210H] TOPICS: - Russia Ramps Up; - Hagel's High-Tech Military. PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Eleanor Clift, The Daily Beast; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Guy Taylor, Washington Times. duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#133H] * David Kirkpatrick on Egypt * Eric Schmidt & Jared Cohen discuss New Digital Age Grants * David Zwirner on contemporary art * Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson * Melena Ryzik previews this weekend's Academy Awards duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#308H] Ian Haney Lopez on the Dog Whistle Politics of Race Author and legal scholar Ian Haney Lopez joins Bill to talk about dog whistle politics and how racism has changed in America since the civil rights era. The dog whistle of racism, says Ian Haney Lopez, is "the dark magic" by which middle-class voters have been seduced to vote against their own economic interests. Politicians have mastered the use of dog whistles - code words that turn Americans against each other while turning America over to plutocrats.
    And yet, "Dog whistle politics doesn't come out of animus at all." Lopez tells Moyers. "It doesn't come out of some desire to hurt minorities. It comes out of a desire to win votes. And in that sense, I want to start using the term strategic racism. It's racism as a strategy. It's cold, it's calculating, it's considered, it's the decision to achieve one's own ends, here winning votes, by stirring racial animosity."
    "And here's a hard, difficult truth. Most racists are good people," he claims. "They're not sick. They're not ruled by anger or raw emotion or hatred. They are complicated people reared in complicated societies. They're fully capable of generosity, of empathy, of real kindness. But because of the idea systems in which they're reared, they're also capable of dehumanizing others and occasionally of brutal violence."
    Ian Haney Lopez, a professor of law at the University of California, Berkeley, is a senior fellow at the policy analysis and advocacy group, Demos.
    duration 24:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1726H] SOLITARY CONFINEMENT - The debate over whether some prisoners should be locked up by themselves heated up this week as a Senate subcommittee held hearings on the practice and the New York State prison system agreed to new guidelines for the maximum length of time prisoners may be placed in solitary. Meanwhile, a growing faith-based movement says the abuse of solitary confinement violates religious values. In the US there are an estimated 80.000 prisoners now locked up in small cells, 23 hours a day, sometimes for more than 40 years. Lucky Severson reports on those who say solitary is unChristian and does more harm than good. Against them are corrections officers and others who insist solitary is necessary to protect guards and other prisoners from the most violent. Severson also interviews Bobby Dellelo who spent 5 years in solitary and talks about the anger and rage it provoked, and with Mississippi's Corrections Director Christopher Epps, who removed two-thirds of Mississippi's prisoners in solitary and saw violence go down 40%. (Previously aired on October 11, 2013)
    JOURNEY OF THE REAL PHILOMENA - At Sunday's Academy Awards, the movie "Philomena" is up for 4 Oscars, including best picture. It's based on the true story of a Catholic teenager in Ireland who became pregnant outside of marriage in the 1950s and was forced by nuns to give up her son for adoption. The movie depicts her search for him decades later, helped by a British journalist. Kim Lawton talks with the inspiration for the film, Philomena Lee and her daughter, Jane Libberton, about Philomena's journey overcoming bitterness and shame.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    Changing Seas [#502H] Sunken Stories In the Florida Keys, divers from around the country learn how to map shipwrecks and apply their skills on a mysterious 19th Century slave ship. When diving isn't possible, professional explorers use high-tech tools to scan objects buried beneath the seafloor. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#309] duration 25:41   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    To Catch A Dollar: Muhammad Yunus Banks On America This program follows Nobel Peace Prize winner Professor Yunus as he brings his unique and revolutionary microfinance program to the US. Witness the birth of Grameen America and the compelling stories of the first women borrowers; from the challenges they face to the successes they achieve. These inspiring entrepreneurs learn to rise from poverty by starting and growing their own sustainable businesses with the education, peer-support, and non-collateral microloans they receive. duration 56:50   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Microloan USA Microfinance is the supply of loans and financial services to those who do not have access to typical banking services. Kiva is a non-profit organization working to alleviate poverty by connecting people through microlending. Kiva partners with a worldwide network of local microfinance institutions. In June 2009 Kiva launched a pilot program to begin offering loans in the United States. Microloan USA follows some of the first U.S. entrepreneurs who received those microloans and shows that when it comes to changing people's lives, every dollar counts. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:30 pm
    Barefoot College This documentary from producer Bob Gliner examines a unique community based education program in rural India. Yet, while seemingly far removed from the American experience, it offers telling lessons for how the current debate around educational reform might be focused and curriculum transformed in the US. When we think about schools in the US, we generally think of places separated from the larger community, places where students go to learn. Like government schools in India, much of what is taught often seems to have little relationship to the problems students face in their day to day lives.
    In contrast, at Barefoot College, located in the Indian State of Rajasthan, education takes place off campus, in nearby impoverished villages, among all age groups, with a unique interdisciplinary curriculum intimately encompassing rural village life and the issues villagers must grapple with. Filled with stunning visuals, poignant and insightful interviews, this cross cultural documentary offers powerful insights not only in terms of addressing world poverty, but changing possible education outcomes here at home.
    duration 28:05   STEREO TVG
  • 4:00 pm
    Frontline [#3116H] Secrets of the Vatican Pope Benedict made history when he announced his resignation, becoming the first Pope to step down voluntarily in 600 years. In his wake he left a bitterly divided Vatican mired in scandals. But is Benedict's successor, Pope Francis, taming the forces that helped destroy Benedict's papacy? Is he succeeding in lifting the Church out of crisis?
    Nearly a year in the making, this film goes inside the Vatican - one of the world's most revered and mysterious institutions - to unravel the remarkable series of events that led to the resignation that shook the world. Through interviews with those at the very heart of what happened - cardinals, priests, convicted criminals, police, prosecutors and whistle-blowers - Frontline gives a first-hand account of the final days of Benedict's papacy and the current battle to set the Church on a new path under Francis.
    duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVM
  • 5:30 pm
    Burt Wolf: Travels & Traditions [#703] Vatican City Rome's Vatican City has a population of only 550 people and a landmass of just over 100 acres, which makes it the world's smallest independent state, but its influence is extraordinary. Burt takes viewers on a unique tour of the city and its history. There are some amazing images from the ceiling of St. Peter's Basilica as well as a look at St. Peter's Tomb below. We see the Sistine Chapel in close-up and visit the Vatican's 500-year-old mosaic studio. duration 25:51   STEREO TVG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#150H] Included: many indigenous people around the world are now using the latest technology to communicate with one another about their legal rights and how best to protect their environment. John Larson reports from Alaska. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5335H] In the aftermath of the uprising in Kiev that drove Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych from power, a new interim government started to take shape this week. The new prime minister said Ukraine's future lies in the European Union and the Obama administration has begun working with the EU on a bailout for Ukraine. But Russian President Vladamir Putin's decision to launch military exercises near the Ukraine border has prompted questions on how much strength Russia might exert over the political direction of its neighbor. Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News will report on new concerns about the power struggle and the competing forces trying to reshape the former Soviet territory.
    Equal rights for gay Americans continue to be a hot-button topic across America. This week alone Attorney General Eric Holder urged state attorneys general not to defend same-sex marriage bans in their states if they believe the laws are discriminatory. In Texas a federal judge struck down the state's gay-marriage ban while in Kentucky a federal judge ordered the state to recognize same-sex marriages performed outside the state. In Arizona Republican Governor Jan Brewer vetoed a bill that would have allowed business owners to refuse service to gay individuals on religious grounds. Pete Williams of NBC News will examine the latest fronts in the battle to protect the LGBT community.
    Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post will report on the retirement of Rep. John Dingell, the longest serving member of Congress, and why after nearly 60 years of service the Michigan Democrat said, "I find serving in the House to be obnoxious."
    President Obama announced the new "My Brother's Keeper" program, a new administration initiative that partners government with businesses and philanthropic organizations to address the problems of minority youth. Michael Scherer of Time Magazine will take a closer look at how this public-private partnership will help create more opportunities for young men of color.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#118H] Bay Bridge Concerns, Beef With a Petaluma Slaughterhouse and Finding Hidden Genius
    Questions Persist Over Bay Bridge Safety
    Caltrans officials admitted for the first time at a hearing this week that concerns brought up by two local scientists over testing of bolts and rods on the new Bay Bridge span may be valid. As the longest and most expensive public works project in California history, with a $6.4 billion price tag, questions persist over leaking and corrosion from the rain and misalignment of sections of the road deck. Caltrans remains confident in the integrity of the structure. Thuy Vu moderates a discussion.

    Further Reporting:
    New Bay Bridge Span Safe Despite Problems, Officials Say

    Guests:
    Mark DeSaulnier, California State Senator, D-Concord
    Jaxon Van Derbeken, San Francisco Chronicle reporter
    Charles Piller, Sacramento Bee reporter
    Brian Maroney, chief bridge design engineer

    Local Ranchers Have a Beef with Petaluma Slaughterhouse
    A federal investigation into whether the Petaluma slaughterhouse Rancho Feeding Corp. distributed tainted beef is raising questions about food safety. It has also put the squeeze on area ranchers who are now without a local slaughterhouse for their meat. KQED News reporter Mina Kim discusses the story with Scott Shafer.

    Further Reporting:
    USDA Inspector: Supervisors Ignored Reports of Trouble at Petaluma Slaughterhouse

    Finding Hidden Genius
    President Obama launched a new initiative Thursday aimed at empowering young men of color. Among the community leaders advising the White House is Kalimah Priforce, a head mentor at The Hidden Genius Project in Oakland — a program where high school students learn computer languages and build apps to solve their everyday problems. The goal is to recruit more African-Americans into the high tech sector — one of the few parts of the economy that's booming, but also lagging in diversity. Aarti Shahani reports.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:30 pm
    Changing Seas [#502H] Sunken Stories In the Florida Keys, divers from around the country learn how to map shipwrecks and apply their skills on a mysterious 19th Century slave ship. When diving isn't possible, professional explorers use high-tech tools to scan objects buried beneath the seafloor. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1218] Nigeria Adela Ucar kicks off her visit in the capital of Lagos, an anarchic and electric city with a vital night life. Next she journeys to Yoruba Land in the southwest, thought to be the site of the Queen of Sheba's tomb. Adela later meets witch doctors in Oyo, travels to the historic walled cities in the north, hunts for bargains in the ancient Kurmi Market, visits the traditional Fulani village of Chafe and encounters a rare mountain gorilla in Nigeria's eastern highlands. duration 57:53   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3107#] Ireland's Wild River The Shannon is Ireland's greatest geographical landmark and the longest river. It is both a barrier and highway -- a silver ribbon holding back the rugged landscapes of the west from the gentler plains to the east. On its journey south, the Shannon passes through a huge palette of rural landscapes; where on little-known backwaters, Ireland's wild animals and plants still thrive as almost nowhere else. For a year, wildlife cameraman Colin Stafford-Johnson lives on the river -- camping on its banks, exploring its countless tributaries in a traditional canoe, following the river from dawn to dusk through the four seasons, on a quest to film the natural history of the Shannon as it has never been seen or heard or experienced before. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4016#] Ground Zero Supertower Nova returns to Ground Zero to witness the final chapter in an epic story of engineering, innovation, and the perseverance of the human spirit: the completion of One World Trade Center, the skyscraper rising up 104 stories and 1,776 feet from the site where the Twin Towers once stood. In this update of Nova's "Engineering Ground Zero, " which featured behind-the-scenes access to the struggles of the engineers and architects working at 1 WTC and the National September 11 Memorial and Museum, Nova goes inside the construction of the new tower's final floors and the installation of its soaring, 800-ton spire and beacon. But 1 WTC isn't the only engineering marvel taking shape here: Nova goes underground to see the construction of a multi-billion dollar transit center whose sweeping, sinuous design is said to be inspired by the shape of a bird being released from a child's hand. Will the buildings be completed on time under competing business, environmental, and safety demands? And will the final product be a fitting site for national remembrance? duration 56:46   STEREO TV14
  • 11:00 pm
    John Portman: A Life of Building This program examines the work and legacy of one of the world's most daring and influential architects. Over the last 45 years, John Portman's iconic urban structures and eye-popping interiors steadily rose in 60 cities across four continents, helping redefine cityscapes in the United States and skylines in Asia. Once considered a maverick because he eschewed long-accepted industry standards, critics and leading architecture schools now fully embrace Portman's design approach, which emphasizes function, purpose and sensory experience.
    This documentary showcases Portman's buildings using dramatic time-lapse footage. It also features interviews with Portman, architecture critic Paul Goldberg (The New Yorker), Harvard professors Mack Scogin and Michael Hays, business associates Mickey Steinberg and A.J. Robinson, architect Jacque Robertson, art critic Robert Craig and Portman's children.
    duration 56:14   STEREO TVG
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#211] Drivers Wanted This program reveals the impossibly eclectic community inhabiting a taxi garage in Queens, New York. Each day, a million New Yorkers depend on the anonymous faces behind the wheels, the men who tirelessly drive the city that doesn't sleep. The film follows Eric, a new immigrant from China with a fresh start in America. With dreams of his own business, and a wife and two young sons to support, he turns to a simple job - driving a taxicab. But the easy route proves to be a Herculean struggle for Eric, who can neither speak the language of his customers nor navigate the city's 6,174 miles of streets. Along for Eric's ride, we meet classic New York personalities, including the city's oldest taxi driver, the rumored inspiration behind Danny DeVito's Louie DePalma, and a melting pot of immigrants with dreams of making it in America. duration 54:16   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, March 1, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too