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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

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KQED World: Saturday, January 25, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, January 25, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10850] Syria Talks * Ukraine Unrest * Food Inequality * Economic Inequality *Shields & Brooks * Juan Gelman duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#33018] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, what's behind the global stock market rout and is this the start of something bigger? And, with the overseas markets in focus, Morningstar's International Stock Fund Manager of the Year is our Market Monitor guest and he has a list of companies to recommend. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3124] Tavis talks with newly minted TV show host, actor Joseph Gordon-Levitt. The Don Jon star, director and screenwriter describes his latest venture, an extension of his online collaborative production company, hitRECord on TV. Tavis also talks with Grammy Award-winning singer Gloria Gaynor. The disco icon, who continues to perform, recounts inspirational stories from her book, We Will Survive. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Pioneers In Aviation: The Race to the Moon [#102] The War Years Documents the 1930s and 40s, as the clouds of war once again began to gather over Europe. With all of Western Europe a German stronghold by the summer of 1940, and England under attack, President Roosevelt calls upon the captains of his Aviation Industry-declaring that America must become "the Arsenal of Democracy. " Under Donald Douglas's leadership, and Dutch Kindelberger's guidance, the U.S. aviation industry unites to tackle the biggest production job in industrial history. With Boeing, Douglas, and North American Aviation factories working around the clock, they produce some of the most legendary aircraft in American history-giving the Allies air supremacy in both the European and Pacific theaters and, ultimately, victory in World War II. Highlights include:
    * Newly discovered footage of the Second World War's most storied military operation: the 1942 Doolittle/Tokyo Raid, flown by North American Aviation's B-25 "Mitchell bomber.
    * Newly discovered footage of Jimmy Doolittle's triumphant return to North American Aviation to share his victory with Dutch Kindelberger and the North American employees.
    * Newly recovered newsreel footage from the1940s, offering a rare glimpse inside the wartime factories at Boeing, Douglas, and North American Aviation.
    * A Lowell Thomas-narrated World War II newsreel of the legendary North American P-51 Mustang in the skies over Berlin.
    duration 56:19   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1721H] JORDAN'S SYRIAN REFUGEES - As world leaders gather in Geneva to discuss possible solutions to the Syrian crisis, one key factor is the huge number of refugees. Since March 2011, almost 2.5 million Syrians have fled the country in what the UN has called "the greatest humanitarian catastrophe of modern times." Many of the refugees - perhaps half of them - have ended up in neighboring Jordan. Kim Lawton traveled to Jordan to report on the plight of the Syrian refugees and how faith-based groups are trying to help.
    VACCINATION SCARE - Measles and whooping cough, contagious diseases once thought eradicated, are coming back in epidemic numbers nationally. Dr. John Snyder, a pediatrician in Amherst, Mass says the rising number of cases are due to parents delaying or forbidding their children's vaccinations. "These are diseases that frequently hospitalized, disfigured, permanently damaged or killed children on a regular basis," said Dr. Snyder. Deborah Potter reports on this growing public health problem and its ethical and religious implications.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1031] Great Investor Thinking Big This week's WT features a "Great Investor" who has made his name investing in small company stocks. Charlie Dreifus, the portfolio manager of the Royce Special Equity funds, explains why he now favors large companies and discusses why big is better in today's markets. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2246H] Obama's Task Force to Fight Sexual Assault * How Religion Can Be the Cause of Divorce * Gimme Shelter: "Pro-life" Movie
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), Republican Commentator Angela McGlowan, Former Prosecutor and Judge Debra Carnahan, Conservative Commentator Darlene Kennedy.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#217] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Salinger: American Masters This film features interviews with 150 subjects, including J.D. Salinger's friends, colleagues and members of his inner circle who have never spoken on the record before as well as film footage, photographs and other material that has never been seen. Additionally, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Edward Norton, John Cusack, Danny DeVito, John Guare, Martin Sheen, David Milch, Robert Towne, Tom Wolfe, E.L. Doctorow, Gore Vidal and Pulitzer Prize winners A. Scott Berg and Elizabeth Frank talk about Salinger's influence on their lives, their work and the broader culture. The film is the first work to get beyond the Catcher in the Rye author's meticulously built up wall: his childhood, painstaking work methods, marriages, private world and the secrets he left behind after his death in 2010. duration 2:26:46   STEREO TV14-L (Secondary audio: none)
  • MORNING
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#303H] From A Universe of Wonder to the Politics of Earth Bill Moyers concludes his conversation with Neil deGrasse Tyson, director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History in New York and host of the upcoming Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey premiering Sunday, March 9, 2014 on Fox.
    Beginning with a Bill Moyers essay on politicians and others who refuse to accept the reality of evolution and climate change, Tyson and Moyers discuss the dangers created by those who would deny scientific fact and block important research. "Since the Industrial Revolution and before, we have known the value of innovation of science and technology and its impact on an economy," Tyson says. "If that begins to go away, it's a different country. We'll still call ourselves America, but we won't lead the world economically. And that's a choice we are making as an elected democracy."
    Science matters, Tyson tells Moyers. "It matters that you know that an asteroid has our name on it and how it might strike us and how we might deflect it...It matters what is happening to your health. This requires a level - a base level of science literacy that I don't think we have achieved yet. You have not fully expressed your power as a voter until you have a scientific literacy in topics that matter for future political issues. Science literacy is an inoculation against charlatans who would exploit your ignorance of scientific law to then take your money from you or your opportunity from you." And that literacy is at risk, Tyson concludes. Yet the scientist's enthusiasm is undiminished. "My favorite questions are the ones, dare I use the word, yet to be divined, because there's a discovery yet to take place that will bring that question into the center of the table," Tyson declares. "I live for those questions. So that means I can't tell you what they are, because they derive from something yet to be discovered."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#231] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    Ideas Exchange [#105H] Frederico Curado and Ines Kolmsee In Sao Paulo, Brazil, Ines Kolmsee, CEO of the German chemical company SKW Metallurgie, meets Frederico Curado, CEO of Embraer, the world's third largest manufacturer of commercial aircraft. duration 26:15   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5330H] Embattled New Jersey Governor Chris Christie began his second term this week as the investigation into alleged political strong-arming by him and members of his staff widened. Over the weekend the mayor of Hoboken, New Jersey accused Christie's lieutenant governor of bullying her and threatening to withhold super storm Sandy relief funds - a charge the Christie team strongly denied. Dan Balz of The Washington Post will update us on the multiple investigations and what impact the scandal is having on Christie's political future as a possible 2016 Republican presidential contender.
    Former Virginia governor Bob McDonnell was also considered a rising star in Republican politics. But this week McDonnell and his wife were indicted on federal corruption charges for accepting gifts while in office. Pete Williams of NBC News will report on the 14-count indictment that stems from the couple's relationship with a wealthy Virginia business man and campaign donor who allegedly provided more than $140,000 in gifts and loans to McDonnell and his family.
    A special election reform commission presented its recommendations to President Obama this week on ways to make voting easier for millions of Americans. Alexis Simendinger of RealClearPolitics will examine the proposed recommendations to streamline voting nationwide which include states sharing voter registration records, the expansion of online voter registration and early ballots.
    Plus, Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News will have the latest on the major Syria peace conference underway in Switzerland and the debate over the future of President Bashar al-Assad.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#113H] The State of California Politics, Commute Friction and Ken Burns on Reciting the Gettysburg Address
    The State of California Politics
    In his annual state of the state address Gov. Jerry Brown touted California's comeback, but he also acknowledged long-term challenges, from drought to pension deficits. As election season heats up, gubernatorial candidate Neel Kashkari criticized the governor's message, while Asian-American candidates Ro Khanna and Mike Honda vie for the seat of Silicon Valley's 17th Congressional district.

    Guests:
    Scott Detrow, KQED Sacramento bureau chief
    Carla Marinucci, San Francisco Chronicle senior political writer
    Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group politics reporter

    Mustache Wars and Commute Friction
    Pink mustachioed alternatives to traditional taxis, door-to-door service you can get with a cellphone app and company shuttles run by Silicon Valley employers — all efforts to expand the way we get around. But services like Lyft and Uber and the increasing presence of private buses are also generating friction and drawing increased scrutiny of their practices and insurance policies.

    Guests:
    Jon Brooks, KQED News Fix reporter
    C. W. Nevius, San Francisco Chronicle columnist

    Further Reporting:
    How Many Ride-Share Drivers Are Hiding Status From Insurers?
    Confusion Over Insurance for 'Ride-Sharing' Drivers

    Reciting the Gettysburg Address — an Interview with Ken Burns
    It's only about two minutes long and contains fewer than 300 words, but it marks a turning point in American history: the Gettysburg Address. In his latest documentary, "The Address," filmmaker Ken Burns follows a group of young boys as they work to memorize the speech that President Lincoln gave during the Civil War. Scott Shafer hears from Burns about the making of the film and why he also asked lawmakers and public figures around the country to recite the Gettysburg Address.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17024Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2246H] Obama's Task Force to Fight Sexual Assault * How Religion Can Be the Cause of Divorce * Gimme Shelter: "Pro-life" Movie
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), Republican Commentator Angela McGlowan, Former Prosecutor and Judge Debra Carnahan, Conservative Commentator Darlene Kennedy.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3205H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#128] Clarissa Ward on Syrian peace talks * Mike Allen on the week in politics * Marines: Colonel Mike Shupp, Sergeant Adam Banotai, Captain Zach Iscol, and Captain Ryan Sparks on Fallujah * David Remnick on President Obama * Actor Frank Langella discusses playing King Lear duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#303H] From A Universe of Wonder to the Politics of Earth Bill Moyers concludes his conversation with Neil deGrasse Tyson, director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History in New York and host of the upcoming Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey premiering Sunday, March 9, 2014 on Fox.
    Beginning with a Bill Moyers essay on politicians and others who refuse to accept the reality of evolution and climate change, Tyson and Moyers discuss the dangers created by those who would deny scientific fact and block important research. "Since the Industrial Revolution and before, we have known the value of innovation of science and technology and its impact on an economy," Tyson says. "If that begins to go away, it's a different country. We'll still call ourselves America, but we won't lead the world economically. And that's a choice we are making as an elected democracy."
    Science matters, Tyson tells Moyers. "It matters that you know that an asteroid has our name on it and how it might strike us and how we might deflect it...It matters what is happening to your health. This requires a level - a base level of science literacy that I don't think we have achieved yet. You have not fully expressed your power as a voter until you have a scientific literacy in topics that matter for future political issues. Science literacy is an inoculation against charlatans who would exploit your ignorance of scientific law to then take your money from you or your opportunity from you." And that literacy is at risk, Tyson concludes. Yet the scientist's enthusiasm is undiminished. "My favorite questions are the ones, dare I use the word, yet to be divined, because there's a discovery yet to take place that will bring that question into the center of the table," Tyson declares. "I live for those questions. So that means I can't tell you what they are, because they derive from something yet to be discovered."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1721H] JORDAN'S SYRIAN REFUGEES - As world leaders gather in Geneva to discuss possible solutions to the Syrian crisis, one key factor is the huge number of refugees. Since March 2011, almost 2.5 million Syrians have fled the country in what the UN has called "the greatest humanitarian catastrophe of modern times." Many of the refugees - perhaps half of them - have ended up in neighboring Jordan. Kim Lawton traveled to Jordan to report on the plight of the Syrian refugees and how faith-based groups are trying to help.
    VACCINATION SCARE - Measles and whooping cough, contagious diseases once thought eradicated, are coming back in epidemic numbers nationally. Dr. John Snyder, a pediatrician in Amherst, Mass says the rising number of cases are due to parents delaying or forbidding their children's vaccinations. "These are diseases that frequently hospitalized, disfigured, permanently damaged or killed children on a regular basis," said Dr. Snyder. Deborah Potter reports on this growing public health problem and its ethical and religious implications.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#216H] HIV Research: Beyond the Vaccine/ Can Robots Learn? Meet the Bay Area HIV/AIDS researchers on the cutting edge of treatment and possibly a cure; and find out if robots can learn - and maybe one day clean your house. duration 25:47   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#304] duration 25:41   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Crisis In Caring: California's School Nursing Shortage If your child becomes sick or injured at school, legally there might be no one who can help them. In one Northern California school district, there is only one nurse for 14,800 students, 20 times more than the recommended national standard. A Crisis in Caring: California's School Nursing Shortage examines this growing concern by taking an in-depth look at some of the daily challenges facing school nurses, faculty, and students. The program follows a credentialed school nurse over the course of an exhausting day visiting a dozen schools. We also discover how telemedicine research from leading medical institutions is helping address this critical problem. duration 26:18   STEREO TVG
  • 2:30 pm
    Critical Condition: California's Emergency Rooms This documentary focuses on the crisis facing emergency rooms in California, and takes a look at the impact that overcrowded emergency rooms have on doctors, nurses and ultimately patients. duration 26:32   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Nova [#3711#] Building The Great Cathedrals Carved from 100 million pounds of stone, soaring effortlessly atop a spiderweb of masonry, Gothic cathedrals are marvels of human achievement and artistry. But how did medieval builders reach such spectacular heights? Consuming the labor of entire towns, sometimes taking 100 years to build, these architectural marvels were crafted from just hand tools and stone. Many now teeter on the brink of catastrophic collapse. To save them, an international team of engineers, architects, art historians and computer scientists searches the naves, bays, and bell towers for clues to how the dream of these heavenly temples on earth came true. NOVA's teams perform hands-on experiments to investigate and reveal the architectural secrets that the cathedral builders used to erect their soaring, glass-filled walls. This program reveals the hidden formulas, drawn from the pages of the Bible itself, that drove medieval builders ever upward. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    Secrets of the Tower of London Standing guard over the city of London for nearly 1000 years, this formidable fortress has been a royal castle, a prison, a place of execution and torture, an armoury and the Royal Mint. Over the centuries it has gone from a symbol of imperialism and tyranny to a national treasure- the protector of the crown jewels and many other historic British traditions. In this episode we go behind the Tower's ancient walls, opening it up to expose its secrets and stories. We'll unlock the doors to rooms you didn't know existed, talk to the people who do the jobs no one sees and reveal some surprising facts about one of England's most famous icons. duration 55:01   STEREO TVPG-V
  • 5:00 pm
    10 Buildings That Changed America The stories of ten American architectural marvels, including a state capitol building designed by Thomas Jefferson, the original indoor shopping mall, the first airport of the Jet Age, and a futuristic concert hall. You may not be familiar with all of these buildings, but they probably shaped the way you live, work, shop, and play. Host Geoffrey Baer takes a journey across America and inside these ten groundbreaking works of art and engineering. duration 56:26   STEREO TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#141H] Included: William Brangham presents a look inside a country you rarely see: Iran. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5330H] Embattled New Jersey Governor Chris Christie began his second term this week as the investigation into alleged political strong-arming by him and members of his staff widened. Over the weekend the mayor of Hoboken, New Jersey accused Christie's lieutenant governor of bullying her and threatening to withhold super storm Sandy relief funds - a charge the Christie team strongly denied. Dan Balz of The Washington Post will update us on the multiple investigations and what impact the scandal is having on Christie's political future as a possible 2016 Republican presidential contender.
    Former Virginia governor Bob McDonnell was also considered a rising star in Republican politics. But this week McDonnell and his wife were indicted on federal corruption charges for accepting gifts while in office. Pete Williams of NBC News will report on the 14-count indictment that stems from the couple's relationship with a wealthy Virginia business man and campaign donor who allegedly provided more than $140,000 in gifts and loans to McDonnell and his family.
    A special election reform commission presented its recommendations to President Obama this week on ways to make voting easier for millions of Americans. Alexis Simendinger of RealClearPolitics will examine the proposed recommendations to streamline voting nationwide which include states sharing voter registration records, the expansion of online voter registration and early ballots.
    Plus, Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News will have the latest on the major Syria peace conference underway in Switzerland and the debate over the future of President Bashar al-Assad.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#113H] The State of California Politics, Commute Friction and Ken Burns on Reciting the Gettysburg Address
    The State of California Politics
    In his annual state of the state address Gov. Jerry Brown touted California's comeback, but he also acknowledged long-term challenges, from drought to pension deficits. As election season heats up, gubernatorial candidate Neel Kashkari criticized the governor's message, while Asian-American candidates Ro Khanna and Mike Honda vie for the seat of Silicon Valley's 17th Congressional district.

    Guests:
    Scott Detrow, KQED Sacramento bureau chief
    Carla Marinucci, San Francisco Chronicle senior political writer
    Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group politics reporter

    Mustache Wars and Commute Friction
    Pink mustachioed alternatives to traditional taxis, door-to-door service you can get with a cellphone app and company shuttles run by Silicon Valley employers — all efforts to expand the way we get around. But services like Lyft and Uber and the increasing presence of private buses are also generating friction and drawing increased scrutiny of their practices and insurance policies.

    Guests:
    Jon Brooks, KQED News Fix reporter
    C. W. Nevius, San Francisco Chronicle columnist

    Further Reporting:
    How Many Ride-Share Drivers Are Hiding Status From Insurers?
    Confusion Over Insurance for 'Ride-Sharing' Drivers

    Reciting the Gettysburg Address — an Interview with Ken Burns
    It's only about two minutes long and contains fewer than 300 words, but it marks a turning point in American history: the Gettysburg Address. In his latest documentary, "The Address," filmmaker Ken Burns follows a group of young boys as they work to memorize the speech that President Lincoln gave during the Civil War. Scott Shafer hears from Burns about the making of the film and why he also asked lawmakers and public figures around the country to recite the Gettysburg Address.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#216H] HIV Research: Beyond the Vaccine/ Can Robots Learn? Meet the Bay Area HIV/AIDS researchers on the cutting edge of treatment and possibly a cure; and find out if robots can learn - and maybe one day clean your house. duration 25:47   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1213] Food Hour: Vietnam Megan starts her culinary tour of Vietnam in the Mekong Delta. Her first stop is Ho Chi Minh City where she visits the Pho Binh noodle shop, which also served as a resistance headquarters during the Vietnam War. Next it's off to Hue in central Vietnam where Megan samples the region's "Imperial" cuisine and then travels to Hanoi. She treks further north to Bac Ha, attends a traditional banquet hosted by the Flower H'mong tribe and ends her journey with a seafood feast in the scenic Ha Long Bay. duration 57:04   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3104] Meet The Coywolf The coywolf, a mixture of western coyote and eastern wolf, is a hauntingly beautiful carnivore found increasingly on the streets of North American cities. Its appearance is very recent -- within the last 90 years -- in evolutionary terms, a blip in time. The story of how it came to be begins in Canada but by no means ends there. It is a tale of how quickly adaptation and evolution can occur, especially when humans interfere. New York wildlife biologist Roland Kay is fascinated by this new hybrid, the product of a shifting gene pool that is now stabilizing. Kays tracks and photographs coywolves with remote motion sensor cameras, collects road kill and scat, and obtains tissue and bone samples from fur trappers, hunters, and others to unravel the mysteries that define this new species. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4106H] Killer Typhoon It was the strongest cyclone to hit land in recorded history. On November 8, 2013, Typhoon Haiyan - what some are calling "the perfect storm" - slammed into the Philippines, whipping the low-lying and densely-populated islands with 200mph winds and sending a 2-story-high storm surge flooding into homes, schools, and hospitals. It wiped villages off the map and devastated cities, including the hard-hit provincial capital Tacloban. Estimates count more than 5000 dead and millions homeless.
    What made Haiyan so destructive? In-depth interviews with the meteorologists charged with tracking and forecasting Pacific storms take us inside the anatomy of the typhoon, tracking its progress from its start as a low-pressure area over Micronesia to its deadly landfall and revealing why the Pacific is such fertile ground for cyclones. But that's just part of the story of why this storm was so deadly. With crews on the ground within days of the storm, Nova reveals how conditions dramatically deteriorated in the storm's aftermath, as impassable roads and shuttered gas stations paralyzed the critical relief effort, leaving lifesaving food, water, and medicine to pile up at the airport. Disaster preparedness experts and relief workers scramble to understand why the Philippines was so vulnerable when other countries,like India, have successfully slashed storm casualty counts in recent years. As climate change and sea level rise threaten millions of the world's most impoverished people with stronger, and perhaps more frequent, storms, how can we prepare for the next monster typhoon?
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 11:00 pm
    Chasing Shackleton [#103] Following the successful sea crossing from Elephant Island, Tim Jarvis must now traverse the mountains of South Georgia to complete his re-enactment of Shackleton's 'double'. But injury, illness and bad weather are against him -- the carefully picked team of eight shrinks to just three, leaving Tim, Royal Marine Baz Gray and sailor Paul Larsen to finish the job. Racing through a narrow weather window, and without a proper support team, they battle high winds, bad visibility, deadly crevasse fields and impossible climbs - even reliving Shackleton's famous glissade down the Tridents -- to finally reach their goal Stromness, and walk in to a hero's welcome. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#210] Downeast Set during an era of US post-industrialization in which numerous factories have been exported, this program focuses on Antonio Bussone's efforts to open a processing factory in rural Maine. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, January 25, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

    • KQED DT9s Over the Air: beginning Wed 7/09

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) The PSIP Info part of our Over the Air (OTA) signal for KQED DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3 dropped out of our overall signal early Wednesday 7/09. Once PSIP was restored most OTA receivers moved our signal back to the correct channel locations. However, for some viewers, it appears as if they have lost […]

    • KQED FM 88.1 translator off air Tues 6/03

      The Martinez translator for KQED-FM will be off the air all day Tuesday June 3rd. We are rebuilding the 25 year old site with all new antennas and cabling. This should only affect people listening on 88.1MHz in the Martinez/Benicia area.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too