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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, January 18, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, January 18, 2014
  • 1:30 am
    Nightly Business Report [#33013] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, inside the surprise profit warning from UPS, the world's largest package delivery company. And, our Market Monitor guest tonight says he's buying a blue chip, a value stock and shares of a high-flying tech company. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Pioneers In Aviation: The Race to the Moon [#101] The Early Years Details the birth of American aviation-from the Wright Brothers' earliest flights, through the turbulent era of the 1920s. "The Early Years" documents the captains of the Aviation Industry as young men as they design and construct planes for America's effort in World War I, begin flying the mail in the 1920s, and develop the first passenger airlines. Episode I concludes with the dramatic head-to-head rivalry between the Boeing 247 and the Douglas DC-3 for command of the newly born commercial aviation industry. Highlights include:
    * footage of the Wright Brothers' famous 1908 demonstration for the U.S. Army Signal Corps at Fort Myer, Virginia.
    * Newly recovered footage of the Boeing workshops and factories (circa 1917-1918), as they build aircraft for America's effort in World War I.
    * Newsreel footage of the 1924 U.S. Army Aviation Service "Around-the-World-Flight" in four Douglas World Cruisers.
    * Donald Douglas's moving reminiscence his experience-at the age of 16-as he witnessed Orville Wright's demonstration of the first Wright airplane.
    duration 55:55   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1720] MINISTRY TO THE POOR IN CAMDEN, NJ - Father Michael Doyle loves his parishioners and tries to help them, but he tells Lucky Severson that conditions in Camden are worse now than they were when he came here from Ireland 39 years ago. His church, Sacred Heart, has founded a school, and has helped build 250 homes. It operates a food kitchen and gives food away on Saturdays. Still, Fr. Doyle says drug wars, primarily, have caused 788 murders in Camden since 1995. But he does not despair. "My little bit in God's hands," he says, is all he can do.
    FIGHTING POVERTY - AND SUCCEEDING - IN THE THIRD WORLD - Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on one man's campaign to persuade the very poor in the slums of the Philippines to move back to the land and use scientific research to grow profitable crops, start small businesses and create new communities. Economist and activist Tony Meloto says the movement he started has transformed the lives of up to a million people. In his words, "This country does not have any excuse to remain poor."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1030] Legendary Investors' Predictions Part 2 WT features part two of its exclusive television interview with Wall Street legends Ed Hyman and Bill Miller. Where do both pros think there is the most money to be made this year? Hyman gives his "one free pass" for investors and Miller shares his two "no brainers." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2245H] * Pregnant Women Cautioned Against Drinking Water in West Virginia * "Female Viagra" Drug Rejected by FDA * UN vs. Catholic Church on Sex Abuse Scandal
    Panelists: NPR Program Host Avis Jones DeWeever, Conservative Commentator Darlene Kennedy, RH Reality Check Editor at Large Erin Matson, Republican Strategist Rina Shah, Environmental Working Group Executive Director Heather White.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#216] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Independent Lens [#1508] At Berkeley Legendary documentarian Frederick Wiseman goes back to school for this film which explores major aspects of university life at The University of California at Berkeley, the oldest and most prestigious member of a 10-campus public education system, and one of the finest research and teaching facilities in the world. duration 4:29:59   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • MORNING
  • 9:30 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#112H] Gov. Declares Drought Emergency, Tales from the Tenderloin and Is Airbnb a Threat to the Hotel Industry?
    Gov. Brown Declares Drought Emergency
    Gov. Jerry Brown declared an official drought Friday, Jan. 17. Last year was the driest year on record in California, and forecasters don't see many rain clouds on the horizon. With the snowpack meager and reservoirs low, water officials and legislators are debating what to do before it's too late.

    Guests:
    Lauren Sommer, KQED Science reporter
    Heather Cooley, Pacific Institute Water Program co-director
    Chris Brown, California Urban Water Conservation Council executive director

    Further Reporting:
    California Drought Update: Gov. Brown Declares Emergency
    Icebergs and Green Paint: Lessons from California's Big Droughts
    KQED Science: Drought Watch 2014

    A Threat to the Hotel Industry?
    Airbnb has been shaking up the travel industry, going from a scrappy upstart listing rooms for rent to an international hospitality powerhouse. It's a leader in the so-called "sharing economy." Customers — or "hosts" as the company calls them — now use the service to list more than a half-billion offerings around the world. But as the company grows, it's also facing mounting criticism from hotel owners and government officials who say the company is breaking the law and avoiding taxes. Scott Shafer hears from Airbnb co-founder and CEO Brian Chesky.

    Tales of the Tenderloin
    Special correspondent Spencer Michels explores whether change is coming to the gritty Tenderloin, home to some of San Francisco's most down and out. As tech companies like Twitter move into the nearby Mid-Market corridor and encroach on the neighborhood, Tenderloin Housing Clinic executive director Randy Shaw says its unique housing stock prevents gentrification. "Cool Gray City of Love" author Gary Kamiya goes further, suggesting in his book that the city and nonprofits headquartered in the Tenderloin have a stake in keeping it the way it is.

    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17017Z] duration 28:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2245H] * Pregnant Women Cautioned Against Drinking Water in West Virginia * "Female Viagra" Drug Rejected by FDA * UN vs. Catholic Church on Sex Abuse Scandal
    Panelists: NPR Program Host Avis Jones DeWeever, Conservative Commentator Darlene Kennedy, RH Reality Check Editor at Large Erin Matson, Republican Strategist Rina Shah, Environmental Working Group Executive Director Heather White.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3204H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#127] * David Sanger, National Security correspondent at the New York Times * Janine Gibson of The Guardian * Robert Gates * James Dyson * E.L. Doctorow on his newest novel Andrew's Brain * poet Kate Tempest duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#302H] Neil deGrasse Tyson on Science, Religion and the Universe This week, Bill Moyers continues his conversation with Neil deGrasse Tyson, Frederick P. Rose director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History in New York and host of the upcoming "Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey" on the National Geographic Channel and Fox TV.
    Tyson speculates not only on the nature of our expanding, accelerating universe and the dark energy and dark matter that may control its destiny but on the possibility of many parallel universes. "Why should nature make anything in ones?" he asks. "Everything else we ever thought was unique or special, we found more of them, so, philosophically, it's not unsettling to imagine more than one universe."
    Tyson and Moyers also discuss whether science and the Bible can be reconciled. Dr. Tyson points out that while living in a free country means enjoying the right to freedom of thought, "the problem arises if you have a religious philosophy that is not based on objective realities that you then want to put in a science classroom. Then I'm going to stand there and say, 'No, I'm not going to allow you in the science classroom. I'm not telling you what to think, I'm just telling you in the science class, you're not doing science.'"
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1720] MINISTRY TO THE POOR IN CAMDEN, NJ - Father Michael Doyle loves his parishioners and tries to help them, but he tells Lucky Severson that conditions in Camden are worse now than they were when he came here from Ireland 39 years ago. His church, Sacred Heart, has founded a school, and has helped build 250 homes. It operates a food kitchen and gives food away on Saturdays. Still, Fr. Doyle says drug wars, primarily, have caused 788 murders in Camden since 1995. But he does not despair. "My little bit in God's hands," he says, is all he can do.
    FIGHTING POVERTY - AND SUCCEEDING - IN THE THIRD WORLD - Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on one man's campaign to persuade the very poor in the slums of the Philippines to move back to the land and use scientific research to grow profitable crops, start small businesses and create new communities. Economist and activist Tony Meloto says the movement he started has transformed the lives of up to a million people. In his words, "This country does not have any excuse to remain poor."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#217H] Underwater Wilderness: Creating Marine Protected Areas/ Bio-Inspiration: Nature as Muse Dive into California's new conservation plan to protect whole ocean ecosystems; and meet UC Berkeley researchers using geckos, insects and other animals as inspiration for the design of new products. duration 25:49   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#303] duration 25:41   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Designing Healthy Communities [#101] Retrofitting Suburbia Dr. Richard Jackson M.D., M.P.H, investigates the link between our nation's obesity and Type 2 Diabetes epidemic with urban sprawl fueled by car dependency. To prevent disease through better urban planning, Boulder,Colorado redesigns the city to make bicycles a safe alternative transportation. Two Denver suburbs transform dead malls into mixed use and public transit-centered communities. An abandoned mall in Georgia gains new life as a K-8th grade charter school. And two former grad students from Georgia Tech, mentored by their professor, create visionary projects that are forever changing the face of Atlanta. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Designing Healthy Communities [#102] Rebuilding Places of the Heart When U.S. industry and manufacturing collapsed or went elsewhere, cities like Elgin, IL and Syracuse, NY (like many communities in the United States) were left with the task of redefining themselves for a new paradigm. Leading the way to a greener, more sustainable Elgin is a group of high school students. Despite many innovative programs to get Syracuse back on its feet, the city struggles with the larger problem of Lake Onondaga, the most polluted lake in our nation. Local Native American Onondaga tribal leader Oren Lyons serves as conscience in the movement to clean the industrially-polluted lake. And in Riverside California, 16-year old science prodigy, Otana Jakpor, has a personal reason for her war against air pollution. She takes her battle all the way to the White House. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 4:00 pm
    Designing Healthy Communities [#103] Social Policy In Concrete Dr. Jackson believes it is every citizen's right to live in a clean, healthy environment. This isn't the case for many low-income neighborhoods, built near big transportation hubs and former industrial cities like Oakland, CA and Detroit, Michigan. We meet a morbidly obese grandmother struggling to raise 7 grandchildren, all of whom have asthma from living near the Port of Oakland. Parts of the city of Detroit resemble abandoned war zones. Yet hope blossoms in both. Health officials, community activists and a new breed of young Urban Pioneers are working to fix their cities by transforming urban wilderness and food deserts into inspirational new models for other troubled, urban communities. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 pm
    Designing Healthy Communities [#104] Searching for Shangri-La On the last Episode, Dr. Jackson searches past and present America for healthy, sustainable communities of all sizes and shapes that can serve as models for the rest of our nation. His journey takes him to Roseto, PA, Prairie Crossing, IL New York City, Charleston, SC and the forgotten 1960's urban renewal project of Lafayette Park in Detroit, Michigan, the brainchild of 4 men, including visionary architect, Mies van der Rohe. Also included are walkability expert, Dan Burden, and the 1960s, humorous but insightful, candid camera- style studies of people in public spaces by William Holly White, described by Fred Kent of Project for Public Spaces. duration 56:48   STEREO TVG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#139H] In November, India launched a mission to Mars in an attempt to become the 4th nation and 1st Asian country to reach the red planet. The Indian Mars Orbiter Mission is a point of immense national pride and will be completed for just over $70 million, a tiny fraction of the cost spent by NASA on similar programs. But is spending any resources on a mission to Mars wise when hundreds of millions of Indians struggle to meet basic needs? Hari Sreenivasan reports from Bangalore, India. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5329H] * On Friday, President Obama will announce his recommendations to revamp government surveillance practices. He is expected to propose stricter oversight of the National Security Agency's domestic operations and the NSA surveillance of foreign allied leaders. Tom Gjelten of NPR reports on the president's plan to reform the NSA operations to better protect Americans' privacy while still being mindful of national security concerns.
    * A congressional report on the 2012 attack on the US consulate in Benghazi, Libya, that left 4 Americans dead, concluded it was "likely preventable." Jim Sciutto of CNN has analysis of the newly-declassified documents that claim the State Department failed to increase security despite multiple warnings about possible terrorist attacks around the 9/11 anniversary. * More than 2 million people have enrolled in private health insurance plans through the Affordable Care Act's federal and state marketplaces. While many of the initial technical problems seem to have been resolved, the political fallout continues. Jeff Zeleny of ABC News explains why Democrats facing re-election in 2014 seem most concerned about the after-effects from the flawed rollout of the new health care law.
    * Plus, Joan Biskupic of Reuters reports on 2 cases argued before the Supreme Court this week dealing with restrictions on abortion protesters and presidential recess appointments.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#112H] Gov. Declares Drought Emergency, Tales from the Tenderloin and Is Airbnb a Threat to the Hotel Industry?
    Gov. Brown Declares Drought Emergency
    Gov. Jerry Brown declared an official drought Friday, Jan. 17. Last year was the driest year on record in California, and forecasters don't see many rain clouds on the horizon. With the snowpack meager and reservoirs low, water officials and legislators are debating what to do before it's too late.

    Guests:
    Lauren Sommer, KQED Science reporter
    Heather Cooley, Pacific Institute Water Program co-director
    Chris Brown, California Urban Water Conservation Council executive director

    Further Reporting:
    California Drought Update: Gov. Brown Declares Emergency
    Icebergs and Green Paint: Lessons from California's Big Droughts
    KQED Science: Drought Watch 2014

    A Threat to the Hotel Industry?
    Airbnb has been shaking up the travel industry, going from a scrappy upstart listing rooms for rent to an international hospitality powerhouse. It's a leader in the so-called "sharing economy." Customers — or "hosts" as the company calls them — now use the service to list more than a half-billion offerings around the world. But as the company grows, it's also facing mounting criticism from hotel owners and government officials who say the company is breaking the law and avoiding taxes. Scott Shafer hears from Airbnb co-founder and CEO Brian Chesky.

    Tales of the Tenderloin
    Special correspondent Spencer Michels explores whether change is coming to the gritty Tenderloin, home to some of San Francisco's most down and out. As tech companies like Twitter move into the nearby Mid-Market corridor and encroach on the neighborhood, Tenderloin Housing Clinic executive director Randy Shaw says its unique housing stock prevents gentrification. "Cool Gray City of Love" author Gary Kamiya goes further, suggesting in his book that the city and nonprofits headquartered in the Tenderloin have a stake in keeping it the way it is.

    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#217H] Underwater Wilderness: Creating Marine Protected Areas/ Bio-Inspiration: Nature as Muse Dive into California's new conservation plan to protect whole ocean ecosystems; and meet UC Berkeley researchers using geckos, insects and other animals as inspiration for the design of new products. duration 25:49   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1212] Honduras & El Salvador Brianna explores Honduras and El Salvador, two of Central America's most rewarding destinations. In Honduras, she swims with dolphins, spends the day at a banana plantation, visits the Mayan ruins of Copan and learns how to roll cigars in Santa Rosa de Copan. Next she heads to El Salvador, where she climbs the Izalco volcano, treks through waterfalls in El Imposible National Park, visits with a former guerrilla commander at the Guazapa volcano, enjoys a rodeo fiesta in San Luis del Carmen and ascends the still-active Santa Ana volcano, the highest in the country. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2906] Fortress of the Bears Part of the massive Tongass National Forest, Admiralty Island in southeast Alaska supports the largest concentration of bears anywhere in the world. Sustained by a wealth of salmon streams, isolated and protected by their environment, some 1,700 Alaskan brown bears are part of a unique circle of life that has played out here for centuries. Beginning in August, millions of salmon -- pink and chum, coho and sockeye -- return to the island to spawn, providing a feast for the bears, eagles, orcas, sea lions and even the trees themselves. As long as the salmon continue to arrive, all is well. But this year, for the first time, the salmon fail to arrive and the bears get a bitter taste of what the future may hold. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4102#] Zeppelin Terror Attack Nova reveals the untold story of the biggest flying machines ever made: Germany's war zeppelins, which rained down death on British towns for two and a half terrifying years during World War I. In hands-on experiments, Nova uncovers how the zeppelins were built and flown, and goes inside the desperate scramble to take down the zeppelins and make the streets of Britain safe again. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 11:00 pm
    Chasing Shackleton [#102] Battered by storms and blinded by thick fog, world record speed sailor and renowned racing skipper Paul Larsen attempts to navigate the notorious Southern Ocean using only a sextant and compass. And extreme filmmaker Ed Wardle risks all to pick up where Shackleton's cameraman left off and record for the first time, how Shackleton and his men managed to survive against all the odds. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#208] My Brooklyn/Fate of a Salesman My Brooklyn is a documentary about Director Kelly Anderson's personal journey, as a Brooklyn "gentrifier," to understand the forces reshaping her neighborhood along lines of race and class. The film asks how to heal the deep racial wounds embedded in our urban development patterns, and how citizens can become active in restoring democracy to a broken planning process.
    Fate of a Salesman is an intimate portrait of a way of life on the verge of disappearing. In its 60th year of business, Men's Fashion Center in Washington, DC has come to represent identity, legacy and redemption for salesmen Willie and Steve and owner Jerry. But business has crawled to a halt in the face of a tough economy and changing neighborhood, pushing the store to the verge of closure. Set amidst racks of pin-striped suits and feathered hats, the clothing of a bygone era, the men struggle to redefine themselves as the place with which they have long identified begins to vanish.
    duration 1:56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, January 18, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED DT9s Over the Air: beginning Wed 7/09

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) The PSIP Info part of our Over the Air (OTA) signal for KQED DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3 dropped out of our overall signal early Wednesday 7/09. Once PSIP was restored most OTA receivers moved our signal back to the correct channel locations. However, for some viewers, it appears as if they have lost […]

    • KQED FM 88.1 translator off air Tues 6/03

      The Martinez translator for KQED-FM will be off the air all day Tuesday June 3rd. We are rebuilding the 25 year old site with all new antennas and cabling. This should only affect people listening on 88.1MHz in the Martinez/Benicia area.

    • KQET planned overnight outage: early Tues 5/13

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET’s Over The Air (OTA) signal will shut down late May 12/early Tues 5/13 shortly after midnight to allow for extensive electrical maintenance work at the transmitter. Engineers will do their best to complete the work by 6am Tuesday morning. This will affect OTA viewers of the DT25 channels, and signal providers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too