Donate

TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, January 4, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, January 4, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10835] Winter Storm * Boeing Machinists * Latino Seniors * Shields and Brooks duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#33003] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the automakers didn't sell as many cars in December as many had hoped and now some are wondering if the slowing pace of sales will continue in the months ahead. And, as equities surge, corporate pension funds are the healthiest they've been in six years. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3109] (repeat) Tavis talks with one of the stars of the feature, The Best Man Holiday, Nia Long. The versatile actress discusses her role in the romantic comedy sequel to the 1999 hit movie, The Best Man. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Refuge: Stories of the Selfhelp Home In the late 1930s - with the violence and destruction of Kristallnacht foreshadowing the devastation of European Jewry - a determined group of German-Jewish refugees left behind well-established lives and most of their possessions and immigrated to Chicago. There, they set out to create a supportive community for themselves and other German, Austrian and Czech Jews fleeing Nazi persecution. Eventually, they founded Selfhelp, an organization providing temporary housing, food, English classes, job placement and, in 1950, a residential home for elderly emigres and Holocaust survivors. REFUGE: STORIES OF THE SELFHELP HOME features the deeply personal stories of these residents, who spent the war years surviving by any means necessary. Vividly, they reflect on these experiences - of separations, deportations, selections and life-and-death decisions. REFUGE moves back and forth seamlessly between these often heartbreaking stories and examines how the trajectories of residents and founders diverged during the war and came together again around Selfhelp. duration 58:00   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1718] The Likely Top Religion and Ethics Stories of 2014 A look ahead at the likely top religion and ethics stories of 2014 - Washington Post Columnist E.J. Dionne, Kevin Eckstrom, Editor-in-Chief of Religion News Service and Kim Lawton, Managing Editor of RENW join host Bob Abernethy to anticipate the likely top religion and ethics stories to come in 2014. Will Pope Francis' worldwide popularity begin to wane? What will the Supreme Court say about prayer before public meetings and the contraception mandate in the Affordable Care Act? What story is already looming that might turn into a surprise? duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1028] Great Value Investors This week features a rare get-together with two value investors who have outstanding track records: Weitz Funds' Wally Weitz and investment advisor Tom Russo discuss the different places each is finding value, and why Warren Buffet is their investment hero. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2220H] Efforts to save the lives of women and children by increasing access to maternal and child care. This special documentary includes interviews with Melinda Gates, Co-founder of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation; Global Health Corps CEO Barbara Bush; Population Services International Global Ambassador Mandy Moore; and many more women on their work. (repeat) duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asia Insight [#119] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Global Voices [#526] Land Rush How do you feed the world? 75% of Mali's population are farmers, but rich, land-hungry nations like China and Saudi Arabia are leasing Mali's land in order to turn large areas into agribusiness farms. Many Malian peasants do not welcome these efforts, seeing them as yet another manifestation of imperialism. As Mali experiences a military coup, the developers are scared off ? but can Mali's farmers combat food shortages and escape poverty on their own terms? duration 56:46   STEREO
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Global Voices [#527] Education Education What does an education get you? In ancient times in China, education was the only way out of poverty, in recent times it has been the best way. China's economic boom and talk of the merits of hard work have created an expectation that to study is to escape poverty. But these days China's higher education system only leads to jobs for a few, educating a new generation to unemployment and despair. duration 56:46   STEREO
  • 7:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#252H] State of Conflict: North Carolina First it was Wisconsin. Now it's North Carolina that is redefining the term "battleground state." On one side: a right wing government enacting laws that are changing the face of the state. On the other: citizen protesters who are fighting back against what they fear is a radical takeover. This crucible of conflict reflects how the battle for control of American politics is likely to be fought for the foreseeable future: not in Washington, DC, but state by state.
    This week Moyers offers a documentary report from the state that votes both blue and red and sometimes purple (Romney carried it by a whisker in 2012, Obama by an eyelash in 2008). Now, however, Republicans hold the Governor's mansion and both houses of the legislature, and they are steering North Carolina far to the right: slashing taxes on corporations and the wealthy, providing vouchers to private schools, cutting unemployment benefits, refusing to expand Medicaid, and rolling back electoral reforms, including voting rights. At the heart of this conservative onslaught sits a businessman who is so wealthy and powerful that he is frequently described as the state's own "Koch brother." Art Pope, whose family fortune was made via a chain of discount stores, has poured tens of millions of dollars into a network of foundations and think tanks that advocate a wide range of conservative causes. Pope insists that he is simply "educating the voters on the issues so that they can hear both side of the issues, not just one side." The New Yorker's Jane Mayer, the first national journalist to investigate Pope's dealings in North Carolina, begs to differ. She says Art Pope has shown "that one really wealthy individual can almost rule."
    Pope's most ardent opponent is the Reverend William Barber, head of the state chapter of the NAACP, who says Pope is the powerhouse behind "an avalanche of extremist policies that threaten health care, that threaten education, [and] that threaten the poor." Barber's opposition to the Pope alliance became a catalyst for the protest movement that became known around the country as "Moral Mondays."
    The documentary features several of the Moral Mondays protesters who were arrested for acts of civil disobedience during protests at the state legislature. They include a college student who says she's willing to go to jail so that she can "have a future," a doctor who claims the Republicans' refusal to expand Medicaid would "do great damage to my patients," and a 92-year-old African American woman who remembers the indignities of enforced segregation under Jim Crow. Declaring she is now fighting the same old battle on a different turf, she proclaims before a crowd of Moral Mondays protesters, "I am fed up and fired up! "
    The film is more than a local story. It offers a case study of what may be the direction of American politics for years, perhaps decades, to come. It is a collaboration between Okapi Productions, LLC and Schumann Media Center, Inc., headed by Bill Moyers, which supports independent journalism and media programs to advance public understanding of the critical issues facing democracy.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#228] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    Ideas Exchange [#102H] Sir Martin Sorrell and Sunil Mittal Sir Martin Sorrell, chief executive of the advertising group WPP, meets Sunil Mittal, the founder, chairman and group chief executive of Bharti Enterprises. They discuss their careers and their brands. duration 26:14   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5327H] Economic indicators suggest a number of positive signs going into the New Year. Job creation picked up in the last quarter of 2013 and unemployment hit a new low. The stock market started 2014 at record highs while the housing market is expected to continue its slow and steady recovery. But for more than a million long-term unemployed, there is little to celebrate after lawmakers failed to agree on an extension of benefits.
    Congress ended its 2013 session on a note of compromise passing a bipartisan budget agreement. Will 2014 see similar consensus on Capitol Hill over issues like the debt ceiling, and immigration reform, especially in the wake of upcoming mid-term elections that could change who controls Congress for the president's final two years.
    During his final news conference of last year, President Obama said 2014 would be "a breakthrough year for America." But as the president enters his sixth year in office, he faces global challenges beyond the lingering questions about NSA surveillance practices. There are still ongoing negotiations with Iran over its nuclear capabilities, plus the planned exit of US troops from Afghanistan.
    This week we look ahead to the 2014 priorities and challenges for the White House and Congress with Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times, Alexis Simendinger of RealClearPolitics.com, Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report, and Jeff Zeleny of ABC News.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#110H] Remembering 2013
    Remembering 2013
    Will 2013 go down in history as the year of Gov. Jerry Brown rising and the California comeback? It was also the year of the government shutdown and the bumpy rollout of the Affordable Care Act. The Bay Area celebrated the opening of the new eastern span of the Bay Bridge and the America's Cup victory by Team Oracle. There were two BART strikes that crippled the commute, and the devastating Rim Fire near Yosemite National Park. A look back at some of the memorable moments of the past year, as well as a look ahead to what might be coming up in 2014.

    Guests:
    Carla Marinucci, San Francisco Chronicle
    Paul Rogers, San Jose Mercury News and KQED Science
    Joshua Johnson, KQED News

    Further Reporting:
    News Pix: The Best Images of 2013
    Our Top Science Stories from 2013

    Silicon Valley De-Bug Founder Raj Jayadev
    KQED's Scott Shafer gets an alternative view of 2013 by Silicon Valley De-Bug founder Raj Jayadev. De-Bug is a hybrid that combines media and community organizing, and is also an entrepreneurial collective and has become a nationally recognized organization while establishing itself as a trusted local platform for communities in the South Bay region since 2001. Some of its initiatives include criminal justice and prison reform, youth, immigration reform, workers and housing reform.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17003Z] Documentary Special - Our World: China's Love Hunters duration 28:03   STEREO
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2243H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3202H] Topics: Clemency for Snowden?; High times in Colorado. PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Eleanor Clift, The Daily Beast; Guy Taylor, Washington Times; Paul Glastris, Washington Monthly. duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#125] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#252H] State of Conflict: North Carolina First it was Wisconsin. Now it's North Carolina that is redefining the term "battleground state." On one side: a right wing government enacting laws that are changing the face of the state. On the other: citizen protesters who are fighting back against what they fear is a radical takeover. This crucible of conflict reflects how the battle for control of American politics is likely to be fought for the foreseeable future: not in Washington, DC, but state by state.
    This week Moyers offers a documentary report from the state that votes both blue and red and sometimes purple (Romney carried it by a whisker in 2012, Obama by an eyelash in 2008). Now, however, Republicans hold the Governor's mansion and both houses of the legislature, and they are steering North Carolina far to the right: slashing taxes on corporations and the wealthy, providing vouchers to private schools, cutting unemployment benefits, refusing to expand Medicaid, and rolling back electoral reforms, including voting rights. At the heart of this conservative onslaught sits a businessman who is so wealthy and powerful that he is frequently described as the state's own "Koch brother." Art Pope, whose family fortune was made via a chain of discount stores, has poured tens of millions of dollars into a network of foundations and think tanks that advocate a wide range of conservative causes. Pope insists that he is simply "educating the voters on the issues so that they can hear both side of the issues, not just one side." The New Yorker's Jane Mayer, the first national journalist to investigate Pope's dealings in North Carolina, begs to differ. She says Art Pope has shown "that one really wealthy individual can almost rule."
    Pope's most ardent opponent is the Reverend William Barber, head of the state chapter of the NAACP, who says Pope is the powerhouse behind "an avalanche of extremist policies that threaten health care, that threaten education, [and] that threaten the poor." Barber's opposition to the Pope alliance became a catalyst for the protest movement that became known around the country as "Moral Mondays."
    The documentary features several of the Moral Mondays protesters who were arrested for acts of civil disobedience during protests at the state legislature. They include a college student who says she's willing to go to jail so that she can "have a future," a doctor who claims the Republicans' refusal to expand Medicaid would "do great damage to my patients," and a 92-year-old African American woman who remembers the indignities of enforced segregation under Jim Crow. Declaring she is now fighting the same old battle on a different turf, she proclaims before a crowd of Moral Mondays protesters, "I am fed up and fired up! "
    The film is more than a local story. It offers a case study of what may be the direction of American politics for years, perhaps decades, to come. It is a collaboration between Okapi Productions, LLC and Schumann Media Center, Inc., headed by Bill Moyers, which supports independent journalism and media programs to advance public understanding of the critical issues facing democracy.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    Changing Seas [#501H] Coral Hybrids While Elkhorn and Staghorn corals have undergone a drastic decline in the Caribbean, their hybrid, "Fused Staghorn," is increasing in numbers in parts of the region. One scientist is studying the animals in Belize to see if the hybrid might be better equipped to deal with environmental stressors than its parents. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#301] duration 25:41   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Saving Songbirds Travel from New England to Costa Rica and Jamaica to meet some of the most colorful and melodic migratory birds and the people who are dedicated to saving them. Meet researchers who employ creative means to assess the health of bird populations, and grassroots efforts by Vermont school children to help re-forest the mountains of Costa Rica. Also featured are scientists in Cape May, NJ, who track large flocks of migrating songbirds in total darkness, and Costa Rican coffee farmers practicing bird-friendly methods of cultivation and processing. Avid bird watchers Samuel Habib and Andrea LeBlanc show the personal side of why the survival of songbirds is so important to us all. duration 56:49   TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Human Spark [#101H] Becoming Us In the caves and rock shelters of the Dordogne region of France, Alan Alda witnesses the spectacular paintings and carvings that date back some 30,000 years, artwork that archeologists once thought to be the first record of people with minds like our own. When this art was created, Europe had already been peopled for hundreds of thousands of years - and thousands of lifetimes - by humans we call Neanderthals. Alan discovers, from visits to sites where Neanderthals once lived, that Neanderthals were tenacious and resourceful. But they appear to have lived in and of the moment; certainly they produced no art, and employed a stone tool technology that changed little over millennia. The people who painted the caves, our ancestors, were strikingly different, possessed of what we are calling the Human Spark, capable not only of art but of innovative technology and symbolic communication. The questions Alan explores: Where and when did the Human Spark first ignite? In these caves, as archeologists have long believed? Or at a much earlier time - and on another continent?
    Finding the answer involves scanning Neanderthal teeth in a giant particle accelerator to learn about their childhood; reading Neanderthal's genetic code in DNA extracted from 50,000 year-old bones; and discovering and reconstructing the weaponry that made possible - and relatively safe - the hunting of large animals in East Africa. We will also unearth the beads that are the first evidence of our species' fascination with social status - and a powerful new means of long-distance communication; recover from the teeth and bones of both Neanderthals and our ancestors evidence of what they ate; and explore the Great Rift Valley in East Africa with archeologists who believe that it was there that the Human Spark first began to glimmer, tens of thousands of years before it burst into flame in Europe.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    Human Spark [#102H] So Human, So Chimp We are separated from our nearest relatives, the chimpanzees, by only one or two percent of our genes - but also by some 6 million years of going our different evolutionary ways. So when we meet the eyes of a chimp we are reminded uncannily - and perhaps a little uneasily - of ourselves. But we are also aware that behind those eyes is a mind very different from our own. Alan Alda sets out to explore that difference, and quickly finds that the scientists studying chimps and other non-human primates are themselves separated into opposing worldviews. One camp emphasizes the continuity between us - seeing everything we believe to be uniquely human present in at least a rudimentary form in our ape and even monkey cousins. The other camp sees a sharp discontinuity in our abilities, admiring chimps for their superb adaptation to their (rapidly disappearing) forest environment, but also granting to human minds a special status that has enabled us to conquer the planet (and cause those forests to disappear).
    In visiting with chimps and those who study them, Alan challenges the arguments of both sides in the debate. Yes, chimps exhibit empathy for others in their group; is that the same empathy humans show for victims of a far off natural disaster? Chimps have cultural practices they pass on within their social group; are those cultures the same as the cultures that can separate humans into "us" and "them?" Chimps can easily tell the difference between heavy and light, but do they have a concept of heavy and light? Chimps use tools, and can be taught that symbols represent objects; does that mean they have technology and language? Chimps can cooperate on tasks that reward them with food. Is that the same cooperation humans employ to build a skyscraper or rescue the victims of an earthquake or even agree to take a walk together? Chimps and monkeys both seem able to judge the intentions of others. Does that mean they wonder, and worry, about who is saying what about whom, and why? And what about that one or two percent change in our DNA? Do those figures mask not a tiny difference but an evolutionary chasm? In short, how much of the Human Spark flared only since we evolved away from our non-human primate cousins, and how much was already there at the parting of the ways?
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 5:00 pm
    Human Spark [#103] Brain Matters In the futuristic setting of the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging at the University of California, Los Angeles, Alan gets a highly detailed scan of his brain - which for a man in his early 70s, is in remarkably good shape. This image, projected on a huge curved screen behind him, is the starting point for a search within his brain - as well as the brains of others - for the essential components of the Human Spark; a search informed by what the previous two programs have revealed about the attributes that make humans unique.
    One of those faculties is language. Through both functional brain scans and high-tech EEGs, we probe for the language centers within Alan's brain, including those employed to recognize mistakes in grammar - and discover the way language allows us to manipulate symbols in our minds. He also untangles the complex story of a gene called FOXP2, visiting researchers in England and Germany as well as the US who are using FOXP2 as an exciting new window into how language may have evolved. Other functional scans of Alan's brain reveal a fascinating link between two of humans' most characteristic abilities - language and the use of tools.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#135H] Included: a profile of The Harmony Project, a music program for inner city kids in LA, that partners with a neurobiologist to study the impact of music training on the learning skills of poor children. hat, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5327H] Economic indicators suggest a number of positive signs going into the New Year. Job creation picked up in the last quarter of 2013 and unemployment hit a new low. The stock market started 2014 at record highs while the housing market is expected to continue its slow and steady recovery. But for more than a million long-term unemployed, there is little to celebrate after lawmakers failed to agree on an extension of benefits.
    Congress ended its 2013 session on a note of compromise passing a bipartisan budget agreement. Will 2014 see similar consensus on Capitol Hill over issues like the debt ceiling, and immigration reform, especially in the wake of upcoming mid-term elections that could change who controls Congress for the president's final two years.
    During his final news conference of last year, President Obama said 2014 would be "a breakthrough year for America." But as the president enters his sixth year in office, he faces global challenges beyond the lingering questions about NSA surveillance practices. There are still ongoing negotiations with Iran over its nuclear capabilities, plus the planned exit of US troops from Afghanistan.
    This week we look ahead to the 2014 priorities and challenges for the White House and Congress with Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times, Alexis Simendinger of RealClearPolitics.com, Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report, and Jeff Zeleny of ABC News.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#110H] Remembering 2013
    Remembering 2013
    Will 2013 go down in history as the year of Gov. Jerry Brown rising and the California comeback? It was also the year of the government shutdown and the bumpy rollout of the Affordable Care Act. The Bay Area celebrated the opening of the new eastern span of the Bay Bridge and the America's Cup victory by Team Oracle. There were two BART strikes that crippled the commute, and the devastating Rim Fire near Yosemite National Park. A look back at some of the memorable moments of the past year, as well as a look ahead to what might be coming up in 2014.

    Guests:
    Carla Marinucci, San Francisco Chronicle
    Paul Rogers, San Jose Mercury News and KQED Science
    Joshua Johnson, KQED News

    Further Reporting:
    News Pix: The Best Images of 2013
    Our Top Science Stories from 2013

    Silicon Valley De-Bug Founder Raj Jayadev
    KQED's Scott Shafer gets an alternative view of 2013 by Silicon Valley De-Bug founder Raj Jayadev. De-Bug is a hybrid that combines media and community organizing, and is also an entrepreneurial collective and has become a nationally recognized organization while establishing itself as a trusted local platform for communities in the South Bay region since 2001. Some of its initiatives include criminal justice and prison reform, youth, immigration reform, workers and housing reform.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:30 pm
    Changing Seas [#501H] Coral Hybrids While Elkhorn and Staghorn corals have undergone a drastic decline in the Caribbean, their hybrid, "Fused Staghorn," is increasing in numbers in parts of the region. One scientist is studying the animals in Belize to see if the hybrid might be better equipped to deal with environmental stressors than its parents. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1210] Bangladesh Holly begins her trip in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh and the seventh largest city in the world. She then travels to Sunderban National Park for an encounter with Bengal tigers and a trek deep into the forest to find honey. Along the way, Holly visits a "floating" school, charms snakes, harvests tea in the hills of Sylhet, visits the ship-breaking yards in Chittagong and relaxes in the seaside resort of Cox's Bazaar near the Myanmar border. duration 57:16   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2705(] Hummingbirds: Magic in the Air Hummingbirds represent one of nature's most interesting paradoxes -- they are the tiniest of birds, yet they qualify as some of the toughest and most energetic creatures on the planet. New knowledge gained from scientists currently making great breakthroughs in hummingbird biology makes this a perfect time to focus on these shimmering, flashing jewels of the natural world. Stunningly beautiful high-definition, high speed footage of hummingbirds in the wild combined with high-tech presentations of their remarkable abilities help us to understand the world of hummingbirds as we never have before. duration 1:29:30   SRND51 TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Brains On Trial with Alan Alda [#101H] Determining Guilt On trial is Jimmy Moran, who at 18 took part in a store robbery during which the storeowner's wife was shot and grievously injured. Presiding is distinguished US District Judge Jed S. Rakoff, who has a longstanding interest in neuroscience and its conceivable effect on criminal law. The trial raises common questions: Is a witness lying? How reliable is eyewitness testimony? What's the best way to avoid a biased jury? How well can the defendant's intentions be judged? Alan Alda explores how brain-scanning technology is providing insights into these questions and discusses the implications of neuroscience entering the courtroom. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-V
  • 11:00 pm
    Brains On Trial with Alan Alda [#102H] Deciding Punishment Jimmy Moran is found guilty of badly injuring a woman during a robbery. In the sentencing phase of the trial, Judge Rakoff hears arguments from the court-appointed psychiatrist, the attorneys, the victim's husband and Jimmy himself. Meanwhile, Alan Alda discovers how neuroscience is already influencing the sentencing of defendants - especially young defendants - by revealing how the immature teenage brain is vulnerable to foolish and impulsive acts. Before Judge Rakoff pronounces Jimmy's sentence, Alda meets a judge who has volunteered to have his own brain probed as he makes sentencing decisions. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-V
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#204] The New Public This program follows the lives of the ambitious educators and lively students of Bed Stuy's new Brooklyn Community Arts and Media High School (BCAM) over the course of the founding year, with the filmmakers returning three years later to again document the senior year of that first graduating class. Beginning in August 2006, just days before BCAM will open its doors for the first time. Dr. James O'Brien, former D.J. and point guard turned first-time principal, and his faculty of eight, take to the streets in Bed Stuy, Brooklyn to recruit students. Their enthusiasm is infectious and enticing: strong support for the individual student, a rigorous academic curriculum and unconventional arts electives taught by local artists. While at first running smoothly, as months go by, conflicts arise, and by the end of freshman year, the school's idealistic vision is addressing some issues, but aggravating others. Flash-forward to September 2010, the first day of senior year, the school is complete with 4 grades and 450 students, with a faculty that has grown from 8 to 50. Of the 104 students in their founding class, almost half have transferred or dropped out, leaving a senior class of 60 and only 30 on track to graduate. BCAM has made major adjustments, most notably, more disciplinary structure and no arts electives for seniors. What happens in the 4 years is both compelling and frustrating, and it's what makes The New Public a critical document of the complexities, frustrations and personal dramas that put public education at the center of national debate. What makes a kid or a school succeed are a series of complicated, interconnected dynamics, including, a re-evaluation of how we define success. duration 1:56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, January 4, 2014

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too