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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus. Read more about this transition on our FAQ page.

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KQED World: Sunday, December 29, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, December 29, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#206] Plagues and Pleasures on the Salton Sea Once known as the California Riviera, the Salton Sea is now called one of America's worst ecological disasters: a fetid, stagnant, salty lake, that coughs up dead fish and birds by the thousands in frequent die-offs that occur. However, amongst the ruins of this man-made mistake, a few remaining eccentrics (a roadside nudist, a religious folk artist, a Hungarian revolutionary, and real estate speculators) struggle to keep a remodeled version of the original Salton Sea dream alive. Accidentally created by an engineering error in 1905, reworked in the 50's as a world class vacation destination for the rich and famous, suddenly abandoned after a series of hurricanes, floods, and fish die-offs, and finally almost saved by Congressman Sonny Bono, the Salton Sea has a bittersweet past. The film shares these people's stories and their difficulties in keeping their unique community alive, as the nearby cities of Los Angeles and San Diego attempt to take the agricultural water run-off that barely sustains the Salton Sea. While covering the historical, economic, political, and environmental issues that face the Sea, this program offers an offbeat portrait of the peculiar and individualistic people who populate its shores. It is an epic western tale of fantastic real estate ventures and failed boomtowns, inner-city gangs fleeing to white small town America, and the subjective notion of success and failure amidst the ruins of the past. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Shakespeare Lost, Shakespeare Found This program tells the fascinating story behind the bold 20-year project by world-renowned Shakespeare scholar Dr. Gary Taylor to recreate The History of Cardenio (1613), a lost work written by William Shakespeare and his early collaborator, John Fletcher. Despite its impressive pedigree, The History of Cardenio remains shrouded in mystery because the 400-year-old play did not survive the ravages of time. Dr. Taylor resurrected the original manuscript by de-constructing Double Falsehood, Lewis Theobald's 1727 adaptation of The History of Cardenio. This process included painstaking research of centuries-old texts and cutting-edge computer microanalysis of each author's writing styles. The documentary culminates with the first full-scale production of the work at the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus, where academics from around the world comment on the play's authenticity, casting choices, plot additions and controversial ending. duration 24:56   STEREO TVPG
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#211] High School English High School English: We'll see how teachers, including 2010 National Teacher of the Year, Sarah Brown Wessling, are working to implement the Common Core State Standards. As students are asked to go deeper into every text they read, we'll see them dissecting, discussing, and debating their way through complex lessons. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#251H] The Pope, Poverty, and Poetry * In just a few months, Pope Francis, the first in history to take the name of the patron saint of the poor, has proven to be one of the most outspoken pontiffs in recent history, especially when it comes to income inequality. He has criticized the "widening gap between those who have more and those who must be content with the crumbs." And in his recent "apostolic exhortation" on "the economy of exclusion and inequality," he said: "The worship of the ancient golden calf has returned in a new and ruthless guise in the idolatry of money and the dictatorship of an impersonal economy lacking a truly human purpose." It remains to be seen if Pope Francis can bend the institutional Church to his exhortation, but for the moment at least, it seems as if the spirit of Occupy Wall Street has settled into a one-man occupation of the Vatican.
    Francis is the first Jesuit to ascend to the papacy, so we turn to Jesuit-educated author and historian Thomas Cahill to get his perspective. This week, Bill Moyers speaks with Cahill in a conversation on the meaning of Pope Francis and the relevance of the Church in the 21st century. Over the past two decades, Cahill has been writing a series of best-selling books he calls "The Hinges of History" - critical moments in Western civilization brought to life through the stories of individuals whose words and deeds helped make us who we are today. They include How the Irish Saved Civilization and The Gifts of the Jews. His latest is Heroes and Heretics about the new beginnings and new ideas at the heart of the Renaissance and Reformation.
    * Also on the broadcast, the poet Philip Levine joins Bill to discuss why Americans have lost sight of who really keeps the country afloat - the hard working men and women who toil, unsung and unknown, in our nation's fields and factories. During the years he himself spent in the grit, noise and heat of the assembly lines of Detroit auto plants, Levine discovered that his gift for verse could provide "a voice for the voiceless." Described by one critic as "a large, ironic Whitman of the industrial heartland," Philip Levine is the author of twenty collections of poems and books of translations and essays. He is the recipient of the Pulitzer and two National Book Awards and recently served as the nation's poet laureate at the Library of Congress.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5326H] We take pause for the holidays to look back at the big stories of 2013. The start of President Obama's second term, the continued partisan deadlock in Washington, and attempts by the GOP to reorganize after the elections of 2012 were all predictable when the year began. But there were also unexpected developments that had a big impact throughout the year. The Edward Snowden-NSA revelations; the bungled rollout of the Affordable Care Act, the Supreme Court decisions giving the green light to same sex marriages; and new diplomatic initiatives with a decades-long adversary, Iran. This week we talk with 16 regular Washington Week panelists to get their perspective and analysis on the "Stories That Shaped 2013." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3201H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose: The Week [#124] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 am
    European Journal [#3152] Belgium: Manager with a Big Heart GREECE: THE ORPHANS OF ALEXANDROUPOLI - The tragic story of the refugee boat that sank off the coast of Lampedusa shocked people across Europe. The disaster took more than 200 lives, many of them children. Europe faces a dilemma: as its borders are tightened, refugees become increasingly desperate to reach the continent. As a result, places like Lampedusa and the River Evros in Greece are subject to growing bottlenecks of asylum seekers. Thousands of people have already drowned. We look at an orphanage in Greece that takes in children who have lost their parents on one of the many perilous crossings.
    CROATIA: THE SMALLEST TOWN IN THE WORLD - The smallest town in the world, Hum in Istria in northwest Croatia, has become a part of the European Union. The medieval town overlooking the Mima Valley is a popular tourist destination. The people of Hum hope that membership in the EU will bring in more tourists and their money. Hum has only about 25 permanent residents. They pride themselves on their openness and hospitality. But they do have some concerns about joining the EU and giving up some of their recently gained sovereignty
    FRANCE: A NEW RECORD IN FARE-DODGING - Fare-dodging is France's new national sport. Some fare-dodgers have even banded together to create a kind of insurance fund to cover the fines if they're caught. Many in France have lax attitudes toward buying tickets for public transport. There's even a famous photo of former president Jacques Chirac jumping over a subway turnstile many years ago. Meanwhile, some cash-strapped university students are paying seven euros each month into a fund that will cover fines rather than shell out for a subway pass. Fare-dodging is estimated to cost France's state-owned railway system around 300 million euros a year; for Paris's public transport system, it's a record 100 million.
    ALBANIA: MARIJUANA VILLAGE - Farmers in a remote mountain village in southern Albania harvest a whopping 900 tons of cannabis every year, with an estimated market value of four and a half billion euros - despite the fact that cannabis cultivation is illegal in Albania. The villagers of Lazarat keep to themselves and threaten strangers with weapons. For years, law enforcement agencies have taken scarcely any steps to prevent cultivation of marijuana. Criminal networks from Albania and Italy are said to be in control of the trade, in most cases protected by members of the judiciary and politicians in exchange for hush money. A camera crew from European Journal has been one of the first to be allowed to enter the village.
    BELGIUM: THREE-STAR ACCOMMODATION FOR THE HOMELESS - In winter, many street people in Brussels are able to spend the night in a hotel. A manager with a big heart provides them with free accommodation. But the operator of the Mozart Hotel, Ahmed Ben Abderrahman, does set some rules. Homeless guests must shower and change their clothes on a daily basis. During the cold spell in January, the hotel provided refuge for over 50 street people, but paying guests barely noticed their presence. The hotel manager organizes donations of clothing and money for his homeless guests. He says he goes to all this trouble because he's a Muslim and views Islam as a religion of sharing.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#206] Plagues and Pleasures on the Salton Sea Once known as the California Riviera, the Salton Sea is now called one of America's worst ecological disasters: a fetid, stagnant, salty lake, that coughs up dead fish and birds by the thousands in frequent die-offs that occur. However, amongst the ruins of this man-made mistake, a few remaining eccentrics (a roadside nudist, a religious folk artist, a Hungarian revolutionary, and real estate speculators) struggle to keep a remodeled version of the original Salton Sea dream alive. Accidentally created by an engineering error in 1905, reworked in the 50's as a world class vacation destination for the rich and famous, suddenly abandoned after a series of hurricanes, floods, and fish die-offs, and finally almost saved by Congressman Sonny Bono, the Salton Sea has a bittersweet past. The film shares these people's stories and their difficulties in keeping their unique community alive, as the nearby cities of Los Angeles and San Diego attempt to take the agricultural water run-off that barely sustains the Salton Sea. While covering the historical, economic, political, and environmental issues that face the Sea, this program offers an offbeat portrait of the peculiar and individualistic people who populate its shores. It is an epic western tale of fantastic real estate ventures and failed boomtowns, inner-city gangs fleeing to white small town America, and the subjective notion of success and failure amidst the ruins of the past. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    QUEST [#203H] Super Laser at the National Ignition Facility / Resurveying California's Wildlife 100 Years Later The largest laser beam in the world is being built in the Bay Area in pursuit of fusion energy; and find out how scientists are discovering key trends about Yosemite and California's wildlife by revisiting a 100-year-old study. duration 26:22   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1717] The Top Religion and Ethics Stories of 2013 A look back at the top religion and ethics stories of 2013 - Washington Post Columnist E.J. Dionne, Kevin Eckstrom, Editor-in-Chief of Religion News Service and Kim Lawton, Managing Editor of RENW join host Bob Abernethy to discuss the priorities and impact of Pope Francis - his concern for the poor and his changes in the Vatican bureaucracy. Also, churches and denominations divided by issues of homosexuality and gay marriage, the late Nelson Mandela and his rejection of revenge, and other top stories of the year. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1027] Consistent Great Investor This week features a rare interview with T. Rowe Price Equity Income fund's long-time Portfolio Manager Brian Rogers on why caution is his guiding principal in today's market. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#317H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Ideas Exchange [#101H] Bethlehem Alemu and Jorgen Vig Knudstorp Bethlehem Tilahun Alemu, founder of Ethiopian footwear company SoleRebels, travels 3,500 miles to Denmark to meet Jorgen Vig Knudstorp, the chief executive of toy company Lego. What do these seemingly disparate companies share in common? duration 25:53   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3201H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5326H] We take pause for the holidays to look back at the big stories of 2013. The start of President Obama's second term, the continued partisan deadlock in Washington, and attempts by the GOP to reorganize after the elections of 2012 were all predictable when the year began. But there were also unexpected developments that had a big impact throughout the year. The Edward Snowden-NSA revelations; the bungled rollout of the Affordable Care Act, the Supreme Court decisions giving the green light to same sex marriages; and new diplomatic initiatives with a decades-long adversary, Iran. This week we talk with 16 regular Washington Week panelists to get their perspective and analysis on the "Stories That Shaped 2013." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#110H] Remembering 2013
    Remembering 2013
    Will 2013 go down in history as the year of Gov. Jerry Brown rising and the California comeback? It was also the year of the government shutdown and the bumpy rollout of the Affordable Care Act. The Bay Area celebrated the opening of the new eastern span of the Bay Bridge and the America's Cup victory by Team Oracle. There were two BART strikes that crippled the commute, and the devastating Rim Fire near Yosemite National Park. A look back at some of the memorable moments of the past year, as well as a look ahead to what might be coming up in 2014.

    Guests:
    Carla Marinucci, San Francisco Chronicle
    Paul Rogers, San Jose Mercury News and KQED Science
    Joshua Johnson, KQED News

    Further Reporting:
    News Pix: The Best Images of 2013
    Our Top Science Stories from 2013

    Silicon Valley De-Bug Founder Raj Jayadev
    KQED's Scott Shafer gets an alternative view of 2013 by Silicon Valley De-Bug founder Raj Jayadev. De-Bug is a hybrid that combines media and community organizing, and is also an entrepreneurial collective and has become a nationally recognized organization while establishing itself as a trusted local platform for communities in the South Bay region since 2001. Some of its initiatives include criminal justice and prison reform, youth, immigration reform, workers and housing reform.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#251H] The Pope, Poverty, and Poetry * In just a few months, Pope Francis, the first in history to take the name of the patron saint of the poor, has proven to be one of the most outspoken pontiffs in recent history, especially when it comes to income inequality. He has criticized the "widening gap between those who have more and those who must be content with the crumbs." And in his recent "apostolic exhortation" on "the economy of exclusion and inequality," he said: "The worship of the ancient golden calf has returned in a new and ruthless guise in the idolatry of money and the dictatorship of an impersonal economy lacking a truly human purpose." It remains to be seen if Pope Francis can bend the institutional Church to his exhortation, but for the moment at least, it seems as if the spirit of Occupy Wall Street has settled into a one-man occupation of the Vatican.
    Francis is the first Jesuit to ascend to the papacy, so we turn to Jesuit-educated author and historian Thomas Cahill to get his perspective. This week, Bill Moyers speaks with Cahill in a conversation on the meaning of Pope Francis and the relevance of the Church in the 21st century. Over the past two decades, Cahill has been writing a series of best-selling books he calls "The Hinges of History" - critical moments in Western civilization brought to life through the stories of individuals whose words and deeds helped make us who we are today. They include How the Irish Saved Civilization and The Gifts of the Jews. His latest is Heroes and Heretics about the new beginnings and new ideas at the heart of the Renaissance and Reformation.
    * Also on the broadcast, the poet Philip Levine joins Bill to discuss why Americans have lost sight of who really keeps the country afloat - the hard working men and women who toil, unsung and unknown, in our nation's fields and factories. During the years he himself spent in the grit, noise and heat of the assembly lines of Detroit auto plants, Levine discovered that his gift for verse could provide "a voice for the voiceless." Described by one critic as "a large, ironic Whitman of the industrial heartland," Philip Levine is the author of twenty collections of poems and books of translations and essays. He is the recipient of the Pulitzer and two National Book Awards and recently served as the nation's poet laureate at the Library of Congress.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    QUEST [#203H] Super Laser at the National Ignition Facility / Resurveying California's Wildlife 100 Years Later The largest laser beam in the world is being built in the Bay Area in pursuit of fusion energy; and find out how scientists are discovering key trends about Yosemite and California's wildlife by revisiting a 100-year-old study. duration 26:22   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Dinosaur Wars: American Experience [#2303H] In the summer of 1868, paleontologist Othniel Charles Marsh boarded a Union Pacific train for a sight-seeing excursion through the heart of the newly-opened American West. While most passengers simply saw magnificent landscapes, Marsh soon realized he was traveling through the greatest dinosaur burial ground of all time. Ruthless, jealous and insanely competitive Marsh would wrestle over the discovery with the other leading paleontologist of his generation -- Edward Drinker Cope. Over time, the two rivals would uncover the remains of dozens of prehistoric animals, including 130 species of dinosaur, collect thousands of specimens, provide ample evidence to prove Charles Darwin's hotly disputed theory of evolution and put American science on the world stage. But their professional rivalry eventually spiraled out of control. What began with denigrating comments in scientific publications, led to espionage, the destruction of fossils and political maneuvering that ultimately left both men alone and almost penniless. duration 56:01   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 2:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1209] Colorado to Utah Holly kicks off her trip in Denver, where she visits the U.S. Mint and enjoys the city's many outdoor pursuits. Next she hikes the Mesa Trail, joins an archaeological research trip at Crow Canyon and delves into the history of the region's ancestral Pueblans. Holly travels to Utah, home to numerous ski resorts, the Great Salt Lake and a plethora of breathtaking national parks - including Arches, Zion and Bryce Canyon. duration 57:10   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Touching The Void Based on the international best-seller by renowned climber Joe Simpson, this program recounts the extraordinary story of a climb Simpson and his climbing partner, Simon Yates, undertook in the Peruvian Andes in 1985. The two ambitious young mountaineers set off to scale the hitherto unclimbed west face of Siula Grande, a remote and treacherous 21,000-foot peak. Starting their descent through a blizzard, Simpson fell and shattered his leg, launching a heroic battle for survival in which both men were faced with life-or-death decisions that tested the human spirit to its limit. Simpson and Yates return to Siula Grande together for the first time to retell their story for the cameras. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG-VL
  • 4:30 pm
    Secrets of the Dead [#1203H] Death on the Railroad A classic story involving foul play, cover ups, a murder mystery and a voyage of discovery to understand what happened to a group of Irish men who came to America for a better life but found only misery. In 1832, railroad contractor, Philip Duffy, hired 57 Irish immigrants to lay railroad tracks in West Chester, Pennsylvania. But, less than two months after their arrival, all 57 were dead. Did they all die - as was widely believed - due to a cholera pandemic? Or, were some of them murdered? In 2003, twin brothers discovered a secret file among their grandfather's papers that led them to investigate the deaths of these men and find the location of their final resting place in a valley now known as Duffy's Cut. Using the latest forensic and scientific investigative techniques, DNA, forensic analysis, facial reconstruction and historical detective work in Ireland and the USA, modern detectives and experts will unravel this extraordinary story. duration 54:16   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 5:30 pm
    Shakespeare Lost, Shakespeare Found This program tells the fascinating story behind the bold 20-year project by world-renowned Shakespeare scholar Dr. Gary Taylor to recreate The History of Cardenio (1613), a lost work written by William Shakespeare and his early collaborator, John Fletcher. Despite its impressive pedigree, The History of Cardenio remains shrouded in mystery because the 400-year-old play did not survive the ravages of time. Dr. Taylor resurrected the original manuscript by de-constructing Double Falsehood, Lewis Theobald's 1727 adaptation of The History of Cardenio. This process included painstaking research of centuries-old texts and cutting-edge computer microanalysis of each author's writing styles. The documentary culminates with the first full-scale production of the work at the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus, where academics from around the world comment on the play's authenticity, casting choices, plot additions and controversial ending. duration 24:56   STEREO TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#134H] Included: a look at an NYPD program called the Juvenile Robbery Intervention Program. Its aim is to mentor and monitor teens who have been arrested for a robbery. The report's focus is on two New York City neighborhoods. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#110H] Remembering 2013
    Remembering 2013
    Will 2013 go down in history as the year of Gov. Jerry Brown rising and the California comeback? It was also the year of the government shutdown and the bumpy rollout of the Affordable Care Act. The Bay Area celebrated the opening of the new eastern span of the Bay Bridge and the America's Cup victory by Team Oracle. There were two BART strikes that crippled the commute, and the devastating Rim Fire near Yosemite National Park. A look back at some of the memorable moments of the past year, as well as a look ahead to what might be coming up in 2014.

    Guests:
    Carla Marinucci, San Francisco Chronicle
    Paul Rogers, San Jose Mercury News and KQED Science
    Joshua Johnson, KQED News

    Further Reporting:
    News Pix: The Best Images of 2013
    Our Top Science Stories from 2013

    Silicon Valley De-Bug Founder Raj Jayadev
    KQED's Scott Shafer gets an alternative view of 2013 by Silicon Valley De-Bug founder Raj Jayadev. De-Bug is a hybrid that combines media and community organizing, and is also an entrepreneurial collective and has become a nationally recognized organization while establishing itself as a trusted local platform for communities in the South Bay region since 2001. Some of its initiatives include criminal justice and prison reform, youth, immigration reform, workers and housing reform.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:00 pm
    Local USA [#110] Poetry In Motion Storytelling with a kick! The words, sounds and people that bring poetry to life?a painful story about bullying; powerful memories of a soon-to-be demolished housing project; inaccurate assumptions about a pretty face; coming to terms and acceptance with loss; and the melting pot of identity politics. Five pieces from cities across the USA, including San Francisco, Detroit, Chicago and Minneapolis, that are connected by the rhythm of words and the search for identity. duration 27:13   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 pm
    Local USA [#109] Social Media We get social, with social media! Finding the people using social media to change the world. The Chicago painting duo, who use Twitter to reward treasure hunters; documentary cameras hit the streets of Raleigh-Durham, NC, to ask how social media influenced the 2012 presidential election; a look at what happens when an entire generation of Instagram users get together with their cameras on the beaches of Santa Monica, California; and how Facebook helped to make a young Los Angeleno boy's dream come true. duration 27:52   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#251H] The Pope, Poverty, and Poetry * In just a few months, Pope Francis, the first in history to take the name of the patron saint of the poor, has proven to be one of the most outspoken pontiffs in recent history, especially when it comes to income inequality. He has criticized the "widening gap between those who have more and those who must be content with the crumbs." And in his recent "apostolic exhortation" on "the economy of exclusion and inequality," he said: "The worship of the ancient golden calf has returned in a new and ruthless guise in the idolatry of money and the dictatorship of an impersonal economy lacking a truly human purpose." It remains to be seen if Pope Francis can bend the institutional Church to his exhortation, but for the moment at least, it seems as if the spirit of Occupy Wall Street has settled into a one-man occupation of the Vatican.
    Francis is the first Jesuit to ascend to the papacy, so we turn to Jesuit-educated author and historian Thomas Cahill to get his perspective. This week, Bill Moyers speaks with Cahill in a conversation on the meaning of Pope Francis and the relevance of the Church in the 21st century. Over the past two decades, Cahill has been writing a series of best-selling books he calls "The Hinges of History" - critical moments in Western civilization brought to life through the stories of individuals whose words and deeds helped make us who we are today. They include How the Irish Saved Civilization and The Gifts of the Jews. His latest is Heroes and Heretics about the new beginnings and new ideas at the heart of the Renaissance and Reformation.
    * Also on the broadcast, the poet Philip Levine joins Bill to discuss why Americans have lost sight of who really keeps the country afloat - the hard working men and women who toil, unsung and unknown, in our nation's fields and factories. During the years he himself spent in the grit, noise and heat of the assembly lines of Detroit auto plants, Levine discovered that his gift for verse could provide "a voice for the voiceless." Described by one critic as "a large, ironic Whitman of the industrial heartland," Philip Levine is the author of twenty collections of poems and books of translations and essays. He is the recipient of the Pulitzer and two National Book Awards and recently served as the nation's poet laureate at the Library of Congress.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    America Reframed [#206] Plagues and Pleasures on the Salton Sea Once known as the California Riviera, the Salton Sea is now called one of America's worst ecological disasters: a fetid, stagnant, salty lake, that coughs up dead fish and birds by the thousands in frequent die-offs that occur. However, amongst the ruins of this man-made mistake, a few remaining eccentrics (a roadside nudist, a religious folk artist, a Hungarian revolutionary, and real estate speculators) struggle to keep a remodeled version of the original Salton Sea dream alive. Accidentally created by an engineering error in 1905, reworked in the 50's as a world class vacation destination for the rich and famous, suddenly abandoned after a series of hurricanes, floods, and fish die-offs, and finally almost saved by Congressman Sonny Bono, the Salton Sea has a bittersweet past. The film shares these people's stories and their difficulties in keeping their unique community alive, as the nearby cities of Los Angeles and San Diego attempt to take the agricultural water run-off that barely sustains the Salton Sea. While covering the historical, economic, political, and environmental issues that face the Sea, this program offers an offbeat portrait of the peculiar and individualistic people who populate its shores. It is an epic western tale of fantastic real estate ventures and failed boomtowns, inner-city gangs fleeing to white small town America, and the subjective notion of success and failure amidst the ruins of the past. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 pm
    Adventists 2 This documentary is the sequel to the critically acclaimed"Adventists". It tells the little-known story of the Seventh-day Adventists' medical mission work around the world and their more than century-old commitment to provide health and healing in some of the most remote regions on earth. It is filmed in Haiti, Brazil, China, Africa, Peru and the Dominican Republic. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 11:30 pm
    POV [#2614H] Listening Is An Act of Love: A Storycorps Special This first-ever animated special from StoryCorps celebrates the transformative power of listening. "Listening Is an Act of Love" features six stories from 10 years of the innovative oral history project, where everyday people sit down together to share memories and tackle life's important questions. Framing these intimate conversations from across the country is an interview between StoryCorps founder Dave Isay and his inquisitive 9-year-old nephew, Benji, animated in the inimitable visual style of The Rauch Brothers. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 12:00 am
    Global Voices [#521] Street Ballad: A Jakarta Story Titi Juwariyah, 27, is a street singer in Jakarta, Indonesia. She leads a challenging, conflicted life - from her migration to Jakarta as a lost teen from the Java countryside to her heartfelt quest for identity and acceptance in her adopted city.
    Armed with just a battered guitar, a soulful voice, and a desire for a better life, Titi composes catchy folk tunes to entertain passengers on Jakarta's teeming buses. She dreams of making a career in music but is overwhelmed by the pressures of supporting her troubled family.
    When personal crisis strikes, Titi finds herself alone and on the edge of despair. An emotional journey to see her ailing parents in their remote countryside village provides Titi with important perspective and new determination to turn her life around.
    Back on the streets of Jakarta, Titi embarks on a brave new quest for independence and legitimacy. But in the process of chasing that dream, she stands to lose the very thing that is closest to her heart.
    duration 53:34   STEREO
Sunday, December 29, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • DT9s: Sutro Tower testing, early Tues 4/22 1am-5am

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED (and 3 other local Bay Area stations) will be doing full-load testing on new equipment at Sutro Tower early Tues 4/22 between 1am & 5am. If all goes as planned the KQED transmitter will go off twice during the early part of this period for between 15 and 30 seconds each […]

    • KQED DT9 planned, very short outages, Tues 4/15 (& possibly Wed 4/16)

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED DT9′s Over the Air (OTA) signal from Sutro Tower will experience a few extremely brief outages on Tuesday 4/15 between 10am and 5pm (and possibly on Wed 4/16 if the work cannot be completed in 1 day). Each outage should be measurable in seconds (not minutes). This work will not affect […]

    • KQET DT25 Planned Outage: early Tues 4/15 (btwn 5am-6am)

      (DT 25.1, 25.2, 25.3) At some point between 5am and 6am early Tuesday 4/15, KQET’s signal from the transmitter on Fremont Peak northeast of Monterey will shut down for a short period of time to allow AT&T to do work on our fiber interface. The outage should be relatively short, but its precise start time […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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