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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, December 28, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, December 28, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10830] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32278] duration 28:00   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3104] Tavis talks with Oscar- and Emmy-winner Jessica Lange. The multifaceted actor shares the backstory of her new children's picture book and previews her role on the new season of American Horror Story. (repeat) duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Pride & Joy Filmmaker Joe York spotlights the tradition-bearers of Southern foodways while presenting intimate portraits of men and women who grow, prepare, and serve Southern food and drink. Along the way, he asks and those tradition-bearers answer important questions about American culinary culture. Travelling from Virginia to Texas and ten states in between, he examines themes related to foodways, sense of place, civil rights, gender, family dynamics, and diversity in the modern American South. What do foodways tell us about what it means to be a Southerner? How and why do traditional foodways endure? As America's ethnic and racial make-up shifts, how do regional foodways change? A diverse and eclectic cast of characters populates Pride & Joy. Farmer and novelist Dori Sanders makes mouths water with her luscious peaches. Dairyman Earl Cruze has unlocked the secret of a lasting marriage by way of buttermilk. The Hardy Family argues that boiled green peanuts are a world-class delicacy. These are just three of the farmers, artisans, and cooks whose stories offer insights on the South's complex history and bright future. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1717H] The Top Religion and Ethics Stories of 2013 A look back at the top religion and ethics stories of 2013 - Washington Post Columnist E.J. Dionne, Kevin Eckstrom, Editor-in-Chief of Religion News Service and Kim Lawton, Managing Editor of RENW join host Bob Abernethy to discuss the priorities and impact of Pope Francis - his concern for the poor and his changes in the Vatican bureaucracy. Also, churches and denominations divided by issues of homosexuality and gay marriage, the late Nelson Mandela and his rejection of revenge, and other top stories of the year. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1027] Consistent Great Investor This week features a rare interview with T. Rowe Price Equity Income fund's long-time Portfolio Manager Brian Rogers on why caution is his guiding principal in today's market. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2242H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asia Insight [#116] duration 28:03   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Frontline [#1612] From Jesus to Christ: The First Christians - (Pt.2) FRONTLINE presents the epic story of the rise of Christianity. Drawing upon new and sometimes controversial historical evidence, the series transports viewers back 2000 years to the time and place where Jesus of Nazareth once lived and preached and challenges familiar assumptions and conventional notions about the origins of Christianity. Program 1 traces the life of Jesus of Nazareth, exploring the message that helped his ministry grow and the events that led to his crucifixion around 30 C.E. The film then turns to the period that followed Jesus' death, examining the rise of Christianity and concluding with the first revolt - the bloody and violent siege of Jerusalem and the beginning of a rift between Christianity and Judaism. The broadcast explores new evidence suggesting that Jesus' followers, because of their diversity and the differences in their cultures and languages, looked at and interpreted Jesus and his teachings in many different ways. Hour three follows the story of the first attempts to write the life of Jesus - The Gospels. The Gospels were products of social and religious reconstruction in the period after the war, ranging from roughly 70 to after 100 C.E. The program looks at how these stories were passed down before they were written and how the writing of each Gospel reflects the experiences and circumstances of early Christians. They do not all tell the same story of Jesus because each one is responding to a different audience and circumstances. For example, Matthew's gospel is clearly written for a Jewish Christian audience; it is the most Jewish of all the gospels. During this time, a growing tension appeared between the emergent Christian groups and their Jewish neighbors. The result was a process of debate, identity, and separation that shaped both religious traditions forever. And there were still other external forces, including a second, devastating Jewish war, the Bar Kochbah revolt, which erupted in 132 C.E. The final hour documents the extraordinary events of the second and third centuries in which Christianity grew from a small Jewish sect to an official religion of the Roman Empire. duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVPG-L (Secondary audio: none)
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#251H] The Pope, Poverty, and Poetry * In just a few months, Pope Francis, the first in history to take the name of the patron saint of the poor, has proven to be one of the most outspoken pontiffs in recent history, especially when it comes to income inequality. He has criticized the "widening gap between those who have more and those who must be content with the crumbs." And in his recent "apostolic exhortation" on "the economy of exclusion and inequality," he said: "The worship of the ancient golden calf has returned in a new and ruthless guise in the idolatry of money and the dictatorship of an impersonal economy lacking a truly human purpose." It remains to be seen if Pope Francis can bend the institutional Church to his exhortation, but for the moment at least, it seems as if the spirit of Occupy Wall Street has settled into a one-man occupation of the Vatican.
    Francis is the first Jesuit to ascend to the papacy, so we turn to Jesuit-educated author and historian Thomas Cahill to get his perspective. This week, Bill Moyers speaks with Cahill in a conversation on the meaning of Pope Francis and the relevance of the Church in the 21st century. Over the past two decades, Cahill has been writing a series of best-selling books he calls "The Hinges of History" - critical moments in Western civilization brought to life through the stories of individuals whose words and deeds helped make us who we are today. They include How the Irish Saved Civilization and The Gifts of the Jews. His latest is Heroes and Heretics about the new beginnings and new ideas at the heart of the Renaissance and Reformation.
    * Also on the broadcast, the poet Philip Levine joins Bill to discuss why Americans have lost sight of who really keeps the country afloat - the hard working men and women who toil, unsung and unknown, in our nation's fields and factories. During the years he himself spent in the grit, noise and heat of the assembly lines of Detroit auto plants, Levine discovered that his gift for verse could provide "a voice for the voiceless." Described by one critic as "a large, ironic Whitman of the industrial heartland," Philip Levine is the author of twenty collections of poems and books of translations and essays. He is the recipient of the Pulitzer and two National Book Awards and recently served as the nation's poet laureate at the Library of Congress.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#227] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    Ideas Exchange [#101H] Bethlehem Alemu and Jorgen Vig Knudstorp Bethlehem Tilahun Alemu, founder of Ethiopian footwear company SoleRebels, travels 3,500 miles to Denmark to meet Jorgen Vig Knudstorp, the chief executive of toy company Lego. What do these seemingly disparate companies share in common? duration 25:53   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5326H] We take pause for the holidays to look back at the big stories of 2013. The start of President Obama's second term, the continued partisan deadlock in Washington, and attempts by the GOP to reorganize after the elections of 2012 were all predictable when the year began. But there were also unexpected developments that had a big impact throughout the year. The Edward Snowden-NSA revelations; the bungled rollout of the Affordable Care Act, the Supreme Court decisions giving the green light to same sex marriages; and new diplomatic initiatives with a decades-long adversary, Iran. This week we talk with 16 regular Washington Week panelists to get their perspective and analysis on the "Stories That Shaped 2013." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#110H] Remembering 2013
    Remembering 2013
    Will 2013 go down in history as the year of Gov. Jerry Brown rising and the California comeback? It was also the year of the government shutdown and the bumpy rollout of the Affordable Care Act. The Bay Area celebrated the opening of the new eastern span of the Bay Bridge and the America's Cup victory by Team Oracle. There were two BART strikes that crippled the commute, and the devastating Rim Fire near Yosemite National Park. A look back at some of the memorable moments of the past year, as well as a look ahead to what might be coming up in 2014.

    Guests:
    Carla Marinucci, San Francisco Chronicle
    Paul Rogers, San Jose Mercury News and KQED Science
    Joshua Johnson, KQED News

    Further Reporting:
    News Pix: The Best Images of 2013
    Our Top Science Stories from 2013

    Silicon Valley De-Bug Founder Raj Jayadev
    KQED's Scott Shafer gets an alternative view of 2013 by Silicon Valley De-Bug founder Raj Jayadev. De-Bug is a hybrid that combines media and community organizing, and is also an entrepreneurial collective and has become a nationally recognized organization while establishing itself as a trusted local platform for communities in the South Bay region since 2001. Some of its initiatives include criminal justice and prison reform, youth, immigration reform, workers and housing reform.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17361Z] Documentary Special - Our World: Who Am I? duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2242H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3201H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#124] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#251H] The Pope, Poverty, and Poetry * In just a few months, Pope Francis, the first in history to take the name of the patron saint of the poor, has proven to be one of the most outspoken pontiffs in recent history, especially when it comes to income inequality. He has criticized the "widening gap between those who have more and those who must be content with the crumbs." And in his recent "apostolic exhortation" on "the economy of exclusion and inequality," he said: "The worship of the ancient golden calf has returned in a new and ruthless guise in the idolatry of money and the dictatorship of an impersonal economy lacking a truly human purpose." It remains to be seen if Pope Francis can bend the institutional Church to his exhortation, but for the moment at least, it seems as if the spirit of Occupy Wall Street has settled into a one-man occupation of the Vatican.
    Francis is the first Jesuit to ascend to the papacy, so we turn to Jesuit-educated author and historian Thomas Cahill to get his perspective. This week, Bill Moyers speaks with Cahill in a conversation on the meaning of Pope Francis and the relevance of the Church in the 21st century. Over the past two decades, Cahill has been writing a series of best-selling books he calls "The Hinges of History" - critical moments in Western civilization brought to life through the stories of individuals whose words and deeds helped make us who we are today. They include How the Irish Saved Civilization and The Gifts of the Jews. His latest is Heroes and Heretics about the new beginnings and new ideas at the heart of the Renaissance and Reformation.
    * Also on the broadcast, the poet Philip Levine joins Bill to discuss why Americans have lost sight of who really keeps the country afloat - the hard working men and women who toil, unsung and unknown, in our nation's fields and factories. During the years he himself spent in the grit, noise and heat of the assembly lines of Detroit auto plants, Levine discovered that his gift for verse could provide "a voice for the voiceless." Described by one critic as "a large, ironic Whitman of the industrial heartland," Philip Levine is the author of twenty collections of poems and books of translations and essays. He is the recipient of the Pulitzer and two National Book Awards and recently served as the nation's poet laureate at the Library of Congress.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#203H] Super Laser at the National Ignition Facility / Resurveying California's Wildlife 100 Years Later The largest laser beam in the world is being built in the Bay Area in pursuit of fusion energy; and find out how scientists are discovering key trends about Yosemite and California's wildlife by revisiting a 100-year-old study. duration 26:22   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#252] duration 25:40   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Buddha Two and a half millennia ago, a new religion was born in northern India, generated from the ideas of a single man, the Buddha. He was a mysterious Indian sage who famously gained enlightenment while he sat under a big, shapely fig tree. The Buddha never claimed to be God or his emissary on earth. He said only that he was a human being who, in a world of unavoidable pain and suffering, had found a kind of serenity that others could find too. Award-winning filmmaker David Grubin tells the story of the Buddha's life, a journey especially relevant to our own bewildering times of violent change and spiritual confusion. This documentary draws upon the work of some of the world's greatest artists and sculptors, who across two millennia have depicted the Buddha's life in art rich in beauty and complexity. His biography is also tracked geographically across the sweeping landscapes of northern India. The testimony of contemporary Buddhists -- including Pulitzer prize-winning poet W.S. Merwin and His Holiness the Dalai Lama -- provides insight into the ancient narrative. To tell his story is to understand his teaching. And to understand his teaching is to gain new insight into what it is to be human. duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    Frontline [#1610^] From Jesus to Christ: The First Christians - Pax Romana/A Light To The Nations Explores the life of Jesus and the movement he started, challenging familiar assumptions and conventional notions about the origins of Christianity. Drawing upon new and sometimes controversial historical evidence and interviews with the nation's leading New Testament scholars, the series transports viewers back two thousand years to the time and place where Jesus once lived and preached. The film traces Jesus' life,focusing on the events that occurred after he died, and on his first followers, the men and women whose belief, conviction and martyrdom created a major movement that transformed the Roman Empire in the space of only 300 years.

    "Pax Romana" - This segment traces the life of Jesus, exploring the message that helped his ministry grow andthe events that led to his crucifixion. Born in the reign of Emperor Augustus in the Pax Romana - the Roman Peace - Jesus was a subject of the Roman Empire. This first hour looks at how scholars and archaeologists have pieced together a new portrait of where Jesus was born, how he lived and who he was.

    "A Light to the Nations" - The second hour turns from the life of Jesus to the period that followed hisdeath, examining the rise of Christianity and concluding with the Fir st Revolt - the bloody and violent siege of Jerusalem and the beginning of a rift between Christianity and Judaism. It also explores new evidence suggesting that Jesus' followers, because of their diversity andthe differences in their cultures and languages, looked at and interp reted Jesus and his teachings in many different ways.
    duration 1:52:21   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#133H] Included: years after Hurricane Katrina devastated the Lower 9th Ward of New Orleans, a debate now rages in the city; with so few residents returning to the Lower 9th, does it even make sense to redevelop the community at all? That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5326H] We take pause for the holidays to look back at the big stories of 2013. The start of President Obama's second term, the continued partisan deadlock in Washington, and attempts by the GOP to reorganize after the elections of 2012 were all predictable when the year began. But there were also unexpected developments that had a big impact throughout the year. The Edward Snowden-NSA revelations; the bungled rollout of the Affordable Care Act, the Supreme Court decisions giving the green light to same sex marriages; and new diplomatic initiatives with a decades-long adversary, Iran. This week we talk with 16 regular Washington Week panelists to get their perspective and analysis on the "Stories That Shaped 2013." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#110H] Remembering 2013
    Remembering 2013
    Will 2013 go down in history as the year of Gov. Jerry Brown rising and the California comeback? It was also the year of the government shutdown and the bumpy rollout of the Affordable Care Act. The Bay Area celebrated the opening of the new eastern span of the Bay Bridge and the America's Cup victory by Team Oracle. There were two BART strikes that crippled the commute, and the devastating Rim Fire near Yosemite National Park. A look back at some of the memorable moments of the past year, as well as a look ahead to what might be coming up in 2014.

    Guests:
    Carla Marinucci, San Francisco Chronicle
    Paul Rogers, San Jose Mercury News and KQED Science
    Joshua Johnson, KQED News

    Further Reporting:
    News Pix: The Best Images of 2013
    Our Top Science Stories from 2013

    Silicon Valley De-Bug Founder Raj Jayadev
    KQED's Scott Shafer gets an alternative view of 2013 by Silicon Valley De-Bug founder Raj Jayadev. De-Bug is a hybrid that combines media and community organizing, and is also an entrepreneurial collective and has become a nationally recognized organization while establishing itself as a trusted local platform for communities in the South Bay region since 2001. Some of its initiatives include criminal justice and prison reform, youth, immigration reform, workers and housing reform.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#203H] Super Laser at the National Ignition Facility / Resurveying California's Wildlife 100 Years Later The largest laser beam in the world is being built in the Bay Area in pursuit of fusion energy; and find out how scientists are discovering key trends about Yosemite and California's wildlife by revisiting a 100-year-old study. duration 26:22   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1209] Colorado to Utah Holly kicks off her trip in Denver, where she visits the U.S. Mint and enjoys the city's many outdoor pursuits. Next she hikes the Mesa Trail, joins an archaeological research trip at Crow Canyon and delves into the history of the region's ancestral Pueblans. Holly travels to Utah, home to numerous ski resorts, the Great Salt Lake and a plethora of breathtaking national parks - including Arches, Zion and Bryce Canyon. duration 57:10   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Touching The Void Based on the international best-seller by renowned climber Joe Simpson, this program recounts the extraordinary story of a climb Simpson and his climbing partner, Simon Yates, undertook in the Peruvian Andes in 1985. The two ambitious young mountaineers set off to scale the hitherto unclimbed west face of Siula Grande, a remote and treacherous 21,000-foot peak. Starting their descent through a blizzard, Simpson fell and shattered his leg, launching a heroic battle for survival in which both men were faced with life-or-death decisions that tested the human spirit to its limit. Simpson and Yates return to Siula Grande together for the first time to retell their story for the cameras. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG-VL
  • 10:30 pm
    Secrets of the Dead [#1203] Death on the Railroad A classic story involving foul play, cover ups, a murder mystery and a voyage of discovery to understand what happened to a group of Irish men who came to America for a better life but found only misery. In 1832, railroad contractor, Philip Duffy, hired 57 Irish immigrants to lay railroad tracks in West Chester, Pennsylvania. But, less than two months after their arrival, all 57 were dead. Did they all die - as was widely believed - due to a cholera pandemic? Or, were some of them murdered? In 2003, twin brothers discovered a secret file among their grandfather's papers that led them to investigate the deaths of these men and find the location of their final resting place in a valley now known as Duffy's Cut. Using the latest forensic and scientific investigative techniques, DNA, forensic analysis, facial reconstruction and historical detective work in Ireland and the USA, modern detectives and experts will unravel this extraordinary story. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:30 pm
    Shakespeare Lost, Shakespeare Found This program tells the fascinating story behind the bold 20-year project by world-renowned Shakespeare scholar Dr. Gary Taylor to recreate The History of Cardenio (1613), a lost work written by William Shakespeare and his early collaborator, John Fletcher. Despite its impressive pedigree, The History of Cardenio remains shrouded in mystery because the 400-year-old play did not survive the ravages of time. Dr. Taylor resurrected the original manuscript by de-constructing Double Falsehood, Lewis Theobald's 1727 adaptation of The History of Cardenio. This process included painstaking research of centuries-old texts and cutting-edge computer microanalysis of each author's writing styles. The documentary culminates with the first full-scale production of the work at the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus, where academics from around the world comment on the play's authenticity, casting choices, plot additions and controversial ending. duration 24:56   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#206] Plagues and Pleasures on the Salton Sea Once known as the California Riviera, the Salton Sea is now called one of America's worst ecological disasters: a fetid, stagnant, salty lake, that coughs up dead fish and birds by the thousands in frequent die-offs that occur. However, amongst the ruins of this man-made mistake, a few remaining eccentrics (a roadside nudist, a religious folk artist, a Hungarian revolutionary, and real estate speculators) struggle to keep a remodeled version of the original Salton Sea dream alive. Accidentally created by an engineering error in 1905, reworked in the 50's as a world class vacation destination for the rich and famous, suddenly abandoned after a series of hurricanes, floods, and fish die-offs, and finally almost saved by Congressman Sonny Bono, the Salton Sea has a bittersweet past. The film shares these people's stories and their difficulties in keeping their unique community alive, as the nearby cities of Los Angeles and San Diego attempt to take the agricultural water run-off that barely sustains the Salton Sea. While covering the historical, economic, political, and environmental issues that face the Sea, this program offers an offbeat portrait of the peculiar and individualistic people who populate its shores. It is an epic western tale of fantastic real estate ventures and failed boomtowns, inner-city gangs fleeing to white small town America, and the subjective notion of success and failure amidst the ruins of the past. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, December 28, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
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XFINITY 189

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KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

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v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

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Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

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