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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, December 14, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, December 14, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10820] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32268] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, if the big storm keeps holiday shoppers home this weekend, what's at stake for retailers already dealing with a shorter holiday shopping season? And, our market monitor guest has a list of stocks she says could gain 20% or more in the new year. duration 28:00   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3054] Tavis talks with best-selling author Amy Tan. The award-winning writer unpacks her sixth novel, The Valley of Amazement, a sweeping tale of two women's search for identity. Tavis also talks with multitalented actor-director-producer-writer-host LeVar Burton. The winner of numerous Emmy Awards, Burton explains the relaunch of Reading Rainbow as a mobile app. duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 2:00 am
    Asian and Abrahamic Religions: A Divine Encounter in America [#102] (see description in part 1.) duration 56:38   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1715] EL SALVADOR'S BAN ON ABORTIONS - Strongly influenced by Catholic teaching, El Salvador now forbids all abortions. Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from San Salvador on the consequences for many women, including some who say they suffered a miscarriage, when abortion is considered murder.
    MORE MORMON MISSIONARIES - At a time when many Christian denominations continue to lose members, the number of people in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints is going up steadily, from 3 million in 1970 to more than 15 million today, worldwide. One reason is new, lower age limits for both men and women who want to serve as missionaries. Lucky Severson reports that there are now more than 80,000 Mormon missionaries, all over the world, trying to combat what one Mormon leader calls the "growing level of wickedness."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1025] Minimizing Tax Pain A combination of new federal laws and stock market gains mean many Americans are facing much higher tax bills. Financial advisors Alexandra Lebenthal (President & CEO, Lebenthal Holdings) and Mark Cortazzo (Senior Partner, MACRO Consulting) help minimize the pain this week on Consuelo Mack WealthTrack. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2147] Special Edition - The Legacy of Hillary Clinton As Hillary Clinton leaves behind her work at the State Department, she sits down with host Bonnie Erbe to share her dedication and commitment to women and girls' empowerment. From First Lady to the US Senate to the State Department, Clinton guides us through her storied career with one common thread: issues facing women and girls. And, she tells us what's next for her. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#215] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Music's Gonna Get You Through Henry Butler is not only a virtuoso jazz and blues artist, but also a passionate educator, photographer and advocate for disability rights. Drawing on his New Orleans heritage, extensive music study and experience as a blind black man, Butler founded the Creative Music and Jazz camp and crafted an eclectic curriculum that encouraged students to see art and music as tools for survival. This program tracks the impact of Butler's music and philosophy on a group of blind and visually impaired teens who gather in New Orleans to train with the master at his week-long summer camp. Butler tells his students they can achieve success by applying the musical principles of focus, discipline, release, practice and perseverance to their everyday lives. The doc shows how valuable music and its lessons can be for both students and teacher alike. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Conducting Hope Today, 2.3 million people in the United States - an all-time high - call prison home. Nearly two-thirds of inmates will face re-arrest within three years, and nearly 50% will return to prison. In response to these disheartening statistics, one innovative program in Kansas aims to reduce the high rate of recidivism in an unexpected way - through the power of music.
    This program reveals the story behind the East Hill Singers, the only secular prison choir in the country allowed to perform outside prison gates. During the documentary, choir director (and former opera singer) Kirk Carson works tirelessly to prepare the men - minimum security inmates at Lansing Correctional Facility - for an upcoming public performance alongside community volunteers and former inmates. Carson's passion never wavers despite the challenges of turning the novices into concert-ready singers capable of performing a repertoire ranging from traditional choral to contemporary music to a "rap of redemption." For many of the inmates, whose offenses range from drug-related crimes to burglary, rape and murder, the choir teaches valuable real-world lessons about discipline, responsibility and teamwork. These traits, along with a newfound self-esteem, confidence and pride, eventually may ultimately help ease the men's reintegration back into society.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 7:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#249H] Gunfighter Nation Cultural historian and scholar Richard Slotkin has spent his adult life studying the violence that has swirled through American history and taken root deep in our culture. He has written an acclaimed trilogy on the myth of the frontier that has shaped our nation's imagination. In Regeneration through Violence, The Fatal Environment, Gunfighter Nation, and other works of history and fiction, he tracks how everything from literature, movies and television to society and politics has been influenced by this violent past - including the gun culture that continues to dominate, wound and kill. And he outlines how, in America's frantic expansion across an opulent continent from the Atlantic to the Pacific, this country embraced a mythology of the frontier. With it came the folklore of gun-slinging, brave white settlers taming the wilderness to justify and romanticize an unhappy record of subjugation, violence and bloodshed.
    On this one year anniversary of the massacre at Newtown, Connecticut - a massacre that took the lives of 20 school children and 6 educators at the Sandy Hook Elementary School - Bill Moyers speaks with Professor Slotkin, who recently retired from a distinguished teaching career at Wesleyan University, just 45 minutes from Newtown. "The myth holds," Slotkin tells Moyers. "And it is stronger than the reality. Because those guns, particularly the Colt, are associated with one of the most active phases - and most interesting phases - of expansion. And therefore it has the magic of a tool - the gun that won the west, the guns that created the American democracy and made equality possible."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#225] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2535H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5324H] * Late Thursday the House passed a bipartisan budget proposal that will fund the government through 2015 and avert a potential government shutdown in January. The Senate is expected to pass the measure next week even though Republican lawmakers remain split on the compromise deal and some Democrats are disappointed the bill does not include an extension of unemployment benefits for the long-term unemployed. Molly Ball of The Atlantic and Jeanne Cummings of Bloomberg News will explain why many liberals and conservatives agree the new deal is "no grand bargain" but it could represent a crucial step in breaking through Washington's partisan gridlock.
    * The Obama administration continues to try and recover from the fumbled rollout of the Affordable Care Act. New polls out this week show most Americans have an unfavorable impression of the job President Obama is doing. Voters hold Congress in even lower regard with an approval rating of just 13%. John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times explains why the president has decided to shakeup some of his White House staff in hopes of nudging a sharply divided Congress toward making some progress on his second-term agenda.
    * Plus, Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will take a closer look at how Secretary of State John Kerry has become Obama's diplomatic star taking on some of the toughest diplomatic challenges from around the globe during his first year at the State Department.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#108H] Water Wars, Archbishop Cordileone and Hacking for Social Change
    Water Tunnel Wars
    This week, state officials unveiled the latest version of an ambitious plan to address California's decades-old water crisis. A whopping 34,000 pages detail the environmental impact of a $25 billion project to divert water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and pipe it to Southern California. Proponents say the project will help move water from the state's north to the south while saving the Delta's endangered species. Critics call the plan a costly water grab and have vowed to block it in court or at the ballot box.

    Guests:
    Paul Rogers, KQED and San Jose Mercury News
    Lauren Sommer, KQED

    Further Reporting:

    KQED Science: California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Archbishop Cordileone
    Catholics around the world cheered this week's selection of Pope Francis as Time magazine's Person of the Year. In words and deeds, the new pope has provided a distinct change in tone for the church, stressing modesty and concern for the poor, while rejecting an emphasis on social issues like abortion and gay rights. Scott Shafer sits down with San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone for a look into how the local church hierarchy is reacting. Cordileone, a San Diego native, was named archbishop by Pope Benedict XVI in 2012. He is a conservative figure in one of the state's liberal bastions, leading a flock that stretches from Marin to San Mateo.

    Hacking for Social Change
    Computer code and apps could be the next tools used in the fight to curb gun violence. One year after the Newtown massacre, the Bay Area hosts a conference exploring how technology can prevent future tragedies. Thuy Vu talks with James Colgan of Highground Hackers, the group behind this weekend's "Symposium for Sandy Hook."
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17347Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2240H] Special Edition - The Legacy of Hillary Clinton As Hillary Clinton leaves behind her work at the State Department, she sits down with host Bonnie Erbe to share her dedication and commitment to women and girls' empowerment. From First Lady to the US Senate to the State Department, Clinton guides us through her storied career with one common thread: issues facing women and girls. And, she tells us what's next for her. (originally broadcast February 2013) duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3151H] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#122] * Mike Allen on the week in politics
    * Mayor Michael Bloomberg on the Sandy Hook anniversary
    * General Ray Odierno
    * Stephen Fry discusses playing Malvolio in Shakespeare's Twelfth Night
    * a look at the film Long Walk to Freedom with Idris Elba and Justin Chadwick
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#249H] Gunfighter Nation Cultural historian and scholar Richard Slotkin has spent his adult life studying the violence that has swirled through American history and taken root deep in our culture. He has written an acclaimed trilogy on the myth of the frontier that has shaped our nation's imagination. In Regeneration through Violence, The Fatal Environment, Gunfighter Nation, and other works of history and fiction, he tracks how everything from literature, movies and television to society and politics has been influenced by this violent past - including the gun culture that continues to dominate, wound and kill. And he outlines how, in America's frantic expansion across an opulent continent from the Atlantic to the Pacific, this country embraced a mythology of the frontier. With it came the folklore of gun-slinging, brave white settlers taming the wilderness to justify and romanticize an unhappy record of subjugation, violence and bloodshed.
    On this one year anniversary of the massacre at Newtown, Connecticut - a massacre that took the lives of 20 school children and 6 educators at the Sandy Hook Elementary School - Bill Moyers speaks with Professor Slotkin, who recently retired from a distinguished teaching career at Wesleyan University, just 45 minutes from Newtown. "The myth holds," Slotkin tells Moyers. "And it is stronger than the reality. Because those guns, particularly the Colt, are associated with one of the most active phases - and most interesting phases - of expansion. And therefore it has the magic of a tool - the gun that won the west, the guns that created the American democracy and made equality possible."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#118] Eat Less, Live Longer?/Earthquakes: Breaking New Ground Is eating less the secret to a longer life? It seems to be for some animals. Find out what scientists have learned. And discover new attempts by geologists to better understand and possibly predict earthquakes. Plus, Quest launches a new photo series featuring science and nature imagery from viewers like you. duration 40:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#251] duration 25:40   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Quilted Conscience This program documents the beautiful and important story of a group of sixteen Sudanese-American girls - refugees from the genocide in their troubled homeland - who are thrust into a new life in Grand Island, Nebraska. It's a story of a quilters' guild of local white women, some of whom have had little previous contact with ethnic or racial minorities. It's a story of a famed African-American quilt maker who travels a thousand miles to help "stitch" the groups together by means of a culture-blend fabric-art project. Finally, it's a story about the making of a lovely wall-sized mural, composed of dozens of dramatic "Dreams & Memories" story panels created by the Sudanese girls with the help of the local women. duration 54:29   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Our Time Is Now A coming-of-age documentary following six New Mexico teenagers as they strive to finish high school, wrestle with personal challenges, and pursue their dreams. Note: This is an American Graduate branded product. The film will be excerpted and highlighted during American Graduate day September 28 along with interviews with some of the kids and the producer and director. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    Frontline [#3106H] Raising Adam Lanza In the wake of the Newtown school massacre, in a special collaboration with the Hartford Courant, Frontline examines the life of a young man and the town he changed forever.
    Adam Lanza left behind a trail of death and destruction, but little else. The mass killer had no known friends, no diary. He destroyed his computer and any evidence it might have provided. His motives, and his life, remain largely a mystery. In partnership with The Hartford Courant, Frontline looks for answers to the central, and so far elusive, question: "Who was Adam Lanza?"
    In the aftermath of the tragedy, President Obama called for a national conversation about guns in America. Nowhere is that conversation more intense than in Newtown itself.
    In a second story, Frontline visits Newtown, Connecticut to explore how those closest to the tragedy are now wrestling with our nation's gun culture and laws.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 5:00 pm
    Refuge: Stories of the Selfhelp Home In the late 1930s - with the violence and destruction of Kristallnacht foreshadowing the devastation of European Jewry - a determined group of German-Jewish refugees left behind well-established lives and most of their possessions and immigrated to Chicago. There, they set out to create a supportive community for themselves and other German, Austrian and Czech Jews fleeing Nazi persecution. Eventually, they founded Selfhelp, an organization providing temporary housing, food, English classes, job placement and, in 1950, a residential home for elderly emigres and Holocaust survivors. REFUGE: STORIES OF THE SELFHELP HOME features the deeply personal stories of these residents, who spent the war years surviving by any means necessary. Vividly, they reflect on these experiences - of separations, deportations, selections and life-and-death decisions. REFUGE moves back and forth seamlessly between these often heartbreaking stories and examines how the trajectories of residents and founders diverged during the war and came together again around Selfhelp. duration 58:00   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#129H] Included: In just a few years, drone aircraft might be delivering orders from Amazon.com to your door - at least, that's what Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos said in a recent interview. But first states and the federal government are wrestling with the implications of many new, pilotless aircraft - how they might affect civil liberties - and how to keep them out of the way of manned aircraft in skies that are already crowded. Rick Karr reports from Colorado. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5324H] * Late Thursday the House passed a bipartisan budget proposal that will fund the government through 2015 and avert a potential government shutdown in January. The Senate is expected to pass the measure next week even though Republican lawmakers remain split on the compromise deal and some Democrats are disappointed the bill does not include an extension of unemployment benefits for the long-term unemployed. Molly Ball of The Atlantic and Jeanne Cummings of Bloomberg News will explain why many liberals and conservatives agree the new deal is "no grand bargain" but it could represent a crucial step in breaking through Washington's partisan gridlock.
    * The Obama administration continues to try and recover from the fumbled rollout of the Affordable Care Act. New polls out this week show most Americans have an unfavorable impression of the job President Obama is doing. Voters hold Congress in even lower regard with an approval rating of just 13%. John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times explains why the president has decided to shakeup some of his White House staff in hopes of nudging a sharply divided Congress toward making some progress on his second-term agenda.
    * Plus, Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will take a closer look at how Secretary of State John Kerry has become Obama's diplomatic star taking on some of the toughest diplomatic challenges from around the globe during his first year at the State Department.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#108H] Water Wars, Archbishop Cordileone and Hacking for Social Change
    Water Tunnel Wars
    This week, state officials unveiled the latest version of an ambitious plan to address California's decades-old water crisis. A whopping 34,000 pages detail the environmental impact of a $25 billion project to divert water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and pipe it to Southern California. Proponents say the project will help move water from the state's north to the south while saving the Delta's endangered species. Critics call the plan a costly water grab and have vowed to block it in court or at the ballot box.

    Guests:
    Paul Rogers, KQED and San Jose Mercury News
    Lauren Sommer, KQED

    Further Reporting:

    KQED Science: California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Archbishop Cordileone
    Catholics around the world cheered this week's selection of Pope Francis as Time magazine's Person of the Year. In words and deeds, the new pope has provided a distinct change in tone for the church, stressing modesty and concern for the poor, while rejecting an emphasis on social issues like abortion and gay rights. Scott Shafer sits down with San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone for a look into how the local church hierarchy is reacting. Cordileone, a San Diego native, was named archbishop by Pope Benedict XVI in 2012. He is a conservative figure in one of the state's liberal bastions, leading a flock that stretches from Marin to San Mateo.

    Hacking for Social Change
    Computer code and apps could be the next tools used in the fight to curb gun violence. One year after the Newtown massacre, the Bay Area hosts a conference exploring how technology can prevent future tragedies. Thuy Vu talks with James Colgan of Highground Hackers, the group behind this weekend's "Symposium for Sandy Hook."
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#118] Eat Less, Live Longer?/Earthquakes: Breaking New Ground Is eating less the secret to a longer life? It seems to be for some animals. Find out what scientists have learned. And discover new attempts by geologists to better understand and possibly predict earthquakes. Plus, Quest launches a new photo series featuring science and nature imagery from viewers like you. duration 40:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1207] Around The World - Silk Road: Kashgar to Istanbul Holly Morris takes over the journey in Central Asia, where silk was traded for "flying horses" from the fertile Ferghana Valley. Crossing the Jiptik Pass to Osh, she then explores the ancient Kingdom of Samarkand and Bukhara before crossing the stony desert of Turkmenistan to the lost city of Merv. Then it's on to the modern capital of Baku in oil-rich Azerbaijan, her last stop before reaching the caravanserais of Turkey and finally the rich bazaars of Istanbul. duration 57:55   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Extreme By Design At a time of unprecedented global challenges, the under-30 "millennial" generation has every reason to be disengaged. Yet plenty of millennials are engaged. Call it the empathy revolution. This program brings this revolution to life by following three Stanford University students as they design and build products to meet basic needs of the world's poor. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG
  • 10:00 pm
    Steve Jobs - One Last Thing Gain unique insight into what made Steve Jobs tick. There has been near-universal agreement that the late Apple founder was a great innovator in business and technology, but why was he great? What were the influences that shaped his character and drove him to such success from humble beginnings? With colleagues who worked closely with him and those who have chronicled his life, take an unflinching look at the mercurial, brilliant man and review his many talents and achievements. In an exclusive, never-before-broadcast interview, Jobs expounds on his philosophy of life. Speaking shortly after coming face-to-face with his own mortality when he was diagnosed with cancer, he looked back over his astonishing career and explained the principles on which he built his success: "[Y]ou can poke life and if you push in, something will pop out the other side; you can change it, you can mold it, embrace it, make your mark upon it. Once you learn that - you'll never be the same again." duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 11:00 pm
    Undaunted: The Forgotten Giants of the Allegheny Observatory This program tells the true but largely forgotten story of the scientific pioneers behind early aviation and the founding of astrophysics. Samuel Pierpont Langley, John and Phoebe Brashear, and James Keeler embarked on studies of the sun and skies in the 19th century, an era when many dismissed astronomy as "junk science." They endured years of enormous hardships, demoralizing setbacks and humiliating failures to ultimately make world-changing contributions to science and technology. This documentary features interviews with scientists, academics, historians and observatory archivists, including astrophysicist Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson of the American Museum of Natural History. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVG
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#202] Radio Unnameable Legendary radio personality Bob Fass revolutionized late night FM radio by serving as a cultural hub for music, politics and audience participation for nearly 50 years. Long before today's innovations in social media, Fass utilized the airwaves for mobilization encouraging luminaries and ordinary listeners to talk openly and take the program in surprising directions. Fass and his committed group of friends, peers, and listeners proved time and time again through massive, planned meetups and other similar events that radio was not a solitary experience but rather a platform to unite communities of like-minded, or even just open-minded, individuals without the dependence on large scale corporate backing. Radio Unnameable is a visual and aural collage that pulls from Bob Fass's immense archive of audio from his program, film, photographs, and video that has been sitting dormant until now. Revealing the underexposed world of independent radio, the film illustrates the intimate relationship Fass and, by extension, WBAI formed with their listeners that were strong enough to maintain the station?s role as one of the most successful listener-sponsored programs in the United States. duration 1:56:45   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, December 14, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

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KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too