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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus. Read more about this transition on our FAQ page.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, December 8, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, December 8, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#201] Building Babel The film follows a year in the life of Sharif El-Gamal, developer of the so-called "Ground Zero Mosque," a Muslim-led community center two blocks from the World Trade Center. With unlimited access to his home and office, the film paints a portrait of a Muslim-American businessman up against impossible odds. A passionate Brooklyn-born Muslim, Sharif El-Gamal sees Park51 as a centerpiece of his own Muslim American identity. Born of a Polish-Catholic mother and Egyptian-Muslim father, El-Gamal only turned to Islam after 9/11 shook his faith to the core, and sees Park51 as a way to give back to the Lower Manhattan community. Married to a Muslim convert and the father of two daughters, Sharif represents an Islam that remains foreign to most Americans, especially given the way the media and politicians have continued to use Park51 as a point of controversy. Despite a principle goal of helping to rebuild Lower Manhattan, opposition to the plan has been virulent and non-stop. Thousands of Americans have rallied against the prospect of a Muslim institution being constructed in such proximity to Ground Zero, and Park51 has become an internationally discussed symbol of Islam's relationship to the Western world. Building Babel follows Park51?s development through the daily experiences and struggles of the men and women trying to make it a reality. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Global Voices [#422] A Son's Sacrifice Imran, a young Muslim American, struggles to take over his father's neighborhood halal slaughterhouse in New York City. duration 25:17   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#214] Math & English Essentials Math & English Essentials: Some may think that math and English classes have nothing in common, but as we take a look inside several high school classrooms around the country we'll see they all share a common purpose: make learning relevant. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#248H] Behind Washington's Closed Doors According to Mark Leibovich, Washington has worked for "a lot of people, a lot very good people, a lot of very bad people, and a lot of very mediocre people." And many who have made the town work for them. Reporting on Washington, DC, as chief national correspondent for The New York Times Magazine, Leibovich has written about the city's bipartisan lust for power, cash and notoriety. In his new book, This Town, he shares what the insiders of Washington are doing to the very notion of government of, by, and for the people, and details how Washington became an occupied city, its hold on reality distorted by greed and ambition. He pulls no punches and names names, revealing the movers and shakers and the deals they make, all in the name of crony capitalism. This week, Leibovich joins Bill Moyers to reveal what he has learned about a city where money rules and status is determined by who you know and what they can do for you. duration 52:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5323%] * Official jobs figures won't be released until Friday, but early indications are that November could be among the strongest months for job growth in 2013. And while the job market appears to be steadying, wages for many workers remain stagnant. President Obama spoke out this week about income inequality and the need to increase the Federal minimum wage calling the growing gap between the rich and poor "a fundamental threat to the American dream." David Wessel of The Wall Street Journal will have analysis of the latest economic indicators and explain what they reveal about the stability of the US recovery.
    * After 2 months of various technical failures, the Obama administration unveiled an overhauled healthcare website on December 1. That's led to a surge in enrollments this week, but some problems persist. Jackie Calmes of The New York Times will report on President Obama's continuing push to sell the benefits of the Affordable Care Act for uninsured Americans, especially young adults, who seem resistant to buying health insurance.
    * A judge ruled Detroit can file for bankruptcy protection to help the city shed billions of dollars in debt. But the ruling also opens the door for dramatically reduced pension payments to employees and retirees. Michael Fletcher of The Washington Post will explain why the Detroit decision could reverberate far beyond Michigan and impact public employee pensions in other cities around the country.
    * We will also have a special tribute to Nelson Mandela who passed away Thursday.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3150H] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose: The Week [#121] * Kurt Campbell, Chairman and CEO of The Asia Group on the relationship between the United States and China
    * Mike Allen on the week in politics
    * Mandy Patinkin discusses his role as Saul Berenson on Homeland
    * Donna Tartt on her latest book The Goldfinch
    * appreciations of Nelson Mandela and Peter Kaplan
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2534H] * Nelson Mandela, South Africa's liberator, dead at the age of 95
    * President Obama on closing the gap between rich and poor. Income inequality, he says, is the defining issue of our time
    * The campaign to raise the minimum wage
    * The Obamcare fix, has it been fixed?
    * Rising tensions over airspace in the East China Sea * Republican male candidates get some sensitivity training on how to run against women
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#201] Building Babel The film follows a year in the life of Sharif El-Gamal, developer of the so-called "Ground Zero Mosque," a Muslim-led community center two blocks from the World Trade Center. With unlimited access to his home and office, the film paints a portrait of a Muslim-American businessman up against impossible odds. A passionate Brooklyn-born Muslim, Sharif El-Gamal sees Park51 as a centerpiece of his own Muslim American identity. Born of a Polish-Catholic mother and Egyptian-Muslim father, El-Gamal only turned to Islam after 9/11 shook his faith to the core, and sees Park51 as a way to give back to the Lower Manhattan community. Married to a Muslim convert and the father of two daughters, Sharif represents an Islam that remains foreign to most Americans, especially given the way the media and politicians have continued to use Park51 as a point of controversy. Despite a principle goal of helping to rebuild Lower Manhattan, opposition to the plan has been virulent and non-stop. Thousands of Americans have rallied against the prospect of a Muslim institution being constructed in such proximity to Ground Zero, and Park51 has become an internationally discussed symbol of Islam's relationship to the Western world. Building Babel follows Park51?s development through the daily experiences and struggles of the men and women trying to make it a reality. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Natural Heroes [#601H] Second Nature: The Biomimicry Evolution Paint that self-cleans like a lotus leaf? Gecko-foot technology? Explore biomimicry, the science of emulating nature's best ideas to solve human problems. Set in South Africa, SECOND NATURE follows Time magazine "Hero of the Environment" Janine Benyus as she illustrates how organisms in nature can teach us to be more sustainable engineers, chemists, architects, and business leaders. After 3.8 billion years, nature has discovered how to survive and thrive. Benyus brings deep affection for the natural world as she guides us toward a vision of a planet in balance between human progress and ecosystem survival. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1714] HISPANIC PROTESTANTS - The explosive growth of the number of evangelical Protestants who are Hispanic. Deborah Potter reports on the personal religious experiences of Hispanic evangelicals in Chicago at what is now the largest Assembly of God church in the country. (Previously aired July 19, 2013)
    CHRISTMAS GIFT GIVING - The tradition of giving Christmas presents is often tied to the magi, or wise men, who according to the Bible story, brought precious gifts to the baby Jesus. But many Christians say things have gotten out of hand. The average American family is projected to spend about $750 on Christmas this year. Kim Lawton looks at the ways some churches are urging their members to avoid consumerism and practice more meaningful Christmas gift giving. (Previously aired December 14, 2012)
    WHIRLING DERVISHES - Like other major religions, Islam has a mystical branch, Sufism, which teaches many ways to experience spiritual union with the divine. One of those paths - dating from the 13th century - is dance, specifically the dancing of whirling dervishes, who were followers of the poet Rumi. Manjula Kumar, a program manager at the Smithsonian Institution, describes the origins and meaning of whirling dervish dancing. (Previously aired June 7, 2013)
    PUNDITS AND THE POPE - Two prominent Washington columnists, E.J. Dionne and Michael Gerson, assess Pope Francis's call for the Catholic Church not only to make caring for the poor a higher priority but to work for a more just economic system.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1024] Women, Investing & Retirement Part 2 In part two of WT's women, investing and retirement series, award-winning financial advisor Erin Botsford and retirement and social security expert Mary Beth Franklin discuss the kinds of financial products women need to have a secure retirement. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#314H] Financial advisor Ric Edelman schools a college student in the importance of knowing what you can expect to do with your diploma. And we also get an education about whether there's big bucks in tiny technology. Plus Jean Edelman talks about "Catching the Wave" in The Other Side of Money. All that and more in this edition of The Truth about Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2534H] * Nelson Mandela, South Africa's liberator, dead at the age of 95
    * President Obama on closing the gap between rich and poor. Income inequality, he says, is the defining issue of our time
    * The campaign to raise the minimum wage
    * The Obamcare fix, has it been fixed?
    * Rising tensions over airspace in the East China Sea * Republican male candidates get some sensitivity training on how to run against women
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3150H] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5323%] * Official jobs figures won't be released until Friday, but early indications are that November could be among the strongest months for job growth in 2013. And while the job market appears to be steadying, wages for many workers remain stagnant. President Obama spoke out this week about income inequality and the need to increase the Federal minimum wage calling the growing gap between the rich and poor "a fundamental threat to the American dream." David Wessel of The Wall Street Journal will have analysis of the latest economic indicators and explain what they reveal about the stability of the US recovery.
    * After 2 months of various technical failures, the Obama administration unveiled an overhauled healthcare website on December 1. That's led to a surge in enrollments this week, but some problems persist. Jackie Calmes of The New York Times will report on President Obama's continuing push to sell the benefits of the Affordable Care Act for uninsured Americans, especially young adults, who seem resistant to buying health insurance.
    * A judge ruled Detroit can file for bankruptcy protection to help the city shed billions of dollars in debt. But the ruling also opens the door for dramatically reduced pension payments to employees and retirees. Michael Fletcher of The Washington Post will explain why the Detroit decision could reverberate far beyond Michigan and impact public employee pensions in other cities around the country.
    * We will also have a special tribute to Nelson Mandela who passed away Thursday.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#107H] Employees Push for Living Wage, 'Extreme by Design' and Remembering Nelson Mandela
    Employees Push for Living Wage
    Fast-food workers walked off the job in cities across the country and here in the Bay Area on Thursday, pushing for higher wages. As a nationwide movement to raise the minimum wage gains support from lawmakers and President Obama, critics of a wage hike say it would stifle business, kill jobs, inflate prices and hurt the very people it's intended to help.

    Guests:
    Ken Jacobs: Chair, UC Berkeley Labor Center
    Ron Unz: Chair, Higher Wages Alliance

    Further Reporting:

    Fast Food Strikes Return

    Ballot Measure Seeks to Raise California Minimum Wage

    'Extreme by Design'
    The San Francisco Bay Area has long been known as an incubator of innovation. In some ways, the epicenter of that creativity is the Institute of Design at Stanford University. The "d.school" nurtures "outside the box thinking" in hopes of tackling some of the world's toughest problems. A new documentary film, "Extreme by Design," follows several Stanford graduate students as they attempt to create life-changing products for developing countries. Their approach, known as design thinking, challenges them to tackle problems like infant pneumonia deaths in Bangladesh and to build products with "extreme affordability." The film airs on KQED 9 on Wednesday, December 11 at 10 p.m.

    Guests:
    Ralph King: Co-Director, "Extreme by Design"
    Pamela Pavkov: Vice President, Jasper Ridge Partners

    Remembering Nelson Mandela
    Scott Shafer and Thuy Vu reflect on the death of Nelson Mandela and the role the Bay Area played in the anti-apartheid movement.
    duration 1:10:00   STEREO
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#248H] Behind Washington's Closed Doors According to Mark Leibovich, Washington has worked for "a lot of people, a lot very good people, a lot of very bad people, and a lot of very mediocre people." And many who have made the town work for them. Reporting on Washington, DC, as chief national correspondent for The New York Times Magazine, Leibovich has written about the city's bipartisan lust for power, cash and notoriety. In his new book, This Town, he shares what the insiders of Washington are doing to the very notion of government of, by, and for the people, and details how Washington became an occupied city, its hold on reality distorted by greed and ambition. He pulls no punches and names names, revealing the movers and shakers and the deals they make, all in the name of crony capitalism. This week, Leibovich joins Bill Moyers to reveal what he has learned about a city where money rules and status is determined by who you know and what they can do for you. duration 52:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    Natural Heroes [#601H] Second Nature: The Biomimicry Evolution Paint that self-cleans like a lotus leaf? Gecko-foot technology? Explore biomimicry, the science of emulating nature's best ideas to solve human problems. Set in South Africa, SECOND NATURE follows Time magazine "Hero of the Environment" Janine Benyus as she illustrates how organisms in nature can teach us to be more sustainable engineers, chemists, architects, and business leaders. After 3.8 billion years, nature has discovered how to survive and thrive. Benyus brings deep affection for the natural world as she guides us toward a vision of a planet in balance between human progress and ecosystem survival. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 1:00 pm
    World Peace and Other 4th Grade Achievements This program interweaves the story of a remarkable educator and the extraordinary game he developed to demonstrate the complexities of peace and global conflict. Teacher John Hunter's World Peace Game is a hands-on political simulation exercise in which students tackle real-world military, economic and environmental issues. The 9- and 10-year-olds divide into groups, including nation states, the World Bank, United Nations officials, indigenous peoples and even arms dealers. Then, they face daily challenges ranging from insurgencies and global warming to ethnic tensions and natural disasters. Working together, while also balancing the interests of their own "nations," they attempt to achieve global prosperity with the least amount of military intervention. As fun and engaging as the game it profiles, this documentary provides an inspirational look at the lasting impact of one wise and caring teacher on his students and, potentially, the world. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1206] Around The World - Silk Road: X'ian to Kashgar In China, Megan McCormick follows the legendary trade route along which caravans of treasures once found their way into Europe. Starting at the silk capital of Xi'an, she passes Jiayugan and the Jade Gate, once frontier towns on the edge to the uncivilized western world. Passing through the Flaming Mountains, she stops to sample the wines and grapes of Turpan, one of the lowest and hottest places on earth. After visiting a 1,000 Buddha cave in Kuqa, she ends her journey at the famous Kashgar Market where wares from east and west are still traded today. duration 56:52   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Waterbuster Filmmaker J. Carlos Peinado revisits his ancestral homeland in North Dakota to investigate the impact of the massive Garrison Dam project. Constructed in the 1950s by the Army Corps of Engineers, the dam destroyed a self-sufficient American Indian community, submerging 156, 000 acres of fertile farmland and ranchland, and ultimately displaced Peinado's family and others at the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation.
    Peinado traces the footsteps of his maternal grandmother back to the reservation, where he learns more about the building of the Garrison Dam and the effects of the federal government's relocation policies upon sovereign Indian nations. Through interviews with elders, he begins to understand the proud and resilient nature of the Mandan-Hidatsa-Arikara Nation, their contributions to American culture and history, and their deep attachment to the harsh and storied landscape of the Northwestern prairie an attachment for which they paid a heavy price.
    duration 56:46   STEREO
  • 4:00 pm
    Tales of the San Joaquin: A River Journey The San Joaquin River has been called by some the hardest working river in America and by others the most abused. This is the story of that river and the key role it plays in California's statewide water system. Designed to inform, educate, illustrate and entertain, the program travels the length of the San Joaquin from its source in the Sierra Nevada Mountains to its eventual merging with the Sacramento River as itswaters flow into San Francisco. By Christopher Beaver. duration 56:04   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 pm
    Troubled Waters: A Mississippi River Story America's Heartland is home to some of the world's most productive farmland, but this bounty comes with a price At a crossroads, the future health of America's agricultural lands and waters depends upon a combination of solutions Troubled Waters: A Mississippi River Story traces the development of America's bountiful harvest and its effect on the legendary river. Excess nitrogen and phosphorous fertilizers are contaminating the nation's waters at the same time that precious soils wash away. Farmers, scientists and citizens are seeking solutions that help meet the goals of an ambitious, food-producing nation while ensuring the long-term health and sustainability of its most precious natural resources. Troubled Waters: A Mississippi River Story examines the "unintended consequences" of farming practices on water quality, soil loss and the "dead zone" in the Gulf of Mexico. Knitting together federal energy, farm and environmental policies, the film makes a compelling case for the revamping of US agricultural policy. It also helps viewers to grasp what is a profound truth - that a single drop of water in the Upper Midwest is connected to the "dead zone" in the Gulf of Mexico. Through beautiful photography and inspiring narrative, the film puts deliberate emphasis on solutions and provides a hopeful blueprint for progress and positive change. duration 56:42   STEREO TVG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#128H] Included: Berkshire County in Massachusetts has taken "buy local" to a whole new level by creating their own currency. The BerkShare is now accepted by some 400 businesses throughout that region. Economics correspondent Paul Solman explores advantages for both consumers and storefronts. duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#107H] Employees Push for Living Wage, 'Extreme by Design' and Remembering Nelson Mandela
    Employees Push for Living Wage
    Fast-food workers walked off the job in cities across the country and here in the Bay Area on Thursday, pushing for higher wages. As a nationwide movement to raise the minimum wage gains support from lawmakers and President Obama, critics of a wage hike say it would stifle business, kill jobs, inflate prices and hurt the very people it's intended to help.

    Guests:
    Ken Jacobs: Chair, UC Berkeley Labor Center
    Ron Unz: Chair, Higher Wages Alliance

    Further Reporting:

    Fast Food Strikes Return

    Ballot Measure Seeks to Raise California Minimum Wage

    'Extreme by Design'
    The San Francisco Bay Area has long been known as an incubator of innovation. In some ways, the epicenter of that creativity is the Institute of Design at Stanford University. The "d.school" nurtures "outside the box thinking" in hopes of tackling some of the world's toughest problems. A new documentary film, "Extreme by Design," follows several Stanford graduate students as they attempt to create life-changing products for developing countries. Their approach, known as design thinking, challenges them to tackle problems like infant pneumonia deaths in Bangladesh and to build products with "extreme affordability." The film airs on KQED 9 on Wednesday, December 11 at 10 p.m.

    Guests:
    Ralph King: Co-Director, "Extreme by Design"
    Pamela Pavkov: Vice President, Jasper Ridge Partners

    Remembering Nelson Mandela
    Scott Shafer and Thuy Vu reflect on the death of Nelson Mandela and the role the Bay Area played in the anti-apartheid movement.
    duration 1:10:00   STEREO
  • 7:00 pm
    Local USA [#107] Beehive Spirits Utah is not exactly the first place you think of when talking about alcohol and liquor. But since the early days of prohibition, The Beehive State has a unique foray into distilling spirits. We retrace Utah's fight for and against alcohol with a look at the characters keeping it alive today. duration 27:25   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 pm
    Local USA [#106] Defying Disabilities Three stories question the limits of any disability: the loving marriage of two intellectually-challenged individuals in New York City; a volunteer program that introduces unlikely candidates to surfing on the North Shore of Hawaii; and a blind North Carolina hiker sets out to climb the Appalachian Trail. duration 27:30   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#248H] Behind Washington's Closed Doors According to Mark Leibovich, Washington has worked for "a lot of people, a lot very good people, a lot of very bad people, and a lot of very mediocre people." And many who have made the town work for them. Reporting on Washington, DC, as chief national correspondent for The New York Times Magazine, Leibovich has written about the city's bipartisan lust for power, cash and notoriety. In his new book, This Town, he shares what the insiders of Washington are doing to the very notion of government of, by, and for the people, and details how Washington became an occupied city, its hold on reality distorted by greed and ambition. He pulls no punches and names names, revealing the movers and shakers and the deals they make, all in the name of crony capitalism. This week, Leibovich joins Bill Moyers to reveal what he has learned about a city where money rules and status is determined by who you know and what they can do for you. duration 52:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    America Reframed [#201] Building Babel The film follows a year in the life of Sharif El-Gamal, developer of the so-called "Ground Zero Mosque," a Muslim-led community center two blocks from the World Trade Center. With unlimited access to his home and office, the film paints a portrait of a Muslim-American businessman up against impossible odds. A passionate Brooklyn-born Muslim, Sharif El-Gamal sees Park51 as a centerpiece of his own Muslim American identity. Born of a Polish-Catholic mother and Egyptian-Muslim father, El-Gamal only turned to Islam after 9/11 shook his faith to the core, and sees Park51 as a way to give back to the Lower Manhattan community. Married to a Muslim convert and the father of two daughters, Sharif represents an Islam that remains foreign to most Americans, especially given the way the media and politicians have continued to use Park51 as a point of controversy. Despite a principle goal of helping to rebuild Lower Manhattan, opposition to the plan has been virulent and non-stop. Thousands of Americans have rallied against the prospect of a Muslim institution being constructed in such proximity to Ground Zero, and Park51 has become an internationally discussed symbol of Islam's relationship to the Western world. Building Babel follows Park51?s development through the daily experiences and struggles of the men and women trying to make it a reality. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 pm
    POV [#2614H] Listening Is An Act of Love: A Storycorps Special This first-ever animated special from StoryCorps celebrates the transformative power of listening. "Listening Is an Act of Love" features six stories from 10 years of the innovative oral history project, where everyday people sit down together to share memories and tackle life's important questions. Framing these intimate conversations from across the country is an interview between StoryCorps founder Dave Isay and his inquisitive 9-year-old nephew, Benji, animated in the inimitable visual style of The Rauch Brothers. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#611] In The Shadow of the Sun An intimate story about two very different members of a remote islands' albino community in Tanzania, as a wave of brutal killings targeting people with albinism sweeps their country. duration 1:26:02   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 am
    Lost Years of Zora Neale Hurston Writer, folklorist and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston, a celebrated (and sometimes controversial) figure of the Harlem Renaissance, first rose to prominence with Mules and Men (1935) and cemented her reputation soon after with her 1937 masterwork, Their Eyes Were Watching God. However, few know about the woman behind this widely read and highly acclaimed novel - particularly the last 10 years of her life.
    This program delves into the writer's life, work and philosophies, concentrating on her very productive but often overlooked, final decade. Interviews with Hurston experts and colleagues, letters from Hurston, and archival photographs piece together this fascinating chapter in the life of an American literary icon.
    duration 26:48   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
Sunday, December 8, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED DT9 planned, very short outages, Tues 4/15 (& possibly Wed 4/16)

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED DT9′s Over the Air (OTA) signal from Sutro Tower will experience a few extremely brief outages on Tuesday 4/15 between 10am and 5pm (and possibly on Wed 4/16 if the work cannot be completed in 1 day). Each outage should be measurable in seconds (not minutes). This work will not affect […]

    • KQET DT25 Planned Outage: early Tues 4/15 (btwn 5am-6am)

      (DT 25.1, 25.2, 25.3) At some point between 5am and 6am early Tuesday 4/15, KQET’s signal from the transmitter on Fremont Peak northeast of Monterey will shut down for a short period of time to allow AT&T to do work on our fiber interface. The outage should be relatively short, but its precise start time […]

    • Occasional sound issues, Comcast Cable, Black remote control

      Originally posted 6/19/2013: Some Comcast Basic Cable customers around the Bay Area have reported audio issues with KQED and KQED Plus, on channels 9 and 10. The problem is not related to KQED’s transmission but may be caused by the language setting on your Comcast remote control. If your Comcast remote control is black, please […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too