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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, December 1, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, December 1, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#119] After Happily Ever After Emmy winning filmmaker Kate Schermerhorn's quirky, funny and movingpersonal quest for the secret to a happy marriage and for answers to some timely questions about an institution which might just be due for some review. This engaging doc features an eclectic mix of long married couples - from a couple who dress alike every day; to a pair of nudists and a newlywed pair of mothers, to a feisty English widow. A lively and world-renowned group of marriage experts - including psychologist John Gottman (who can predict divorce with 90% accuracy), marrriage historian Stephanie Coontz, and a Beverly Hills divorce attorney, ground the film in fact as they piece together the history and possible future and motivations for marriage. Along the way, Schermerhorn chronicles the joys and heartbreaks of her own marriage and finds that even the best advice can?t always guarantee a happily ever after. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    POV [#2511H] Sun Kissed When a Navajo couple discovers their children have a disorder that makes exposure to sunlight fatal, they also learn their reservation is a hotbed for this rare genetic disease. Why? "Sun Kissed" follows Dorey and Yolanda Nez as they confront cultural taboos, tribal history and their own unconventional choices to learn the shocking truth: the consequences of the Navajos' Long Walk -- their forced relocation by the U.S. military in 1864 --are far from over. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#212] Kindergarten Common Core Kindergarten Common Core: We're heading to kindergarten classrooms where many students are getting their very first exposure to the Common Core State Standards. Good foundations for math and literacy start here-but that doesn't mean the students aren't having fun! duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#247H] Wendell Berry: Poet & Prophet * Wendell Berry, a quiet and humble man, has become an outspoken advocate for revolution. He urges immediate action as he mourns how America has turned its back on the land and rejected Jeffersonian principles of respect for the environment and sustainable agriculture. Berry warns, "People who own the world outright for profit will have to be stopped; by influence, by power, by us." In a rare television interview, this visionary, author - and farmer - discusses a sensible, but no-compromise plan to save the Earth.
    In an encore broadcast, Bill Moyers profiles this passionate advocate, a man of the land and one of America's most influential writers, whose prolific career includes more than 40 books of poetry, novels, short stories, and essays. This one-on-one conversation was taped at Kentucky's St. Catharine College during a two-day celebrating Wendell Berry's life and ideas and marking the 35th anniversary of the publication of his landmark book, The Unsettling of America.
    Berry, described by environmental activist Bill McKibben as "a prophet of responsibility," lives and works on the Kentucky farm where his family has tilled the soil for 200 years. He's a man of action as well as words. In 2011, he joined a four-day sit-in at the Kentucky governor's office to protest mountaintop mining, a brutally destructive method of extracting coal. Moyers explores Berry's views on civil disobedience as well as his strong opposition to agribusiness and massive industrial farms, as well as his support for sustainable farming and the local food movement.
    "It's mighty hard right now to think of anything that's precious that isn't endangered," Berry tells Moyers. "There are no sacred and unsacred places; there are only sacred and desecrated places. My belief is that the world and our life in it are conditional gifts. We have the world to live in on the condition that we will take good care of it. And to take good care of it we have to know it. And to know it and to be willing to take care of it, we have to love it."
    * Also on the broadcast, Bill presents the short documentary Dance of the Honey Bee. Narrated by Bill McKibben, the film takes a look at the determined, beautiful and vital role honey bees play in preserving life, as well as the threats bees face from a rapidly changing landscape. "Not only are we dependent on the honey bee for much of what we eat," says Bill, "there is, of course, a grace and elegance they bring to the natural world that would diminish us all were they to disappear."
    duration 52:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5322H] duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3149H] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#120] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2533H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#119] After Happily Ever After Emmy winning filmmaker Kate Schermerhorn's quirky, funny and movingpersonal quest for the secret to a happy marriage and for answers to some timely questions about an institution which might just be due for some review. This engaging doc features an eclectic mix of long married couples - from a couple who dress alike every day; to a pair of nudists and a newlywed pair of mothers, to a feisty English widow. A lively and world-renowned group of marriage experts - including psychologist John Gottman (who can predict divorce with 90% accuracy), marrriage historian Stephanie Coontz, and a Beverly Hills divorce attorney, ground the film in fact as they piece together the history and possible future and motivations for marriage. Along the way, Schermerhorn chronicles the joys and heartbreaks of her own marriage and finds that even the best advice can?t always guarantee a happily ever after. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Focus On Europe [#3148] Un Calls for End of Racist Santa Spectacle TURKEY: TRIALS AGAINST THE STATE - Crimes committed by the state in the 1990s are only now going to trial in Turkey. Relatives of the victims are hoping for justice. But time is running out: the statute of limitations is 20 years. Kurdish and Turkish families alike suffered from the crimes. The state is accused of ordering the annihilation of entire Kurdish villages. But members of the Turkish military also paid with their lives if, for example, they were too lenient with the Kurds. These were political murders and, for years, the real killers remained confident they'd never be called to account. The government had blamed most of the killings on the armed wing of the PKK, the Kurdistan Workers' Party.
    NORWAY: KING CRABS SAVE JOBS - Many Norwegians used to leave the villages in the north of the country because there were no jobs. Now they're coming back. Thanks to king crabs, the fishermen, at least, can count on a lucrative business. The crabs migrated from Russian waters. The giant creatures can measure up to two meters across. As well as the locals, tourists are also coming back for a look at the sensational crabs. However oceanographers worry that over time the king crabs could displace marine life that has been living in the arctic waters for millions of years.
    HUNGARY/AUSTRIA: BANNING THE HOMELESS - Hungary's constitution had to be amended to allow for the criminalization of the homeless. Now many homeless people are leaving Hungary for Austria. In some areas of Hungary, the homeless are banned from bunking down in popular tourist areas. Several districts in the capital Budapest ban sleeping on the streets. Critics say it's just more proof of the conservative Hungarian government's disregard for basic human rights. Some of the homeless hoping for a better life are trying their luck in neighboring Austria, but there they could also face bans and fines.
    THE NETHERLANDS: CONTROVERSIAL ST. NICHOLAS - The Netherlands' version of St. Nicholas - Sinterklaas - has been getting a dressing down. The UN calls the Sinterklaas spectacle racist and wants it abolished. In centuries' old tradition, Sinterklaas travels through the country with a band of helpers in black face. And that's the problem. The character is known as Zwarte Piet, or Black Pete, and for years was portrayed as a dimwit. Opponents call the tradition racist. Many Dutch are outraged and have organized protests. Traditionally Sinterklaas brings presents for Dutch children each November.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 am
    QUEST [#311] Profile: Sylvia Earle/SETI: The New Search for ET QUEST profiles marine scientist and deep sea explorer Sylvia Earle, and find out why SETI scientists now say we might be hearing from ET sooner than you think. duration 26:18   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1713] METHODIST GAY MARRIAGE CONTROVERSY - The issue of same-sex marriage continues to roil the United Methodist Church, the nation's second-largest Protestant denomination. Last week, a Methodist court convicted a Pennsylvania pastor of violating church law after he officiated at a gay wedding. He will be defrocked ifhe does not withdraw his support for same-sex marriage in 30 days. And other church trials on the issue are still ahead. Betty Rollin speaks with Rev. Tom Ogletree, a United Methodist scholar and former Dean of the Yale Divinity School and the Drew Divinity School, in New Jersey, who faces a possible trial for officiating at the marriage of his gay son. Rev. Ogletree says there is "no concept of homosexuality or sexual orientation at all" in scripture. But Rev. Rob Renfroe of the Woodland United Methodist Church, near Houston, is among Methodists who insist "there is not any passage in scripture that is condoning or accepting of that practice." (Originally aired on September 20, 2013)
    TAYLOR BRANCH ON 1963 - Last week the nation marked the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Pulitzer Prize-winning author Taylor Branch says that event was among several major milestones in 1963that played a key role in struggle for civil rights. "1963 is without a doubt the breakthrough pivotal year" for Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and the civil rights movement, says Branch, whose latest book is called The King Years. Managing editor Kim Lawton talks with Branch about some of those events and the central role churches played in all of them.(Originally aired on June 21, 2013)
    GETTYSBURG ADDRESS 150THANNIVERSARY - Students and tutors from Washington DC's New York Avenue Presbyterian Church's after-school tutoring program Community Club recite the Gettysburg Address in honor of its 150thAnniversary. The club meets at the church every week and provides dinner, academic tutoring and mentorship to DC students ranging in age from 5 to18. New York Presbyterian is also the church where President Lincoln rented a pew and sometimes attended services.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1023] Active Vs. Passive This week WT tackles the active versus passive investing debate. Which strategy is best for you? Vanguard's Daniel Wallick and award-winning financial planner Gregg Fisher argue the pros and cons. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#313H] Ric Edelman offers some blunt financial advice to a man unable to save even though he's working three jobs. Plus which is more important: sending your kids to college or saving for retirement? And will tomorrow's robots make our workload easier or will they eliminate human jobs? And in The Other Side of Money Jean Edelman explains the impact of too much clutter. All that and much more on this episode of Truth about Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2533H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3149H] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5322H] duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    Echoes of a Lost Valley Travel deep into California's past to its geological birth. See the plants, the animals and the Native Californians who thrived for hundreds of years before the first European explorers laid eyes on the Central Valley. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#247H] Wendell Berry: Poet & Prophet * Wendell Berry, a quiet and humble man, has become an outspoken advocate for revolution. He urges immediate action as he mourns how America has turned its back on the land and rejected Jeffersonian principles of respect for the environment and sustainable agriculture. Berry warns, "People who own the world outright for profit will have to be stopped; by influence, by power, by us." In a rare television interview, this visionary, author - and farmer - discusses a sensible, but no-compromise plan to save the Earth.
    In an encore broadcast, Bill Moyers profiles this passionate advocate, a man of the land and one of America's most influential writers, whose prolific career includes more than 40 books of poetry, novels, short stories, and essays. This one-on-one conversation was taped at Kentucky's St. Catharine College during a two-day celebrating Wendell Berry's life and ideas and marking the 35th anniversary of the publication of his landmark book, The Unsettling of America.
    Berry, described by environmental activist Bill McKibben as "a prophet of responsibility," lives and works on the Kentucky farm where his family has tilled the soil for 200 years. He's a man of action as well as words. In 2011, he joined a four-day sit-in at the Kentucky governor's office to protest mountaintop mining, a brutally destructive method of extracting coal. Moyers explores Berry's views on civil disobedience as well as his strong opposition to agribusiness and massive industrial farms, as well as his support for sustainable farming and the local food movement.
    "It's mighty hard right now to think of anything that's precious that isn't endangered," Berry tells Moyers. "There are no sacred and unsacred places; there are only sacred and desecrated places. My belief is that the world and our life in it are conditional gifts. We have the world to live in on the condition that we will take good care of it. And to take good care of it we have to know it. And to know it and to be willing to take care of it, we have to love it."
    * Also on the broadcast, Bill presents the short documentary Dance of the Honey Bee. Narrated by Bill McKibben, the film takes a look at the determined, beautiful and vital role honey bees play in preserving life, as well as the threats bees face from a rapidly changing landscape. "Not only are we dependent on the honey bee for much of what we eat," says Bill, "there is, of course, a grace and elegance they bring to the natural world that would diminish us all were they to disappear."
    duration 52:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    QUEST [#311] Profile: Sylvia Earle/SETI: The New Search for ET QUEST profiles marine scientist and deep sea explorer Sylvia Earle, and find out why SETI scientists now say we might be hearing from ET sooner than you think. duration 26:18   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    POV [#2511H] Sun Kissed When a Navajo couple discovers their children have a disorder that makes exposure to sunlight fatal, they also learn their reservation is a hotbed for this rare genetic disease. Why? "Sun Kissed" follows Dorey and Yolanda Nez as they confront cultural taboos, tribal history and their own unconventional choices to learn the shocking truth: the consequences of the Navajos' Long Walk -- their forced relocation by the U.S. military in 1864 --are far from over. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 2:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1205] Around The World - Pacific Journeys: Tonga to New Caledonia Zay's island-hopping escapades take him now to the independent Kingdom of Tonga and then on to multi-cultural Fiji, once home to cannibals and Indian plantation workers that were brought to the islands to harvest sugar cane. In Norfolk Island, we learn about its convict past while the hills of New Caledonia make a perfect setting for an island trek to the country's native inhabitants. Zay ends his journey in Noumea, where the Kanak people's culture is celebrated at the Tibijao Cultural Center, an architectural marvel that combines ancient knowledge with modern techniques. duration 56:42   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Nature [#2904] My Life As A Turkey Based on a true story. Deep in the wilds of Florida, writer and naturalist Joe Hutto was given the rare opportunity to raise wild turkeys from chicks. Hutto spent each day out and about as a "wild turkey" with his family of chicks until the day came when he had to let his children grow up and go off on their own. As it turned out, this was harder than he ever imagined. Hutto's story eventually became a book, Illuminations in the Flatlands. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    Nature [#3004#] An Original DUCKumentary Working with "Hummingbirds" producer Ann Prum, Nature features another popular, beautiful and fascinating bird - the duck. The story follows a wood duck family and discovers how a male and female create a bond, migrate together across thousands of miles, nurture and protect a brood of chicks and come full circle as they head to their wintering grounds. But our stars are just one of some 150 species of ducks. They come in all shapes and sizes and abilities - some are dabblers popping in and out of the surface of a glass lake and others swim with powerful webbed feet underwater. They fly through the air on short, stubby wings, traveling in large, energy-efficient formations over thousands of miles. Some are noisy and gregarious, others shy and elusive. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nature [#3012] The Private Life of Deer From our kitchen windows we spot them, nibbling away at our gardens and shrubs. They wander along our highways, reminders of the wilderness we have paved our way through. From coast to coast some 30 million white-tailed deer make their home in the United States. But once they retreat from our view, where do they go? What secrets do they carry back into the forest, away from our prying eyes? Deer are among the most highly-studied mammals in the world; but does any typical homeowner with deer in the yard know how long a deer can live? When they sleep? How many babies a doe can have each year? Working with scientists, special camera equipment, and deer experts and devotees of every kind, Nature reveals the hidden world of white-tailed deer in a whole new light. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#126H] Included: art and politics meet in the work of exiled Iranian artist Nicky Nodjoumi. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Echoes of a Lost Valley Travel deep into California's past to its geological birth. See the plants, the animals and the Native Californians who thrived for hundreds of years before the first European explorers laid eyes on the Central Valley. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 pm
    Local USA [#106] Defying Disabilities Three stories question the limits of any disability: the loving marriage of two intellectually-challenged individuals in New York City; a volunteer program that introduces unlikely candidates to surfing on the North Shore of Hawaii; and a blind North Carolina hiker sets out to climb the Appalachian Trail. duration 27:30   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 pm
    Local USA [#105] Native American Culture Three stories about the modern Native American culture: A look at how climate change is effecting a Pacific Northwest tribe known as the "Salmon People" and how science can help find a solution; the Lincoln, Nebraska rock star artist who's creating sculptures, linking the past to the present; and the fight an Oklahoma tribe tries to revive their fading language. duration 26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#247H] Wendell Berry: Poet & Prophet * Wendell Berry, a quiet and humble man, has become an outspoken advocate for revolution. He urges immediate action as he mourns how America has turned its back on the land and rejected Jeffersonian principles of respect for the environment and sustainable agriculture. Berry warns, "People who own the world outright for profit will have to be stopped; by influence, by power, by us." In a rare television interview, this visionary, author - and farmer - discusses a sensible, but no-compromise plan to save the Earth.
    In an encore broadcast, Bill Moyers profiles this passionate advocate, a man of the land and one of America's most influential writers, whose prolific career includes more than 40 books of poetry, novels, short stories, and essays. This one-on-one conversation was taped at Kentucky's St. Catharine College during a two-day celebrating Wendell Berry's life and ideas and marking the 35th anniversary of the publication of his landmark book, The Unsettling of America.
    Berry, described by environmental activist Bill McKibben as "a prophet of responsibility," lives and works on the Kentucky farm where his family has tilled the soil for 200 years. He's a man of action as well as words. In 2011, he joined a four-day sit-in at the Kentucky governor's office to protest mountaintop mining, a brutally destructive method of extracting coal. Moyers explores Berry's views on civil disobedience as well as his strong opposition to agribusiness and massive industrial farms, as well as his support for sustainable farming and the local food movement.
    "It's mighty hard right now to think of anything that's precious that isn't endangered," Berry tells Moyers. "There are no sacred and unsacred places; there are only sacred and desecrated places. My belief is that the world and our life in it are conditional gifts. We have the world to live in on the condition that we will take good care of it. And to take good care of it we have to know it. And to know it and to be willing to take care of it, we have to love it."
    * Also on the broadcast, Bill presents the short documentary Dance of the Honey Bee. Narrated by Bill McKibben, the film takes a look at the determined, beautiful and vital role honey bees play in preserving life, as well as the threats bees face from a rapidly changing landscape. "Not only are we dependent on the honey bee for much of what we eat," says Bill, "there is, of course, a grace and elegance they bring to the natural world that would diminish us all were they to disappear."
    duration 52:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    America Reframed [#119] After Happily Ever After Emmy winning filmmaker Kate Schermerhorn's quirky, funny and movingpersonal quest for the secret to a happy marriage and for answers to some timely questions about an institution which might just be due for some review. This engaging doc features an eclectic mix of long married couples - from a couple who dress alike every day; to a pair of nudists and a newlywed pair of mothers, to a feisty English widow. A lively and world-renowned group of marriage experts - including psychologist John Gottman (who can predict divorce with 90% accuracy), marrriage historian Stephanie Coontz, and a Beverly Hills divorce attorney, ground the film in fact as they piece together the history and possible future and motivations for marriage. Along the way, Schermerhorn chronicles the joys and heartbreaks of her own marriage and finds that even the best advice can?t always guarantee a happily ever after. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Frontline [#3017] Endgame: AIDS In Black America Every 10 minutes, someone in the U.S. contracts HIV. Half are black. Thirty years after the discovery of the AIDS virus among gay white men, nearly half of the one million people in the United States infected with HIV are black men, women and children. "If Black America was a country unto itself, it would have the 16th worst epidemic in the world," says Phill Wilson, head of the Black AIDS Institute. "Endgame: AIDS in Black America" is an exploration of one of the country's most urgent, preventable health crises. The film traces the history of the epidemic through the experiences of extraordinary individuals who tell their stories. People like Nel, a 63-year-old grandmother, who married a deacon in her church and later found an HIV diagnosis tucked into his Bible; Tom and Keith, who call themselves "Bornies," survivors who were children born with the virus in the early 1990s; and Jovante, a high school football player who didn't realize what HIV meant until it was too late. From Magic Johnson to civil rights pioneer Julian Bond, from pastors to health workers, people on the front lines tell moving stories of the battle to contain the spread of the virus, and the opportunity to finally turn the tide of the epidemic. Written, produced an directed by Renata Simone, the producer of the 2006 Frontline series, "The Age of AIDS." duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Global Voices [#610] Blessed Is The Match The first documentary feature about Hannah Senesh, a World War II-era poet and diarist who became a paratrooper, resistance fighter and modern-day Joan of Arc. Safe in Palestine in 1944, Hannah joined a mission to rescue Jews in her native Hungary. Hannah parachuted behind enemy lines, was captured, tortured, and ultimately executed by the Nazis. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Sunday, December 1, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too