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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, November 17, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, November 17, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#207] The Way We Get By On call 24 hours a day for the past five years, a group of senior citizens has made history by greeting nearly 800,000 American troops at a tiny airport in Bangor, Maine. This film is an intimate look at three of these greeters as they confront the universal losses that come with aging and rediscover their reason for living. Bill Knight, Jerry Mundy and Joan Gaudet find the strength to overcome their personal battles and transform their lives through service. This inspirational and surprising story shatters the stereotypes of today's senior citizens as the greeters redefine the meaning of community. duration 1:28:26   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Native Waters: A Chitimacha Recollection The Chitimacha, the 1000-member tribe known as "the People of Many Waters," are heirs to an unbroken 8000-year past. Living off the bounty of Louisiana's Atchafalaya Basin, one of the richest inland estuaries on the continent, this indigenous nation persists and rejuvenates its culture despite gradually losing its ancestral territory to environmental and man-made forces. This program journeys into sacred places of the Atchafalaya Basin with author Roger Stouff, the son of the last chief of the Chitimacha Indians and a keeper of his family's oral tradition. Stouff shares native stories, beliefs and perspectives about this often overlooked people. An avid fly-fisherman, Stouff laments the certain demise of the river basin, the depletion of its sacred fishing and hunting grounds and the painful "vanishings" of the time-honored Chitimacha way of life. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#307] Middle School Math & Science We'll immerse ourselves in Middle School math and science-from using your whole body to graph linear equations to going on a pond water safari-these classes are engaging and inventive. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#245H] The Path of Positive Resistance * Between them, doctors Jill Stein and Margaret Flowers have been arrested 9 times. In the face of injustice and government by the 1%, rather than look the other way and stick to practicing medicine they chose a different approach.
    At first they took separate paths. Margaret Flowers fought for single payer health insurance. She works for the organization Physicians for a National Health Program and is a contributor to PopularResistance.org, a website advocating nonviolent direct action against injustice. Jill Stein advocated for campaign finance reform in her home state of Massachusetts, working in 1998 with others in her community to pass the Clean Election Law. She co-founded the Massachusetts Coalition for Healthy Communities in 2003 and represented the Green-Rainbow Party for governor in 2002, for State Representative in 2004 and for Secretary of State in 2006. She was the Green Party candidate for president in 2012.
    Now Stein and Flowers are both members of the Green Shadow Cabinet, a group of 100 prominent men and women offering alternative policy and speaking out in an organized voice against a dysfunctional government. Stein serves as president and Flowers as secretary of health. Each fights against political corruption and a host of grievances that that have led many people to cynicism and despair.
    This week, Bill Moyers speaks with Stein and Flowers about their personal journeys, what they have learned about our political system along the way and why they continue to fight the good fight. "Once you start speaking truth to power and standing up for the right things, it's very empowering," Margaret Flowers tells Bill. "After the Occupy movement disbanded and people kept saying, 'Oh, it's gone, it went away,' it didn't go away. It inspired others to stand up for their rights. So we see low wage workers all around the country standing up. And now states that are starting to raise their minimum wages. We see anti-foreclosure activists fighting back and people being able to stay in their homes. We see communities creating democratic economic institutions so that they can lift themselves out of poverty. These things are happening. They're not covered in the mass media. They're not funded by the big funders. But they're happening in this country. "
    * Also on the broadcast, Bill reports back on viewer response to our recent segments on drone attacks and government surveillance and previews the new film "Following the Ninth," a documentary exploring the worldwide cultural and political influence of Beethoven's masterpiece, the Ninth Symphony, and its majestic "Ode to Joy."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5320H] * Thursday, President Obama unveiled a plan to fix a provision of the Affordable Care Act that will allow policy holders whose current insurance plans were canceled to get 1-year extensions even if they don't conform to all the new health care laws. He also admitted that the administration "fumbled" last month's roll-out of the healthcare exchange program. On Wednesday the administration announced that only 106,000 people enrolled on the state and federal insurance exchanges since they opened on October 1.
    Republicans remain skeptical that the Affordable Care Act can be "fixed." The House will vote on Friday on a Republican bill to permanently change the health care law to allow insurance companies to continue selling existing policies that do not comply with the law's new standards. Meanwhile the president admitted that troubles in implementing the ACA have "put a burden on Democrats" whose constituents are unhappy that they might lose their current health insurance plans despite the president's assurances that if they liked their existing plans, they could keep them.
    Joining Gwen Ifill to explore the proposed solution to fix Obamacare and whether the ongoing political battle over the president's signature legislative achievement could stall other legislative priorities including a long-term budget deal, immigration reform and passing a farm bill: Dan Balz of The Washington Post, John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times, and Jeff Zeleny of ABC News.
    * Secretary of State John Kerry remains optimistic that the US and international community will be able to reach a deal with Iran over its nuclear program before the end of the month. Kerry returned to Washington this week empty-handed after talks in Geneva failed to yield an interim deal. Kerry spent part of the week trying to persuade skeptical lawmakers on Capitol Hill determined to impose a new wave of sanctions on Iran that some members of Congress believe would give the US increased leverage in negotiations. Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News traveled with the secretary of state and will report on the sticking points of a deal to limit Iran's nuclear program.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3147H] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#118] * Stephen Chu on the typhoon in the Philippines * Mike Allen on the week in politics * Claire Danes of Homeland * Patrick Stewart and Ian McKellen discuss performing Pinter's No Man's Land and Beckett's Waiting for Godot * Actor Bruce Dern on his role in Alexander Payne's Nebraska * Henry Louis Gates Jr. on his 6-part documentary 'The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross' duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2531H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#207] The Way We Get By On call 24 hours a day for the past five years, a group of senior citizens has made history by greeting nearly 800,000 American troops at a tiny airport in Bangor, Maine. This film is an intimate look at three of these greeters as they confront the universal losses that come with aging and rediscover their reason for living. Bill Knight, Jerry Mundy and Joan Gaudet find the strength to overcome their personal battles and transform their lives through service. This inspirational and surprising story shatters the stereotypes of today's senior citizens as the greeters redefine the meaning of community. duration 1:28:26   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    QUEST [#701H] Next Meal: Engineering Food Discover how genetically engineered crops are made, their pros and cons, and what the future might hold for research and regulations such as labeling. In a half-hour special, QUEST Northern California explores genetically engineered crops in the wake of Proposition 37, the November 2012 initiative that would have required foods containing genetically engineered ingredients to be labeled in California. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1711] GUN VIOLENCE AND THE FAITH COMMUNITY - Next month marks 1 year since the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, which killed 20 children and 6 staff members. Kim Lawton reports that over the last several months, a growing interfaith movement has been mobilizing to stop gun violence. She also talks with faith-based activists who are opposing any new gun control laws.
    THE LONG FORGOTTEN MENTALLY ILL - Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on re-discovering the identity and restoring the dignity of long-deceased inmates of a former Minnesota state mental institution. Once, they were buried in nameless graves marked only with numbers. Now they are getting headstones with their names on them, and their stories reveal a dark history of neglect.
    AMERICAN CATHOLICS - On the eve of the 50th anniversary of President Kennedy's assassination, Host Bob Abernethy talks with Catholic Church authority Father Thomas Reese on changes in attitudes toward Catholics in the US brought about by JFK's election as well as the influence of Pope Francis on the priorities of Catholic leaders today.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1021] Mutual Fund Shakeups This week WT looks at major changes in the mutual fund industry. Investors are deserting actively managed funds for passive ones and fleeing bond funds for other sources of income. In their first joint television appearance, two Morningstar veterans - Christine Benz, Director of Personal Finance and Russel Kinnel, Director of Mutual Fund Research - tell us what it all means for investors and their funds. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#311H] Ric Edelman says real estate was a rock solid investment for decades, but is that still true today or is the stock market a better investment? Technological advances are moving forward at breakneck speeds and Ric talks with an expert about which industries investors should consider targeting. And in The other Side of Money Jean Edelman explains how change is good. All that and much more in this edition of The Truth about Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2531H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3147H] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5320H] * Thursday, President Obama unveiled a plan to fix a provision of the Affordable Care Act that will allow policy holders whose current insurance plans were canceled to get 1-year extensions even if they don't conform to all the new health care laws. He also admitted that the administration "fumbled" last month's roll-out of the healthcare exchange program. On Wednesday the administration announced that only 106,000 people enrolled on the state and federal insurance exchanges since they opened on October 1.
    Republicans remain skeptical that the Affordable Care Act can be "fixed." The House will vote on Friday on a Republican bill to permanently change the health care law to allow insurance companies to continue selling existing policies that do not comply with the law's new standards. Meanwhile the president admitted that troubles in implementing the ACA have "put a burden on Democrats" whose constituents are unhappy that they might lose their current health insurance plans despite the president's assurances that if they liked their existing plans, they could keep them.
    Joining Gwen Ifill to explore the proposed solution to fix Obamacare and whether the ongoing political battle over the president's signature legislative achievement could stall other legislative priorities including a long-term budget deal, immigration reform and passing a farm bill: Dan Balz of The Washington Post, John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times, and Jeff Zeleny of ABC News.
    * Secretary of State John Kerry remains optimistic that the US and international community will be able to reach a deal with Iran over its nuclear program before the end of the month. Kerry returned to Washington this week empty-handed after talks in Geneva failed to yield an interim deal. Kerry spent part of the week trying to persuade skeptical lawmakers on Capitol Hill determined to impose a new wave of sanctions on Iran that some members of Congress believe would give the US increased leverage in negotiations. Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News traveled with the secretary of state and will report on the sticking points of a deal to limit Iran's nuclear program.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#105H] Napolitano Outlines Vision for UC and New Study Examines California's Criminal Justice Experiment
    A Conversation With UC President Janet Napolitano
    In her first address to the University of California Board of Regents this week, UC President Janet Napolitano proposed freezing tuition and other reforms. The former U.S. Department of Homeland Security secretary and governor of Arizona sits down with Scott Shafer to discuss her vision for the 10-campus system and responds to criticism of her record on immigration.

    Further Reporting: For Napolitano, UC Could Be a Stepping Stone to California Politics

    Examining California's Criminal Justice Experiment
    Two years into California's massive criminal justice experiment dubbed "realignment," a new Stanford University study examines how the reforms are playing out across the state's 58 counties, many with different resources and distinct approaches. Since realignment went into effect, more than 100,000 prisoners have been diverted from state prisons to county jails or probation. While some law enforcement agencies report rising crime rates and a decline in public safety, other agencies say they have renewed their emphasis on rehabilitation.

    Additional Resources: Prison Break: California Rethinks Criminal Justice, a KQED-CIR co-production

    Silicon Valley Space Ventures Blast Off
    Silicon Valley is known for game-changing innovation. Now, some local startups are trying to change the game in the space industry, where the stakes — and rewards — are sky-high. This video segment examines a new wave of for-profit companies demonstrating that this final frontier is no longer the exclusive domain of the federal government.

    Additional Resources: Silicon Valley Goes to Space
    duration 1:20:00   STEREO
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#245H] The Path of Positive Resistance * Between them, doctors Jill Stein and Margaret Flowers have been arrested 9 times. In the face of injustice and government by the 1%, rather than look the other way and stick to practicing medicine they chose a different approach.
    At first they took separate paths. Margaret Flowers fought for single payer health insurance. She works for the organization Physicians for a National Health Program and is a contributor to PopularResistance.org, a website advocating nonviolent direct action against injustice. Jill Stein advocated for campaign finance reform in her home state of Massachusetts, working in 1998 with others in her community to pass the Clean Election Law. She co-founded the Massachusetts Coalition for Healthy Communities in 2003 and represented the Green-Rainbow Party for governor in 2002, for State Representative in 2004 and for Secretary of State in 2006. She was the Green Party candidate for president in 2012.
    Now Stein and Flowers are both members of the Green Shadow Cabinet, a group of 100 prominent men and women offering alternative policy and speaking out in an organized voice against a dysfunctional government. Stein serves as president and Flowers as secretary of health. Each fights against political corruption and a host of grievances that that have led many people to cynicism and despair.
    This week, Bill Moyers speaks with Stein and Flowers about their personal journeys, what they have learned about our political system along the way and why they continue to fight the good fight. "Once you start speaking truth to power and standing up for the right things, it's very empowering," Margaret Flowers tells Bill. "After the Occupy movement disbanded and people kept saying, 'Oh, it's gone, it went away,' it didn't go away. It inspired others to stand up for their rights. So we see low wage workers all around the country standing up. And now states that are starting to raise their minimum wages. We see anti-foreclosure activists fighting back and people being able to stay in their homes. We see communities creating democratic economic institutions so that they can lift themselves out of poverty. These things are happening. They're not covered in the mass media. They're not funded by the big funders. But they're happening in this country. "
    * Also on the broadcast, Bill reports back on viewer response to our recent segments on drone attacks and government surveillance and previews the new film "Following the Ninth," a documentary exploring the worldwide cultural and political influence of Beethoven's masterpiece, the Ninth Symphony, and its majestic "Ode to Joy."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    QUEST [#701H] Next Meal: Engineering Food Discover how genetically engineered crops are made, their pros and cons, and what the future might hold for research and regulations such as labeling. In a half-hour special, QUEST Northern California explores genetically engineered crops in the wake of Proposition 37, the November 2012 initiative that would have required foods containing genetically engineered ingredients to be labeled in California. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Sacred Stick This program examines the historical, cultural, and spiritual aspects of lacrosse. From the ancient Maya to the world famous Iroquois Nationals team, this program explores the cultural diffusion and transmutation of a uniquely indigenous sport that, like Native people themselves, adapted and endured within the dominant culture. The film is intended for both a general audience, for whom lacrosse is the fastest growing sport in the country, and a Native American-specific audience for whom lacrosse has deep cultural meaning. duration 56:50   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1203] Around The World - Panamericana: Incas & Inquisitions Brianna Barnes journeys to Peru, home of the legendary Incas, where she begins her trek in Cajamarca, where thousands of Incan soldiers were slaughtered by Pizarro's conquistadors. After visiting one of the world's largest gold mines, Brianna makes her way to Lima, the "City of Kings," once home to the Spanish Inquisition in South America. In Cusco, she learns about the golden Inca Empire before ending her journey on the volcano El Misti, where incredibly well-preserved ice mummies tell the story of the country's illustrious past. duration 56:07   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Nature [#3103] Parrot Confidential Meet Lou. Abandoned in a foreclosed home, Lou is one of thousands of parrots in need of rescue. From the wilds of Costa Rica to suburban America, a loveable, quirky cast of parrots reveal their unforgettable tales and the bittersweet world they share with humans. Their outrageous intelligence and uncanny ability to communicate in any language has made parrots one of the world's most popular pets. But unlike dogs and cats, parrots have not been domesticated. Hard wired for the wild, their ear-shattering squawks and unpredictable behavior are designed for the rain forest, not the suburbs. Add a lifespan of 50 plus years to their intense need to bond and a life in captivity often ends in disaster. With shelters and sanctuaries bursting at the seams, too many birds like Lou have no place to go. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    Nova [#4022H] Cold Case JFK For decades, the assassination of John F. Kennedy has fueled dark rumors of conspiracies and mishandled evidence. Now, 50 years later, Nova asks: Could modern investigators do better? We'll see how state-of-the art forensic tools would be applied to the investigation were it to happen today. At the same time, Nova takes a critical look at contemporary cases, like the murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman, to reveal how charges of evidence mishandling and human error can mar even scientifically sophisticated detective work. Will forensics ever be truly foolproof, or does modern technology just give a scientific sheen to a practice that will always be more art than science? duration 54:35   STEREO TVPG-V
  • 5:00 pm
    Secrets of the Dead [#1301] JFK: One PM Central Standard Time Fifty years after the tragic shooting of President John F. Kennedy, this episode chronicles minute-by-minute the assassination as it was revealed in the CBS newsroom from the moment the President was shot until Walter Cronkite's emotional pronouncement of his death, one hour and eight minutes later. The drama of "One P.M. Central Standard Time" -- the episode title is taken from the time President Kennedy was declared dead at Parkland Hospital -- is played out amidst the chaos in Dallas, in the hospital, and in the CBS newsroom in New York. Included in the program will be moving memories from men and women who were there on the day -- in Dallas and New York. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#122H] Included: for more than 70 years, the General Educational Development exam, or the GED, has been an important tool for those who didn't complete high school and immigrants looking to make inroads in to higher education or secure better jobs. We take a look at the overhaul to the exam set to take effect in January 2014. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#105H] Napolitano Outlines Vision for UC and New Study Examines California's Criminal Justice Experiment
    A Conversation With UC President Janet Napolitano
    In her first address to the University of California Board of Regents this week, UC President Janet Napolitano proposed freezing tuition and other reforms. The former U.S. Department of Homeland Security secretary and governor of Arizona sits down with Scott Shafer to discuss her vision for the 10-campus system and responds to criticism of her record on immigration.

    Further Reporting: For Napolitano, UC Could Be a Stepping Stone to California Politics

    Examining California's Criminal Justice Experiment
    Two years into California's massive criminal justice experiment dubbed "realignment," a new Stanford University study examines how the reforms are playing out across the state's 58 counties, many with different resources and distinct approaches. Since realignment went into effect, more than 100,000 prisoners have been diverted from state prisons to county jails or probation. While some law enforcement agencies report rising crime rates and a decline in public safety, other agencies say they have renewed their emphasis on rehabilitation.

    Additional Resources: Prison Break: California Rethinks Criminal Justice, a KQED-CIR co-production

    Silicon Valley Space Ventures Blast Off
    Silicon Valley is known for game-changing innovation. Now, some local startups are trying to change the game in the space industry, where the stakes — and rewards — are sky-high. This video segment examines a new wave of for-profit companies demonstrating that this final frontier is no longer the exclusive domain of the federal government.

    Additional Resources: Silicon Valley Goes to Space
    duration 1:20:00   STEREO
  • 7:00 pm
    Local USA [#104] Head Trauma at War Traumatic brain injuries, or TBI, has received increasing attention especially among athletes and soldiers returning from combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. We examine the links between TBI and post-traumatic stress disorder, and the damage they can do, through the story of retired Army sergeant Andrew Reeves of Colchester, Vermont. duration 26:52   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 pm
    Local USA [#103] Finding One's Voice Searching for an artistic voice and a way of expressing oneself. An autistic artist in New Jersey finds the best tools to communicate his wonderful works of art -- despite barely uttering a word -- and a young Chicago prodigy connects with her inner performer and discovers her electrifying voice. duration 26:28   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#245H] The Path of Positive Resistance * Between them, doctors Jill Stein and Margaret Flowers have been arrested 9 times. In the face of injustice and government by the 1%, rather than look the other way and stick to practicing medicine they chose a different approach.
    At first they took separate paths. Margaret Flowers fought for single payer health insurance. She works for the organization Physicians for a National Health Program and is a contributor to PopularResistance.org, a website advocating nonviolent direct action against injustice. Jill Stein advocated for campaign finance reform in her home state of Massachusetts, working in 1998 with others in her community to pass the Clean Election Law. She co-founded the Massachusetts Coalition for Healthy Communities in 2003 and represented the Green-Rainbow Party for governor in 2002, for State Representative in 2004 and for Secretary of State in 2006. She was the Green Party candidate for president in 2012.
    Now Stein and Flowers are both members of the Green Shadow Cabinet, a group of 100 prominent men and women offering alternative policy and speaking out in an organized voice against a dysfunctional government. Stein serves as president and Flowers as secretary of health. Each fights against political corruption and a host of grievances that that have led many people to cynicism and despair.
    This week, Bill Moyers speaks with Stein and Flowers about their personal journeys, what they have learned about our political system along the way and why they continue to fight the good fight. "Once you start speaking truth to power and standing up for the right things, it's very empowering," Margaret Flowers tells Bill. "After the Occupy movement disbanded and people kept saying, 'Oh, it's gone, it went away,' it didn't go away. It inspired others to stand up for their rights. So we see low wage workers all around the country standing up. And now states that are starting to raise their minimum wages. We see anti-foreclosure activists fighting back and people being able to stay in their homes. We see communities creating democratic economic institutions so that they can lift themselves out of poverty. These things are happening. They're not covered in the mass media. They're not funded by the big funders. But they're happening in this country. "
    * Also on the broadcast, Bill reports back on viewer response to our recent segments on drone attacks and government surveillance and previews the new film "Following the Ninth," a documentary exploring the worldwide cultural and political influence of Beethoven's masterpiece, the Ninth Symphony, and its majestic "Ode to Joy."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    America Reframed [#207] The Way We Get By On call 24 hours a day for the past five years, a group of senior citizens has made history by greeting nearly 800,000 American troops at a tiny airport in Bangor, Maine. This film is an intimate look at three of these greeters as they confront the universal losses that come with aging and rediscover their reason for living. Bill Knight, Jerry Mundy and Joan Gaudet find the strength to overcome their personal battles and transform their lives through service. This inspirational and surprising story shatters the stereotypes of today's senior citizens as the greeters redefine the meaning of community. duration 1:28:26   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 pm
    POV [#2612#] Brooklyn Castle This public school powerhouse in junior high chess competitions has won more than 30 national championships, the most of any school in the country. Its 85-member squad boasts so many strong players that the late Albert Einstein, a dedicated chess maven, would rank fourth if he were on the team. Most astoundingly, I.S. 318 is a Brooklyn school that serves mostly minority students from families living below the poverty line. "Brooklyn Castle" is the story of five of the school's aspiring young players and how chess became the school's unlikely inspiration for academic success. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 12:00 am
    Global Voices [#607] Invoking Justice Muslim women from a small town in South India deliver justice in their own courts, posing a radical challenge to their traditional Muslim community and clergy. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Sunday, November 17, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED all channels, planned overnight maintenance: early Fri 12/19 midnight-6am

      (this includes all DT9, DT54 and DT25 channels, along with all paid services) We will be doing upgrade and maintenance work in our Master Control area during the overnight hours of late Thurs/early Fri 12/19. Work will begin shortly after midnight early Friday, which may last until 6am, though we hope to finish earlier. This […]

    • KQED Plus OTA ? Optimistically planned maintenance: Fri 12/05 mid-morning

      (DT54.1 thru 54.5) Assuming that the weather and road conditions permit, we plan to do a bit of maintenance on our KQEH transmitter the morning of Friday 12/05… hopefully 10am-11am-ish, but could be a bit later. Most of the work should not affect the outgoing signal, but there will need to be a cable swap […]

    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
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Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
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Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

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KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

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Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

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KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

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