Donate

TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, November 16, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, November 16, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10800] Affordable Care Act * Changes in China's Society * Ethanol * Shields and Brooks duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32248] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the S&P posts its longest win streak in nine months. And with stocks hitting records and rates expected to stay low, will dividend plays payoff for investors? And, President Obama meets with insurance company executives at the White House. What happens next and will any of the deadlines be met? duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3034] Tavis talks with the "Queen of Hip-Hop Soul," R&B superstar Mary J. Blige. The multi-faceted Grammy winner discusses her first-ever holiday CD and her new film, Black Nativity. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Not Yet Begun to Fight Retired Marine Colonel Eric Hastings remembers flight missions high above the death and destruction in Vietnam. From the cockpit, he traced meandering ribbons that cut through the jungle. He recognized the shapes of the trout streams of home. Every night, he dreamed about fly-fishing. When he returned home to Montana in 1969, to a nation decades away from diagnosing PTSD, he went to the water. He tied a fly onto a line and cast. The river, he says, healed him.
    This program unfolds in the space between war and a new battle. Hastings reaches out to five men, a new generation returning from war. He brings them to the river and shares his secret: there are places where you can still be consumed by a simple act, find joy in a fight, and be redeemed as you gently release another creature, unharmed, into quiet waters.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1711] GUN VIOLENCE AND THE FAITH COMMUNITY - Next month marks 1 year since the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, which killed 20 children and 6 staff members. Kim Lawton reports that over the last several months, a growing interfaith movement has been mobilizing to stop gun violence. She also talks with faith-based activists who are opposing any new gun control laws.
    THE LONG FORGOTTEN MENTALLY ILL - Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on re-discovering the identity and restoring the dignity of long-deceased inmates of a former Minnesota state mental institution. Once, they were buried in nameless graves marked only with numbers. Now they are getting headstones with their names on them, and their stories reveal a dark history of neglect.
    AMERICAN CATHOLICS - On the eve of the 50th anniversary of President Kennedy's assassination, Host Bob Abernethy talks with Catholic Church authority Father Thomas Reese on changes in attitudes toward Catholics in the US brought about by JFK's election as well as the influence of Pope Francis on the priorities of Catholic leaders today.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1021] Mutual Fund Shakeups This week WT looks at major changes in the mutual fund industry. Investors are deserting actively managed funds for passive ones and fleeing bond funds for other sources of income. In their first joint television appearance, two Morningstar veterans - Christine Benz, Director of Personal Finance and Russel Kinnel, Director of Mutual Fund Research - tell us what it all means for investors and their funds. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2236H] Obamacare And Women's Health Protection Act * Michelle Obama's Education Initiative * EDGE - Certifying Companies as Woman-Friendly
    Panelists: Progressive Commentator Patricia Sosa; The Gender Equality Project's Megan Beyer; The Heritage Foundation's Genevieve Wood; Former Bush White House Aide Mercy Viana Schlapp.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#213] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    POV [#2613H] 56 Up In 1964, a group of British seven-year-olds were interviewed about their lives and dreams in a groundbreaking television documentary, "Seven Up." Since then, in one of the greatest projects in television history, renowned director Michael Apted has returned to film the same subjects every seven years, tracking their ups and downs. POV, which presented the U.S. broadcast premiere of "49 Up" in 2007, returns with "56 Up" to find the group settling into middle age and surprisingly upbeat. Through marriage and childbirth, poverty and illness, the "kids" have come to terms with both hope and disappointment. duration 2:25:55   STEREO TVPG
  • MORNING
  • 7:30 am
    QUEST [#701H] Next Meal: Engineering Food Discover how genetically engineered crops are made, their pros and cons, and what the future might hold for research and regulations such as labeling. In a half-hour special, QUEST Northern California explores genetically engineered crops in the wake of Proposition 37, the November 2012 initiative that would have required foods containing genetically engineered ingredients to be labeled in California. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#221] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2531H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5320H] * Thursday, President Obama unveiled a plan to fix a provision of the Affordable Care Act that will allow policy holders whose current insurance plans were canceled to get 1-year extensions even if they don't conform to all the new health care laws. He also admitted that the administration "fumbled" last month's roll-out of the healthcare exchange program. On Wednesday the administration announced that only 106,000 people enrolled on the state and federal insurance exchanges since they opened on October 1.
    Republicans remain skeptical that the Affordable Care Act can be "fixed." The House will vote on Friday on a Republican bill to permanently change the health care law to allow insurance companies to continue selling existing policies that do not comply with the law's new standards. Meanwhile the president admitted that troubles in implementing the ACA have "put a burden on Democrats" whose constituents are unhappy that they might lose their current health insurance plans despite the president's assurances that if they liked their existing plans, they could keep them.
    Joining Gwen Ifill to explore the proposed solution to fix Obamacare and whether the ongoing political battle over the president's signature legislative achievement could stall other legislative priorities including a long-term budget deal, immigration reform and passing a farm bill: Dan Balz of The Washington Post, John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times, and Jeff Zeleny of ABC News.
    * Secretary of State John Kerry remains optimistic that the US and international community will be able to reach a deal with Iran over its nuclear program before the end of the month. Kerry returned to Washington this week empty-handed after talks in Geneva failed to yield an interim deal. Kerry spent part of the week trying to persuade skeptical lawmakers on Capitol Hill determined to impose a new wave of sanctions on Iran that some members of Congress believe would give the US increased leverage in negotiations. Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News traveled with the secretary of state and will report on the sticking points of a deal to limit Iran's nuclear program.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#105H] Napolitano Outlines Vision for UC and New Study Examines California's Criminal Justice Experiment
    A Conversation With UC President Janet Napolitano
    In her first address to the University of California Board of Regents this week, UC President Janet Napolitano proposed freezing tuition and other reforms. The former U.S. Department of Homeland Security secretary and governor of Arizona sits down with Scott Shafer to discuss her vision for the 10-campus system and responds to criticism of her record on immigration.

    Further Reporting: For Napolitano, UC Could Be a Stepping Stone to California Politics

    Examining California's Criminal Justice Experiment
    Two years into California's massive criminal justice experiment dubbed "realignment," a new Stanford University study examines how the reforms are playing out across the state's 58 counties, many with different resources and distinct approaches. Since realignment went into effect, more than 100,000 prisoners have been diverted from state prisons to county jails or probation. While some law enforcement agencies report rising crime rates and a decline in public safety, other agencies say they have renewed their emphasis on rehabilitation.

    Additional Resources: Prison Break: California Rethinks Criminal Justice, a KQED-CIR co-production

    Silicon Valley Space Ventures Blast Off
    Silicon Valley is known for game-changing innovation. Now, some local startups are trying to change the game in the space industry, where the stakes — and rewards — are sky-high. This video segment examines a new wave of for-profit companies demonstrating that this final frontier is no longer the exclusive domain of the federal government.

    Additional Resources: Silicon Valley Goes to Space
    duration 1:20:00   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17319Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2236H] Obamacare And Women's Health Protection Act * Michelle Obama's Education Initiative * EDGE - Certifying Companies as Woman-Friendly
    Panelists: Progressive Commentator Patricia Sosa; The Gender Equality Project's Megan Beyer; The Heritage Foundation's Genevieve Wood; Former Bush White House Aide Mercy Viana Schlapp.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3147H] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#118] * Stephen Chu on the typhoon in the Philippines * Mike Allen on the week in politics * Claire Danes of Homeland * Patrick Stewart and Ian McKellen discuss performing Pinter's No Man's Land and Beckett's Waiting for Godot * Actor Bruce Dern on his role in Alexander Payne's Nebraska * Henry Louis Gates Jr. on his 6-part documentary 'The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross' duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#245H] The Path of Positive Resistance * Between them, doctors Jill Stein and Margaret Flowers have been arrested 9 times. In the face of injustice and government by the 1%, rather than look the other way and stick to practicing medicine they chose a different approach.
    At first they took separate paths. Margaret Flowers fought for single payer health insurance. She works for the organization Physicians for a National Health Program and is a contributor to PopularResistance.org, a website advocating nonviolent direct action against injustice. Jill Stein advocated for campaign finance reform in her home state of Massachusetts, working in 1998 with others in her community to pass the Clean Election Law. She co-founded the Massachusetts Coalition for Healthy Communities in 2003 and represented the Green-Rainbow Party for governor in 2002, for State Representative in 2004 and for Secretary of State in 2006. She was the Green Party candidate for president in 2012.
    Now Stein and Flowers are both members of the Green Shadow Cabinet, a group of 100 prominent men and women offering alternative policy and speaking out in an organized voice against a dysfunctional government. Stein serves as president and Flowers as secretary of health. Each fights against political corruption and a host of grievances that that have led many people to cynicism and despair.
    This week, Bill Moyers speaks with Stein and Flowers about their personal journeys, what they have learned about our political system along the way and why they continue to fight the good fight. "Once you start speaking truth to power and standing up for the right things, it's very empowering," Margaret Flowers tells Bill. "After the Occupy movement disbanded and people kept saying, 'Oh, it's gone, it went away,' it didn't go away. It inspired others to stand up for their rights. So we see low wage workers all around the country standing up. And now states that are starting to raise their minimum wages. We see anti-foreclosure activists fighting back and people being able to stay in their homes. We see communities creating democratic economic institutions so that they can lift themselves out of poverty. These things are happening. They're not covered in the mass media. They're not funded by the big funders. But they're happening in this country. "
    * Also on the broadcast, Bill reports back on viewer response to our recent segments on drone attacks and government surveillance and previews the new film "Following the Ninth," a documentary exploring the worldwide cultural and political influence of Beethoven's masterpiece, the Ninth Symphony, and its majestic "Ode to Joy."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#701H] Next Meal: Engineering Food Discover how genetically engineered crops are made, their pros and cons, and what the future might hold for research and regulations such as labeling. In a half-hour special, QUEST Northern California explores genetically engineered crops in the wake of Proposition 37, the November 2012 initiative that would have required foods containing genetically engineered ingredients to be labeled in California. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#247] duration 25:40   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    JFK: American Experience [#101(] Part One Follow JFK's rise to power from his birth to his election as president in 1960 - the youngest man ever to be elected to the office. With illuminating interviews from family members including sister Jean Kennedy Smith, niece Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, historian Robert Dallek and author Robert Caro, this episode offers new insight into Kennedy's early years, from his transformation from a sickly youth to Washington's most eligible bachelor to the nation's president.
    (note: only part 1 is airing during our December 2013 fundraising. The entire program is available as a thank you gift for a membership contribution).
    duration 2:29:16   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    JFK: American Experience [#102] Part Two Follow Kennedy into the White House through his assassination and the unfulfilled promise of his presidency. Offering fresh assessments of the successes and failures of his tenure, this episode features frank appraisals by administration officials, including John Siegenthaler, Thomas Hughes and Harris Wofford, civil rights leaders Andrew Young and Julian Bond, and journalists Evan Thomas and Richard Reeves. duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVPG-L (Secondary audio: none)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#121H] Included: a report from Santiago. Chile has some of the most restrictive abortion laws in the world, but the recent rape and impregnation of an 11-year-old girl has ignited a national debate on this previously taboo topic. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5320H] * Thursday, President Obama unveiled a plan to fix a provision of the Affordable Care Act that will allow policy holders whose current insurance plans were canceled to get 1-year extensions even if they don't conform to all the new health care laws. He also admitted that the administration "fumbled" last month's roll-out of the healthcare exchange program. On Wednesday the administration announced that only 106,000 people enrolled on the state and federal insurance exchanges since they opened on October 1.
    Republicans remain skeptical that the Affordable Care Act can be "fixed." The House will vote on Friday on a Republican bill to permanently change the health care law to allow insurance companies to continue selling existing policies that do not comply with the law's new standards. Meanwhile the president admitted that troubles in implementing the ACA have "put a burden on Democrats" whose constituents are unhappy that they might lose their current health insurance plans despite the president's assurances that if they liked their existing plans, they could keep them.
    Joining Gwen Ifill to explore the proposed solution to fix Obamacare and whether the ongoing political battle over the president's signature legislative achievement could stall other legislative priorities including a long-term budget deal, immigration reform and passing a farm bill: Dan Balz of The Washington Post, John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times, and Jeff Zeleny of ABC News.
    * Secretary of State John Kerry remains optimistic that the US and international community will be able to reach a deal with Iran over its nuclear program before the end of the month. Kerry returned to Washington this week empty-handed after talks in Geneva failed to yield an interim deal. Kerry spent part of the week trying to persuade skeptical lawmakers on Capitol Hill determined to impose a new wave of sanctions on Iran that some members of Congress believe would give the US increased leverage in negotiations. Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News traveled with the secretary of state and will report on the sticking points of a deal to limit Iran's nuclear program.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#105H] Napolitano Outlines Vision for UC and New Study Examines California's Criminal Justice Experiment
    A Conversation With UC President Janet Napolitano
    In her first address to the University of California Board of Regents this week, UC President Janet Napolitano proposed freezing tuition and other reforms. The former U.S. Department of Homeland Security secretary and governor of Arizona sits down with Scott Shafer to discuss her vision for the 10-campus system and responds to criticism of her record on immigration.

    Further Reporting: For Napolitano, UC Could Be a Stepping Stone to California Politics

    Examining California's Criminal Justice Experiment
    Two years into California's massive criminal justice experiment dubbed "realignment," a new Stanford University study examines how the reforms are playing out across the state's 58 counties, many with different resources and distinct approaches. Since realignment went into effect, more than 100,000 prisoners have been diverted from state prisons to county jails or probation. While some law enforcement agencies report rising crime rates and a decline in public safety, other agencies say they have renewed their emphasis on rehabilitation.

    Additional Resources: Prison Break: California Rethinks Criminal Justice, a KQED-CIR co-production

    Silicon Valley Space Ventures Blast Off
    Silicon Valley is known for game-changing innovation. Now, some local startups are trying to change the game in the space industry, where the stakes — and rewards — are sky-high. This video segment examines a new wave of for-profit companies demonstrating that this final frontier is no longer the exclusive domain of the federal government.

    Additional Resources: Silicon Valley Goes to Space
    duration 1:20:00   STEREO
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#701H] Next Meal: Engineering Food Discover how genetically engineered crops are made, their pros and cons, and what the future might hold for research and regulations such as labeling. In a half-hour special, QUEST Northern California explores genetically engineered crops in the wake of Proposition 37, the November 2012 initiative that would have required foods containing genetically engineered ingredients to be labeled in California. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1203] Around The World - Panamericana: Incas & Inquisitions Brianna Barnes journeys to Peru, home of the legendary Incas, where she begins her trek in Cajamarca, where thousands of Incan soldiers were slaughtered by Pizarro's conquistadors. After visiting one of the world's largest gold mines, Brianna makes her way to Lima, the "City of Kings," once home to the Spanish Inquisition in South America. In Cusco, she learns about the golden Inca Empire before ending her journey on the volcano El Misti, where incredibly well-preserved ice mummies tell the story of the country's illustrious past. duration 56:07   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3103] Parrot Confidential Meet Lou. Abandoned in a foreclosed home, Lou is one of thousands of parrots in need of rescue. From the wilds of Costa Rica to suburban America, a loveable, quirky cast of parrots reveal their unforgettable tales and the bittersweet world they share with humans. Their outrageous intelligence and uncanny ability to communicate in any language has made parrots one of the world's most popular pets. But unlike dogs and cats, parrots have not been domesticated. Hard wired for the wild, their ear-shattering squawks and unpredictable behavior are designed for the rain forest, not the suburbs. Add a lifespan of 50 plus years to their intense need to bond and a life in captivity often ends in disaster. With shelters and sanctuaries bursting at the seams, too many birds like Lou have no place to go. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4022H] Cold Case JFK For decades, the assassination of John F. Kennedy has fueled dark rumors of conspiracies and mishandled evidence. Now, 50 years later, Nova asks: Could modern investigators do better? We'll see how state-of-the art forensic tools would be applied to the investigation were it to happen today. At the same time, Nova takes a critical look at contemporary cases, like the murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman, to reveal how charges of evidence mishandling and human error can mar even scientifically sophisticated detective work. Will forensics ever be truly foolproof, or does modern technology just give a scientific sheen to a practice that will always be more art than science? duration 54:35   STEREO TVPG-V
  • 11:00 pm
    Secrets of the Dead [#1301] JFK: One PM Central Standard Time Fifty years after the tragic shooting of President John F. Kennedy, this episode chronicles minute-by-minute the assassination as it was revealed in the CBS newsroom from the moment the President was shot until Walter Cronkite's emotional pronouncement of his death, one hour and eight minutes later. The drama of "One P.M. Central Standard Time" -- the episode title is taken from the time President Kennedy was declared dead at Parkland Hospital -- is played out amidst the chaos in Dallas, in the hospital, and in the CBS newsroom in New York. Included in the program will be moving memories from men and women who were there on the day -- in Dallas and New York. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#207] The Way We Get By On call 24 hours a day for the past five years, a group of senior citizens has made history by greeting nearly 800,000 American troops at a tiny airport in Bangor, Maine. This film is an intimate look at three of these greeters as they confront the universal losses that come with aging and rediscover their reason for living. Bill Knight, Jerry Mundy and Joan Gaudet find the strength to overcome their personal battles and transform their lives through service. This inspirational and surprising story shatters the stereotypes of today's senior citizens as the greeters redefine the meaning of community. duration 1:28:26   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, November 16, 2013

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED DT9s Over the Air: beginning Wed 7/09

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) The PSIP Info part of our Over the Air (OTA) signal for KQED DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3 dropped out of our overall signal early Wednesday 7/09. Once PSIP was restored most OTA receivers moved our signal back to the correct channel locations. However, for some viewers, it appears as if they have lost […]

    • KQED FM 88.1 translator off air Tues 6/03

      The Martinez translator for KQED-FM will be off the air all day Tuesday June 3rd. We are rebuilding the 25 year old site with all new antennas and cabling. This should only affect people listening on 88.1MHz in the Martinez/Benicia area.

    • KQET planned overnight outage: early Tues 5/13

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET’s Over The Air (OTA) signal will shut down late May 12/early Tues 5/13 shortly after midnight to allow for extensive electrical maintenance work at the transmitter. Engineers will do their best to complete the work by 6am Tuesday morning. This will affect OTA viewers of the DT25 channels, and signal providers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too