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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Tuesday, November 5, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, November 5, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10648] Turkish Government Attempts to Diffuse Protests * NSA Faces Questions About Surveillance on Capitol Hill * Why Older Workers Help the Economy * Boston Mob Boss Has His Day in Court * Singapore Farmers Find Innovative Ways Around Lack of Open Land duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32136Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, are the world's biggest economics undergoing a major shift that could impact your investments? NBR will look at everything from stocks to bonds and commodities. And, are the cards stacked against the little guy? We'll tell you why some traders have access to a closely watched, market moving consumer confidence number before it's released to the public and individual investors. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2922] Tavis talks with activist Myrlie Evers-Williams on the eve of the 50th anniversary of the assassination of her husband, civil rights hero, Medgar Evers. An activist in her own right, Evers-Williams reflects on the legacy of her slain husband. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Niagara Falls A historical and picturesque exploration of the spectacular waterfall, this film offers stunning views and profiles some of the quirky visitors and workers of the nation's first great symbol. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#4054] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2923] Tavis talks with Downton Abbey creator Julian Fellowes and one of the stars of the hit series, Elizabeth McGovern, who discuss their critically acclaimed and Emmy-winning period drama. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Scully/The World Show [#1606] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 4:30 am
    Second Opinion [#911] Mystery Diagnosis A fascinating discussion unfolds as doctors work to solve a mysterious medical case affecting a prominent Boston physician. Dr. Anne Louise Oaklander shares her mother's medical story, which was complicated by her mother's knowledge as a medical professional. Follow along as the life-altering problems are described and the surprising diagnosis is revealed. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Anyone and Everyone This documentary tells the stories of families from Utah to North Carolina and Wyoming to New York, all connected by a common thread - a gay child. By first-time filmmaker Susan Polis Schutz (also the parent of a gay son), it depicts families representing a wide range of religions, nationalities and political leanings. During the film, parents of homosexual teens and young adults eloquently recall their initial reactions to their child's coming-out and their sometimes difficult journeys to acceptance. Some showed unconditional support; others struggled with their child's sexual orientation, either fearing alienation from their extended family, their church or community or failing to understand the universal nature of homosexuality. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Independent Lens [#1225] Two Spirits Fred Martinez was one of the youngest hate-crime victims in modern history when he was brutally murdered at 16. This film explores the life and death of a boy, who was also a girl, and the essentially spiritual nature of gender. duration 56:46   STEREO TV14-L (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Frontline [#3107H] Syria Behind The Lines In the rural heartland of Syria's countryside, the bloody uprising against President Bashar Al Assad has taken a terrifying turn. In this documentary, award-winning filmmaker Olly Lambert lives on both sides of Syria's sectarian frontline, witnessing the devastating effect of a religious feud that, regardless of the outcome of the war, is shaping Syria's future. For generations, the many religions that live in Syria's Orontes River Valley have lived together peacefully. But as the conflict spirals into a contagious and sectarian blood feud, friends and neighbors of different faiths are taking up arms against each other, as Syrian society begins to collapse. And as each side seeks more and more revenge, shells, mortars, and air attacks only escalate the hatred and violence on both sides. duration 56:16   STEREO TV14
  • 8:00 am
    Niagara Falls A historical and picturesque exploration of the spectacular waterfall, this film offers stunning views and profiles some of the quirky visitors and workers of the nation's first great symbol. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2923] Tavis talks with Downton Abbey creator Julian Fellowes and one of the stars of the hit series, Elizabeth McGovern, who discuss their critically acclaimed and Emmy-winning period drama. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2922] Tavis talks with activist Myrlie Evers-Williams on the eve of the 50th anniversary of the assassination of her husband, civil rights hero, Medgar Evers. An activist in her own right, Evers-Williams reflects on the legacy of her slain husband. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    Scully/The World Show [#1606] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:30 am
    Second Opinion [#911] Mystery Diagnosis A fascinating discussion unfolds as doctors work to solve a mysterious medical case affecting a prominent Boston physician. Dr. Anne Louise Oaklander shares her mother's medical story, which was complicated by her mother's knowledge as a medical professional. Follow along as the life-altering problems are described and the surprising diagnosis is revealed. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 am
    Anyone and Everyone This documentary tells the stories of families from Utah to North Carolina and Wyoming to New York, all connected by a common thread - a gay child. By first-time filmmaker Susan Polis Schutz (also the parent of a gay son), it depicts families representing a wide range of religions, nationalities and political leanings. During the film, parents of homosexual teens and young adults eloquently recall their initial reactions to their child's coming-out and their sometimes difficult journeys to acceptance. Some showed unconditional support; others struggled with their child's sexual orientation, either fearing alienation from their extended family, their church or community or failing to understand the universal nature of homosexuality. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Independent Lens [#1225] Two Spirits Fred Martinez was one of the youngest hate-crime victims in modern history when he was brutally murdered at 16. This film explores the life and death of a boy, who was also a girl, and the essentially spiritual nature of gender. duration 56:46   STEREO TV14-L (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    Frontline [#3107H] Syria Behind The Lines In the rural heartland of Syria's countryside, the bloody uprising against President Bashar Al Assad has taken a terrifying turn. In this documentary, award-winning filmmaker Olly Lambert lives on both sides of Syria's sectarian frontline, witnessing the devastating effect of a religious feud that, regardless of the outcome of the war, is shaping Syria's future. For generations, the many religions that live in Syria's Orontes River Valley have lived together peacefully. But as the conflict spirals into a contagious and sectarian blood feud, friends and neighbors of different faiths are taking up arms against each other, as Syrian society begins to collapse. And as each side seeks more and more revenge, shells, mortars, and air attacks only escalate the hatred and violence on both sides. duration 56:16   STEREO TV14
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#4054] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#9118] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2923] Tavis talks with Downton Abbey creator Julian Fellowes and one of the stars of the hit series, Elizabeth McGovern, who discuss their critically acclaimed and Emmy-winning period drama. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32137Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, stocks may be grabbing all the headlines with another triple digit gain, but NBR will tell you why the real action is in the bond market and what you should do if treasuries are a big part of your portfolio. And, how much would you pay to see a movie? Two of the biggest names in Hollywood - Steven Spielberg and George Lucas - say you're going to be paying more...a lot more. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10649] Massive Colorado Wildfire Forces Thousands to Evacuate * The Supreme Court Rules on DNA Patenting * Collaboration for Dairy Production * A Look at the Attitudes Towards LGBT Community * California Prepares for Ruling on Proposition 8 duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32137Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, stocks may be grabbing all the headlines with another triple digit gain, but NBR will tell you why the real action is in the bond market and what you should do if treasuries are a big part of your portfolio. And, how much would you pay to see a movie? Two of the biggest names in Hollywood - Steven Spielberg and George Lucas - say you're going to be paying more...a lot more. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2229] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#4054] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3359] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10649] Massive Colorado Wildfire Forces Thousands to Evacuate * The Supreme Court Rules on DNA Patenting * Collaboration for Dairy Production * A Look at the Attitudes Towards LGBT Community * California Prepares for Ruling on Proposition 8 duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3359] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#19124H] (original broadcast date: 6/13/13)
    * James Bamford, bestselling author and journalist discusses the NSA leaks
    * professional golfer Graeme McDowell on his career achievements and this week's US Open Championship
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3359] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2924] Tavis talks with former Major League Baseball star pitcher Dwight Gooden about his candid new memoir, Doc. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3359] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#208] Learn about writer and civil rights activist in Detroit, a rocket scientist who founded matchmaker.com, and the cofounder of ImprovOlympic theatres, which has produced famous comedians including cast members of "Saturday Night Live." duration 26:46   TVPG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3359] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10649] Massive Colorado Wildfire Forces Thousands to Evacuate * The Supreme Court Rules on DNA Patenting * Collaboration for Dairy Production * A Look at the Attitudes Towards LGBT Community * California Prepares for Ruling on Proposition 8 duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3359] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2229] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10649] Massive Colorado Wildfire Forces Thousands to Evacuate * The Supreme Court Rules on DNA Patenting * Collaboration for Dairy Production * A Look at the Attitudes Towards LGBT Community * California Prepares for Ruling on Proposition 8 duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32137Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, stocks may be grabbing all the headlines with another triple digit gain, but NBR will tell you why the real action is in the bond market and what you should do if treasuries are a big part of your portfolio. And, how much would you pay to see a movie? Two of the biggest names in Hollywood - Steven Spielberg and George Lucas - say you're going to be paying more...a lot more. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2923] Tavis talks with Downton Abbey creator Julian Fellowes and one of the stars of the hit series, Elizabeth McGovern, who discuss their critically acclaimed and Emmy-winning period drama. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Pacific Heartbeat [#105H] There Once Was An Island - Te Henua E Nnoho There Once was an Island - Te Henua e Nnoho gives a human face to the issue of global climate change. It is the story of a Pacific Island community fighting to preserve what really matters in the face of rising tides. Takuu Atoll is an idyllic home to articulate, educated people who maintain a 1,200-year-old culture and language. The island is disintegrating and when scientists arrive to investigate, residents realize that their attempts to preserve the atoll are making the situation worse. With limited means of communication or outside support, the people of Takuu must make the heart-wrenching decision of whether to risk their safety and remain on their beloved island or become environmental refugees and begin new lives in neighboring, but foreign, Bougainville, Papua New Guinea. There Once Was an Island - Te Henua e Nnoho is a sobering expose on climate change and how a community's sense of identity will be lost in the rising tides. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#4055] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2924] Tavis talks with former Major League Baseball star pitcher Dwight Gooden about his candid new memoir, Doc. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Well Read [#107] David Blatner, Spectrums How can we grasp the world of the atom or the size of our galaxy? Blatner explores the bizarre, beautiful wonders of our universe in language we all can understand. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Great Decisions In Foreign Policy [#404] Imperfect Union: The Eurozone In Crisis After World War Two, the leaders of Europe established greater economic ties to help prevent future continental conflict. Now, more than half a century later, the EU faces the biggest financial crisis in its history - and the future of the Eurozone itself is under question. What's preventing the world's second largest economy -- and America's largest trading partner -- from pulling itself out of recession? duration 29:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Nova [#3507] Ape Genius Chimps, orangutans, gorillas, and bonobos -- seem to have rich emotional lives similar to our own. A new generation of investigators is revealing the mental capabilities of great apes. And our evolutionary next-of-kin are turning out to be far smarter than most experts ever imagined. duration 56:41   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 6:00 am
    Nova scienceNOW [#504H] How Smart Are Animals? How well can we understand what's going on in the brains of non-human animals? Do our pets - like dogs - have the same feelings we do? How smart are animals really? duration 55:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 7:00 am
    Nova scienceNOW [#605] What Are Animals Thinking? Have you ever wondered what's going on inside an Animal's head? How do they see the world -- and us? Is your dog really feeling guilty when it gives you that famous "guilty look?" Do pigeon brains possess "superpowers" that allow them to find their way home across hundreds of unfamiliar miles? David Pogue meets -- and competes -- with a menagerie of smart critters that challenge preconceived notions about what makes "us" different from "them" expanding our understanding of how animals really think. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    Pacific Heartbeat [#105H] There Once Was An Island - Te Henua E Nnoho There Once was an Island - Te Henua e Nnoho gives a human face to the issue of global climate change. It is the story of a Pacific Island community fighting to preserve what really matters in the face of rising tides. Takuu Atoll is an idyllic home to articulate, educated people who maintain a 1,200-year-old culture and language. The island is disintegrating and when scientists arrive to investigate, residents realize that their attempts to preserve the atoll are making the situation worse. With limited means of communication or outside support, the people of Takuu must make the heart-wrenching decision of whether to risk their safety and remain on their beloved island or become environmental refugees and begin new lives in neighboring, but foreign, Bougainville, Papua New Guinea. There Once Was an Island - Te Henua e Nnoho is a sobering expose on climate change and how a community's sense of identity will be lost in the rising tides. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2924] Tavis talks with former Major League Baseball star pitcher Dwight Gooden about his candid new memoir, Doc. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2923] Tavis talks with Downton Abbey creator Julian Fellowes and one of the stars of the hit series, Elizabeth McGovern, who discuss their critically acclaimed and Emmy-winning period drama. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    Well Read [#107] David Blatner, Spectrums How can we grasp the world of the atom or the size of our galaxy? Blatner explores the bizarre, beautiful wonders of our universe in language we all can understand. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 am
    Great Decisions In Foreign Policy [#404] Imperfect Union: The Eurozone In Crisis After World War Two, the leaders of Europe established greater economic ties to help prevent future continental conflict. Now, more than half a century later, the EU faces the biggest financial crisis in its history - and the future of the Eurozone itself is under question. What's preventing the world's second largest economy -- and America's largest trading partner -- from pulling itself out of recession? duration 29:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 am
    Nova [#3507] Ape Genius Chimps, orangutans, gorillas, and bonobos -- seem to have rich emotional lives similar to our own. A new generation of investigators is revealing the mental capabilities of great apes. And our evolutionary next-of-kin are turning out to be far smarter than most experts ever imagined. duration 56:41   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 12:00 pm
    Nova scienceNOW [#504H] How Smart Are Animals? How well can we understand what's going on in the brains of non-human animals? Do our pets - like dogs - have the same feelings we do? How smart are animals really? duration 55:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 1:00 pm
    Nova scienceNOW [#605] What Are Animals Thinking? Have you ever wondered what's going on inside an Animal's head? How do they see the world -- and us? Is your dog really feeling guilty when it gives you that famous "guilty look?" Do pigeon brains possess "superpowers" that allow them to find their way home across hundreds of unfamiliar miles? David Pogue meets -- and competes -- with a menagerie of smart critters that challenge preconceived notions about what makes "us" different from "them" expanding our understanding of how animals really think. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#4055] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#9119] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2924] Tavis talks with former Major League Baseball star pitcher Dwight Gooden about his candid new memoir, Doc. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32138] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10650] President Obama Gives Green Light to Send Military Aid to Syria * Detroit's Emergency Manager Says the City Will Default on Debt * The Six Month Anniversary of Newtown * Mark Shields and David Brooks Analyze This Week's News * Collaboration to Discuss the Future of the Dairy Industry duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32138] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2230] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    BBC Newsnight [#17165Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3360] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10650] President Obama Gives Green Light to Send Military Aid to Syria * Detroit's Emergency Manager Says the City Will Default on Debt * The Six Month Anniversary of Newtown * Mark Shields and David Brooks Analyze This Week's News * Collaboration to Discuss the Future of the Dairy Industry duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3360] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#19125] (original broadcast date: 6/14/13)
    * Hall of Fame Tennis player John McEnroe discusses Wimbledon and his John McEnroe Tennis Academy in New York City
    * Jaime Diaz, Editor-In-Chief of Golf World magazine and a Senior Writer for Golf Digest on the US Open
    * Donald Rumsfeld, former US Secretary of Defense on his book "Known and Unknown"
    duration 56:47   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3360] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2925] Tavis talks with Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations, about his text, Foreign Policy Begins at Home, in which he argues that the biggest threat to the US comes from within. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3360] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#209] Interviews include an executive director at Greenpeace USA, a member of the FBI in Washington, D.C. and a newscaster at NPR who focuses on Latin American issues. duration 26:46   TVPG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3360] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10650] President Obama Gives Green Light to Send Military Aid to Syria * Detroit's Emergency Manager Says the City Will Default on Debt * The Six Month Anniversary of Newtown * Mark Shields and David Brooks Analyze This Week's News * Collaboration to Discuss the Future of the Dairy Industry duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3360] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2230] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10650] President Obama Gives Green Light to Send Military Aid to Syria * Detroit's Emergency Manager Says the City Will Default on Debt * The Six Month Anniversary of Newtown * Mark Shields and David Brooks Analyze This Week's News * Collaboration to Discuss the Future of the Dairy Industry duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32138] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2924] Tavis talks with former Major League Baseball star pitcher Dwight Gooden about his candid new memoir, Doc. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    AfroPop: The Ultimate Cultural Exchange [#303] Riseup Reggae Underground is a journey into the heart of Jamaica - the island that gave birth to the worldwide cultural phenomenon of Reggae. In a society where talent abounds and opportunity is scarce, three distinct and courageous artists fight to rise up from obscurity and write themselves into the pages of history. With music and appearances by legends Lee "Scratch" Perry, Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare. duration 57:23   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1641] IRISH RECONCILIATION - The G8 economic summit begins shortly in Enniskillen, Northern Ireland, scene of a sectarian bombing that killed 11 people in 1987 - the work of the Irish Republican Army. But, as David Tereshchuk reports, efforts to reconcile the Catholic and Protestant communities since then were sparked by the father of one of the victims, who declared at the time that the bombers should be forgiven, and that he would pray for them every night.
    RUSSELL MOORE - The Southern Baptist Convention, the nation's largest Protestant denomination, has long advocated for conservative values in the public square. The denomination's new national leader on matters of ethics and public policy, Russell Moore, shares those values, but has a different style from many previous Southern Baptist leaders. Moore talks with managing editor Kim Lawton about how he hopes to set a tone of "kindness" and expand the slate of issues that Southern Baptists care about.
    THE ETHICS OF GOVERNMENT DATA COLLECTION - Host Bob Abernethy talks with Michael Kessler, Associate Director of Georgetown University's Berkley Center for Religion, Peace and World Affairs, about what religious and ethical traditions have to say about the government's massive collection of electronic data. How should we balance respect for privacy versus national security?
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#951] Global Opportunities This week: an exclusive interview with Brandywine Global Opportunities Bond Fund's "Great Investor" Stephen Smith, a maverick bond investor who delivers stock market-like returns. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2214H] IMMIGRATION REFORM: The panelists discuss whether current immigration law is gender discriminating.
    MOTHER BREADWINNERS: Looking at the rising number of households with mothers being the source of primary income.
    SURROGACY AND SINGLE DADS: Single men are pursing alternatives ways to becoming fathers.
    Panelists: Democratic Commentator Debra Carnahan, Libertarian Commentator Nicole Kurokawa Neily, and special male guests: UPTOWN Magazine Chief Political Correspondent Charles Ellison, Campaign for America's Future Online Producer Terrance Heath.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asia Insight [#106] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Helen of Troy Bettany Hughes (THE SPARTANS) travels across the eastern Mediterranean on an epic journey to find out the truth about Helen of Troy, known as "the face that launched a thousand ships." She has been blamed for causing the Trojan War, a conflict that resulted in countless deaths. During her own voyage in Helen's wake, Bettany Hughes sorts the reality from the myths told about Helen. She travels from the city where it is said Helen was born - Sparta in the mountains of Greece - to the archaeological site in modern Turkey that will be forever linked with the war fought in Helen's name: Troy. duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#223H] Big Brother's Prying Eyes Whatever your take on the recent revelations about government spying on our phone calls and Internet activity, there's no denying that Big Brother is bigger and less brotherly than we thought. What's the resulting cost to our privacy - and more so, our democracy? This week Lawrence Lessig, professor of law and director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University and founder of Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society, joins Bill to discuss the implications of our government's actions and Edward Snowden's role in leaking the information.
    Few are as knowledgeable about the impact of the Internet on our public and private lives as Lessig, who argues that government needs to protect American rights with the same determination and technological sophistication it uses to invade our privacy and root out terrorists. "What do we put into place to check government officials to make sure they behave in a way that respects our most fundamental values?" Lessig asks.
    A former conservative who's now a liberal, Lessig also knows that the caustic impact of money is another weapon capable of mortally wounding democracy. His recent book, "Republic, Lost: How Money Corrupts Congress - and a Plan to Stop It", decries a pervasive "dependence corruption" in our government and politics that should sound a desperate alarm for both the Left and the Right. On the broadcast, Lessig outlines a radical approach to the problem that uses big money itself to reform big money-powered corruption.
    How do we protect our privacy when Big Government and Big Business morph into Big Brother? Next on Moyers & Company.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#146] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2509H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5250H] * US and foreign intelligence agencies have determined that Syria has used chemical weapons against opposition forces multiple times over the past year. President Barack Obama has said that the use of chemical weapons by Syrian President Bashar al-Assad would cross a "red line" for the US. Late Thursday the White House announced that the US will provide military assistance to some rebel forces but released few specifics on the extent of America's involvement in Syria's civil war. Mark Mazzetti of The New York Times will have the latest on this developing story.
    * Following the disclosures of the NSA's widespread anti-terrorism surveillance programs, there is a political debate over whether Edward Snowden, the former CIA contractor who leaked top-secret information, was acting as a whistleblower or traitor. Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post will have the latest on investigations into the government's data-monitoring activities and the international search for Snowden.
    * On Capitol Hill, lawmakers moved forward in considering comprehensive immigration reform. The Senate is debating a bill that would strengthen border security and require all U.S. businesses to check the immigration status of new hires. Alan Gomez of USA Today will have details of the bipartisan effort to create a path to citizenship for some 11 million people currently in the country illegally and hurdles still to be faced in the House.
    * Plus Joan Biskupic of Reuters will explain the significance of today's Supreme Court decision that prohibits human genes from being patented but allows artificially copied DNA to be claimed as intellectual property. Plus we'll look ahead at the three major cases yet to be decided this term dealing with same-sex marriage, affirmative action and voting rights.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2433] June 14, 2013 Guest Host: Dana King.
    News Panel:
    STATE BUDGET DEAL - Gov. Jerry Brown and top Democrats in the legislature reached a $96.4 billion budget deal this week, putting them on track to meet the June 15 deadline. The compromise plan embraces the governor's cautious revenue outlook, and gives more money to schools with higher numbers of low income students and English learners. It also includes some additional spending on mental health and dental services for the poor, with a commitment to increased funding in the future for social services.
    SCOTUS ON GENE PATENTING - The US Supreme Court has unanimously ruled that companies cannot patent naturally occurring human genes, sending ripples through the medical and biotechnology industries. With billions of dollars on the line, some companies might abandon work on genetic research if they are unable protect it through patents. But it could also encourage more research and competition, opening the door to new discoveries.
    SAN ONOFRE CLOSURE - While California pledges to cut greenhouse gas emissions, the San Onofre nuclear plant in Southern California is closing. Some environmentalists and policy makers who are concerned about global warming have come to embrace nuclear power, which, unlike natural gas or coal powered energy plants, does not emit carbon into the atmosphere. What will the end of nuclear power mean for growing energy demand and how will the state offset the increased pollution caused by fossil fuel generated power?
    Guests: Dan Walters, Sacramento Bee; Lauren Sommer, KQED Science; and David R. Baker, San Francisco Chronicle.
    DANIEL ELLSBERG ON THE NSA LEAKS - Members of Congress, including California Democratic Senator Diane Feinstein, say Edward Snowden is a traitor who should be prosecuted for revealing classified information about the National Security Agency's domestic surveillance programs. Calling him a modern-day Daniel Ellsberg, supporters around the world are taking to the streets in defense of Snowden. Ellsberg himself, whose infamous leak of the Pentagon Papers led to public outrage over the Vietnam War, says Snowden's disclosures are the most important in US history. Daniel Ellsberg joins guest host Dana King in studio for a conversation about domestic surveillance and the debate over espionage vs. whistle-blowing.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17165Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2214H] IMMIGRATION REFORM: The panelists discuss whether current immigration law is gender discriminating.
    MOTHER BREADWINNERS: Looking at the rising number of households with mothers being the source of primary income.
    SURROGACY AND SINGLE DADS: Single men are pursing alternatives ways to becoming fathers.
    Panelists: Democratic Commentator Debra Carnahan, Libertarian Commentator Nicole Kurokawa Neily, and special male guests: UPTOWN Magazine Chief Political Correspondent Charles Ellison, Campaign for America's Future Online Producer Terrance Heath.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3125] Topics: NSA's Sweeping Surveillance, Edward Snowden - Traitor or Whistleblower? Panelists: Pat Buchanan, Author & Columnist; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#324H] RAY SUAREZ ANCHORS. Medical correspondent Dr. Emily Senay investigates readmission penalties, an element of the Affordable Care Act designed to reduce costs and lead to more coordinated healthcare once patients are released from the hospital. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#223H] Big Brother's Prying Eyes Whatever your take on the recent revelations about government spying on our phone calls and Internet activity, there's no denying that Big Brother is bigger and less brotherly than we thought. What's the resulting cost to our privacy - and more so, our democracy? This week Lawrence Lessig, professor of law and director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University and founder of Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society, joins Bill to discuss the implications of our government's actions and Edward Snowden's role in leaking the information.
    Few are as knowledgeable about the impact of the Internet on our public and private lives as Lessig, who argues that government needs to protect American rights with the same determination and technological sophistication it uses to invade our privacy and root out terrorists. "What do we put into place to check government officials to make sure they behave in a way that respects our most fundamental values?" Lessig asks.
    A former conservative who's now a liberal, Lessig also knows that the caustic impact of money is another weapon capable of mortally wounding democracy. His recent book, "Republic, Lost: How Money Corrupts Congress - and a Plan to Stop It", decries a pervasive "dependence corruption" in our government and politics that should sound a desperate alarm for both the Left and the Right. On the broadcast, Lessig outlines a radical approach to the problem that uses big money itself to reform big money-powered corruption.
    How do we protect our privacy when Big Government and Big Business morph into Big Brother? Next on Moyers & Company.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    Saving The Ocean [#101H] Shark Reef In the first episode, host Carl Safina travels to Glover's Reef Marine Reserve, a coral atoll in the central American country of Belize. Accompanied by a team of U.S. researchers, who've been studying the reserve for eight years, Carl catches, tags and releases a wide variety of sharks. He scuba dives to check out the shark-counting instruments that the researchers have placed around the atoll, and he also visits the shark fin trader in Belize City's fish market. The fin trade now threatens sharks worldwide, but the sharks in Glover's Reef Reserve are safe and thriving. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#225] duration 25:40   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Panetta Institute Lectures [#804] Middle East Turmoil: Chaos Or Reform? This lecture features:
    Ehud Barak (invited), former Israeli minister of Defense and prime minister;
    Richard Lugar, former United States senator and former chairman of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations;
    Olympia Snowe (invited), former United States senator for Maine;
    and Joe Lieberman, former United States senator for Connecticut.
    duration 1:29:30   STEREO TVG
  • 3:30 pm
    Maria Hinojosa: One-On-One [#423] Jarrett Barrios Since 2009 Jarrett Barrios has been the president of the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD), which works to promote and ensure fair, accurate and inclusive representation of the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community in the media. Barrios joined GLAAD after serving nine years in the Massachusetts legislature where he was the first Latino and first openly gay man elected to the state Senate. Jarrett Barrios talks with Maria Hinojosa about the importance of coming out, his personal experience as a married man with two teens, and reaching full equality in America. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 4:00 pm
    Independent Lens [#1225] Two Spirits Fred Martinez was one of the youngest hate-crime victims in modern history when he was brutally murdered at 16. This film explores the life and death of a boy, who was also a girl, and the essentially spiritual nature of gender. duration 56:46   STEREO TV14-L (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Grove, The More Americans have been lost to AIDS than in all the US wars since 1900. And the pandemic has killed 22 million people worldwide. But few know about the existence of the National AIDS Memorial, a 7-acre grove hidden in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park. This program chronicles this garden's transformation from a neglected eyesore to landscaped sanctuary to national memorial. The film shows how a community in crisis found healing and remembrance, and how the seeds of a few visionary environmentalists blossomed into something larger than they could have imagined. But as the Grove's stakeholders seek broader public recognition through an international design competition, a battle erupts over what constitutes an appropriate memorial for the AIDS pandemic. What does it mean to be a national memorial? And how do we mark a time of unimaginable loss? duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3125] Topics: NSA's Sweeping Surveillance, Edward Snowden - Traitor or Whistleblower? Panelists: Pat Buchanan, Author & Columnist; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5250H] * US and foreign intelligence agencies have determined that Syria has used chemical weapons against opposition forces multiple times over the past year. President Barack Obama has said that the use of chemical weapons by Syrian President Bashar al-Assad would cross a "red line" for the US. Late Thursday the White House announced that the US will provide military assistance to some rebel forces but released few specifics on the extent of America's involvement in Syria's civil war. Mark Mazzetti of The New York Times will have the latest on this developing story.
    * Following the disclosures of the NSA's widespread anti-terrorism surveillance programs, there is a political debate over whether Edward Snowden, the former CIA contractor who leaked top-secret information, was acting as a whistleblower or traitor. Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post will have the latest on investigations into the government's data-monitoring activities and the international search for Snowden.
    * On Capitol Hill, lawmakers moved forward in considering comprehensive immigration reform. The Senate is debating a bill that would strengthen border security and require all U.S. businesses to check the immigration status of new hires. Alan Gomez of USA Today will have details of the bipartisan effort to create a path to citizenship for some 11 million people currently in the country illegally and hurdles still to be faced in the House.
    * Plus Joan Biskupic of Reuters will explain the significance of today's Supreme Court decision that prohibits human genes from being patented but allows artificially copied DNA to be claimed as intellectual property. Plus we'll look ahead at the three major cases yet to be decided this term dealing with same-sex marriage, affirmative action and voting rights.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2433] June 14, 2013 Guest Host: Dana King.
    News Panel:
    STATE BUDGET DEAL - Gov. Jerry Brown and top Democrats in the legislature reached a $96.4 billion budget deal this week, putting them on track to meet the June 15 deadline. The compromise plan embraces the governor's cautious revenue outlook, and gives more money to schools with higher numbers of low income students and English learners. It also includes some additional spending on mental health and dental services for the poor, with a commitment to increased funding in the future for social services.
    SCOTUS ON GENE PATENTING - The US Supreme Court has unanimously ruled that companies cannot patent naturally occurring human genes, sending ripples through the medical and biotechnology industries. With billions of dollars on the line, some companies might abandon work on genetic research if they are unable protect it through patents. But it could also encourage more research and competition, opening the door to new discoveries.
    SAN ONOFRE CLOSURE - While California pledges to cut greenhouse gas emissions, the San Onofre nuclear plant in Southern California is closing. Some environmentalists and policy makers who are concerned about global warming have come to embrace nuclear power, which, unlike natural gas or coal powered energy plants, does not emit carbon into the atmosphere. What will the end of nuclear power mean for growing energy demand and how will the state offset the increased pollution caused by fossil fuel generated power?
    Guests: Dan Walters, Sacramento Bee; Lauren Sommer, KQED Science; and David R. Baker, San Francisco Chronicle.
    DANIEL ELLSBERG ON THE NSA LEAKS - Members of Congress, including California Democratic Senator Diane Feinstein, say Edward Snowden is a traitor who should be prosecuted for revealing classified information about the National Security Agency's domestic surveillance programs. Calling him a modern-day Daniel Ellsberg, supporters around the world are taking to the streets in defense of Snowden. Ellsberg himself, whose infamous leak of the Pentagon Papers led to public outrage over the Vietnam War, says Snowden's disclosures are the most important in US history. Daniel Ellsberg joins guest host Dana King in studio for a conversation about domestic surveillance and the debate over espionage vs. whistle-blowing.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    Saving The Ocean [#101H] Shark Reef In the first episode, host Carl Safina travels to Glover's Reef Marine Reserve, a coral atoll in the central American country of Belize. Accompanied by a team of U.S. researchers, who've been studying the reserve for eight years, Carl catches, tags and releases a wide variety of sharks. He scuba dives to check out the shark-counting instruments that the researchers have placed around the atoll, and he also visits the shark fin trader in Belize City's fish market. The fin trade now threatens sharks worldwide, but the sharks in Glover's Reef Reserve are safe and thriving. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1210] Bangladesh Holly begins her trip in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh and the seventh largest city in the world. She then travels to Sunderban National Park for an encounter with Bengal tigers and a trek deep into the forest to find honey. Along the way, Holly visits a "floating" school, charms snakes, harvests tea in the hills of Sylhet, visits the ship-breaking yards in Chittagong and relaxes in the seaside resort of Cox's Bazaar near the Myanmar border. duration 57:16   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Ferrets: The Pursuit of Excellence The program travels to Ohio and the annual Ferret Buckeye Bash -- the home to the largest and most popular ferret show in the country, where hundreds of top breeders, seasoned experts and ferret enthusiasts pamper and parade their pets in a quest for prizes and prestige. Though these mischievous creatures are unlikely show animals, the competition is intense. For top breeders, the Best in Show award is the ultimate validation of their breeding stock though the many ferret fanatics whose "fuzzies" don't win a prize insist that beauty remains in the eye of the beholder. duration 56:37   STEREO TVPG
  • 10:00 pm
    Amish: American Experience This program explores the insular religious community whose intense faith and adherence to 400-year-old traditions have by turns captivated and baffled Americans for more than a century. It examines the beliefs, lifestyle and history of the Amish, as well as their complex relationship to mainstream American culture. Beautifully and lyrically photographed, the film is part history, part observational documentary that takes viewers into the private world of the Amish. duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#111] Red Without Blue The intimate bond between two identical twin brothers is challenged when one decides to transition from male to female; this is the story of their evolving relationship, and the resurrection of their family from a darker past. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Losing Lambert: A Journey Through Survival & Hope Kathy O'Hern Fowler, who lost her 16-year-old son to suicide in 1995, spent years struggling with the loss and grief. However, the life-altering experience led her to advocate for other parents who tragically find themselves in the same position. This touching and insightful documentary explores the heart-rending questions left in the wake of suicide, interviews parents struggling to cope with the pain and stigma, and offers hope for the future of suicide prevention.
    At a survivors meeting, parents speak candidly about the loss of their children - their darkest hours - in an effort to raise awareness about teen suicide and to help others find compassion and support. The documentary also focuses on the promising medical research being conducted at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in conjunction with Carnegie Mellon University. Their preliminary findings show impulse-control problems in the brains of suicidal teens, an impressive discovery researchers hope may someday lead to better identification and treatment for at-risk teenagers.
    duration 28:44   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#215] Stem In Action STEM in Action: Science, Technology, Engineering and Math come alive as students take on engineering challenges that encourage them to think like scientists. Design, collaboration, calculations, and predictions all play a role in these lessons. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#223H] Big Brother's Prying Eyes Whatever your take on the recent revelations about government spying on our phone calls and Internet activity, there's no denying that Big Brother is bigger and less brotherly than we thought. What's the resulting cost to our privacy - and more so, our democracy? This week Lawrence Lessig, professor of law and director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University and founder of Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society, joins Bill to discuss the implications of our government's actions and Edward Snowden's role in leaking the information.
    Few are as knowledgeable about the impact of the Internet on our public and private lives as Lessig, who argues that government needs to protect American rights with the same determination and technological sophistication it uses to invade our privacy and root out terrorists. "What do we put into place to check government officials to make sure they behave in a way that respects our most fundamental values?" Lessig asks.
    A former conservative who's now a liberal, Lessig also knows that the caustic impact of money is another weapon capable of mortally wounding democracy. His recent book, "Republic, Lost: How Money Corrupts Congress - and a Plan to Stop It", decries a pervasive "dependence corruption" in our government and politics that should sound a desperate alarm for both the Left and the Right. On the broadcast, Lessig outlines a radical approach to the problem that uses big money itself to reform big money-powered corruption.
    How do we protect our privacy when Big Government and Big Business morph into Big Brother? Next on Moyers & Company.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5250] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3125] Topics: NSA's Sweeping Surveillance, Edward Snowden - Traitor or Whistleblower? Panelists: Pat Buchanan, Author & Columnist; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Need To Know [#324H] RAY SUAREZ ANCHORS. Medical correspondent Dr. Emily Senay investigates readmission penalties, an element of the Affordable Care Act designed to reduce costs and lead to more coordinated healthcare once patients are released from the hospital. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2509H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#111] Red Without Blue The intimate bond between two identical twin brothers is challenged when one decides to transition from male to female; this is the story of their evolving relationship, and the resurrection of their family from a darker past. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Saving The Ocean [#101H] Shark Reef In the first episode, host Carl Safina travels to Glover's Reef Marine Reserve, a coral atoll in the central American country of Belize. Accompanied by a team of U.S. researchers, who've been studying the reserve for eight years, Carl catches, tags and releases a wide variety of sharks. He scuba dives to check out the shark-counting instruments that the researchers have placed around the atoll, and he also visits the shark fin trader in Belize City's fish market. The fin trade now threatens sharks worldwide, but the sharks in Glover's Reef Reserve are safe and thriving. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1641] IRISH RECONCILIATION - The G8 economic summit begins shortly in Enniskillen, Northern Ireland, scene of a sectarian bombing that killed 11 people in 1987 - the work of the Irish Republican Army. But, as David Tereshchuk reports, efforts to reconcile the Catholic and Protestant communities since then were sparked by the father of one of the victims, who declared at the time that the bombers should be forgiven, and that he would pray for them every night.
    RUSSELL MOORE - The Southern Baptist Convention, the nation's largest Protestant denomination, has long advocated for conservative values in the public square. The denomination's new national leader on matters of ethics and public policy, Russell Moore, shares those values, but has a different style from many previous Southern Baptist leaders. Moore talks with managing editor Kim Lawton about how he hopes to set a tone of "kindness" and expand the slate of issues that Southern Baptists care about.
    THE ETHICS OF GOVERNMENT DATA COLLECTION - Host Bob Abernethy talks with Michael Kessler, Associate Director of Georgetown University's Berkley Center for Religion, Peace and World Affairs, about what religious and ethical traditions have to say about the government's massive collection of electronic data. How should we balance respect for privacy versus national security?
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#951] Global Opportunities This week: an exclusive interview with Brandywine Global Opportunities Bond Fund's "Great Investor" Stephen Smith, a maverick bond investor who delivers stock market-like returns. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#220H] Ric Edelman answers questions on private-equity funds, how to buy your first house and when to make distributions from your IRA account. Plus, a look at the surprisingly reasonable price of a "nanny" for your children and a reality check on your kid's chances of making the majors from Ken Kendrick of the Arizona Diamondbacks. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2509H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3125] Topics: NSA's Sweeping Surveillance, Edward Snowden - Traitor or Whistleblower? Panelists: Pat Buchanan, Author & Columnist; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week [#5250H] * US and foreign intelligence agencies have determined that Syria has used chemical weapons against opposition forces multiple times over the past year. President Barack Obama has said that the use of chemical weapons by Syrian President Bashar al-Assad would cross a "red line" for the US. Late Thursday the White House announced that the US will provide military assistance to some rebel forces but released few specifics on the extent of America's involvement in Syria's civil war. Mark Mazzetti of The New York Times will have the latest on this developing story.
    * Following the disclosures of the NSA's widespread anti-terrorism surveillance programs, there is a political debate over whether Edward Snowden, the former CIA contractor who leaked top-secret information, was acting as a whistleblower or traitor. Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post will have the latest on investigations into the government's data-monitoring activities and the international search for Snowden.
    * On Capitol Hill, lawmakers moved forward in considering comprehensive immigration reform. The Senate is debating a bill that would strengthen border security and require all U.S. businesses to check the immigration status of new hires. Alan Gomez of USA Today will have details of the bipartisan effort to create a path to citizenship for some 11 million people currently in the country illegally and hurdles still to be faced in the House.
    * Plus Joan Biskupic of Reuters will explain the significance of today's Supreme Court decision that prohibits human genes from being patented but allows artificially copied DNA to be claimed as intellectual property. Plus we'll look ahead at the three major cases yet to be decided this term dealing with same-sex marriage, affirmative action and voting rights.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2433] June 14, 2013 Guest Host: Dana King.
    News Panel:
    STATE BUDGET DEAL - Gov. Jerry Brown and top Democrats in the legislature reached a $96.4 billion budget deal this week, putting them on track to meet the June 15 deadline. The compromise plan embraces the governor's cautious revenue outlook, and gives more money to schools with higher numbers of low income students and English learners. It also includes some additional spending on mental health and dental services for the poor, with a commitment to increased funding in the future for social services.
    SCOTUS ON GENE PATENTING - The US Supreme Court has unanimously ruled that companies cannot patent naturally occurring human genes, sending ripples through the medical and biotechnology industries. With billions of dollars on the line, some companies might abandon work on genetic research if they are unable protect it through patents. But it could also encourage more research and competition, opening the door to new discoveries.
    SAN ONOFRE CLOSURE - While California pledges to cut greenhouse gas emissions, the San Onofre nuclear plant in Southern California is closing. Some environmentalists and policy makers who are concerned about global warming have come to embrace nuclear power, which, unlike natural gas or coal powered energy plants, does not emit carbon into the atmosphere. What will the end of nuclear power mean for growing energy demand and how will the state offset the increased pollution caused by fossil fuel generated power?
    Guests: Dan Walters, Sacramento Bee; Lauren Sommer, KQED Science; and David R. Baker, San Francisco Chronicle.
    DANIEL ELLSBERG ON THE NSA LEAKS - Members of Congress, including California Democratic Senator Diane Feinstein, say Edward Snowden is a traitor who should be prosecuted for revealing classified information about the National Security Agency's domestic surveillance programs. Calling him a modern-day Daniel Ellsberg, supporters around the world are taking to the streets in defense of Snowden. Ellsberg himself, whose infamous leak of the Pentagon Papers led to public outrage over the Vietnam War, says Snowden's disclosures are the most important in US history. Daniel Ellsberg joins guest host Dana King in studio for a conversation about domestic surveillance and the debate over espionage vs. whistle-blowing.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#223H] Big Brother's Prying Eyes Whatever your take on the recent revelations about government spying on our phone calls and Internet activity, there's no denying that Big Brother is bigger and less brotherly than we thought. What's the resulting cost to our privacy - and more so, our democracy? This week Lawrence Lessig, professor of law and director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University and founder of Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society, joins Bill to discuss the implications of our government's actions and Edward Snowden's role in leaking the information.
    Few are as knowledgeable about the impact of the Internet on our public and private lives as Lessig, who argues that government needs to protect American rights with the same determination and technological sophistication it uses to invade our privacy and root out terrorists. "What do we put into place to check government officials to make sure they behave in a way that respects our most fundamental values?" Lessig asks.
    A former conservative who's now a liberal, Lessig also knows that the caustic impact of money is another weapon capable of mortally wounding democracy. His recent book, "Republic, Lost: How Money Corrupts Congress - and a Plan to Stop It", decries a pervasive "dependence corruption" in our government and politics that should sound a desperate alarm for both the Left and the Right. On the broadcast, Lessig outlines a radical approach to the problem that uses big money itself to reform big money-powered corruption.
    How do we protect our privacy when Big Government and Big Business morph into Big Brother? Next on Moyers & Company.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 pm
    Inside Washington [#2509H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3125] Topics: NSA's Sweeping Surveillance, Edward Snowden - Traitor or Whistleblower? Panelists: Pat Buchanan, Author & Columnist; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2214H] IMMIGRATION REFORM: The panelists discuss whether current immigration law is gender discriminating.
    MOTHER BREADWINNERS: Looking at the rising number of households with mothers being the source of primary income.
    SURROGACY AND SINGLE DADS: Single men are pursing alternatives ways to becoming fathers.
    Panelists: Democratic Commentator Debra Carnahan, Libertarian Commentator Nicole Kurokawa Neily, and special male guests: UPTOWN Magazine Chief Political Correspondent Charles Ellison, Campaign for America's Future Online Producer Terrance Heath.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 pm
    LinkAsia [#146] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:30 pm
    Saving The Ocean [#101H] Shark Reef In the first episode, host Carl Safina travels to Glover's Reef Marine Reserve, a coral atoll in the central American country of Belize. Accompanied by a team of U.S. researchers, who've been studying the reserve for eight years, Carl catches, tags and releases a wide variety of sharks. He scuba dives to check out the shark-counting instruments that the researchers have placed around the atoll, and he also visits the shark fin trader in Belize City's fish market. The fin trade now threatens sharks worldwide, but the sharks in Glover's Reef Reserve are safe and thriving. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Need To Know [#324H] RAY SUAREZ ANCHORS. Medical correspondent Dr. Emily Senay investigates readmission penalties, an element of the Affordable Care Act designed to reduce costs and lead to more coordinated healthcare once patients are released from the hospital. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 pm
    Moyers & Company [#223H] Big Brother's Prying Eyes Whatever your take on the recent revelations about government spying on our phone calls and Internet activity, there's no denying that Big Brother is bigger and less brotherly than we thought. What's the resulting cost to our privacy - and more so, our democracy? This week Lawrence Lessig, professor of law and director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University and founder of Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society, joins Bill to discuss the implications of our government's actions and Edward Snowden's role in leaking the information.
    Few are as knowledgeable about the impact of the Internet on our public and private lives as Lessig, who argues that government needs to protect American rights with the same determination and technological sophistication it uses to invade our privacy and root out terrorists. "What do we put into place to check government officials to make sure they behave in a way that respects our most fundamental values?" Lessig asks.
    A former conservative who's now a liberal, Lessig also knows that the caustic impact of money is another weapon capable of mortally wounding democracy. His recent book, "Republic, Lost: How Money Corrupts Congress - and a Plan to Stop It", decries a pervasive "dependence corruption" in our government and politics that should sound a desperate alarm for both the Left and the Right. On the broadcast, Lessig outlines a radical approach to the problem that uses big money itself to reform big money-powered corruption.
    How do we protect our privacy when Big Government and Big Business morph into Big Brother? Next on Moyers & Company.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5250H] * US and foreign intelligence agencies have determined that Syria has used chemical weapons against opposition forces multiple times over the past year. President Barack Obama has said that the use of chemical weapons by Syrian President Bashar al-Assad would cross a "red line" for the US. Late Thursday the White House announced that the US will provide military assistance to some rebel forces but released few specifics on the extent of America's involvement in Syria's civil war. Mark Mazzetti of The New York Times will have the latest on this developing story.
    * Following the disclosures of the NSA's widespread anti-terrorism surveillance programs, there is a political debate over whether Edward Snowden, the former CIA contractor who leaked top-secret information, was acting as a whistleblower or traitor. Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post will have the latest on investigations into the government's data-monitoring activities and the international search for Snowden.
    * On Capitol Hill, lawmakers moved forward in considering comprehensive immigration reform. The Senate is debating a bill that would strengthen border security and require all U.S. businesses to check the immigration status of new hires. Alan Gomez of USA Today will have details of the bipartisan effort to create a path to citizenship for some 11 million people currently in the country illegally and hurdles still to be faced in the House.
    * Plus Joan Biskupic of Reuters will explain the significance of today's Supreme Court decision that prohibits human genes from being patented but allows artificially copied DNA to be claimed as intellectual property. Plus we'll look ahead at the three major cases yet to be decided this term dealing with same-sex marriage, affirmative action and voting rights.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Inside Washington [#2509H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3125] Topics: NSA's Sweeping Surveillance, Edward Snowden - Traitor or Whistleblower? Panelists: Pat Buchanan, Author & Columnist; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2433] June 14, 2013 Guest Host: Dana King.
    News Panel:
    STATE BUDGET DEAL - Gov. Jerry Brown and top Democrats in the legislature reached a $96.4 billion budget deal this week, putting them on track to meet the June 15 deadline. The compromise plan embraces the governor's cautious revenue outlook, and gives more money to schools with higher numbers of low income students and English learners. It also includes some additional spending on mental health and dental services for the poor, with a commitment to increased funding in the future for social services.
    SCOTUS ON GENE PATENTING - The US Supreme Court has unanimously ruled that companies cannot patent naturally occurring human genes, sending ripples through the medical and biotechnology industries. With billions of dollars on the line, some companies might abandon work on genetic research if they are unable protect it through patents. But it could also encourage more research and competition, opening the door to new discoveries.
    SAN ONOFRE CLOSURE - While California pledges to cut greenhouse gas emissions, the San Onofre nuclear plant in Southern California is closing. Some environmentalists and policy makers who are concerned about global warming have come to embrace nuclear power, which, unlike natural gas or coal powered energy plants, does not emit carbon into the atmosphere. What will the end of nuclear power mean for growing energy demand and how will the state offset the increased pollution caused by fossil fuel generated power?
    Guests: Dan Walters, Sacramento Bee; Lauren Sommer, KQED Science; and David R. Baker, San Francisco Chronicle.
    DANIEL ELLSBERG ON THE NSA LEAKS - Members of Congress, including California Democratic Senator Diane Feinstein, say Edward Snowden is a traitor who should be prosecuted for revealing classified information about the National Security Agency's domestic surveillance programs. Calling him a modern-day Daniel Ellsberg, supporters around the world are taking to the streets in defense of Snowden. Ellsberg himself, whose infamous leak of the Pentagon Papers led to public outrage over the Vietnam War, says Snowden's disclosures are the most important in US history. Daniel Ellsberg joins guest host Dana King in studio for a conversation about domestic surveillance and the debate over espionage vs. whistle-blowing.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Saving The Ocean [#101H] Shark Reef In the first episode, host Carl Safina travels to Glover's Reef Marine Reserve, a coral atoll in the central American country of Belize. Accompanied by a team of U.S. researchers, who've been studying the reserve for eight years, Carl catches, tags and releases a wide variety of sharks. He scuba dives to check out the shark-counting instruments that the researchers have placed around the atoll, and he also visits the shark fin trader in Belize City's fish market. The fin trade now threatens sharks worldwide, but the sharks in Glover's Reef Reserve are safe and thriving. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 pm
    Revolutionaries [#203H] Turing's Cathedral Legendary science historian George Dyson vividly recreates the beginnings of our digital universe with captivating stories of focused experimentation, mathematical insight and pure creative genius. Computer History Museum's John Hollar leads Dyson in a wide-ranging conversation on the birth of computers, digital television, modern genetics and more. duration 53:10   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#223H] Big Brother's Prying Eyes Whatever your take on the recent revelations about government spying on our phone calls and Internet activity, there's no denying that Big Brother is bigger and less brotherly than we thought. What's the resulting cost to our privacy - and more so, our democracy? This week Lawrence Lessig, professor of law and director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University and founder of Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society, joins Bill to discuss the implications of our government's actions and Edward Snowden's role in leaking the information.
    Few are as knowledgeable about the impact of the Internet on our public and private lives as Lessig, who argues that government needs to protect American rights with the same determination and technological sophistication it uses to invade our privacy and root out terrorists. "What do we put into place to check government officials to make sure they behave in a way that respects our most fundamental values?" Lessig asks.
    A former conservative who's now a liberal, Lessig also knows that the caustic impact of money is another weapon capable of mortally wounding democracy. His recent book, "Republic, Lost: How Money Corrupts Congress - and a Plan to Stop It", decries a pervasive "dependence corruption" in our government and politics that should sound a desperate alarm for both the Left and the Right. On the broadcast, Lessig outlines a radical approach to the problem that uses big money itself to reform big money-powered corruption.
    How do we protect our privacy when Big Government and Big Business morph into Big Brother? Next on Moyers & Company.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    America Reframed [#112] 90 Miles Probing and thoughtful, Juan Carlos Zaldvar's personal memoir offers a rare glimpse into Cuba, a country as mythologized to Americans as the US is to the rest of the world. The Cuban-born filmmaker recounts the strange fate that brought him as a teenage communist to exile in Miami in 1980 during the dramatic Mariel boatlift. Zaldvar uses news clips, family photos and home movies to depict the emotional journey of an immigrant father and son struggling to understand the historical and individual forces shaping their relationships and identities in a new country. A Latino Public Broadcasting (LPB) Co-presentation. A Diverse Voices Project Selection. duration 1:28:00   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 pm
    Independent Lens [#1326] We Were Here When AIDS came to San Francisco in the early 1980s, the city became a war zone. Friends and family members were struck down in their prime by a mostly mysterious illness for which there was no cure. But the community -- hippies, drag queens, lesbians, moms and dads, doctors and nurses -- came together when the nation's leaders looked the other way and built an unprecedented system of love, care, and compassion. Their tireless fight is a testament to the capacity of people working together to rise to an unthinkable occasion. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TV14-L (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    AfroPop: The Ultimate Cultural Exchange [#303] Riseup Reggae Underground is a journey into the heart of Jamaica - the island that gave birth to the worldwide cultural phenomenon of Reggae. In a society where talent abounds and opportunity is scarce, three distinct and courageous artists fight to rise up from obscurity and write themselves into the pages of history. With music and appearances by legends Lee "Scratch" Perry, Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare. duration 57:23   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Losing Lambert: A Journey Through Survival & Hope Kathy O'Hern Fowler, who lost her 16-year-old son to suicide in 1995, spent years struggling with the loss and grief. However, the life-altering experience led her to advocate for other parents who tragically find themselves in the same position. This touching and insightful documentary explores the heart-rending questions left in the wake of suicide, interviews parents struggling to cope with the pain and stigma, and offers hope for the future of suicide prevention.
    At a survivors meeting, parents speak candidly about the loss of their children - their darkest hours - in an effort to raise awareness about teen suicide and to help others find compassion and support. The documentary also focuses on the promising medical research being conducted at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in conjunction with Carnegie Mellon University. Their preliminary findings show impulse-control problems in the brains of suicidal teens, an impressive discovery researchers hope may someday lead to better identification and treatment for at-risk teenagers.
    duration 28:44   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Visa Dream This program tells the touching story of one family's experience gaining entry into the United States. Representatives from the US Consulate demystify the visa process and illuminate the reasons why they approve some applications - and deny others. The film's main characters are Ramon and Aurora Chavez, an elderly couple living in Jalisco, Mexico, who have not seen their children in 16 years. They are a family divided, connected only by photo albums and phone calls.
    The daughters may not visit Mexico because they do not possess the necessary documents; going there would mean forever leaving behind their spouses, children, homes and lives. One daughter tearfully explains the hardships many immigrant families endure as a result of this prolonged separation. Ramon, the patriarch of the family, would rather live in Mexico but he longs to reunite with his family, who live 2500 miles away in Los Angeles. In order to visit, they must secure a tourist visa, an expensive and difficult proposition.
    Previous attempts proved unsuccessful but the Chavezes decide to try again after years of postponement. A camera crew follows them step-by-step through the application process, which begins at the US Consulate two hours away in Guadalajara.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Niagara Falls A historical and picturesque exploration of the spectacular waterfall, this film offers stunning views and profiles some of the quirky visitors and workers of the nation's first great symbol. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#4056] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2925] Tavis talks with Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations, about his text, Foreign Policy Begins at Home, in which he argues that the biggest threat to the US comes from within. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    LinkAsia [#99] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 4:30 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1641] IRISH RECONCILIATION - The G8 economic summit begins shortly in Enniskillen, Northern Ireland, scene of a sectarian bombing that killed 11 people in 1987 - the work of the Irish Republican Army. But, as David Tereshchuk reports, efforts to reconcile the Catholic and Protestant communities since then were sparked by the father of one of the victims, who declared at the time that the bombers should be forgiven, and that he would pray for them every night.
    RUSSELL MOORE - The Southern Baptist Convention, the nation's largest Protestant denomination, has long advocated for conservative values in the public square. The denomination's new national leader on matters of ethics and public policy, Russell Moore, shares those values, but has a different style from many previous Southern Baptist leaders. Moore talks with managing editor Kim Lawton about how he hopes to set a tone of "kindness" and expand the slate of issues that Southern Baptists care about.
    THE ETHICS OF GOVERNMENT DATA COLLECTION - Host Bob Abernethy talks with Michael Kessler, Associate Director of Georgetown University's Berkley Center for Religion, Peace and World Affairs, about what religious and ethical traditions have to say about the government's massive collection of electronic data. How should we balance respect for privacy versus national security?
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    America Reframed [#112] 90 Miles Probing and thoughtful, Juan Carlos Zaldvar's personal memoir offers a rare glimpse into Cuba, a country as mythologized to Americans as the US is to the rest of the world. The Cuban-born filmmaker recounts the strange fate that brought him as a teenage communist to exile in Miami in 1980 during the dramatic Mariel boatlift. Zaldvar uses news clips, family photos and home movies to depict the emotional journey of an immigrant father and son struggling to understand the historical and individual forces shaping their relationships and identities in a new country. A Latino Public Broadcasting (LPB) Co-presentation. A Diverse Voices Project Selection. duration 1:28:00   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 6:30 am
    Visa Dream This program tells the touching story of one family's experience gaining entry into the United States. Representatives from the US Consulate demystify the visa process and illuminate the reasons why they approve some applications - and deny others. The film's main characters are Ramon and Aurora Chavez, an elderly couple living in Jalisco, Mexico, who have not seen their children in 16 years. They are a family divided, connected only by photo albums and phone calls.
    The daughters may not visit Mexico because they do not possess the necessary documents; going there would mean forever leaving behind their spouses, children, homes and lives. One daughter tearfully explains the hardships many immigrant families endure as a result of this prolonged separation. Ramon, the patriarch of the family, would rather live in Mexico but he longs to reunite with his family, who live 2500 miles away in Los Angeles. In order to visit, they must secure a tourist visa, an expensive and difficult proposition.
    Previous attempts proved unsuccessful but the Chavezes decide to try again after years of postponement. A camera crew follows them step-by-step through the application process, which begins at the US Consulate two hours away in Guadalajara.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Global Voices [#603] When Hari Got Married Hari, a 30-year-old taxi driver in the Indian Himalayas, is getting married to a girl he has never met but has fallen in love with over the mobile phone. duration 53:53   STEREO
  • 8:00 am
    AfroPop: The Ultimate Cultural Exchange [#303] Riseup Reggae Underground is a journey into the heart of Jamaica - the island that gave birth to the worldwide cultural phenomenon of Reggae. In a society where talent abounds and opportunity is scarce, three distinct and courageous artists fight to rise up from obscurity and write themselves into the pages of history. With music and appearances by legends Lee "Scratch" Perry, Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare. duration 57:23   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2925] Tavis talks with Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations, about his text, Foreign Policy Begins at Home, in which he argues that the biggest threat to the US comes from within. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2924] Tavis talks with former Major League Baseball star pitcher Dwight Gooden about his candid new memoir, Doc. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    LinkAsia [#99] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 10:30 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1641] IRISH RECONCILIATION - The G8 economic summit begins shortly in Enniskillen, Northern Ireland, scene of a sectarian bombing that killed 11 people in 1987 - the work of the Irish Republican Army. But, as David Tereshchuk reports, efforts to reconcile the Catholic and Protestant communities since then were sparked by the father of one of the victims, who declared at the time that the bombers should be forgiven, and that he would pray for them every night.
    RUSSELL MOORE - The Southern Baptist Convention, the nation's largest Protestant denomination, has long advocated for conservative values in the public square. The denomination's new national leader on matters of ethics and public policy, Russell Moore, shares those values, but has a different style from many previous Southern Baptist leaders. Moore talks with managing editor Kim Lawton about how he hopes to set a tone of "kindness" and expand the slate of issues that Southern Baptists care about.
    THE ETHICS OF GOVERNMENT DATA COLLECTION - Host Bob Abernethy talks with Michael Kessler, Associate Director of Georgetown University's Berkley Center for Religion, Peace and World Affairs, about what religious and ethical traditions have to say about the government's massive collection of electronic data. How should we balance respect for privacy versus national security?
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 am
    America Reframed [#112] 90 Miles Probing and thoughtful, Juan Carlos Zaldvar's personal memoir offers a rare glimpse into Cuba, a country as mythologized to Americans as the US is to the rest of the world. The Cuban-born filmmaker recounts the strange fate that brought him as a teenage communist to exile in Miami in 1980 during the dramatic Mariel boatlift. Zaldvar uses news clips, family photos and home movies to depict the emotional journey of an immigrant father and son struggling to understand the historical and individual forces shaping their relationships and identities in a new country. A Latino Public Broadcasting (LPB) Co-presentation. A Diverse Voices Project Selection. duration 1:28:00   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 pm
    Visa Dream This program tells the touching story of one family's experience gaining entry into the United States. Representatives from the US Consulate demystify the visa process and illuminate the reasons why they approve some applications - and deny others. The film's main characters are Ramon and Aurora Chavez, an elderly couple living in Jalisco, Mexico, who have not seen their children in 16 years. They are a family divided, connected only by photo albums and phone calls.
    The daughters may not visit Mexico because they do not possess the necessary documents; going there would mean forever leaving behind their spouses, children, homes and lives. One daughter tearfully explains the hardships many immigrant families endure as a result of this prolonged separation. Ramon, the patriarch of the family, would rather live in Mexico but he longs to reunite with his family, who live 2500 miles away in Los Angeles. In order to visit, they must secure a tourist visa, an expensive and difficult proposition.
    Previous attempts proved unsuccessful but the Chavezes decide to try again after years of postponement. A camera crew follows them step-by-step through the application process, which begins at the US Consulate two hours away in Guadalajara.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    Global Voices [#603] When Hari Got Married Hari, a 30-year-old taxi driver in the Indian Himalayas, is getting married to a girl he has never met but has fallen in love with over the mobile phone. duration 53:53   STEREO
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#4056] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#9120] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2925] Tavis talks with Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations, about his text, Foreign Policy Begins at Home, in which he argues that the biggest threat to the US comes from within. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32139] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the price of your prescriptions. NBR will have details on the Supreme Court's generic drug ruling that touches the wallet and medicine cabinets of most Americans. And, Texas tells older Americans they can sell their life insurance policies to pay for long-term care. But do the risks outweigh the rewards? duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10651] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32139] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the price of your prescriptions. NBR will have details on the Supreme Court's generic drug ruling that touches the wallet and medicine cabinets of most Americans. And, Texas tells older Americans they can sell their life insurance policies to pay for long-term care. But do the risks outweigh the rewards? duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2231] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#4056] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3361] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10651] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3361] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#19126] (original broadcast date: 6/17/13)
    * President Barack Obama sits down with Charlie Rose for an exclusive 45-minute interview at the White House, the President shares his thoughts on Syria, Iran, the NSA leaks controversy and more.
    duration 56:47   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3361] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2926] Tavis talks with founder and president of the FealGood Foundation, John Feal. One of the individuals who experienced firsthand the fallout from 9/11, Feal explains his mission to fight for justice for first responders. Tavis also chats with Emmy-winning actress Shohreh Aghdashloo. The Oscar nominee recounts some of her struggles as a woman, a Muslim and an Iranian, as detailed in her memoir, The Alley of Love and Yellow Jasmines. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3361] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#210] Interviews include an independent film director, the founder of Samuel Adams Brewery in Boston, and a Pulitzer Prize-winning political cartoonist in Washington, D.C. duration 26:46   TVPG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3361] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10651] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3361] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2231] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10651] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32139] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the price of your prescriptions. NBR will have details on the Supreme Court's generic drug ruling that touches the wallet and medicine cabinets of most Americans. And, Texas tells older Americans they can sell their life insurance policies to pay for long-term care. But do the risks outweigh the rewards? duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2925] Tavis talks with Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations, about his text, Foreign Policy Begins at Home, in which he argues that the biggest threat to the US comes from within. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Global Voices [#603] When Hari Got Married Hari, a 30-year-old taxi driver in the Indian Himalayas, is getting married to a girl he has never met but has fallen in love with over the mobile phone. duration 53:53   STEREO
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#4057] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2926] Tavis talks with founder and president of the FealGood Foundation, John Feal. One of the individuals who experienced firsthand the fallout from 9/11, Feal explains his mission to fight for justice for first responders. Tavis also chats with Emmy-winning actress Shohreh Aghdashloo. The Oscar nominee recounts some of her struggles as a woman, a Muslim and an Iranian, as detailed in her memoir, The Alley of Love and Yellow Jasmines. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Asia This Week [#311] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    European Journal [#3124] Eastern Europe Under Water With the Danube and Elbe rivers at critically high levels, many towns and villages in Germany, Austria and the Czech Republic are still in danger. Will the levees hold? So far the most effective flood prevention has often proven to be in areas that have seen investment in pastureland - allowing rivers to expand safely. The details:
    CZECH REPUBLIC: FLOOD PREVENTION - Torrential rain has left parts of Central Europe underwater, with the Danube and Elbe rivers and their tributaries rising to record levels. Entire communities in Germany, Austria and the Czech Republic have been flooded. In the Czech Republic, the havoc wreaked by the floods of 2002 had barely been dealt with when fresh floods hit. Tens of thousands of people have had to flee their homes, in many cases being housed in emergency accommodation. The Czech government has now invested several millions euros in retention basins and reservoirs to prevent further flooding. The dams are being kept topped up in order to ensure traffic can still ply the rivers.
    GREECE: ADMINISTRATIVE REFORM - The dozens of official agencies and government-subsidized bodies running public affairs in Greece have for decades been a burden on the state budget as well as having a reputation for cronyism. Many of them have now been shut down - officially, at least. Top of the list are youth welfare organizations, with many having been declared pointless and others being merged. One such organization is the national center for gold and silver-smithing. Staff there have been sent home without pay. The government designates them as necessary public sector layoffs - but as former employees take their case to court, it remains unclear whether such agencies have actually been closed at all.
    GERMANY: THE BENEVOLENT BRAUNSCHWEIGER - It's the stuff of fairytales: a generous soul benefiting others. This true story from Braunschweig is about a philanthropist who has been giving away money to the needy. The mystery man has so far handed out around 200,000 euros - to child daycare facilities, road safety centers and homeless shelters. He has also singled out individuals, such as an elderly lady who was attacked and a man who risked his own safety coming to the help of others. The donor has always remained anonymous. Locals are not sure whether this is someone who has inherited considerable wealth or somebody wishing to assuage a guilty conscience. The beneficiaries are not too concerned with the person's identity. They are grateful for the gifts, regardless of whether the source is anonymous or known to them.
    SPAIN: THE THREAT TO TUNA - Illegal fishing and soaring demand in Japan are threatening stocks of bluefin tuna in the Mediterranean. Japan dominates the international tuna market, and Spanish trawlers plying the Mediterranean supply many Japanese customers with legal catches. The Mitsubishi conglomerate, for example, controls a large percentage of the global market in bluefin tuna. Environmental activists, however, are concerned about industrial trawlers whose catch is likewise bought by Japanese customers and which use huge nets and state-of-the-art satellite technology to locate schools of tuna.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 am
    India with Sanjeev Bhaskar [#104] A Camel Called Sanjeev On the final leg of his journey, Sanjeev heads into the magical state of Rajasthan, where he samples the princely lifestyle of the Maharaja of Jodhpur and learns how Indian royalty has reinvented itself in a bid to become relevant in the 21st century. Deeper into the country, Sanjeev hooks up with nomadic camel herders and witnesses the birth of a baby camel. At the remarkable Barefoot College he sees how some of India's poorest people are being empowered and the caste system challenged. duration 59:08   STEREO (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 6:00 am
    India with Sanjeev Bhaskar [#102] The Longest Road Sanjeev takes a trip along the incredible Grand Trunk Road in a quest to find his ancestral home. Along the way he is invited to a lavish wedding, travels high into the mountains to see the summer capital of the Raj, and visits the breathtaking Golden Temple of Amritsar, the holiest shrine of the Sikhs. Finally, Sanjeev crosses the border into Pakistan in search of the village his father was forced to leave when India was partitioned 60 years ago. duration 58:49   STEREO (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 7:00 am
    Global Voices [#503] Lakshmi and Me Have you ever dreamed of being waited on hand and foot? For the past six years, Lakshmi has been working for Nishtha as a part-time maid in Mumbai. Against the backdrop of a culture where "servants" are often treated as social inferiors, Nishtha begins making a film with Lakshmi. In a deeply personal portrait, the film takes a hard look at the caste system and how Lakshmi manages to flourish despite such social boundaries. duration 55:04   STEREO
  • 8:00 am
    Global Voices [#603] When Hari Got Married Hari, a 30-year-old taxi driver in the Indian Himalayas, is getting married to a girl he has never met but has fallen in love with over the mobile phone. duration 53:53   STEREO
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2926] Tavis talks with founder and president of the FealGood Foundation, John Feal. One of the individuals who experienced firsthand the fallout from 9/11, Feal explains his mission to fight for justice for first responders. Tavis also chats with Emmy-winning actress Shohreh Aghdashloo. The Oscar nominee recounts some of her struggles as a woman, a Muslim and an Iranian, as detailed in her memoir, The Alley of Love and Yellow Jasmines. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2925] Tavis talks with Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations, about his text, Foreign Policy Begins at Home, in which he argues that the biggest threat to the US comes from within. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    Asia This Week [#311] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 am
    European Journal [#3124] Eastern Europe Under Water With the Danube and Elbe rivers at critically high levels, many towns and villages in Germany, Austria and the Czech Republic are still in danger. Will the levees hold? So far the most effective flood prevention has often proven to be in areas that have seen investment in pastureland - allowing rivers to expand safely. The details:
    CZECH REPUBLIC: FLOOD PREVENTION - Torrential rain has left parts of Central Europe underwater, with the Danube and Elbe rivers and their tributaries rising to record levels. Entire communities in Germany, Austria and the Czech Republic have been flooded. In the Czech Republic, the havoc wreaked by the floods of 2002 had barely been dealt with when fresh floods hit. Tens of thousands of people have had to flee their homes, in many cases being housed in emergency accommodation. The Czech government has now invested several millions euros in retention basins and reservoirs to prevent further flooding. The dams are being kept topped up in order to ensure traffic can still ply the rivers.
    GREECE: ADMINISTRATIVE REFORM - The dozens of official agencies and government-subsidized bodies running public affairs in Greece have for decades been a burden on the state budget as well as having a reputation for cronyism. Many of them have now been shut down - officially, at least. Top of the list are youth welfare organizations, with many having been declared pointless and others being merged. One such organization is the national center for gold and silver-smithing. Staff there have been sent home without pay. The government designates them as necessary public sector layoffs - but as former employees take their case to court, it remains unclear whether such agencies have actually been closed at all.
    GERMANY: THE BENEVOLENT BRAUNSCHWEIGER - It's the stuff of fairytales: a generous soul benefiting others. This true story from Braunschweig is about a philanthropist who has been giving away money to the needy. The mystery man has so far handed out around 200,000 euros - to child daycare facilities, road safety centers and homeless shelters. He has also singled out individuals, such as an elderly lady who was attacked and a man who risked his own safety coming to the help of others. The donor has always remained anonymous. Locals are not sure whether this is someone who has inherited considerable wealth or somebody wishing to assuage a guilty conscience. The beneficiaries are not too concerned with the person's identity. They are grateful for the gifts, regardless of whether the source is anonymous or known to them.
    SPAIN: THE THREAT TO TUNA - Illegal fishing and soaring demand in Japan are threatening stocks of bluefin tuna in the Mediterranean. Japan dominates the international tuna market, and Spanish trawlers plying the Mediterranean supply many Japanese customers with legal catches. The Mitsubishi conglomerate, for example, controls a large percentage of the global market in bluefin tuna. Environmental activists, however, are concerned about industrial trawlers whose catch is likewise bought by Japanese customers and which use huge nets and state-of-the-art satellite technology to locate schools of tuna.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 am
    India with Sanjeev Bhaskar [#104] A Camel Called Sanjeev On the final leg of his journey, Sanjeev heads into the magical state of Rajasthan, where he samples the princely lifestyle of the Maharaja of Jodhpur and learns how Indian royalty has reinvented itself in a bid to become relevant in the 21st century. Deeper into the country, Sanjeev hooks up with nomadic camel herders and witnesses the birth of a baby camel. At the remarkable Barefoot College he sees how some of India's poorest people are being empowered and the caste system challenged. duration 59:08   STEREO (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 12:00 pm
    India with Sanjeev Bhaskar [#102] The Longest Road Sanjeev takes a trip along the incredible Grand Trunk Road in a quest to find his ancestral home. Along the way he is invited to a lavish wedding, travels high into the mountains to see the summer capital of the Raj, and visits the breathtaking Golden Temple of Amritsar, the holiest shrine of the Sikhs. Finally, Sanjeev crosses the border into Pakistan in search of the village his father was forced to leave when India was partitioned 60 years ago. duration 58:49   STEREO (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 1:00 pm
    Global Voices [#503] Lakshmi and Me Have you ever dreamed of being waited on hand and foot? For the past six years, Lakshmi has been working for Nishtha as a part-time maid in Mumbai. Against the backdrop of a culture where "servants" are often treated as social inferiors, Nishtha begins making a film with Lakshmi. In a deeply personal portrait, the film takes a hard look at the caste system and how Lakshmi manages to flourish despite such social boundaries. duration 55:04   STEREO
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#4057] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#9121] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2926] Tavis talks with founder and president of the FealGood Foundation, John Feal. One of the individuals who experienced firsthand the fallout from 9/11, Feal explains his mission to fight for justice for first responders. Tavis also chats with Emmy-winning actress Shohreh Aghdashloo. The Oscar nominee recounts some of her struggles as a woman, a Muslim and an Iranian, as detailed in her memoir, The Alley of Love and Yellow Jasmines. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32140] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the markets have been whipsawed. Six straight days of triple digit moves and all because of speculation over what Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke may say tomorrow. NBR will tell you what to watch for. And, why are health care costs, long the culprit behind rising inflation, now showing signs of slowing? duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10652] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32140] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the markets have been whipsawed. Six straight days of triple digit moves and all because of speculation over what Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke may say tomorrow. NBR will tell you what to watch for. And, why are health care costs, long the culprit behind rising inflation, now showing signs of slowing? duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2232] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#4057] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3362] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10652] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3362] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#19127] (original broadcast date: 6/18/13)
    * Niall Ferguson on his book "The Great Degeneration"
    * George Packer on "The Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America"
    duration 56:47   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3362] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2927] Tavis talks with Val Kilmer. One of the most prolific actors of his generation, he shares the backstory of his new one-man show, Citizen Twain. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3362] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#211] Interviews include the Editor of "Seventeen" magazine, the owner of an adored chocolate shop in New York City, and world famous photographer Abelardo Morrell. duration 26:46   TVPG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3362] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10652] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3362] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2232] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10652] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32140] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the markets have been whipsawed. Six straight days of triple digit moves and all because of speculation over what Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke may say tomorrow. NBR will tell you what to watch for. And, why are health care costs, long the culprit behind rising inflation, now showing signs of slowing? duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2926] Tavis talks with founder and president of the FealGood Foundation, John Feal. One of the individuals who experienced firsthand the fallout from 9/11, Feal explains his mission to fight for justice for first responders. Tavis also chats with Emmy-winning actress Shohreh Aghdashloo. The Oscar nominee recounts some of her struggles as a woman, a Muslim and an Iranian, as detailed in her memoir, The Alley of Love and Yellow Jasmines. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Anyone and Everyone This documentary tells the stories of families from Utah to North Carolina and Wyoming to New York, all connected by a common thread - a gay child. By first-time filmmaker Susan Polis Schutz (also the parent of a gay son), it depicts families representing a wide range of religions, nationalities and political leanings. During the film, parents of homosexual teens and young adults eloquently recall their initial reactions to their child's coming-out and their sometimes difficult journeys to acceptance. Some showed unconditional support; others struggled with their child's sexual orientation, either fearing alienation from their extended family, their church or community or failing to understand the universal nature of homosexuality. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#4058] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2927] Tavis talks with Val Kilmer. One of the most prolific actors of his generation, he shares the backstory of his new one-man show, Citizen Twain. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Asia Insight [#106] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Asia Biz Forecast [#411] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Nature [#2810H] Outback Pelicans The Australian outback is the driest place on the driest inhabited continent on the planet. It is a place you might expect to see kangaroos but certainly not waterbirds. Yet once every 10 years, rains flood into dried-up river beds and head inland to create the largest lake in Australia, and 100,000 pelicans -- a third of all the pelicans in Australia -- arrive for the event. Leaving their homes on coasts and harbors, they come to feed on fish washed in on the floods and on billions of brine shrimp and other crustaceans which hatch and grow to adulthood in a few days in water twice as salty as the Dead Sea. The pelicans have come home to court and raise as many families as possible before the water and the food disappear once more. duration 55:15   SRND51 TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 6:00 am
    Nature [#3002H] Magic of the Snowy Owl This episode explores the world of the snowy owl, a bird recently made popular by Hedwig, Harry Potter's faithful companion. Turning fantasy into reality, "Magic of the Snowy Owl" takes an intimate look at how these majestic birds survive in one of the most isolated and inhospitable places on the planet. Noted wildlife filmmaker Fergus Beeley ("Jungle Eagle") takes viewers deep into the "snowy's" tundra home on the North Slope of Alaska to observe the daily struggles involved in raising a family of helpless chicks until they are able to fly. Viewers will discover that these strikingly beautiful Arctic owls - essentially eagles, falcons and owls rolled into one - have a magic of their own. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 7:00 am
    Nature [#2705(] Hummingbirds: Magic in the Air Hummingbirds represent one of nature's most interesting paradoxes -- they are the tiniest of birds, yet they qualify as some of the toughest and most energetic creatures on the planet. New knowledge gained from scientists currently making great breakthroughs in hummingbird biology makes this a perfect time to focus on these shimmering, flashing jewels of the natural world. Stunningly beautiful high-definition, high speed footage of hummingbirds in the wild combined with high-tech presentations of their remarkable abilities help us to understand the world of hummingbirds as we never have before. duration 1:29:30   SRND51 TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 8:00 am
    Anyone and Everyone This documentary tells the stories of families from Utah to North Carolina and Wyoming to New York, all connected by a common thread - a gay child. By first-time filmmaker Susan Polis Schutz (also the parent of a gay son), it depicts families representing a wide range of religions, nationalities and political leanings. During the film, parents of homosexual teens and young adults eloquently recall their initial reactions to their child's coming-out and their sometimes difficult journeys to acceptance. Some showed unconditional support; others struggled with their child's sexual orientation, either fearing alienation from their extended family, their church or community or failing to understand the universal nature of homosexuality. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2927] Tavis talks with Val Kilmer. One of the most prolific actors of his generation, he shares the backstory of his new one-man show, Citizen Twain. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2926] Tavis talks with founder and president of the FealGood Foundation, John Feal. One of the individuals who experienced firsthand the fallout from 9/11, Feal explains his mission to fight for justice for first responders. Tavis also chats with Emmy-winning actress Shohreh Aghdashloo. The Oscar nominee recounts some of her struggles as a woman, a Muslim and an Iranian, as detailed in her memoir, The Alley of Love and Yellow Jasmines. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    Asia Insight [#106] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 am
    Asia Biz Forecast [#411] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 am
    Nature [#2810H] Outback Pelicans The Australian outback is the driest place on the driest inhabited continent on the planet. It is a place you might expect to see kangaroos but certainly not waterbirds. Yet once every 10 years, rains flood into dried-up river beds and head inland to create the largest lake in Australia, and 100,000 pelicans -- a third of all the pelicans in Australia -- arrive for the event. Leaving their homes on coasts and harbors, they come to feed on fish washed in on the floods and on billions of brine shrimp and other crustaceans which hatch and grow to adulthood in a few days in water twice as salty as the Dead Sea. The pelicans have come home to court and raise as many families as possible before the water and the food disappear once more. duration 55:15   SRND51 TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 12:00 pm
    Nature [#3002H] Magic of the Snowy Owl This episode explores the world of the snowy owl, a bird recently made popular by Hedwig, Harry Potter's faithful companion. Turning fantasy into reality, "Magic of the Snowy Owl" takes an intimate look at how these majestic birds survive in one of the most isolated and inhospitable places on the planet. Noted wildlife filmmaker Fergus Beeley ("Jungle Eagle") takes viewers deep into the "snowy's" tundra home on the North Slope of Alaska to observe the daily struggles involved in raising a family of helpless chicks until they are able to fly. Viewers will discover that these strikingly beautiful Arctic owls - essentially eagles, falcons and owls rolled into one - have a magic of their own. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 1:00 pm
    Nature [#2705(] Hummingbirds: Magic in the Air Hummingbirds represent one of nature's most interesting paradoxes -- they are the tiniest of birds, yet they qualify as some of the toughest and most energetic creatures on the planet. New knowledge gained from scientists currently making great breakthroughs in hummingbird biology makes this a perfect time to focus on these shimmering, flashing jewels of the natural world. Stunningly beautiful high-definition, high speed footage of hummingbirds in the wild combined with high-tech presentations of their remarkable abilities help us to understand the world of hummingbirds as we never have before. duration 1:29:30   SRND51 TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#4058] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#9122] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2927] Tavis talks with Val Kilmer. One of the most prolific actors of his generation, he shares the backstory of his new one-man show, Citizen Twain. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32141Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke gives his long-awaited press conference and gives the market a big hint as to the future of his stimulus program. NBR will ask Mark Zandi of Moody's Analytics what it means for the economy and Jim Paulsen of Wells Fargo what it means for the market and your investments. And, the American Medical Association classifies obesity as a disease - and it could have implications for doctors, patients, insurers and health care costs. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10653] Afghan Government Refuses Peace Negotiations with Taliban * President Obama Calls for Decrease in Nuclear Weapons * Cicadas Return After a 17-Year Hibernation * The Continuing Debate on Immigration Reform * A Call for Humanities in Higher Education duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32141Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke gives his long-awaited press conference and gives the market a big hint as to the future of his stimulus program. NBR will ask Mark Zandi of Moody's Analytics what it means for the economy and Jim Paulsen of Wells Fargo what it means for the market and your investments. And, the American Medical Association classifies obesity as a disease - and it could have implications for doctors, patients, insurers and health care costs. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2233] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#4058] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3363] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10653] Afghan Government Refuses Peace Negotiations with Taliban * President Obama Calls for Decrease in Nuclear Weapons * Cicadas Return After a 17-Year Hibernation * The Continuing Debate on Immigration Reform * A Call for Humanities in Higher Education duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3363] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#19128H] (original broadcast date: 6/19/13)
    * Stephen Schwarzman
    * Alan Cumming
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3363] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2928] Tavis talks with Morgan Spurlock. The Oscar-nominated documentary filmmaker talks about his new venture, the CNN original series, Inside Man, which he hosts and produces. Tavis also chats with actor Michael McKean. The multi-talented performer discusses his role as co-star of the play, Yes, Minister. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3363] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#212] The final episode of the series includes an interview with the chancellor of the New York School District who was the former Assistant Attorney General for the Department of Justice's Antitrust Division, and a cofounder of the Blue Man Group. duration 26:46   TVPG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3363] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10653] Afghan Government Refuses Peace Negotiations with Taliban * President Obama Calls for Decrease in Nuclear Weapons * Cicadas Return After a 17-Year Hibernation * The Continuing Debate on Immigration Reform * A Call for Humanities in Higher Education duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3363] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2233] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10653] Afghan Government Refuses Peace Negotiations with Taliban * President Obama Calls for Decrease in Nuclear Weapons * Cicadas Return After a 17-Year Hibernation * The Continuing Debate on Immigration Reform * A Call for Humanities in Higher Education duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32141Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke gives his long-awaited press conference and gives the market a big hint as to the future of his stimulus program. NBR will ask Mark Zandi of Moody's Analytics what it means for the economy and Jim Paulsen of Wells Fargo what it means for the market and your investments. And, the American Medical Association classifies obesity as a disease - and it could have implications for doctors, patients, insurers and health care costs. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2927] Tavis talks with Val Kilmer. One of the most prolific actors of his generation, he shares the backstory of his new one-man show, Citizen Twain. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Secrets of the Dead [#1101] Lost Ships of Rome In 2009 a team of marine archeologists, carrying out a sonar survey of the seabed around the remote Italian island of Ventotene, made an astonishing discovery. The wrecks of five ancient Roman ships were found in pristine condition, each one fully laden with exotic goods. Remarkably, much of the cargo remained exactly as the ancient Roman crews had loaded it, suggesting that these ships had not capsized but had gone to the bottom of the sea intact and upright. What happened to these ancient ships? What were they carrying and why had they traveled to this remote, rocky island in the first place? "Lost Ships of Rome" follows the team as they explore the sites in detail, salvage artifacts and piece together the history of the ships and why they were lost at Ventotene 2,000 years ago. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#4059] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2928] Tavis talks with Morgan Spurlock. The Oscar-nominated documentary filmmaker talks about his new venture, the CNN original series, Inside Man, which he hosts and produces. Tavis also chats with actor Michael McKean. The multi-talented performer discusses his role as co-star of the play, Yes, Minister. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Scully/The World Show [#1607] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 4:30 am
    Second Opinion [#912] The Future of Cancer Treatment Advances in the fight against cancer are due to the work of health care professionals, clinical researchers, and thousands of cancer patients and advocates. Since cancer isn't a single disease, understanding the differences and similarities in how various cancers behave is essential to better treatment in the future. Hear from Judy Orem, who relates her experience as a patient in a clinical trial. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Independent Lens [#1304H] Deaf Jam National poetry slams for youth have been gaining momentum, but few, if any, deaf teens have ever been included in these contests. In this documentary, a group of New York City deaf teens reveal their passions, frustrations and senses of humor as they discover American Sign Language poetry - eventually stepping into the world of the youth poetry slams with their hearing peers. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 6:00 am
    Independent Lens [#1417] The Revolutionary Optimists Children in the slums of Calcutta are starting a revolution. Called to action by visionary former attorney Amlan Ganguly, the 'Daredevils' have already made radical health and sanitation improvements in one of the city's poorest slums -- awakening a neglected populace to the real possibility of change. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Frontline [#3108] The Retirement Gamble Ten trillion dollars in Americans' retirement savings are invested in large and small accounts managed by banks, brokerages, mutual funds, and insurance companies. But whether your IRA or 401K will assure a safe retirement is largely a gamble.
    Frontline raises troubling questions about how America's financial institutions protect our savings. The Retirement Gamble reveals how fees, self-dealing, and kickbacks bring great profits to Wall Street while imperiling the prospects of a secure future for individuals. The film questions who has the consumer's best interests in mind, and whether there is a better way to manage our retirements.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    Secrets of the Dead [#1101] Lost Ships of Rome In 2009 a team of marine archeologists, carrying out a sonar survey of the seabed around the remote Italian island of Ventotene, made an astonishing discovery. The wrecks of five ancient Roman ships were found in pristine condition, each one fully laden with exotic goods. Remarkably, much of the cargo remained exactly as the ancient Roman crews had loaded it, suggesting that these ships had not capsized but had gone to the bottom of the sea intact and upright. What happened to these ancient ships? What were they carrying and why had they traveled to this remote, rocky island in the first place? "Lost Ships of Rome" follows the team as they explore the sites in detail, salvage artifacts and piece together the history of the ships and why they were lost at Ventotene 2,000 years ago. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2928] Tavis talks with Morgan Spurlock. The Oscar-nominated documentary filmmaker talks about his new venture, the CNN original series, Inside Man, which he hosts and produces. Tavis also chats with actor Michael McKean. The multi-talented performer discusses his role as co-star of the play, Yes, Minister. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2927] Tavis talks with Val Kilmer. One of the most prolific actors of his generation, he shares the backstory of his new one-man show, Citizen Twain. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    Scully/The World Show [#1607] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:30 am
    Second Opinion [#912] The Future of Cancer Treatment Advances in the fight against cancer are due to the work of health care professionals, clinical researchers, and thousands of cancer patients and advocates. Since cancer isn't a single disease, understanding the differences and similarities in how various cancers behave is essential to better treatment in the future. Hear from Judy Orem, who relates her experience as a patient in a clinical trial. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 am
    Independent Lens [#1304H] Deaf Jam National poetry slams for youth have been gaining momentum, but few, if any, deaf teens have ever been included in these contests. In this documentary, a group of New York City deaf teens reveal their passions, frustrations and senses of humor as they discover American Sign Language poetry - eventually stepping into the world of the youth poetry slams with their hearing peers. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 12:00 pm
    Independent Lens [#1417] The Revolutionary Optimists Children in the slums of Calcutta are starting a revolution. Called to action by visionary former attorney Amlan Ganguly, the 'Daredevils' have already made radical health and sanitation improvements in one of the city's poorest slums -- awakening a neglected populace to the real possibility of change. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    Frontline [#3108] The Retirement Gamble Ten trillion dollars in Americans' retirement savings are invested in large and small accounts managed by banks, brokerages, mutual funds, and insurance companies. But whether your IRA or 401K will assure a safe retirement is largely a gamble.
    Frontline raises troubling questions about how America's financial institutions protect our savings. The Retirement Gamble reveals how fees, self-dealing, and kickbacks bring great profits to Wall Street while imperiling the prospects of a secure future for individuals. The film questions who has the consumer's best interests in mind, and whether there is a better way to manage our retirements.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#4059] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#9123] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2928] Tavis talks with Morgan Spurlock. The Oscar-nominated documentary filmmaker talks about his new venture, the CNN original series, Inside Man, which he hosts and produces. Tavis also chats with actor Michael McKean. The multi-talented performer discusses his role as co-star of the play, Yes, Minister. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32142Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report - stocks, bonds and commodities suffer huge losses after yesterday's Fed statement. What do investors do now? One bright spot - housing. Sales spike and prices rise, but one set of buyers is on the outside looking in. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10654] Immigration Debate Heats Up Over Border Security * Supreme Court Rules Against "Anti-Prostitution" Stance for AIDS Funding * HPV Vaccine Reduces Infections in Teenage Girls by Half * Does Wealth Make You Happier? * Two Championships on the Line duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32142Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report - stocks, bonds and commodities suffer huge losses after yesterday's Fed statement. What do investors do now? One bright spot - housing. Sales spike and prices rise, but one set of buyers is on the outside looking in. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2234] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#4059] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3364] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10654] Immigration Debate Heats Up Over Border Security * Supreme Court Rules Against "Anti-Prostitution" Stance for AIDS Funding * HPV Vaccine Reduces Infections in Teenage Girls by Half * Does Wealth Make You Happier? * Two Championships on the Line duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3364] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#19129H] (original broadcast date: 6/20/13)
    * Jennifer Bradley and Bruce Katz on their book "The Metropolitan Revolution."
    * Vishaan Chakrabarti of Columbia University on his book "Country of Cities."
    * a discussion about Presidential libraries with James Polshek, Dean of Columbia University's Graduate School of Architecture; Robert Stern, Dean of the Yale University's School of Architecture and Margaret Russell, Editor in Chief at Architectural Digest.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3364] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2929] Tavis talks with W. Richard West, Jr., president and CEO of the Autry National Center of the American West, who explains his mission to tell the compelling story of the American West and the people who created its history and shape the present and future. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3364] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#601H] 3 young Americans fly to New Zealand to embark on a 4-week roadtrip on the other side of the world. Meeting up in Los Angeles, Ray, Fawna, and Allison fly to Auckland. Upon arrival, they paint their RV home and experience the challenge of driving on the other side of the road. Soon, they head out for their first interview with adventurer and mountain climber Peter Hillary. They then meet up with fashion designer Trelise Cooper and hip-hop and graffiti artist DLT. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3364] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10654] Immigration Debate Heats Up Over Border Security * Supreme Court Rules Against "Anti-Prostitution" Stance for AIDS Funding * HPV Vaccine Reduces Infections in Teenage Girls by Half * Does Wealth Make You Happier? * Two Championships on the Line duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3364] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2234] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10654] Immigration Debate Heats Up Over Border Security * Supreme Court Rules Against "Anti-Prostitution" Stance for AIDS Funding * HPV Vaccine Reduces Infections in Teenage Girls by Half * Does Wealth Make You Happier? * Two Championships on the Line duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32142Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report - stocks, bonds and commodities suffer huge losses after yesterday's Fed statement. What do investors do now? One bright spot - housing. Sales spike and prices rise, but one set of buyers is on the outside looking in. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2928] Tavis talks with Morgan Spurlock. The Oscar-nominated documentary filmmaker talks about his new venture, the CNN original series, Inside Man, which he hosts and produces. Tavis also chats with actor Michael McKean. The multi-talented performer discusses his role as co-star of the play, Yes, Minister. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Pacific Heartbeat [#102H] Under A Jarvis Moon Under a Jarvis Moon is the story of 130 young men from Hawai'i who, from the late 1930s through the early years of World War II, were part of a clandestine mission by the U.S. federal government to occupy desert islands in the middle of the Pacific. The first wave of these colonists were Hawaiian high school students, chosen because government officials assumed Pacific Islanders could best survive the harsh conditions present on the tiny, isolated islands. For the young men, who were unaware of the true purpose of their role as colonists, what ensued is a tale of intrigue, courage, and ultimately, tragedy. Amazingly, these men (four of whom are still alive) are only now being recognized for their sacrifice, and efforts are underway for the United States to officially acknowledge them for serving their country. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#4060] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2929] Tavis talks with W. Richard West, Jr., president and CEO of the Autry National Center of the American West, who explains his mission to tell the compelling story of the American West and the people who created its history and shape the present and future. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Well Read [#108] G. Willow Wilson, Alif The Unseen Hackers, geeks, the Arab Spring, a parallel universe, genies: they're all part of G. Willow Wilson's debut novel. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Great Decisions In Foreign Policy [#405] Red Line: Iran, Israel and the Bomb For nearly a decade, Iran's quest for nuclear capabilities has topped global security concerns in Washington, Brussels and Tel Aviv. Why is a nuclear armed Iran considered so dangerous to U.S. and Israeli interests, and what's prevented Iran from reaching a deal year after year? duration 29:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Nova [#3705] Extreme Cave Diving Follow the charismatic Dr. Kenny Broad as he dives into Blue Holes -- underwater caves that formed during the last ice age when sea level was nearly 400 feet below what it is today. They are Earth's least explored and perhaps most dangerous frontiers. With an interdisciplinary team of climatologists, paleontologists and anthropologists, Broad investigates the hidden history of Earth's climate as revealed by finds in this spectacularly beautiful "alternate universe." duration 54:16   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 6:00 am
    Cave People of the Himalaya Everest climber and thrill seeker, Pete Athans, returns to the Himalayas with Dr. Mark Aldenderfer in search of the caves and mummies of a lost civilization. There they will risk their own safety to reveal astonishing evidence of a previously unknown, 1500-year-old death ritual high in the Himalayan caves. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG
  • 7:00 am
    Nova scienceNOW [#604H] Can I Eat That? What are the secrets behind your favorite foods? Why are some treats - like chocolate chip cookies - delectable, while others - like cookies made with mealworms - disgusting? You may think you understand what makes something sweet, salty or bitter, but David Pogue gets a taste of a much more complicated truth as he ventures into labs and kitchens where everything from apple pie to Thanksgiving turkey to juicy grasshoppers is diced, sliced, dissected and put under the microscope. If scientists can uncover exactly what's behind the mouth-watering flavors and textures we take for granted every day, could they help us enjoy our food more - without packing on the pounds? duration 55:17   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 8:00 am
    Pacific Heartbeat [#102H] Under A Jarvis Moon Under a Jarvis Moon is the story of 130 young men from Hawai'i who, from the late 1930s through the early years of World War II, were part of a clandestine mission by the U.S. federal government to occupy desert islands in the middle of the Pacific. The first wave of these colonists were Hawaiian high school students, chosen because government officials assumed Pacific Islanders could best survive the harsh conditions present on the tiny, isolated islands. For the young men, who were unaware of the true purpose of their role as colonists, what ensued is a tale of intrigue, courage, and ultimately, tragedy. Amazingly, these men (four of whom are still alive) are only now being recognized for their sacrifice, and efforts are underway for the United States to officially acknowledge them for serving their country. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2929] Tavis talks with W. Richard West, Jr., president and CEO of the Autry National Center of the American West, who explains his mission to tell the compelling story of the American West and the people who created its history and shape the present and future. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2928] Tavis talks with Morgan Spurlock. The Oscar-nominated documentary filmmaker talks about his new venture, the CNN original series, Inside Man, which he hosts and produces. Tavis also chats with actor Michael McKean. The multi-talented performer discusses his role as co-star of the play, Yes, Minister. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    Well Read [#108] G. Willow Wilson, Alif The Unseen Hackers, geeks, the Arab Spring, a parallel universe, genies: they're all part of G. Willow Wilson's debut novel. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 am
    Great Decisions In Foreign Policy [#405] Red Line: Iran, Israel and the Bomb For nearly a decade, Iran's quest for nuclear capabilities has topped global security concerns in Washington, Brussels and Tel Aviv. Why is a nuclear armed Iran considered so dangerous to U.S. and Israeli interests, and what's prevented Iran from reaching a deal year after year? duration 29:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 am
    Nova [#3705] Extreme Cave Diving Follow the charismatic Dr. Kenny Broad as he dives into Blue Holes -- underwater caves that formed during the last ice age when sea level was nearly 400 feet below what it is today. They are Earth's least explored and perhaps most dangerous frontiers. With an interdisciplinary team of climatologists, paleontologists and anthropologists, Broad investigates the hidden history of Earth's climate as revealed by finds in this spectacularly beautiful "alternate universe." duration 54:16   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 12:00 pm
    Cave People of the Himalaya Everest climber and thrill seeker, Pete Athans, returns to the Himalayas with Dr. Mark Aldenderfer in search of the caves and mummies of a lost civilization. There they will risk their own safety to reveal astonishing evidence of a previously unknown, 1500-year-old death ritual high in the Himalayan caves. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG
  • 1:00 pm
    Nova scienceNOW [#604H] Can I Eat That? What are the secrets behind your favorite foods? Why are some treats - like chocolate chip cookies - delectable, while others - like cookies made with mealworms - disgusting? You may think you understand what makes something sweet, salty or bitter, but David Pogue gets a taste of a much more complicated truth as he ventures into labs and kitchens where everything from apple pie to Thanksgiving turkey to juicy grasshoppers is diced, sliced, dissected and put under the microscope. If scientists can uncover exactly what's behind the mouth-watering flavors and textures we take for granted every day, could they help us enjoy our food more - without packing on the pounds? duration 55:17   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#4060] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#9124] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2929] Tavis talks with W. Richard West, Jr., president and CEO of the Autry National Center of the American West, who explains his mission to tell the compelling story of the American West and the people who created its history and shape the present and future. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32143] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, a wild week on Wall Street comes to a close. But with the end of the quarter and first half quickly approaching, will we see even bigger swings next week? And, remember Jeff Skilling? The ex-Enron CEO was at the center of one of the most notorious financial scandals and today his prison sentence was reduced. NBR has a report from the courthouse in Houston. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10655] Protests in Brazil Escalate * Debate Over Language Requirements in Immigration Reform Bill * Is Money Really the Root of All Evil? * Mark Shields and David Brooks Analyze This Week's News * "Does Jesus Really Love Me?" Book Discussion duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32143] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, a wild week on Wall Street comes to a close. But with the end of the quarter and first half quickly approaching, will we see even bigger swings next week? And, remember Jeff Skilling? The ex-Enron CEO was at the center of one of the most notorious financial scandals and today his prison sentence was reduced. NBR has a report from the courthouse in Houston. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2235] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    BBC Newsnight [#17172Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3365] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10655] Protests in Brazil Escalate * Debate Over Language Requirements in Immigration Reform Bill * Is Money Really the Root of All Evil? * Mark Shields and David Brooks Analyze This Week's News * "Does Jesus Really Love Me?" Book Discussion duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3365] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#19130] (original broadcast date: 6/21/13)
    * Actor Terence Stamp on his career and upcoming film "Unfinished Song"
    * Lebanese filmmaker Ziad Doueiri on his film "The Attack."
    duration 56:47   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3365] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2930] Tavis talks with multiple Grammy-winning singer-songwriter India.Arie. The 4-time Grammy winner talks about her 4-year absence from the public eye and her new CD, "SongVersation." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3365] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#602] The team visits a Maori museum and chef Kate Fay before interviewing dub and hip-hop musician Tiki Taane. Driving on to Coromandel, the team interviews Barry Brickell, potter and railway engineer, and horse trainer Tina Fagan. Finally, they head to Gisborne, where they spend time with Geoff and Nicola Wright, organic winemakers. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3365] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10655] Protests in Brazil Escalate * Debate Over Language Requirements in Immigration Reform Bill * Is Money Really the Root of All Evil? * Mark Shields and David Brooks Analyze This Week's News * "Does Jesus Really Love Me?" Book Discussion duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3365] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2235] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10655] Protests in Brazil Escalate * Debate Over Language Requirements in Immigration Reform Bill * Is Money Really the Root of All Evil? * Mark Shields and David Brooks Analyze This Week's News * "Does Jesus Really Love Me?" Book Discussion duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32143] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, a wild week on Wall Street comes to a close. But with the end of the quarter and first half quickly approaching, will we see even bigger swings next week? And, remember Jeff Skilling? The ex-Enron CEO was at the center of one of the most notorious financial scandals and today his prison sentence was reduced. NBR has a report from the courthouse in Houston. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2929] Tavis talks with W. Richard West, Jr., president and CEO of the Autry National Center of the American West, who explains his mission to tell the compelling story of the American West and the people who created its history and shape the present and future. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Independent Lens [#1304H] Deaf Jam National poetry slams for youth have been gaining momentum, but few, if any, deaf teens have ever been included in these contests. In this documentary, a group of New York City deaf teens reveal their passions, frustrations and senses of humor as they discover American Sign Language poetry - eventually stepping into the world of the youth poetry slams with their hearing peers. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1642] PRISONS AND THE MENTALLY ILL - In the US the largest institutions housing the mentally ill are jails. On any given day Cook County jail in Chicago holds about 10,000 inmates and on average 1 in 4 is suffering from some kind of mental illness. Cook Country Sheriff Tom Dart tells Lucky Severson of the moral and financial costs of dealing this way with the mentally troubled and others describe their programs to house the mentally ill and keep them out of jail.
    TAYLOR BRANCH ON 1963 - This year marks the 50th anniversary of several key moments in struggle for civil rights. "1963 is without a doubt the breakthrough pivotal year" for Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and the civil rights movement, says Pulitzer Prize-winning author Taylor Branch, who recently released a new work, The King Years. Kim Lawton talks with Branch about some of the major milestones and the central role churches played in all of them.
    SUPREME COURT - Tim O'Brien reports on upcoming major rulings, including on affirmative action, about to be issued by the Supreme Court.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#952] Active Vs. Passive This week: WT tackles the active versus passive investing debate. Which strategy is best for you? Vanguard's Daniel Wallick and award-winning financial planner Gregg Fisher argue the pros and cons. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2215H] HUMAN TRAFFICKING AS A DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN ISSUE. We speak with DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano.
    THE SNAP CHALLENGE: For one week almost 30 congressmen and women tried to dine for less than $5 per day.
    NURSING RESEARCH. Why the US is experiencing a shortage of nurses.
    Panelists: Women's Campaign Fund President Sam Bennett, The Heritage Foundation's Genevieve Wood, Host of NPR's Focus Point Dr. Avis Jones DeWeever, Republican Commentator Tara Setmayer.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asia Insight [#107] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    John D. Rockefeller: American Experience For decades, the Rockefeller name was despised in America - associated with John D. Rockefeller Sr.'s feared monopoly, Standard Oil. By the end of his life, Rockefeller had given away half his fortune - but even his vast philanthropy could not erase the memory of his predatory business practices. His only son, John D. Rockefeller Jr., would dedicate his life to recasting the family image. In the quest for redemption and respectability, Junior would give away hundreds of millions of dollars, and would insist that his six children behave impeccably. Their contributions transformed America. When he died at age 86, Junior left his six children and 22 grandchildren an invaluable inheritance: a name that stood not for corporate greed, but for "the well-being of mankind." This episode was derived from the original series "The Rockefellers." duration 1:55:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 7:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#224H] United States of ALEC: A Follow-Up This week, Moyers & Company follows up and expands on a breakthrough 2012 report on the most influential corporate-funded political force most of us have never heard of - ALEC, the American Legislative Exchange Council. A national consortium of state politicians and powerful corporations, ALEC presents itself as a "nonpartisan public-private partnership". But behind that mantra lies a vast network of corporate lobbying and political action aimed to increase corporate profits at public expense without public knowledge.
    Using interviews, documents, and field reporting, the episode explores ALEC's self-serving machine at work, acting in a way one Wisconsin politician describes as "a corporate dating service for lonely legislators and corporate special interests." Updated coverage includes new examples of corporate influence on state legislation and lawmakers, the growing public protest against ALEC's big business-serving agenda, and internal tactics ALEC is instituting to further shroud its actions and intentions.
    Even with increased scrutiny, ALEC's influence continues to grow. In state houses around the country, hundreds of pieces of boilerplate ALEC legislation are proposed or enacted that would, among other things, dilute collective bargaining rights, make it harder for some Americans to vote, and limit corporate liability for harm caused to consumers - each accomplished without the public ever knowing who's behind it.
    "All of us here are very familiar with ALEC and the influence that ALEC has with many of the [legislative] members," says Arizona State Senator Steve Farley. "Corporations have the right to present their arguments, but they don't have the right to do it secretly."
    "United States of ALEC" is a collaboration between Okapi Productions (the filmmakers Tom Casciato and Kathleen Hughes) and the Schumann Media Center, headed by Bill Moyers, which supports independent journalism and public watchdogs including the Center for Media and Democracy, whose investigators are featured in the report.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#147] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2510H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5251H] Peter Baker of The New York Times will report on the success and setbacks President Obama had at this week's G8 summit and how his influence on the world stage has changed since his first term in office.
    * Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News will explain attempts by the US to start talks with the Taliban to help end the 12-year old Afghan war and why President Hamid Karzai has suddenly decided to boycott the peace talks.
    * Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post will take a closer look at the politics surrounding a tentative bipartisan deal on immigration reform in the Senate and the defeat of a sweeping farm bill in the House.
    * Tom Gjelten of NPR will report on the NSA surveillance program and this week's disclosures that it helped foil more than 50 potential terrorist events, as well as news that the FBI has used drones for domestic surveillance here at home.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2434H] June 21, 2013 Guest Host: Dana King.
    News Panel:
    OPEN RECORDS BATTLE - A move by Gov. Brown to weaken the California Public Records Act set off a heated controversy among journalists and open government advocates this week, followed by back-peddling from top state Democrats. At the core of the debate is whether the state or local governments should foot the bill for requests for government records.
    SAN CLEMENTE DAM REMOVAL - In what will be the largest dam removal project ever undertaken in California, officials have agreed to tear down the 106-foot-tall San Clemente Dam in Monterey County. The reservoir it holds is now 95 percent silted up and the obsolete dam has been declared seismically unsafe. The removal of the dam will also be good for endangered steelhead trout, which for decades have been blocked from their traditional spawning grounds by the enormous barrier on the Carmel River.
    SAN JOSE SUES MLB - The Oakland A's are itching to relocate from their longtime home at the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum to a new proposed stadium in downtown San Jose. But Major League Baseball has thus far blocked the move, claiming the San Francisco Giants hold the territorial rights to the South Bay. This week the city of San Jose sued Major League Baseball, challenging the geographic rights in order to allow the A's to make the move south.
    Guests: Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group; Mark Purdy, San Jose Mercury News; and Paul Rogers, SJ Mercury News.
    INTERVIEW WITH CONGRESSMAN JARED HUFFMAN - Huffman, a Marin County Democrat, is a cosponsor of the Student Loan Relief Act (HR1595). If Congress doesn't act before July 1, federally subsidized loans are set to double from the current historically low rate of 3.4% to 6.8%. With nearly half of California college students borrowing money to go to school, the hike would mean thousands of dollars more of debt. We hear from Congressman Huffman on efforts being made to freeze the rate.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17172Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2215H] HUMAN TRAFFICKING AS A DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN ISSUE. We speak with DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano.
    THE SNAP CHALLENGE: For one week almost 30 congressmen and women tried to dine for less than $5 per day.
    NURSING RESEARCH. Why the US is experiencing a shortage of nurses.
    Panelists: Women's Campaign Fund President Sam Bennett, The Heritage Foundation's Genevieve Wood, Host of NPR's Focus Point Dr. Avis Jones DeWeever, Republican Commentator Tara Setmayer.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3126] Topics: G-8 Speaks Out on Syria; Did Ben Bernanke Get the Boot? Panelists: Pat Buchanan, Author & Columnist; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#325H] Main Street: Findlay, Ohio How many times during the past several years have you heard one commentator or another express the same familiar lament? "We just don't make anything anymore." Of course, it's not true. Not even close. No country exports more than the United States except China. What is true is that millions of manufacturing jobs have been lost, shipped overseas where labor costs are often dramatically lower.
    And that's had a profound effect on many factory towns across the US, particularly in the industrial heartland - The Midwest. What is the state of American manufacturing today? Is it coming back, as the president says? And will we be able to compete once again?
    To learn more, NTK traveled to Findlay, Ohio, a manufacturing town that is still growing even as towns close by have struggled. Correspondent John Larson reports from Main Street. Maria Hinojosa anchors the broadcast.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#224H] United States of ALEC: A Follow-Up This week, Moyers & Company follows up and expands on a breakthrough 2012 report on the most influential corporate-funded political force most of us have never heard of - ALEC, the American Legislative Exchange Council. A national consortium of state politicians and powerful corporations, ALEC presents itself as a "nonpartisan public-private partnership". But behind that mantra lies a vast network of corporate lobbying and political action aimed to increase corporate profits at public expense without public knowledge.
    Using interviews, documents, and field reporting, the episode explores ALEC's self-serving machine at work, acting in a way one Wisconsin politician describes as "a corporate dating service for lonely legislators and corporate special interests." Updated coverage includes new examples of corporate influence on state legislation and lawmakers, the growing public protest against ALEC's big business-serving agenda, and internal tactics ALEC is instituting to further shroud its actions and intentions.
    Even with increased scrutiny, ALEC's influence continues to grow. In state houses around the country, hundreds of pieces of boilerplate ALEC legislation are proposed or enacted that would, among other things, dilute collective bargaining rights, make it harder for some Americans to vote, and limit corporate liability for harm caused to consumers - each accomplished without the public ever knowing who's behind it.
    "All of us here are very familiar with ALEC and the influence that ALEC has with many of the [legislative] members," says Arizona State Senator Steve Farley. "Corporations have the right to present their arguments, but they don't have the right to do it secretly."
    "United States of ALEC" is a collaboration between Okapi Productions (the filmmakers Tom Casciato and Kathleen Hughes) and the Schumann Media Center, headed by Bill Moyers, which supports independent journalism and public watchdogs including the Center for Media and Democracy, whose investigators are featured in the report.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    Saving The Ocean [#103H] Destination Baja A remarkable success story of how local fishing people developed a whale-watching co-op that now caters to tourists from all over the world. The co-op runs not only the tourist accommodations, but also polices the lagoon, regulates access to the whales, and preserves most of the area as a quiet sanctuary for the whales and their calves. And it's not just whales -- there are now several other highly successful, self-regulated fishing co-ops along Baja's Pacific coast. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#226] duration 25:40   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    History Detectives [#806H] Korean War Letter, Diana, Lookout Mt. Painting Rhonda Bradley never met her father. He's still listed Missing in Action from the Korean War. In a letter dated 1953, her father mentioned a man he said saved his life. Eduardo Pagan researches the "Korean War Letter" to find the man Rhonda believes is a hero.
    Then Tukufu Zuberi searches for the author of Diana: A Strange Biography. Could "Diana" be groundbreaking literature as the first widely published and true lesbian autobiography?
    Then, Wes Cowan digs into the mystery of the "Lookout Mt. Painting," depicting a Civil War battle. How did the artist of this painting end up in prison at the Rock Island Arsenal?
    duration 55:16   STEREO TVPG
  • 3:00 pm
    Independent Lens [#1417] The Revolutionary Optimists Children in the slums of Calcutta are starting a revolution. Called to action by visionary former attorney Amlan Ganguly, the 'Daredevils' have already made radical health and sanitation improvements in one of the city's poorest slums -- awakening a neglected populace to the real possibility of change. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    Inlaws & Outlaws The award-winning documentary Inlaws & Outlaws weaves together the true stories of couples and singles, gay and straight, to embrace what we have in common: we love. While timely and topical, the film dispenses with the politics and judgments that often divide us and focuses, instead, on the experiences of everyday storytellers -ages 4 to 80. The feature is accompanied by a short, Just Marriage: From Outlaws to Inlaws. As the topic of same-sex marriage has moved centerstage over the past eight years, so too have the lives of Inlaws & Outlaws' subjects. Filmmaker and storyteller Drew Emery carries the stories to the present in an engaging companion to the feature. duration 1:55:32   STEREO TVPG
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3126] Topics: G-8 Speaks Out on Syria; Did Ben Bernanke Get the Boot? Panelists: Pat Buchanan, Author & Columnist; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5251H] Peter Baker of The New York Times will report on the success and setbacks President Obama had at this week's G8 summit and how his influence on the world stage has changed since his first term in office.
    * Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News will explain attempts by the US to start talks with the Taliban to help end the 12-year old Afghan war and why President Hamid Karzai has suddenly decided to boycott the peace talks.
    * Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post will take a closer look at the politics surrounding a tentative bipartisan deal on immigration reform in the Senate and the defeat of a sweeping farm bill in the House.
    * Tom Gjelten of NPR will report on the NSA surveillance program and this week's disclosures that it helped foil more than 50 potential terrorist events, as well as news that the FBI has used drones for domestic surveillance here at home.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2434H] June 21, 2013 Guest Host: Dana King.
    News Panel:
    OPEN RECORDS BATTLE - A move by Gov. Brown to weaken the California Public Records Act set off a heated controversy among journalists and open government advocates this week, followed by back-peddling from top state Democrats. At the core of the debate is whether the state or local governments should foot the bill for requests for government records.
    SAN CLEMENTE DAM REMOVAL - In what will be the largest dam removal project ever undertaken in California, officials have agreed to tear down the 106-foot-tall San Clemente Dam in Monterey County. The reservoir it holds is now 95 percent silted up and the obsolete dam has been declared seismically unsafe. The removal of the dam will also be good for endangered steelhead trout, which for decades have been blocked from their traditional spawning grounds by the enormous barrier on the Carmel River.
    SAN JOSE SUES MLB - The Oakland A's are itching to relocate from their longtime home at the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum to a new proposed stadium in downtown San Jose. But Major League Baseball has thus far blocked the move, claiming the San Francisco Giants hold the territorial rights to the South Bay. This week the city of San Jose sued Major League Baseball, challenging the geographic rights in order to allow the A's to make the move south.
    Guests: Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group; Mark Purdy, San Jose Mercury News; and Paul Rogers, SJ Mercury News.
    INTERVIEW WITH CONGRESSMAN JARED HUFFMAN - Huffman, a Marin County Democrat, is a cosponsor of the Student Loan Relief Act (HR1595). If Congress doesn't act before July 1, federally subsidized loans are set to double from the current historically low rate of 3.4% to 6.8%. With nearly half of California college students borrowing money to go to school, the hike would mean thousands of dollars more of debt. We hear from Congressman Huffman on efforts being made to freeze the rate.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    Saving The Ocean [#103H] Destination Baja A remarkable success story of how local fishing people developed a whale-watching co-op that now caters to tourists from all over the world. The co-op runs not only the tourist accommodations, but also polices the lagoon, regulates access to the whales, and preserves most of the area as a quiet sanctuary for the whales and their calves. And it's not just whales -- there are now several other highly successful, self-regulated fishing co-ops along Baja's Pacific coast. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1211] Georgia & Armenia Ian's travels begin in Yerevan, Armenia's capital. He visits the rock-hewn Gerhard Church, Lake Sevan and the Armenian Genocide Memorial in the shadow of Mount Ararat. In Georgia, he explores the capital Tbilisi and the seaside resort Batumi before heading out into the Caucasus Mountains. In the village of Ushguli, he experiences the roots of Georgian song and dance and then visits the carved city of Vardzia before embarking on a two-day trek up Mount Kazbek, the highest peak in the Eastern Caucasus. duration 57:22   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Saving Songbirds Travel from New England to Costa Rica and Jamaica to meet some of the most colorful and melodic migratory birds and the people who are dedicated to saving them. Meet researchers who employ creative means to assess the health of bird populations, and grassroots efforts by Vermont school children to help re-forest the mountains of Costa Rica. Also featured are scientists in Cape May, NJ, who track large flocks of migrating songbirds in total darkness, and Costa Rican coffee farmers practicing bird-friendly methods of cultivation and processing. Avid bird watchers Samuel Habib and Andrea LeBlanc show the personal side of why the survival of songbirds is so important to us all. duration 56:49   TVG
  • 10:00 pm
    John D. Rockefeller: American Experience For decades, the Rockefeller name was despised in America - associated with John D. Rockefeller Sr.'s feared monopoly, Standard Oil. By the end of his life, Rockefeller had given away half his fortune - but even his vast philanthropy could not erase the memory of his predatory business practices. His only son, John D. Rockefeller Jr., would dedicate his life to recasting the family image. In the quest for redemption and respectability, Junior would give away hundreds of millions of dollars, and would insist that his six children behave impeccably. Their contributions transformed America. When he died at age 86, Junior left his six children and 22 grandchildren an invaluable inheritance: a name that stood not for corporate greed, but for "the well-being of mankind." This episode was derived from the original series "The Rockefellers." duration 1:55:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#112] 90 Miles Probing and thoughtful, Juan Carlos Zaldvar's personal memoir offers a rare glimpse into Cuba, a country as mythologized to Americans as the US is to the rest of the world. The Cuban-born filmmaker recounts the strange fate that brought him as a teenage communist to exile in Miami in 1980 during the dramatic Mariel boatlift. Zaldvar uses news clips, family photos and home movies to depict the emotional journey of an immigrant father and son struggling to understand the historical and individual forces shaping their relationships and identities in a new country. A Latino Public Broadcasting (LPB) Co-presentation. A Diverse Voices Project Selection. duration 1:28:00   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Visa Dream This program tells the touching story of one family's experience gaining entry into the United States. Representatives from the US Consulate demystify the visa process and illuminate the reasons why they approve some applications - and deny others. The film's main characters are Ramon and Aurora Chavez, an elderly couple living in Jalisco, Mexico, who have not seen their children in 16 years. They are a family divided, connected only by photo albums and phone calls.
    The daughters may not visit Mexico because they do not possess the necessary documents; going there would mean forever leaving behind their spouses, children, homes and lives. One daughter tearfully explains the hardships many immigrant families endure as a result of this prolonged separation. Ramon, the patriarch of the family, would rather live in Mexico but he longs to reunite with his family, who live 2500 miles away in Los Angeles. In order to visit, they must secure a tourist visa, an expensive and difficult proposition.
    Previous attempts proved unsuccessful but the Chavezes decide to try again after years of postponement. A camera crew follows them step-by-step through the application process, which begins at the US Consulate two hours away in Guadalajara.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#216] Teaching English to the Core Teaching English to the Core: We'll join three teachers as they integrate the Common Core State Standards into their daily lessons. Along the way, we'll see one teacher's insider "play-by-play" on his lesson plan and see another teacher reflect on what went right and wrong with her lesson. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#224H] United States of ALEC: A Follow-Up This week, Moyers & Company follows up and expands on a breakthrough 2012 report on the most influential corporate-funded political force most of us have never heard of - ALEC, the American Legislative Exchange Council. A national consortium of state politicians and powerful corporations, ALEC presents itself as a "nonpartisan public-private partnership". But behind that mantra lies a vast network of corporate lobbying and political action aimed to increase corporate profits at public expense without public knowledge.
    Using interviews, documents, and field reporting, the episode explores ALEC's self-serving machine at work, acting in a way one Wisconsin politician describes as "a corporate dating service for lonely legislators and corporate special interests." Updated coverage includes new examples of corporate influence on state legislation and lawmakers, the growing public protest against ALEC's big business-serving agenda, and internal tactics ALEC is instituting to further shroud its actions and intentions.
    Even with increased scrutiny, ALEC's influence continues to grow. In state houses around the country, hundreds of pieces of boilerplate ALEC legislation are proposed or enacted that would, among other things, dilute collective bargaining rights, make it harder for some Americans to vote, and limit corporate liability for harm caused to consumers - each accomplished without the public ever knowing who's behind it.
    "All of us here are very familiar with ALEC and the influence that ALEC has with many of the [legislative] members," says Arizona State Senator Steve Farley. "Corporations have the right to present their arguments, but they don't have the right to do it secretly."
    "United States of ALEC" is a collaboration between Okapi Productions (the filmmakers Tom Casciato and Kathleen Hughes) and the Schumann Media Center, headed by Bill Moyers, which supports independent journalism and public watchdogs including the Center for Media and Democracy, whose investigators are featured in the report.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5251] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3126] Topics: G-8 Speaks Out on Syria; Did Ben Bernanke Get the Boot? Panelists: Pat Buchanan, Author & Columnist; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Need To Know [#325H] Main Street: Findlay, Ohio How many times during the past several years have you heard one commentator or another express the same familiar lament? "We just don't make anything anymore." Of course, it's not true. Not even close. No country exports more than the United States except China. What is true is that millions of manufacturing jobs have been lost, shipped overseas where labor costs are often dramatically lower.
    And that's had a profound effect on many factory towns across the US, particularly in the industrial heartland - The Midwest. What is the state of American manufacturing today? Is it coming back, as the president says? And will we be able to compete once again?
    To learn more, NTK traveled to Findlay, Ohio, a manufacturing town that is still growing even as towns close by have struggled. Correspondent John Larson reports from Main Street. Maria Hinojosa anchors the broadcast.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2510H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#112] 90 Miles Probing and thoughtful, Juan Carlos Zaldvar's personal memoir offers a rare glimpse into Cuba, a country as mythologized to Americans as the US is to the rest of the world. The Cuban-born filmmaker recounts the strange fate that brought him as a teenage communist to exile in Miami in 1980 during the dramatic Mariel boatlift. Zaldvar uses news clips, family photos and home movies to depict the emotional journey of an immigrant father and son struggling to understand the historical and individual forces shaping their relationships and identities in a new country. A Latino Public Broadcasting (LPB) Co-presentation. A Diverse Voices Project Selection. duration 1:28:00   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Saving The Ocean [#103H] Destination Baja A remarkable success story of how local fishing people developed a whale-watching co-op that now caters to tourists from all over the world. The co-op runs not only the tourist accommodations, but also polices the lagoon, regulates access to the whales, and preserves most of the area as a quiet sanctuary for the whales and their calves. And it's not just whales -- there are now several other highly successful, self-regulated fishing co-ops along Baja's Pacific coast. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1642] PRISONS AND THE MENTALLY ILL - In the US the largest institutions housing the mentally ill are jails. On any given day Cook County jail in Chicago holds about 10,000 inmates and on average 1 in 4 is suffering from some kind of mental illness. Cook Country Sheriff Tom Dart tells Lucky Severson of the moral and financial costs of dealing this way with the mentally troubled and others describe their programs to house the mentally ill and keep them out of jail.
    TAYLOR BRANCH ON 1963 - This year marks the 50th anniversary of several key moments in struggle for civil rights. "1963 is without a doubt the breakthrough pivotal year" for Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and the civil rights movement, says Pulitzer Prize-winning author Taylor Branch, who recently released a new work, The King Years. Kim Lawton talks with Branch about some of the major milestones and the central role churches played in all of them.
    SUPREME COURT - Tim O'Brien reports on upcoming major rulings, including on affirmative action, about to be issued by the Supreme Court.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#952] Active Vs. Passive This week: WT tackles the active versus passive investing debate. Which strategy is best for you? Vanguard's Daniel Wallick and award-winning financial planner Gregg Fisher argue the pros and cons. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#221H] Should you put your retirement money into Collectibles and Fine Art? Ric Edelman and his staff visit one of the world's largest auction houses to find out. Plus, our Cash Comedy sketches look at the funny side of the world's worst dates and the editor of Variety gives us an inside look at the business of show business. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2510H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3126] Topics: G-8 Speaks Out on Syria; Did Ben Bernanke Get the Boot? Panelists: Pat Buchanan, Author & Columnist; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week [#5251H] Peter Baker of The New York Times will report on the success and setbacks President Obama had at this week's G8 summit and how his influence on the world stage has changed since his first term in office.
    * Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News will explain attempts by the US to start talks with the Taliban to help end the 12-year old Afghan war and why President Hamid Karzai has suddenly decided to boycott the peace talks.
    * Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post will take a closer look at the politics surrounding a tentative bipartisan deal on immigration reform in the Senate and the defeat of a sweeping farm bill in the House.
    * Tom Gjelten of NPR will report on the NSA surveillance program and this week's disclosures that it helped foil more than 50 potential terrorist events, as well as news that the FBI has used drones for domestic surveillance here at home.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2434H] June 21, 2013 Guest Host: Dana King.
    News Panel:
    OPEN RECORDS BATTLE - A move by Gov. Brown to weaken the California Public Records Act set off a heated controversy among journalists and open government advocates this week, followed by back-peddling from top state Democrats. At the core of the debate is whether the state or local governments should foot the bill for requests for government records.
    SAN CLEMENTE DAM REMOVAL - In what will be the largest dam removal project ever undertaken in California, officials have agreed to tear down the 106-foot-tall San Clemente Dam in Monterey County. The reservoir it holds is now 95 percent silted up and the obsolete dam has been declared seismically unsafe. The removal of the dam will also be good for endangered steelhead trout, which for decades have been blocked from their traditional spawning grounds by the enormous barrier on the Carmel River.
    SAN JOSE SUES MLB - The Oakland A's are itching to relocate from their longtime home at the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum to a new proposed stadium in downtown San Jose. But Major League Baseball has thus far blocked the move, claiming the San Francisco Giants hold the territorial rights to the South Bay. This week the city of San Jose sued Major League Baseball, challenging the geographic rights in order to allow the A's to make the move south.
    Guests: Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group; Mark Purdy, San Jose Mercury News; and Paul Rogers, SJ Mercury News.
    INTERVIEW WITH CONGRESSMAN JARED HUFFMAN - Huffman, a Marin County Democrat, is a cosponsor of the Student Loan Relief Act (HR1595). If Congress doesn't act before July 1, federally subsidized loans are set to double from the current historically low rate of 3.4% to 6.8%. With nearly half of California college students borrowing money to go to school, the hike would mean thousands of dollars more of debt. We hear from Congressman Huffman on efforts being made to freeze the rate.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#224H] United States of ALEC: A Follow-Up This week, Moyers & Company follows up and expands on a breakthrough 2012 report on the most influential corporate-funded political force most of us have never heard of - ALEC, the American Legislative Exchange Council. A national consortium of state politicians and powerful corporations, ALEC presents itself as a "nonpartisan public-private partnership". But behind that mantra lies a vast network of corporate lobbying and political action aimed to increase corporate profits at public expense without public knowledge.
    Using interviews, documents, and field reporting, the episode explores ALEC's self-serving machine at work, acting in a way one Wisconsin politician describes as "a corporate dating service for lonely legislators and corporate special interests." Updated coverage includes new examples of corporate influence on state legislation and lawmakers, the growing public protest against ALEC's big business-serving agenda, and internal tactics ALEC is instituting to further shroud its actions and intentions.
    Even with increased scrutiny, ALEC's influence continues to grow. In state houses around the country, hundreds of pieces of boilerplate ALEC legislation are proposed or enacted that would, among other things, dilute collective bargaining rights, make it harder for some Americans to vote, and limit corporate liability for harm caused to consumers - each accomplished without the public ever knowing who's behind it.
    "All of us here are very familiar with ALEC and the influence that ALEC has with many of the [legislative] members," says Arizona State Senator Steve Farley. "Corporations have the right to present their arguments, but they don't have the right to do it secretly."
    "United States of ALEC" is a collaboration between Okapi Productions (the filmmakers Tom Casciato and Kathleen Hughes) and the Schumann Media Center, headed by Bill Moyers, which supports independent journalism and public watchdogs including the Center for Media and Democracy, whose investigators are featured in the report.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 pm
    Inside Washington [#2510H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3126] Topics: G-8 Speaks Out on Syria; Did Ben Bernanke Get the Boot? Panelists: Pat Buchanan, Author & Columnist; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2215H] HUMAN TRAFFICKING AS A DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN ISSUE. We speak with DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano.
    THE SNAP CHALLENGE: For one week almost 30 congressmen and women tried to dine for less than $5 per day.
    NURSING RESEARCH. Why the US is experiencing a shortage of nurses.
    Panelists: Women's Campaign Fund President Sam Bennett, The Heritage Foundation's Genevieve Wood, Host of NPR's Focus Point Dr. Avis Jones DeWeever, Republican Commentator Tara Setmayer.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 pm
    LinkAsia [#147] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:30 pm
    Saving The Ocean [#103H] Destination Baja A remarkable success story of how local fishing people developed a whale-watching co-op that now caters to tourists from all over the world. The co-op runs not only the tourist accommodations, but also polices the lagoon, regulates access to the whales, and preserves most of the area as a quiet sanctuary for the whales and their calves. And it's not just whales -- there are now several other highly successful, self-regulated fishing co-ops along Baja's Pacific coast. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Need To Know [#325H] Main Street: Findlay, Ohio How many times during the past several years have you heard one commentator or another express the same familiar lament? "We just don't make anything anymore." Of course, it's not true. Not even close. No country exports more than the United States except China. What is true is that millions of manufacturing jobs have been lost, shipped overseas where labor costs are often dramatically lower.
    And that's had a profound effect on many factory towns across the US, particularly in the industrial heartland - The Midwest. What is the state of American manufacturing today? Is it coming back, as the president says? And will we be able to compete once again?
    To learn more, NTK traveled to Findlay, Ohio, a manufacturing town that is still growing even as towns close by have struggled. Correspondent John Larson reports from Main Street. Maria Hinojosa anchors the broadcast.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 pm
    Moyers & Company [#224H] United States of ALEC: A Follow-Up This week, Moyers & Company follows up and expands on a breakthrough 2012 report on the most influential corporate-funded political force most of us have never heard of - ALEC, the American Legislative Exchange Council. A national consortium of state politicians and powerful corporations, ALEC presents itself as a "nonpartisan public-private partnership". But behind that mantra lies a vast network of corporate lobbying and political action aimed to increase corporate profits at public expense without public knowledge.
    Using interviews, documents, and field reporting, the episode explores ALEC's self-serving machine at work, acting in a way one Wisconsin politician describes as "a corporate dating service for lonely legislators and corporate special interests." Updated coverage includes new examples of corporate influence on state legislation and lawmakers, the growing public protest against ALEC's big business-serving agenda, and internal tactics ALEC is instituting to further shroud its actions and intentions.
    Even with increased scrutiny, ALEC's influence continues to grow. In state houses around the country, hundreds of pieces of boilerplate ALEC legislation are proposed or enacted that would, among other things, dilute collective bargaining rights, make it harder for some Americans to vote, and limit corporate liability for harm caused to consumers - each accomplished without the public ever knowing who's behind it.
    "All of us here are very familiar with ALEC and the influence that ALEC has with many of the [legislative] members," says Arizona State Senator Steve Farley. "Corporations have the right to present their arguments, but they don't have the right to do it secretly."
    "United States of ALEC" is a collaboration between Okapi Productions (the filmmakers Tom Casciato and Kathleen Hughes) and the Schumann Media Center, headed by Bill Moyers, which supports independent journalism and public watchdogs including the Center for Media and Democracy, whose investigators are featured in the report.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5251H] Peter Baker of The New York Times will report on the success and setbacks President Obama had at this week's G8 summit and how his influence on the world stage has changed since his first term in office.
    * Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News will explain attempts by the US to start talks with the Taliban to help end the 12-year old Afghan war and why President Hamid Karzai has suddenly decided to boycott the peace talks.
    * Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post will take a closer look at the politics surrounding a tentative bipartisan deal on immigration reform in the Senate and the defeat of a sweeping farm bill in the House.
    * Tom Gjelten of NPR will report on the NSA surveillance program and this week's disclosures that it helped foil more than 50 potential terrorist events, as well as news that the FBI has used drones for domestic surveillance here at home.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Inside Washington [#2510H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 5:30 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3126] Topics: G-8 Speaks Out on Syria; Did Ben Bernanke Get the Boot? Panelists: Pat Buchanan, Author & Columnist; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2434H] June 21, 2013 Guest Host: Dana King.
    News Panel:
    OPEN RECORDS BATTLE - A move by Gov. Brown to weaken the California Public Records Act set off a heated controversy among journalists and open government advocates this week, followed by back-peddling from top state Democrats. At the core of the debate is whether the state or local governments should foot the bill for requests for government records.
    SAN CLEMENTE DAM REMOVAL - In what will be the largest dam removal project ever undertaken in California, officials have agreed to tear down the 106-foot-tall San Clemente Dam in Monterey County. The reservoir it holds is now 95 percent silted up and the obsolete dam has been declared seismically unsafe. The removal of the dam will also be good for endangered steelhead trout, which for decades have been blocked from their traditional spawning grounds by the enormous barrier on the Carmel River.
    SAN JOSE SUES MLB - The Oakland A's are itching to relocate from their longtime home at the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum to a new proposed stadium in downtown San Jose. But Major League Baseball has thus far blocked the move, claiming the San Francisco Giants hold the territorial rights to the South Bay. This week the city of San Jose sued Major League Baseball, challenging the geographic rights in order to allow the A's to make the move south.
    Guests: Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group; Mark Purdy, San Jose Mercury News; and Paul Rogers, SJ Mercury News.
    INTERVIEW WITH CONGRESSMAN JARED HUFFMAN - Huffman, a Marin County Democrat, is a cosponsor of the Student Loan Relief Act (HR1595). If Congress doesn't act before July 1, federally subsidized loans are set to double from the current historically low rate of 3.4% to 6.8%. With nearly half of California college students borrowing money to go to school, the hike would mean thousands of dollars more of debt. We hear from Congressman Huffman on efforts being made to freeze the rate.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Saving The Ocean [#103H] Destination Baja A remarkable success story of how local fishing people developed a whale-watching co-op that now caters to tourists from all over the world. The co-op runs not only the tourist accommodations, but also polices the lagoon, regulates access to the whales, and preserves most of the area as a quiet sanctuary for the whales and their calves. And it's not just whales -- there are now several other highly successful, self-regulated fishing co-ops along Baja's Pacific coast. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 pm
    New State of Mind: Ending The Stigma of Mental Illness Examination of the stigma and discrimination facing people with mental health challenges, the efforts underway to promote understanding and acceptance, and stories of individuals from all walks of life who've overcome mental illness to achieve success and happiness. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#224H] United States of ALEC: A Follow-Up This week, Moyers & Company follows up and expands on a breakthrough 2012 report on the most influential corporate-funded political force most of us have never heard of - ALEC, the American Legislative Exchange Council. A national consortium of state politicians and powerful corporations, ALEC presents itself as a "nonpartisan public-private partnership". But behind that mantra lies a vast network of corporate lobbying and political action aimed to increase corporate profits at public expense without public knowledge.
    Using interviews, documents, and field reporting, the episode explores ALEC's self-serving machine at work, acting in a way one Wisconsin politician describes as "a corporate dating service for lonely legislators and corporate special interests." Updated coverage includes new examples of corporate influence on state legislation and lawmakers, the growing public protest against ALEC's big business-serving agenda, and internal tactics ALEC is instituting to further shroud its actions and intentions.
    Even with increased scrutiny, ALEC's influence continues to grow. In state houses around the country, hundreds of pieces of boilerplate ALEC legislation are proposed or enacted that would, among other things, dilute collective bargaining rights, make it harder for some Americans to vote, and limit corporate liability for harm caused to consumers - each accomplished without the public ever knowing who's behind it.
    "All of us here are very familiar with ALEC and the influence that ALEC has with many of the [legislative] members," says Arizona State Senator Steve Farley. "Corporations have the right to present their arguments, but they don't have the right to do it secretly."
    "United States of ALEC" is a collaboration between Okapi Productions (the filmmakers Tom Casciato and Kathleen Hughes) and the Schumann Media Center, headed by Bill Moyers, which supports independent journalism and public watchdogs including the Center for Media and Democracy, whose investigators are featured in the report.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    America Reframed [#103] La Americana When nine-year-old Carla suffers a life-threatening accident, her mother, Carmen, must leave her behind and make the dangerous and illegal journey from Bolivia to the U.S., where she hopes to earn enough to save her daughter's life. Working in New York to support Carla's medical needs, Carmen struggles in vain to legalize her immigration status, and wrestles with the prospect of never seeing her daughter again. Then, after six years of separation, Congress proposes "amnesty" legislation that could allow Carmen and Carla to be reunited at last. Filmed across three countries in a captivating cinematic narrative, LA AMERICANA is Carmen's story, and the story of millions of illegal immigrants who must leave their families behind to pursue the elusive American dream. duration 1:29:07   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 pm
    Model Minority: Do The Math Model Minority: Do the Math reveals the impact of the model minority myth on the experiences and perspectives of Asian American college students. The myth is a complex and contradictory stereotype of Asian Americans as academic over-achievers. As a result, many struggle with personal goals and mental health, leading to racial resentment, discrimination, and suicide. duration 26:09   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#604] Unmistaken Child When one of Tibet's greatest monks passes away, his shy, gifted disciple must complete a monumental task assigned by the Dalai Lama: to find the child who is the reincarnation of his master. duration 1:26:46   STEREO
  • 12:30 am
    Serving America: Memories of Peace Corps This program highlights the experiences of some of the nearly 3000 volunteers who served during the early years of the Peace Corps. A mix of archival film and photographs, along with personal stories from former volunteers, tells a story of service and idealism. Interviews convey the volunteers' passion, commitment and bravery as they lived and worked in developing countries, including South and Central America, Africa and the Middle East. From almost fatal obstacles to spiritual epiphanies, these men and women describe their transformative experiences. Donna Shalala, former US Secretary of Health and Human Services (1993-2001), recounts the adventure of serving in Iran between 1962 and 1964. "What the Peace Corps really did is make me a citizen of the world," says Shalala. duration 26:44   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    India with Sanjeev Bhaskar [#101] Bombay Dreams Sanjeev Bhaskar begins his Indian journey in Mumbai, the nation's financial capital, before heading south to the global IT hub of Bangalore. Along the way, Sanjeev meets some of the rising young middle class who are transforming the face of Indian society. Finally, Sanjeev chills out in the beautiful island backwaters of Kerala, the playground of India's rich and famous. duration 59:11   STEREO (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 2:00 am
    India with Sanjeev Bhaskar [#102] The Longest Road Sanjeev takes a trip along the incredible Grand Trunk Road in a quest to find his ancestral home. Along the way he is invited to a lavish wedding, travels high into the mountains to see the summer capital of the Raj, and visits the breathtaking Golden Temple of Amritsar, the holiest shrine of the Sikhs. Finally, Sanjeev crosses the border into Pakistan in search of the village his father was forced to leave when India was partitioned 60 years ago. duration 58:49   STEREO (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#4061] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2930] Tavis talks with multiple Grammy-winning singer-songwriter India.Arie. The 4-time Grammy winner talks about her 4-year absence from the public eye and her new CD, "SongVersation." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    LinkAsia [#100] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 4:30 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1642] PRISONS AND THE MENTALLY ILL - In the US the largest institutions housing the mentally ill are jails. On any given day Cook County jail in Chicago holds about 10,000 inmates and on average 1 in 4 is suffering from some kind of mental illness. Cook Country Sheriff Tom Dart tells Lucky Severson of the moral and financial costs of dealing this way with the mentally troubled and others describe their programs to house the mentally ill and keep them out of jail.
    TAYLOR BRANCH ON 1963 - This year marks the 50th anniversary of several key moments in struggle for civil rights. "1963 is without a doubt the breakthrough pivotal year" for Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and the civil rights movement, says Pulitzer Prize-winning author Taylor Branch, who recently released a new work, The King Years. Kim Lawton talks with Branch about some of the major milestones and the central role churches played in all of them.
    SUPREME COURT - Tim O'Brien reports on upcoming major rulings, including on affirmative action, about to be issued by the Supreme Court.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    America Reframed [#103] La Americana When nine-year-old Carla suffers a life-threatening accident, her mother, Carmen, must leave her behind and make the dangerous and illegal journey from Bolivia to the U.S., where she hopes to earn enough to save her daughter's life. Working in New York to support Carla's medical needs, Carmen struggles in vain to legalize her immigration status, and wrestles with the prospect of never seeing her daughter again. Then, after six years of separation, Congress proposes "amnesty" legislation that could allow Carmen and Carla to be reunited at last. Filmed across three countries in a captivating cinematic narrative, LA AMERICANA is Carmen's story, and the story of millions of illegal immigrants who must leave their families behind to pursue the elusive American dream. duration 1:29:07   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 6:30 am
    Model Minority: Do The Math Model Minority: Do the Math reveals the impact of the model minority myth on the experiences and perspectives of Asian American college students. The myth is a complex and contradictory stereotype of Asian Americans as academic over-achievers. As a result, many struggle with personal goals and mental health, leading to racial resentment, discrimination, and suicide. duration 26:09   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 am
    Global Voices [#604] Unmistaken Child When one of Tibet's greatest monks passes away, his shy, gifted disciple must complete a monumental task assigned by the Dalai Lama: to find the child who is the reincarnation of his master. duration 1:26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    Serving America: Memories of Peace Corps This program highlights the experiences of some of the nearly 3000 volunteers who served during the early years of the Peace Corps. A mix of archival film and photographs, along with personal stories from former volunteers, tells a story of service and idealism. Interviews convey the volunteers' passion, commitment and bravery as they lived and worked in developing countries, including South and Central America, Africa and the Middle East. From almost fatal obstacles to spiritual epiphanies, these men and women describe their transformative experiences. Donna Shalala, former US Secretary of Health and Human Services (1993-2001), recounts the adventure of serving in Iran between 1962 and 1964. "What the Peace Corps really did is make me a citizen of the world," says Shalala. duration 26:44   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2930] Tavis talks with multiple Grammy-winning singer-songwriter India.Arie. The 4-time Grammy winner talks about her 4-year absence from the public eye and her new CD, "SongVersation." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2929] Tavis talks with W. Richard West, Jr., president and CEO of the Autry National Center of the American West, who explains his mission to tell the compelling story of the American West and the people who created its history and shape the present and future. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    LinkAsia [#100] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 10:30 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1642] PRISONS AND THE MENTALLY ILL - In the US the largest institutions housing the mentally ill are jails. On any given day Cook County jail in Chicago holds about 10,000 inmates and on average 1 in 4 is suffering from some kind of mental illness. Cook Country Sheriff Tom Dart tells Lucky Severson of the moral and financial costs of dealing this way with the mentally troubled and others describe their programs to house the mentally ill and keep them out of jail.
    TAYLOR BRANCH ON 1963 - This year marks the 50th anniversary of several key moments in struggle for civil rights. "1963 is without a doubt the breakthrough pivotal year" for Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and the civil rights movement, says Pulitzer Prize-winning author Taylor Branch, who recently released a new work, The King Years. Kim Lawton talks with Branch about some of the major milestones and the central role churches played in all of them.
    SUPREME COURT - Tim O'Brien reports on upcoming major rulings, including on affirmative action, about to be issued by the Supreme Court.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 am
    America Reframed [#103] La Americana When nine-year-old Carla suffers a life-threatening accident, her mother, Carmen, must leave her behind and make the dangerous and illegal journey from Bolivia to the U.S., where she hopes to earn enough to save her daughter's life. Working in New York to support Carla's medical needs, Carmen struggles in vain to legalize her immigration status, and wrestles with the prospect of never seeing her daughter again. Then, after six years of separation, Congress proposes "amnesty" legislation that could allow Carmen and Carla to be reunited at last. Filmed across three countries in a captivating cinematic narrative, LA AMERICANA is Carmen's story, and the story of millions of illegal immigrants who must leave their families behind to pursue the elusive American dream. duration 1:29:07   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 pm
    Global Voices [#604] Unmistaken Child When one of Tibet's greatest monks passes away, his shy, gifted disciple must complete a monumental task assigned by the Dalai Lama: to find the child who is the reincarnation of his master. duration 1:26:46   STEREO
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#4061] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#9125] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2930] Tavis talks with multiple Grammy-winning singer-songwriter India.Arie. The 4-time Grammy winner talks about her 4-year absence from the public eye and her new CD, "SongVersation." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32144] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, China sends a jolt through already jittery global markets. So why does this country matter so much to your money? And, how much will your company pay if you need an MRI or a hip replacement? That may be the key question to ask as companies look to cap the cost of care. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10656] The Supreme Court Rules on Affirmative Action * Edward Snowden Continues to Seek Asylum * The George Zimmerman Trial Began Today * Cities Breathe New Life Into the U.S. Economy and Politics duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32144] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, China sends a jolt through already jittery global markets. So why does this country matter so much to your money? And, how much will your company pay if you need an MRI or a hip replacement? That may be the key question to ask as companies look to cap the cost of care. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2236] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#4061] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3366] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10656] The Supreme Court Rules on Affirmative Action * Edward Snowden Continues to Seek Asylum * The George Zimmerman Trial Began Today * Cities Breathe New Life Into the U.S. Economy and Politics duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3366] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#19131] (original broadcast date: 6/24/13)
    * Continued coverage on the aftermath of the NSA leaks with Norah O'Donnell, co-host of CBS This Morning, John Miller of CBS News, Spencer Ackerman, National Security editor for The Guardian and Philip Mudd, former deputy director of National Security at the FBI and the Counterterrorist Center of the CIA.
    * A look at the documentary "Dirty Wars" with director Richard Rowley and author Jeremy Scahill
    duration 56:47   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3366] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2931Z] Tavis talks with law professors Kimberle Williams Crenshaw and Justin Levitt about the pending US Supreme Court decisions. Crenshaw and Levitt assess the Supreme Court's affirmative action ruling and issues in other major cases awaiting decisions. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3366] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#603] After a Zorbing adventure the team are at the halfway point of their roadtrip. In Rotorua, they meet with Doug Tamaki, local personality John "Bertie" Cocking, and political blogger David Farrar. After a ferry ride to the South Island, the team meets with mountaineer Mark Ingalls. They head to Christchurch where they talk with Robin Judkins, an artist, author, and creator of adventure racing events. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3366] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10656] The Supreme Court Rules on Affirmative Action * Edward Snowden Continues to Seek Asylum * The George Zimmerman Trial Began Today * Cities Breathe New Life Into the U.S. Economy and Politics duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3366] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2236] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10656] The Supreme Court Rules on Affirmative Action * Edward Snowden Continues to Seek Asylum * The George Zimmerman Trial Began Today * Cities Breathe New Life Into the U.S. Economy and Politics duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32144] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, China sends a jolt through already jittery global markets. So why does this country matter so much to your money? And, how much will your company pay if you need an MRI or a hip replacement? That may be the key question to ask as companies look to cap the cost of care. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2930] Tavis talks with multiple Grammy-winning singer-songwriter India.Arie. The 4-time Grammy winner talks about her 4-year absence from the public eye and her new CD, "SongVersation." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Global Voices [#503] Lakshmi and Me Have you ever dreamed of being waited on hand and foot? For the past six years, Lakshmi has been working for Nishtha as a part-time maid in Mumbai. Against the backdrop of a culture where "servants" are often treated as social inferiors, Nishtha begins making a film with Lakshmi. In a deeply personal portrait, the film takes a hard look at the caste system and how Lakshmi manages to flourish despite such social boundaries. duration 55:04   STEREO
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#4062] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2931Z] Tavis talks with law professors Kimberle Williams Crenshaw and Justin Levitt about the pending US Supreme Court decisions. Crenshaw and Levitt assess the Supreme Court's affirmative action ruling and issues in other major cases awaiting decisions. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    Asia This Week [#312] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    European Journal [#3125] Attacks On British Muslims Grow GREAT BRITAIN: SOCIAL UNEASE IN LONDON - The number of violent attacks on Muslims has risen sharply in Great Britain. Police are currently investigating two fires that broke out at separate Islamic sites in London. Fear of revenge attacks has been growing since the murder of soldier Lee Rigby last month. Many mosques have been vandalized and Muslim families are feeling uneasy after fires broke out at an Islamic community center and boarding school. People from around 200 countries live in London - and things there are tense.
    THE NETHERLANDS: SHAKEN UP - No other land in Europe produces as much natural gas as the Netherlands. But this has come at a price for the people who live there. Drilling is causing more and more earthquakes - and stronger ones too. People in Groningen - a densely populated area in the northern Netherlands - live directly above Europe's biggest natural gas field. They've got used to the odd rumble or two, but this year alone 20 earthquakes have shaken the region. Now The Dutch Oil Company (NAM) has announced it wants to increase its rate of gas extraction. Thus far, the quakes have been relatively low in magnitude, but scientists warn this is likely to change. Angry homeowners, complaining of cracked walls and roofs, are demanding the plans be reconsidered.
    GERMANY/POLAND: DIRTY LAUNDRY INTO CLEAN CASH - Berlin's top hotels are whirling their washing off to Poland. Gryfino - a small polish town just across the border - is turning Berlin's dirty laundry into cash. In our globalized world there are many examples of services being carried out in towns in countries next door. Gryfino is just one of these. 500 employees - most of whom are women - work here almost round the clock. Next year the size of the workforce is expected to increase by about 100 jobs. In a region where unemployment rates are high the cross-border laundry business seems like a blessing.
    RUSSIA: COSSACKS COMEBACK - Back in tsarist Russia Cossacks helped the rulers to protect their borders and conquer new territories. Today it seems they're stepping back into their old boots. Cossacks are best-known for their folk dancing and music. They sing in choirs and wear furry hats. President Vladimir Putin has made statements saying he values their loyalty and discipline highly. In October, he signed a strategy paper for the development of the Cossack life and culture in Russia. Cossack patrols could return on an official basis as early as next year.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 am
    India with Sanjeev Bhaskar [#103] Mystic River Sanjeev finds out how the country's ancient traditions still shape life today. Starting in Calcutta during the chaos and fireworks of the Hindu New Year, Sanjeev takes a trip on the Ganges, and sees a spectacular statue-dunking ceremony dedicated to the city's patron goddess, Kali. And he finds out how today's young Indian professionals are reconnecting with the spirituality of their forefathers. duration 58:58   STEREO (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 6:00 am
    India with Sanjeev Bhaskar [#104] A Camel Called Sanjeev On the final leg of his journey, Sanjeev heads into the magical state of Rajasthan, where he samples the princely lifestyle of the Maharaja of Jodhpur and learns how Indian royalty has reinvented itself in a bid to become relevant in the 21st century. Deeper into the country, Sanjeev hooks up with nomadic camel herders and witnesses the birth of a baby camel. At the remarkable Barefoot College he sees how some of India's poorest people are being empowered and the caste system challenged. duration 59:08   STEREO (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 7:00 am
    Dabbawallas This documentary explores a form of work that has existed in Bombay, India for more than 100 years. Each day 4,000 Dabbawallas (box persons) deliver 100,000 lunches at high levels of reliability. This delivery system functions without any of the trappings of modern day work, such as technology, business procedures and practices, and so on. The program focuses on what people in more-developed countries can learn from workers in less-developed countries, the reliance upon human and social ingenuity for organizing rather than relying on external mechanisms such as technology, and according respect for the seldom-heard voices of disadvantaged populations in India. By Paul Goodman. duration 56:11   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Global Voices [#503] Lakshmi and Me Have you ever dreamed of being waited on hand and foot? For the past six years, Lakshmi has been working for Nishtha as a part-time maid in Mumbai. Against the backdrop of a culture where "servants" are often treated as social inferiors, Nishtha begins making a film with Lakshmi. In a deeply personal portrait, the film takes a hard look at the caste system and how Lakshmi manages to flourish despite such social boundaries. duration 55:04   STEREO
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2931Z] Tavis talks with law professors Kimberle Williams Crenshaw and Justin Levitt about the pending US Supreme Court decisions. Crenshaw and Levitt assess the Supreme Court's affirmative action ruling and issues in other major cases awaiting decisions. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2930] Tavis talks with multiple Grammy-winning singer-songwriter India.Arie. The 4-time Grammy winner talks about her 4-year absence from the public eye and her new CD, "SongVersation." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    Asia This Week [#312] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 am
    European Journal [#3125] Attacks On British Muslims Grow GREAT BRITAIN: SOCIAL UNEASE IN LONDON - The number of violent attacks on Muslims has risen sharply in Great Britain. Police are currently investigating two fires that broke out at separate Islamic sites in London. Fear of revenge attacks has been growing since the murder of soldier Lee Rigby last month. Many mosques have been vandalized and Muslim families are feeling uneasy after fires broke out at an Islamic community center and boarding school. People from around 200 countries live in London - and things there are tense.
    THE NETHERLANDS: SHAKEN UP - No other land in Europe produces as much natural gas as the Netherlands. But this has come at a price for the people who live there. Drilling is causing more and more earthquakes - and stronger ones too. People in Groningen - a densely populated area in the northern Netherlands - live directly above Europe's biggest natural gas field. They've got used to the odd rumble or two, but this year alone 20 earthquakes have shaken the region. Now The Dutch Oil Company (NAM) has announced it wants to increase its rate of gas extraction. Thus far, the quakes have been relatively low in magnitude, but scientists warn this is likely to change. Angry homeowners, complaining of cracked walls and roofs, are demanding the plans be reconsidered.
    GERMANY/POLAND: DIRTY LAUNDRY INTO CLEAN CASH - Berlin's top hotels are whirling their washing off to Poland. Gryfino - a small polish town just across the border - is turning Berlin's dirty laundry into cash. In our globalized world there are many examples of services being carried out in towns in countries next door. Gryfino is just one of these. 500 employees - most of whom are women - work here almost round the clock. Next year the size of the workforce is expected to increase by about 100 jobs. In a region where unemployment rates are high the cross-border laundry business seems like a blessing.
    RUSSIA: COSSACKS COMEBACK - Back in tsarist Russia Cossacks helped the rulers to protect their borders and conquer new territories. Today it seems they're stepping back into their old boots. Cossacks are best-known for their folk dancing and music. They sing in choirs and wear furry hats. President Vladimir Putin has made statements saying he values their loyalty and discipline highly. In October, he signed a strategy paper for the development of the Cossack life and culture in Russia. Cossack patrols could return on an official basis as early as next year.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 am
    India with Sanjeev Bhaskar [#103] Mystic River Sanjeev finds out how the country's ancient traditions still shape life today. Starting in Calcutta during the chaos and fireworks of the Hindu New Year, Sanjeev takes a trip on the Ganges, and sees a spectacular statue-dunking ceremony dedicated to the city's patron goddess, Kali. And he finds out how today's young Indian professionals are reconnecting with the spirituality of their forefathers. duration 58:58   STEREO (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 12:00 pm
    India with Sanjeev Bhaskar [#104] A Camel Called Sanjeev On the final leg of his journey, Sanjeev heads into the magical state of Rajasthan, where he samples the princely lifestyle of the Maharaja of Jodhpur and learns how Indian royalty has reinvented itself in a bid to become relevant in the 21st century. Deeper into the country, Sanjeev hooks up with nomadic camel herders and witnesses the birth of a baby camel. At the remarkable Barefoot College he sees how some of India's poorest people are being empowered and the caste system challenged. duration 59:08   STEREO (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 1:00 pm
    Dabbawallas This documentary explores a form of work that has existed in Bombay, India for more than 100 years. Each day 4,000 Dabbawallas (box persons) deliver 100,000 lunches at high levels of reliability. This delivery system functions without any of the trappings of modern day work, such as technology, business procedures and practices, and so on. The program focuses on what people in more-developed countries can learn from workers in less-developed countries, the reliance upon human and social ingenuity for organizing rather than relying on external mechanisms such as technology, and according respect for the seldom-heard voices of disadvantaged populations in India. By Paul Goodman. duration 56:11   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#4062] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#9126] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2931Z] Tavis talks with law professors Kimberle Williams Crenshaw and Justin Levitt about the pending US Supreme Court decisions. Crenshaw and Levitt assess the Supreme Court's affirmative action ruling and issues in other major cases awaiting decisions. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32145Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, home prices are jumping, but so are mortgage rates. And with the supply of homes tight, what's a potential buyer to do? Plus, an American businessman held hostage by his own employees in China. It's a story you have to see. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10657] The Supreme Court Strikes Down a Provision of the Voting Rights Act * President Obama Announces a New Plan to Combat Climate Change * Colorado Plans to Roll Out a New Way to Get Healthcare duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32145Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, home prices are jumping, but so are mortgage rates. And with the supply of homes tight, what's a potential buyer to do? Plus, an American businessman held hostage by his own employees in China. It's a story you have to see. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2237] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#4062] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3367] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10657] The Supreme Court Strikes Down a Provision of the Voting Rights Act * President Obama Announces a New Plan to Combat Climate Change * Colorado Plans to Roll Out a New Way to Get Healthcare duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3367] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#19132] (original broadcast date: 6/25/13)
    * Nouriel Roubini (professor of economics at New York University and chairman of Roubini Global Economics, a popular economics website) and Ian Bremmer (political scientist specializing on US foreign policy, states in transition, and global political risk, and president of Eurasia Group, a global political risk consultancy). The pair discuss their article in Institutional Investor magazine warning that the world's economies still face structural problems.
    * author Colum McCann
    duration 56:47   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3367] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2932Z] Tavis talks with artist Natalie Cole. The 9-time Grammy winner shares the backstory of her latest CD - her first-ever Spanish-language project, "Natalie Cole en Espanol." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3367] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#604] Beginning the final week of their roadtrip, the team interviews Vicki Buck, former mayor of Christchurch and founder of a sustainable energy company. Heading to Queenstown, the team interviews Louisa "Choppy" Patterson, helicopter pilot. The team's final interview has them speaking with bungy legend Henry Van Asch after which the team decides to take a huge risk and take their own jumps. Heading back to Auckland to fly back to the US, the team leaves New Zealand with a new perspective and a new outlook on their futures. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3367] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10657] The Supreme Court Strikes Down a Provision of the Voting Rights Act * President Obama Announces a New Plan to Combat Climate Change * Colorado Plans to Roll Out a New Way to Get Healthcare duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3367] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2237] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10657] The Supreme Court Strikes Down a Provision of the Voting Rights Act * President Obama Announces a New Plan to Combat Climate Change * Colorado Plans to Roll Out a New Way to Get Healthcare duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32145Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, home prices are jumping, but so are mortgage rates. And with the supply of homes tight, what's a potential buyer to do? Plus, an American businessman held hostage by his own employees in China. It's a story you have to see. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2931Z] Tavis talks with law professors Kimberle Williams Crenshaw and Justin Levitt about the pending US Supreme Court decisions. Crenshaw and Levitt assess the Supreme Court's affirmative action ruling and issues in other major cases awaiting decisions. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 am
    Independent Lens [#1304H] Deaf Jam National poetry slams for youth have been gaining momentum, but few, if any, deaf teens have ever been included in these contests. In this documentary, a group of New York City deaf teens reveal their passions, frustrations and senses of humor as they discover American Sign Language poetry - eventually stepping into the world of the youth poetry slams with their hearing peers. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#4063] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2932Z] Tavis talks with artist Natalie Cole. The 9-time Grammy winner shares the backstory of her latest CD - her first-ever Spanish-language project, "Natalie Cole en Espanol." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    Asia Insight [#107] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Asia Biz Forecast [#412] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Walk in the Park with Nick Molle - Rivers of the Rockies The second installment of the nature series A WALK IN THE PARK WITH NICK MOLLE explores the Colorado, Big Thompson, Cache la Poudre and St. Vrain rivers located within the northern Rocky Mountains. With sound science, respect and a touch of humor, host Nick Molle traces the sources of the streams - from the top of the Rockies to the bottom of the Grand Canyon - and explores the scenic natural habitats of the region's indigenous animals, including beavers, moose, bears, coyotes and others. Along the way, he carefully illustrates the role humans play in each ecosystem. duration 56:48   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 6:00 am
    Wildside with Nick Molle - Costa Rica Nature lover and award-winning filmmaker Nick Molle embarks on entertaining and educational adventures in one of the most biologically diverse places on Earth. An experienced guide leads eco-tourist Molle through Corcovada National Park on Costa Rica's Osa Peninsula. Molle's extensive knowledge of biology, passion for preservation and sense of humor shine through as he encounters a variety of wildlife, including white-faced spider monkeys, squirrel monkeys, the scarlet macaw, the American saltwater crocodile, humpback whales and many other inhabitants of Costa Rica's ecosystems. duration 55:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Nature [#2708H] Invasion of the Giant Pythons Florida's Everglades National Park is one of the last great wildlife refuges in the United States, home to numerous unique and endangered mammals, trees, plants, birds and turtles, as well as half a million alligators. However, the Everglades is also the dumping ground for many animal invaders over 15 species of parrot, 75 kinds of fish and 30 different reptiles from places as far away as Africa, Asia and the Caribbean. All of the intruders found their way into the park either by accidental escape from pet owners or intentional releases by people no longer wishing to care for an exotic species. Add to the mix tens of thousands of giant pythons, snakes that can grow to 20 feet and weigh nearly 300 pounds, some released into the wild by irresponsible pet owners, some escapees from almost 200 wildlife facilities destroyed by Hurricane Andrew in 1992. The predatory pythons slithered into this protected wilderness and thrived, and the refuge has consequently become less of a haven and more of a killing ground every day since then. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 8:00 am
    Independent Lens [#1304H] Deaf Jam National poetry slams for youth have been gaining momentum, but few, if any, deaf teens have ever been included in these contests. In this documentary, a group of New York City deaf teens reveal their passions, frustrations and senses of humor as they discover American Sign Language poetry - eventually stepping into the world of the youth poetry slams with their hearing peers. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2932Z] Tavis talks with artist Natalie Cole. The 9-time Grammy winner shares the backstory of her latest CD - her first-ever Spanish-language project, "Natalie Cole en Espanol." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2931Z] Tavis talks with law professors Kimberle Williams Crenshaw and Justin Levitt about the pending US Supreme Court decisions. Crenshaw and Levitt assess the Supreme Court's affirmative action ruling and issues in other major cases awaiting decisions. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    Asia Insight [#107] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 am
    Asia Biz Forecast [#412] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 am
    Walk in the Park with Nick Molle - Rivers of the Rockies The second installment of the nature series A WALK IN THE PARK WITH NICK MOLLE explores the Colorado, Big Thompson, Cache la Poudre and St. Vrain rivers located within the northern Rocky Mountains. With sound science, respect and a touch of humor, host Nick Molle traces the sources of the streams - from the top of the Rockies to the bottom of the Grand Canyon - and explores the scenic natural habitats of the region's indigenous animals, including beavers, moose, bears, coyotes and others. Along the way, he carefully illustrates the role humans play in each ecosystem. duration 56:48   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 pm
    Wildside with Nick Molle - Costa Rica Nature lover and award-winning filmmaker Nick Molle embarks on entertaining and educational adventures in one of the most biologically diverse places on Earth. An experienced guide leads eco-tourist Molle through Corcovada National Park on Costa Rica's Osa Peninsula. Molle's extensive knowledge of biology, passion for preservation and sense of humor shine through as he encounters a variety of wildlife, including white-faced spider monkeys, squirrel monkeys, the scarlet macaw, the American saltwater crocodile, humpback whales and many other inhabitants of Costa Rica's ecosystems. duration 55:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    Nature [#2708H] Invasion of the Giant Pythons Florida's Everglades National Park is one of the last great wildlife refuges in the United States, home to numerous unique and endangered mammals, trees, plants, birds and turtles, as well as half a million alligators. However, the Everglades is also the dumping ground for many animal invaders over 15 species of parrot, 75 kinds of fish and 30 different reptiles from places as far away as Africa, Asia and the Caribbean. All of the intruders found their way into the park either by accidental escape from pet owners or intentional releases by people no longer wishing to care for an exotic species. Add to the mix tens of thousands of giant pythons, snakes that can grow to 20 feet and weigh nearly 300 pounds, some released into the wild by irresponsible pet owners, some escapees from almost 200 wildlife facilities destroyed by Hurricane Andrew in 1992. The predatory pythons slithered into this protected wilderness and thrived, and the refuge has consequently become less of a haven and more of a killing ground every day since then. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#4063] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#9127] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2932Z] Tavis talks with artist Natalie Cole. The 9-time Grammy winner shares the backstory of her latest CD - her first-ever Spanish-language project, "Natalie Cole en Espanol." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32146Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the Supreme Court hands down a ruling on same-sex marriage. NBR will look at the implications for businesses big and small. Plus, NBR will tell you why adjustable rate mortgages, popular during the housing boom, may be making a comeback. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10658] Supreme Court Rules on DOMA and Prop 8 * Valley Fever Causing Serious Infections * Thirteen Hour Filibuster Blocks Kills Abortion Bill in Texas Senate * Egyptian President Morsi Addresses Nation as Tensions Rise duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32146Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the Supreme Court hands down a ruling on same-sex marriage. NBR will look at the implications for businesses big and small. Plus, NBR will tell you why adjustable rate mortgages, popular during the housing boom, may be making a comeback. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2238] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#4063] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3368] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10658] Supreme Court Rules on DOMA and Prop 8 * Valley Fever Causing Serious Infections * Thirteen Hour Filibuster Blocks Kills Abortion Bill in Texas Senate * Egyptian President Morsi Addresses Nation as Tensions Rise duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3368] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#19133] (original broadcast date: 6/26/13)
    * Adam Liptak of the New York Times & Jeffrey Toobin of CNN on the Supreme Court's decision on the Defense of Marriage Act.
    * Bill Hader of Saturday Night Live on his upcoming movie "The To Do List."
    * John Hendricks, founder and chairman of Discovery Communications and the Discovery Channel on his book "A Curious Discovery: An Entrepreneur's Story."
    duration 56:47   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3368] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2933] Tavis talks with founder and president of the FealGood Foundation, John Feal, who explains his passion in fighting for justice for first responders of the 9/11 terrorist attack on the US. Tavis also talks with The Big Bang Theory's Johnny Galecki. The Emmy-nominated actor reflects on his role in the hit sitcom. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3368] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#605H] 3 young Australian women head to the US and roadtrip across the country. After arriving in Los Angeles, Mariana, Camilla, and Su-Yin learn to drive an RV and acclimate to life on the road. The team heads to San Diego for their first interview with members of the band Switchfoot. The team then drives to Orange County where they meet activists and philanthropists Augie and Lynn Nieto. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3368] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10658] Supreme Court Rules on DOMA and Prop 8 * Valley Fever Causing Serious Infections * Thirteen Hour Filibuster Blocks Kills Abortion Bill in Texas Senate * Egyptian President Morsi Addresses Nation as Tensions Rise duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3368] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2238] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10658] Supreme Court Rules on DOMA and Prop 8 * Valley Fever Causing Serious Infections * Thirteen Hour Filibuster Blocks Kills Abortion Bill in Texas Senate * Egyptian President Morsi Addresses Nation as Tensions Rise duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32146Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the Supreme Court hands down a ruling on same-sex marriage. NBR will look at the implications for businesses big and small. Plus, NBR will tell you why adjustable rate mortgages, popular during the housing boom, may be making a comeback. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2932Z] Tavis talks with artist Natalie Cole. The 9-time Grammy winner shares the backstory of her latest CD - her first-ever Spanish-language project, "Natalie Cole en Espanol." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 am
    John Portman: A Life of Building This program examines the work and legacy of one of the world's most daring and influential architects. Over the last 45 years, John Portman's iconic urban structures and eye-popping interiors steadily rose in 60 cities across four continents, helping redefine cityscapes in the United States and skylines in Asia. Once considered a maverick because he eschewed long-accepted industry standards, critics and leading architecture schools now fully embrace Portman's design approach, which emphasizes function, purpose and sensory experience.
    This documentary showcases Portman's buildings using dramatic time-lapse footage. It also features interviews with Portman, architecture critic Paul Goldberg (The New Yorker), Harvard professors Mack Scogin and Michael Hays, business associates Mickey Steinberg and A.J. Robinson, architect Jacque Robertson, art critic Robert Craig and Portman's children.
    duration 56:14   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#4064] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2933] Tavis talks with founder and president of the FealGood Foundation, John Feal, who explains his passion in fighting for justice for first responders of the 9/11 terrorist attack on the US. Tavis also talks with The Big Bang Theory's Johnny Galecki. The Emmy-nominated actor reflects on his role in the hit sitcom. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Scully/The World Show [#1608] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 4:30 am
    Second Opinion [#913] Angina While there are different causes of angina, the symptoms can be scary and a sign of an underlying heart problem. Fortunately, there are good treatments available. Meet Joan and Fred Jahnke as they describe how they live with Joan's microvascular disease and the often-frightening angina that it causes. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Frontline [#2603] The Undertaking Frontline enters the world of Thomas Lynch, a poet and undertaker whose family for three generations has cared for both the living and the dead in a small Michigan town. Through the intimate stories of families coming to terms with grief, mortality, and a funeral's rituals, the film illuminates the heartbreak and beauty in the journey taken between the living and the dead when someone dies. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 6:00 am
    POV [#2601] Homegoings Through the eyes of funeral director Isaiah Owens, the beauty and grace of African American funerals are brought to life. Filmed at Owens Funeral Home in New York City's historic Harlem neighborhood, "Homegoings" takes an up-close look at the rarely seen world of undertaking in the black community, where funeral rites draw on a rich palette of tradition, history and celebration. Combining cinema verite with intimate interviews and archival photographs, the film paints a portrait of the dearly departed, their grieving families and a man who sends loved ones "home." duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Frontline [#3111H] Rape in the Fields For the women who pick and process the food we eat every day, getting sexually assaulted, and even raped, is sometimes part of the job. Frontline and Univision partner to tell the story of the hidden price many migrant women working in America's fields and packing plants pay to stay employed and provide for their families. This investigation is the result of a yearlong reporting effort by veteran correspondent Lowell Bergman, the Investigative Reporting Program at UC Berkeley and the Center for Investigative Reporting. duration 56:46   STEREO TV14
  • 8:00 am
    John Portman: A Life of Building This program examines the work and legacy of one of the world's most daring and influential architects. Over the last 45 years, John Portman's iconic urban structures and eye-popping interiors steadily rose in 60 cities across four continents, helping redefine cityscapes in the United States and skylines in Asia. Once considered a maverick because he eschewed long-accepted industry standards, critics and leading architecture schools now fully embrace Portman's design approach, which emphasizes function, purpose and sensory experience.
    This documentary showcases Portman's buildings using dramatic time-lapse footage. It also features interviews with Portman, architecture critic Paul Goldberg (The New Yorker), Harvard professors Mack Scogin and Michael Hays, business associates Mickey Steinberg and A.J. Robinson, architect Jacque Robertson, art critic Robert Craig and Portman's children.
    duration 56:14   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2933] Tavis talks with founder and president of the FealGood Foundation, John Feal, who explains his passion in fighting for justice for first responders of the 9/11 terrorist attack on the US. Tavis also talks with The Big Bang Theory's Johnny Galecki. The Emmy-nominated actor reflects on his role in the hit sitcom. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2932Z] Tavis talks with artist Natalie Cole. The 9-time Grammy winner shares the backstory of her latest CD - her first-ever Spanish-language project, "Natalie Cole en Espanol." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    Scully/The World Show [#1608] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:30 am
    Second Opinion [#913] Angina While there are different causes of angina, the symptoms can be scary and a sign of an underlying heart problem. Fortunately, there are good treatments available. Meet Joan and Fred Jahnke as they describe how they live with Joan's microvascular disease and the often-frightening angina that it causes. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 am
    Frontline [#2603] The Undertaking Frontline enters the world of Thomas Lynch, a poet and undertaker whose family for three generations has cared for both the living and the dead in a small Michigan town. Through the intimate stories of families coming to terms with grief, mortality, and a funeral's rituals, the film illuminates the heartbreak and beauty in the journey taken between the living and the dead when someone dies. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 pm
    POV [#2601] Homegoings Through the eyes of funeral director Isaiah Owens, the beauty and grace of African American funerals are brought to life. Filmed at Owens Funeral Home in New York City's historic Harlem neighborhood, "Homegoings" takes an up-close look at the rarely seen world of undertaking in the black community, where funeral rites draw on a rich palette of tradition, history and celebration. Combining cinema verite with intimate interviews and archival photographs, the film paints a portrait of the dearly departed, their grieving families and a man who sends loved ones "home." duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    Frontline [#3111H] Rape in the Fields For the women who pick and process the food we eat every day, getting sexually assaulted, and even raped, is sometimes part of the job. Frontline and Univision partner to tell the story of the hidden price many migrant women working in America's fields and packing plants pay to stay employed and provide for their families. This investigation is the result of a yearlong reporting effort by veteran correspondent Lowell Bergman, the Investigative Reporting Program at UC Berkeley and the Center for Investigative Reporting. duration 56:46   STEREO TV14
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#4064] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#9128] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2933] Tavis talks with founder and president of the FealGood Foundation, John Feal, who explains his passion in fighting for justice for first responders of the 9/11 terrorist attack on the US. Tavis also talks with The Big Bang Theory's Johnny Galecki. The Emmy-nominated actor reflects on his role in the hit sitcom. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32147Z] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10659] Immigration Reform Bill Passes Senate * President Obama Begins His Eight Day Tour of Africa * Young Artists Struggle to Make Ends Meet * New Battlegrounds for Same-Sex Marriage After Supreme Court Rulings * New Federal Rules Makes School Food Healthier duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32147Z] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2239] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#4064] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3369] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10659] Immigration Reform Bill Passes Senate * President Obama Begins His Eight Day Tour of Africa * Young Artists Struggle to Make Ends Meet * New Battlegrounds for Same-Sex Marriage After Supreme Court Rulings * New Federal Rules Makes School Food Healthier duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3369] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#19134H] (original broadcast date: 6/27/13)
    * Guardian editors Alan Rusbridger and Janine Gibson on Edward Snowden and the NSA leaks. < br />* robotics designer David Hanson & Dmitry Iitskov, founder and chair of the 2045 Initiative on robotics and avatars of the future.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3369] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2934] Tavis talks to Stax Records' soul legend Booker T. about his latest project. The 4-time Grammy winner reflects on his five decades in the music business and demonstrates his immense talent with a preview of his latest project, "Sound the Alarm." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3369] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#606] The RV breaks down as the team heads from Los Angeles to San Francisco before they interview Thomas Nazario, law professor and children's rights activist. They then go to Golden Gate Park to talk with David Miles, Jr., the "godfather of skating." Driving east into Utah, they visit the Great Salt Lake and talk with David and Sandy Jensen, theater owners. The team pushes on to New Mexico and meets up with Christina Heyniger, an adventure tourism consultant. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3369] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10659] Immigration Reform Bill Passes Senate * President Obama Begins His Eight Day Tour of Africa * Young Artists Struggle to Make Ends Meet * New Battlegrounds for Same-Sex Marriage After Supreme Court Rulings * New Federal Rules Makes School Food Healthier duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3369] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2239] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10659] Immigration Reform Bill Passes Senate * President Obama Begins His Eight Day Tour of Africa * Young Artists Struggle to Make Ends Meet * New Battlegrounds for Same-Sex Marriage After Supreme Court Rulings * New Federal Rules Makes School Food Healthier duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32147Z] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2933] Tavis talks with founder and president of the FealGood Foundation, John Feal, who explains his passion in fighting for justice for first responders of the 9/11 terrorist attack on the US. Tavis also talks with The Big Bang Theory's Johnny Galecki. The Emmy-nominated actor reflects on his role in the hit sitcom. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Dabbawallas This documentary explores a form of work that has existed in Bombay, India for more than 100 years. Each day 4,000 Dabbawallas (box persons) deliver 100,000 lunches at high levels of reliability. This delivery system functions without any of the trappings of modern day work, such as technology, business procedures and practices, and so on. The program focuses on what people in more-developed countries can learn from workers in less-developed countries, the reliance upon human and social ingenuity for organizing rather than relying on external mechanisms such as technology, and according respect for the seldom-heard voices of disadvantaged populations in India. By Paul Goodman. duration 56:11   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#4065] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2934] Tavis talks to Stax Records' soul legend Booker T. about his latest project. The 4-time Grammy winner reflects on his five decades in the music business and demonstrates his immense talent with a preview of his latest project, "Sound the Alarm." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Well Read [#109] Domingo Martinez, "The Boy Kings of Texas: A Memoir" First-time author Martinez' compelling memoir of growing up in the border town of Brownsville, Texas. A National Book Award finalist. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Great Decisions In Foreign Policy [#406] The Intervention Calculation The U.S., for better or worse, is often seen as the world's policeman. But the question of when to intervene in other nations' affairs with military force has long stymied American policymakers, from Afghanistan and Iraq to Libya and Syria. Why do we intervene in some conflicts and stand on the sidelines in others? duration 29:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Nova [#4006H] Earth from Space This film reveals a spectacular new space-based vision of our planet. Produced in extensive consultation with NASA scientists, NOVA takes data from earth-observing satellites and transforms it into dazzling visual sequences, each one exposing the intricate web of forces that sustains life on earth. Viewers witness how dust blown from the Sahara fertilizes the Amazon; how a vast submarine "waterfall" off Antarctica helps drive ocean currents around the world; and how the sun's heating up of the southern Atlantic gives birth to a colossally powerful hurricane. From the microscopic world of water molecules vaporizing over the ocean to the magnetic field that is bigger than Earth itself, this show reveals the astonishing beauty and complexity of our dynamic planet. duration 1:56:31   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 am
    Aspen Institute Presents [#201] 2013 Overview The second season of The Aspen Institute Presents premieres with an overview of the 2012 Aspen Ideas Festival. Hari Sreenivasan of PBS NewsHour, the host of the first episode, takes us to the best of the 2012 sessions but not before starting off with festival prep and a talk with Walter Isaacson, the President and CEO of The Aspen Institute. Last year's conversations and interviews, which continue to be relevant today, covered issues of corporate values, work-life balance, technology, parenting, the economy's outlook and national service. Featured speakers included Special Master of the 9/11 Victims Compensation Kenneth Feinberg, who is currently overseeing The One Fund; "Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mom" author Amy Chua; retired Admiral Mike Mullen; Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz; economist Lawrence Summers; CEO Marissa Mayer of Yahoo and retired General Stanley McChrystal. One of the most captivating subjects of the festival was on concussions in football, which began with a screening of American Man. The documentary profiles former NFL running back Kevin Turner and his struggles with ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease; the film's conversation continued with a panel discussion. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    Dabbawallas This documentary explores a form of work that has existed in Bombay, India for more than 100 years. Each day 4,000 Dabbawallas (box persons) deliver 100,000 lunches at high levels of reliability. This delivery system functions without any of the trappings of modern day work, such as technology, business procedures and practices, and so on. The program focuses on what people in more-developed countries can learn from workers in less-developed countries, the reliance upon human and social ingenuity for organizing rather than relying on external mechanisms such as technology, and according respect for the seldom-heard voices of disadvantaged populations in India. By Paul Goodman. duration 56:11   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2934] Tavis talks to Stax Records' soul legend Booker T. about his latest project. The 4-time Grammy winner reflects on his five decades in the music business and demonstrates his immense talent with a preview of his latest project, "Sound the Alarm." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2933] Tavis talks with founder and president of the FealGood Foundation, John Feal, who explains his passion in fighting for justice for first responders of the 9/11 terrorist attack on the US. Tavis also talks with The Big Bang Theory's Johnny Galecki. The Emmy-nominated actor reflects on his role in the hit sitcom. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    Well Read [#109] Domingo Martinez, "The Boy Kings of Texas: A Memoir" First-time author Martinez' compelling memoir of growing up in the border town of Brownsville, Texas. A National Book Award finalist. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 am
    Great Decisions In Foreign Policy [#406] The Intervention Calculation The U.S., for better or worse, is often seen as the world's policeman. But the question of when to intervene in other nations' affairs with military force has long stymied American policymakers, from Afghanistan and Iraq to Libya and Syria. Why do we intervene in some conflicts and stand on the sidelines in others? duration 29:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 am
    Nova [#4006H] Earth from Space This film reveals a spectacular new space-based vision of our planet. Produced in extensive consultation with NASA scientists, NOVA takes data from earth-observing satellites and transforms it into dazzling visual sequences, each one exposing the intricate web of forces that sustains life on earth. Viewers witness how dust blown from the Sahara fertilizes the Amazon; how a vast submarine "waterfall" off Antarctica helps drive ocean currents around the world; and how the sun's heating up of the southern Atlantic gives birth to a colossally powerful hurricane. From the microscopic world of water molecules vaporizing over the ocean to the magnetic field that is bigger than Earth itself, this show reveals the astonishing beauty and complexity of our dynamic planet. duration 1:56:31   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Aspen Institute Presents [#201] 2013 Overview The second season of The Aspen Institute Presents premieres with an overview of the 2012 Aspen Ideas Festival. Hari Sreenivasan of PBS NewsHour, the host of the first episode, takes us to the best of the 2012 sessions but not before starting off with festival prep and a talk with Walter Isaacson, the President and CEO of The Aspen Institute. Last year's conversations and interviews, which continue to be relevant today, covered issues of corporate values, work-life balance, technology, parenting, the economy's outlook and national service. Featured speakers included Special Master of the 9/11 Victims Compensation Kenneth Feinberg, who is currently overseeing The One Fund; "Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mom" author Amy Chua; retired Admiral Mike Mullen; Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz; economist Lawrence Summers; CEO Marissa Mayer of Yahoo and retired General Stanley McChrystal. One of the most captivating subjects of the festival was on concussions in football, which began with a screening of American Man. The documentary profiles former NFL running back Kevin Turner and his struggles with ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease; the film's conversation continued with a panel discussion. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#4065] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#9129] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2934] Tavis talks to Stax Records' soul legend Booker T. about his latest project. The 4-time Grammy winner reflects on his five decades in the music business and demonstrates his immense talent with a preview of his latest project, "Sound the Alarm." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32148] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10660] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32148] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2240] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    BBC Newsnight [#17179Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3370] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10660] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3370] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#19135H] (original broadcast date: 6/28/13)
    * a look at the Venice Biennale with Biennale director Massimiliano Gioni and artist Sarah Sze, who is representing the US at the Biennale.
    * artist James Turell discusses his current exhibition at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3370] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2935] Tavis talks with Rawn James, Jr., attorney and author of The Double V. The son and grandson of African American vets, James examines the significance of the landmark executive order signed by President Truman integrating the military. Tavis also talks with jazz saxophonist Dave Koz. The multiple Grammy nominee talks about his latest project, the CD, "Dave Koz and Friends Summer Horns." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3370] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#607] In Santa Fe, the team interviews Celine Cousteau, filmmaker and granddaughter of famed explorer Jacques Cousteau. They then drive into West Texas and visit with Doug Baum, owner of Texas Camel Corps. Driving east to Austin, they interview Terry Lickona, producer of the television program Austin City Limits and finish up their tour of Texas in Houston where they talk with blogger and author Gwendolyn Zepeda. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3370] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10660] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3370] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2240] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10660] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32148] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2934] Tavis talks to Stax Records' soul legend Booker T. about his latest project. The 4-time Grammy winner reflects on his five decades in the music business and demonstrates his immense talent with a preview of his latest project, "Sound the Alarm." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Frontline [#2603] The Undertaking Frontline enters the world of Thomas Lynch, a poet and undertaker whose family for three generations has cared for both the living and the dead in a small Michigan town. Through the intimate stories of families coming to terms with grief, mortality, and a funeral's rituals, the film illuminates the heartbreak and beauty in the journey taken between the living and the dead when someone dies. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1643] SUPREME COURT DECISIONS - Tim O'Brien analyzes the important Supreme Court decisions on gay marriage, voting rights and affirmative action that came down earlier this week.
    DECISION REACTION -Managing editor Kim Lawton reports on the widespread religious reaction to the Supreme Court decision on same-sex marriage.
    DECISION ANALYSIS - Host Bob Abernethy discusses the Supreme Court decisions, their import, reaction to them and what it means for those affected, with Kim Lawton and Tim O'Brien.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1001] Women, Investing & Retirement, Part 1 In part one of Consuelo Mack WealthTrack's two-part series on women, investing and retirement, Morgan Stanley's award-winning financial advisor Ami Forte and GenSpring's Senior Strategist Jewelle Bickford discuss why the traditional financial planning approach doesn't work for women. duration 27:26   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2216H] WENDY DAVIS AND THE TEXAS ABORTION BATTLE - Texas State Senator Wendy Davis' rise to women's rights stardom.
    SAME-SEX MARRIAGE RULINGS - What's next and how it affects the future of the LGBT community and the nation.
    FLEXISM - Employers are finding new ways to adapt to their employees' needs.
    Panelists: The Heritage Foundation's Jennifer Marshall, Author and Political Analyst Lara Brown, Red Alert Politics Editor Francesca Chambers, Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC) and Center for American Progress' Advisor for LGBT Policy & Racial Justice Aisha Moodie-Mills (for the gay marriage segment).
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#205] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Henry Ford: American Experience Henry Ford's car transformed the lives of millions, and redrew the grid of the United States and much of the world. His assembly line changed the character of modern industry, and his Five Dollar Day laid the foundation for the creation of the American middle class. A bundle of contradictions, Ford was at once forward and backward-looking, innovative and close-minded, generous and mean-spirited. The same man who helped liberate millions from social isolation with his Model T also trapped thousands in a workplace prison where they were forbidden to sit or talk. The same Ford who welcomed African Americans and disabled people into his factories was a bigot who broadcast to the world his vitriolic hatred of Jews and exhibited devastating cruelty to his own son. This biography draws upon a rich archival record and recent scholarship to provide a revealing portrait of a complex, pivotal and ultimately flawed figure. duration 1:56:16   STEREO TVPG-L (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 7:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#225H] The Faces of America's Hungry * Here in the richest country on earth, 50 million of us - 1 in 6 Americans - go hungry. More than a third of them are children. And yet Congress can't pass a Farm Bill because our representatives continue to fight over how many billions to slash from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, better known as food stamps. The debate is filled with tired cliches about freeloaders undeserving of government help, living large at the expense of honest, hardworking taxpayers. But a new documentary, A Place at the Table, paints a truer picture of America's poor.
    This week Kristi Jacobson, one of the film's directors and producers, and Mariana Chilton, director of the Center for Hunger-Free Communities, join Bill to break these stereotypes apart and share how hunger hits hard at people from every walk of life. The story of American families facing food insecurity is as frustrating as it is heartbreaking, because the truth is as avoidable as it is tragic.
    "If we could think about poverty during childhood as a type of a disease, if we could pay as much attention to poverty for children as we pay attention to infectious disease, we might be able to do something in this country," Chilton explains to Bill.
    * Also, on the program, journalist Greg Kaufmann - who's dedicated himself to the beat of poverty, food and politics - talks about the need to meet and accurately understand Americans in poverty to truly help them. A frequent contributor for The Nation, Kaufmann claims that the poor have been stereotyped and demonized in an effort to justify huge cuts in food stamps and other programs low-income Americans rely on to survive.
    "People are working and they're not getting paid enough to feed their families, pay their utilities, pay for their housing, pay for the healthcare," Kaufmann tells Bill. "50% of the jobs in this country pay less than $34,000 a year. 25% pay less than the poverty line for a family of 4 - which is $23,000 a year. So if you're not paying people enough to pay for the basics, they're going to need help getting food."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#148] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2511H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5252H] A number of blockbuster decisions were handed down by the Supreme Court this week dealing with same-sex marriage and voting rights. But the justices held off on ruling on the validity of affirmative action in school admissions by sending that case back to the lower courts. < br />In two landmark decisions, the high court struck down part of the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) and refused to reinstate a ban on same-sex marriages in California. The decisions appear to have laid the legal groundwork for future cases challenging state laws banning gay marriage but neither decision addressed whether same-sex marriage is a fundamental right under the US Constitution. While supporters of gay rights are celebrating, opponents vow to continue their fight to preserve traditional marriage.
    Earlier in the week, the sharply divided Supreme Court struck down a key provision of the historic 1965 Voting Rights Act that requires states and local districts with a history of discrimination to get federal approval to change voting laws. In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court ruled the formula to determine which places need monitoring is out of date and ruled that Congress needs to revise the provision.
    And in a decision about affirmative action, the high court questioned whether race should be a determinant in deciding college admissions at the University of Texas. The court sent the case to the lower court for further review saying that school needs to show that there are, "no workable race-neutral alternatives."
    Joining Gwen Ifill to discuss the legal and policy implications as well as the political fallout from this week's Supreme Court decisions: Pete Williams of NBC News, Joan Biskupic of Reuters, Dan Balz of The Washington Post, and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2435H] June 28, 2013 Guest Host: Scott Shafer.
    News Panel:
    GAY MARRIAGE VICTORIES - Gay rights advocates celebrated historic victories this week when the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act and also upheld a lower court ruling finding California's ban on same-sex marriage unconstitutional. The two rulings will have major legal ramifications at both the federal and state level. What do the court's decisions mean and when will gay couples be allowed to legally marry in California? Also, how do the SCOTUS rulings on affirmative action and voting rights impact California?
    PRESIDENT OBAMA'S CLIMATE PLAN - President Obama this week called for sweeping executive action to combat the effects of climate change before a cheering crowd of environmentalists in Washington, D.C. One major proposal is modeled after California's ambitious climate change goals and pushes for a national cap-and-trade bill. Other initiatives include eliminating tax loopholes for big oil and creating policies that address the impact of severe weather.
    POSSIBLE BART STRIKE - Members of BART's two largest unions have voted to authorize a strike which could result in transit chaos for thousands of commuters as early as next Monday. Fears are building that train operators, station agents and maintenance workers could walk off the job if a deal is not reached by Sunday. Negotiations between the union and BART management have broken down over wages, health and retirement benefits, and safety issues.
    Guests: Vik Amar, UC Davis School of Law; Paul Rogers, SJ Mercury News; Michael Cabanatuan, SF Chronicle.
    Please Note: This Week In Northern California will not air the weekend beginning July 5th. It returns Friday 7/12.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17179Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2216H] WENDY DAVIS AND THE TEXAS ABORTION BATTLE - Texas State Senator Wendy Davis' rise to women's rights stardom.
    SAME-SEX MARRIAGE RULINGS - What's next and how it affects the future of the LGBT community and the nation.
    FLEXISM - Employers are finding new ways to adapt to their employees' needs.
    Panelists: The Heritage Foundation's Jennifer Marshall, Author and Political Analyst Lara Brown, Red Alert Politics Editor Francesca Chambers, Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC) and Center for American Progress' Advisor for LGBT Policy & Racial Justice Aisha Moodie-Mills (for the gay marriage segment).
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3127] Topics: Supremes Rule on Gay Marriage; Obama in Africa. Panelists: Michelle Bernard, Author; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#326H] JEFF GREENFIELD ANCHORS. On the second of two inauguration specials examining the advocacy group "Common Good's" proposals to end bureaucratic gridlock and get the United States moving forward, Need to Know anchor Jeff Greenfield explores how malpractice lawsuits contribute to rising healthcare costs. Correspondent William Brangham travels to Denmark, where medical disputes are settled by experts without ever going to court. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#225H] The Faces of America's Hungry * Here in the richest country on earth, 50 million of us - 1 in 6 Americans - go hungry. More than a third of them are children. And yet Congress can't pass a Farm Bill because our representatives continue to fight over how many billions to slash from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, better known as food stamps. The debate is filled with tired cliches about freeloaders undeserving of government help, living large at the expense of honest, hardworking taxpayers. But a new documentary, A Place at the Table, paints a truer picture of America's poor.
    This week Kristi Jacobson, one of the film's directors and producers, and Mariana Chilton, director of the Center for Hunger-Free Communities, join Bill to break these stereotypes apart and share how hunger hits hard at people from every walk of life. The story of American families facing food insecurity is as frustrating as it is heartbreaking, because the truth is as avoidable as it is tragic.
    "If we could think about poverty during childhood as a type of a disease, if we could pay as much attention to poverty for children as we pay attention to infectious disease, we might be able to do something in this country," Chilton explains to Bill.
    * Also, on the program, journalist Greg Kaufmann - who's dedicated himself to the beat of poverty, food and politics - talks about the need to meet and accurately understand Americans in poverty to truly help them. A frequent contributor for The Nation, Kaufmann claims that the poor have been stereotyped and demonized in an effort to justify huge cuts in food stamps and other programs low-income Americans rely on to survive.
    "People are working and they're not getting paid enough to feed their families, pay their utilities, pay for their housing, pay for the healthcare," Kaufmann tells Bill. "50% of the jobs in this country pay less than $34,000 a year. 25% pay less than the poverty line for a family of 4 - which is $23,000 a year. So if you're not paying people enough to pay for the basics, they're going to need help getting food."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#602H] Pump It Up: Heart Health Special Report Investigate the number one cause of death in America, heart disease, which kills close to 600,000 people each year - more than die from cancer, car accidents or AIDS. Meet a teenager trying to lower her risk; a heart attack patient and the team that saved her life, and a researcher working to one day rebuild a damaged heart from the inside out. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#227] duration 25:40   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Out & Proud In Chicago Hosted by actress Jane Lynch, this program charts the history of Chicago's lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community from the 19th century to the present. The documentary profiles famous and unsung LGBT Chicagoans: a retired schoolteacher, a successful businessman, a community activist, a bar owner, a lawyer and a social service worker. Each recounts their own extraordinary stories of struggle and success - from coming-out experiences and supporting anti-discrimination laws to founding Chicago's earliest gay-rights organization and defying the federal government's indifference towards people with AIDS. Through their voices, this program tells the story of the LGBT citizens who helped shape the face of a city. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 3:30 pm
    In My Lifetime This program thoughtfully and thoroughly examines the 68-year history of nuclear weapons - the most destructive force ever invented. Filmed in Europe, Japan and the US, it focuses on the continuing struggle of citizens, scientists and political leaders working to reduce or eliminate the atomic threat, while others search for ways to build nuclear weapons.
    In contemporary interviews, former heads of state, UN representatives, figures from the nuclear establishment, Manhattan Project scientists, Nobel Peace- and Pulitzer Prize-winners, military personnel and atomic-bomb survivors recount the birth of the nuclear age and detail the key developments that followed. The film shifts between historical events, including the Cuban missile crisis and the historic 1986 Reykjavik Summit between Reagan and Gorbachev to present-day efforts to contain the spread of nuclear weapons. It also details the obstacles - political and human- impeding a solution to this complex global issue.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 pm
    Serving America: Memories of Peace Corps This program highlights the experiences of some of the nearly 3000 volunteers who served during the early years of the Peace Corps. A mix of archival film and photographs, along with personal stories from former volunteers, tells a story of service and idealism. Interviews convey the volunteers' passion, commitment and bravery as they lived and worked in developing countries, including South and Central America, Africa and the Middle East. From almost fatal obstacles to spiritual epiphanies, these men and women describe their transformative experiences. Donna Shalala, former US Secretary of Health and Human Services (1993-2001), recounts the adventure of serving in Iran between 1962 and 1964. "What the Peace Corps really did is make me a citizen of the world," says Shalala. duration 26:44   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    New State of Mind: Ending The Stigma of Mental Illness Examination of the stigma and discrimination facing people with mental health challenges, the efforts underway to promote understanding and acceptance, and stories of individuals from all walks of life who've overcome mental illness to achieve success and happiness. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3127] Topics: Supremes Rule on Gay Marriage; Obama in Africa. Panelists: Michelle Bernard, Author; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5252H] A number of blockbuster decisions were handed down by the Supreme Court this week dealing with same-sex marriage and voting rights. But the justices held off on ruling on the validity of affirmative action in school admissions by sending that case back to the lower courts. < br />In two landmark decisions, the high court struck down part of the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) and refused to reinstate a ban on same-sex marriages in California. The decisions appear to have laid the legal groundwork for future cases challenging state laws banning gay marriage but neither decision addressed whether same-sex marriage is a fundamental right under the US Constitution. While supporters of gay rights are celebrating, opponents vow to continue their fight to preserve traditional marriage.
    Earlier in the week, the sharply divided Supreme Court struck down a key provision of the historic 1965 Voting Rights Act that requires states and local districts with a history of discrimination to get federal approval to change voting laws. In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court ruled the formula to determine which places need monitoring is out of date and ruled that Congress needs to revise the provision.
    And in a decision about affirmative action, the high court questioned whether race should be a determinant in deciding college admissions at the University of Texas. The court sent the case to the lower court for further review saying that school needs to show that there are, "no workable race-neutral alternatives."
    Joining Gwen Ifill to discuss the legal and policy implications as well as the political fallout from this week's Supreme Court decisions: Pete Williams of NBC News, Joan Biskupic of Reuters, Dan Balz of The Washington Post, and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2435H] June 28, 2013 Guest Host: Scott Shafer.
    News Panel:
    GAY MARRIAGE VICTORIES - Gay rights advocates celebrated historic victories this week when the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act and also upheld a lower court ruling finding California's ban on same-sex marriage unconstitutional. The two rulings will have major legal ramifications at both the federal and state level. What do the court's decisions mean and when will gay couples be allowed to legally marry in California? Also, how do the SCOTUS rulings on affirmative action and voting rights impact California?
    PRESIDENT OBAMA'S CLIMATE PLAN - President Obama this week called for sweeping executive action to combat the effects of climate change before a cheering crowd of environmentalists in Washington, D.C. One major proposal is modeled after California's ambitious climate change goals and pushes for a national cap-and-trade bill. Other initiatives include eliminating tax loopholes for big oil and creating policies that address the impact of severe weather.
    POSSIBLE BART STRIKE - Members of BART's two largest unions have voted to authorize a strike which could result in transit chaos for thousands of commuters as early as next Monday. Fears are building that train operators, station agents and maintenance workers could walk off the job if a deal is not reached by Sunday. Negotiations between the union and BART management have broken down over wages, health and retirement benefits, and safety issues.
    Guests: Vik Amar, UC Davis School of Law; Paul Rogers, SJ Mercury News; Michael Cabanatuan, SF Chronicle.
    Please Note: This Week In Northern California will not air the weekend beginning July 5th. It returns Friday 7/12.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#602H] Pump It Up: Heart Health Special Report Investigate the number one cause of death in America, heart disease, which kills close to 600,000 people each year - more than die from cancer, car accidents or AIDS. Meet a teenager trying to lower her risk; a heart attack patient and the team that saved her life, and a researcher working to one day rebuild a damaged heart from the inside out. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1212] Honduras & El Salvador Brianna explores Honduras and El Salvador, two of Central America's most rewarding destinations. In Honduras, she swims with dolphins, spends the day at a banana plantation, visits the Mayan ruins of Copan and learns how to roll cigars in Santa Rosa de Copan. Next she heads to El Salvador, where she climbs the Izalco volcano, treks through waterfalls in El Imposible National Park, visits with a former guerrilla commander at the Guazapa volcano, enjoys a rodeo fiesta in San Luis del Carmen and ascends the still-active Santa Ana volcano, the highest in the country. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2703#] Black Mamba The black mamba is one of Africa's most dangerous and feared snakes, known for being very aggressive when disturbed. Rearing up with its head four feet above the ground, it strikes with deadly precision, delivering venom that is packed with three different kinds of toxins and is ten times more deadly than needed to kill an adult human. Without treatment the mortality rate is 100%, the highest among all venomous snakes in the world. Until now, little has been known about the black mamba's natural behavior in the wild because in Africa most people kill a black mamba on sight and feel lucky to have done so. But in the tiny country of Swaziland in southern Africa, a team of herpetologists has an entirely different "take" on these creatures and hopes their six-week study will change public perception of what they feel is the world's most misunderstood snake. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3507H] Ape Genius Chimps, orangutans, gorillas, and bonobos -- seem to have rich emotional lives similar to our own. A new generation of investigators is revealing the mental capabilities of great apes. And our evolutionary next-of-kin are turning out to be far smarter than most experts ever imagined. duration 55:34   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 11:00 pm
    Boyhood Shadows "One in six boys is sexually molested by the age of 16." This documentary tells a gripping story that began with Glenn as a young boy under the power of a sexual predator. The narrative chronicles Glenn's struggle as he tries to make sense of this abuse and his life, telling no one. After suffering decades of addiction, Glenn breaks the silence, describing his past... funny, poignant, sad... poignant, sad... finally gaining redemption. Glenn claims he is alive today because he finally spoke out about his abuse, "There is no shame in being a victim!" Today he directs a sober living facility in Los Angeles. duration 59:00   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#103] La Americana When nine-year-old Carla suffers a life-threatening accident, her mother, Carmen, must leave her behind and make the dangerous and illegal journey from Bolivia to the U.S., where she hopes to earn enough to save her daughter's life. Working in New York to support Carla's medical needs, Carmen struggles in vain to legalize her immigration status, and wrestles with the prospect of never seeing her daughter again. Then, after six years of separation, Congress proposes "amnesty" legislation that could allow Carmen and Carla to be reunited at last. Filmed across three countries in a captivating cinematic narrative, LA AMERICANA is Carmen's story, and the story of millions of illegal immigrants who must leave their families behind to pursue the elusive American dream. duration 1:29:07   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Serving America: Memories of Peace Corps This program highlights the experiences of some of the nearly 3000 volunteers who served during the early years of the Peace Corps. A mix of archival film and photographs, along with personal stories from former volunteers, tells a story of service and idealism. Interviews convey the volunteers' passion, commitment and bravery as they lived and worked in developing countries, including South and Central America, Africa and the Middle East. From almost fatal obstacles to spiritual epiphanies, these men and women describe their transformative experiences. Donna Shalala, former US Secretary of Health and Human Services (1993-2001), recounts the adventure of serving in Iran between 1962 and 1964. "What the Peace Corps really did is make me a citizen of the world," says Shalala. duration 26:44   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#217] Teaching Math to the Core Teaching Math to the Core: Math Common Core State Standards emphasize analysis and problem solving: the how and why of every answer. We'll follow four phenomenal math teachers as they clearly show us how the Common Core can be implemented in classrooms. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#225H] The Faces of America's Hungry * Here in the richest country on earth, 50 million of us - 1 in 6 Americans - go hungry. More than a third of them are children. And yet Congress can't pass a Farm Bill because our representatives continue to fight over how many billions to slash from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, better known as food stamps. The debate is filled with tired cliches about freeloaders undeserving of government help, living large at the expense of honest, hardworking taxpayers. But a new documentary, A Place at the Table, paints a truer picture of America's poor.
    This week Kristi Jacobson, one of the film's directors and producers, and Mariana Chilton, director of the Center for Hunger-Free Communities, join Bill to break these stereotypes apart and share how hunger hits hard at people from every walk of life. The story of American families facing food insecurity is as frustrating as it is heartbreaking, because the truth is as avoidable as it is tragic.
    "If we could think about poverty during childhood as a type of a disease, if we could pay as much attention to poverty for children as we pay attention to infectious disease, we might be able to do something in this country," Chilton explains to Bill.
    * Also, on the program, journalist Greg Kaufmann - who's dedicated himself to the beat of poverty, food and politics - talks about the need to meet and accurately understand Americans in poverty to truly help them. A frequent contributor for The Nation, Kaufmann claims that the poor have been stereotyped and demonized in an effort to justify huge cuts in food stamps and other programs low-income Americans rely on to survive.
    "People are working and they're not getting paid enough to feed their families, pay their utilities, pay for their housing, pay for the healthcare," Kaufmann tells Bill. "50% of the jobs in this country pay less than $34,000 a year. 25% pay less than the poverty line for a family of 4 - which is $23,000 a year. So if you're not paying people enough to pay for the basics, they're going to need help getting food."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5252] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3127] Topics: Supremes Rule on Gay Marriage; Obama in Africa. Panelists: Michelle Bernard, Author; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Need To Know [#326H] JEFF GREENFIELD ANCHORS. On the second of two inauguration specials examining the advocacy group "Common Good's" proposals to end bureaucratic gridlock and get the United States moving forward, Need to Know anchor Jeff Greenfield explores how malpractice lawsuits contribute to rising healthcare costs. Correspondent William Brangham travels to Denmark, where medical disputes are settled by experts without ever going to court. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2511H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#103] La Americana When nine-year-old Carla suffers a life-threatening accident, her mother, Carmen, must leave her behind and make the dangerous and illegal journey from Bolivia to the U.S., where she hopes to earn enough to save her daughter's life. Working in New York to support Carla's medical needs, Carmen struggles in vain to legalize her immigration status, and wrestles with the prospect of never seeing her daughter again. Then, after six years of separation, Congress proposes "amnesty" legislation that could allow Carmen and Carla to be reunited at last. Filmed across three countries in a captivating cinematic narrative, LA AMERICANA is Carmen's story, and the story of millions of illegal immigrants who must leave their families behind to pursue the elusive American dream. duration 1:29:07   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    QUEST [#602H] Pump It Up: Heart Health Special Report Investigate the number one cause of death in America, heart disease, which kills close to 600,000 people each year - more than die from cancer, car accidents or AIDS. Meet a teenager trying to lower her risk; a heart attack patient and the team that saved her life, and a researcher working to one day rebuild a damaged heart from the inside out. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1643] SUPREME COURT DECISIONS - Tim O'Brien analyzes the important Supreme Court decisions on gay marriage, voting rights and affirmative action that came down earlier this week.
    DECISION REACTION -Managing editor Kim Lawton reports on the widespread religious reaction to the Supreme Court decision on same-sex marriage.
    DECISION ANALYSIS - Host Bob Abernethy discusses the Supreme Court decisions, their import, reaction to them and what it means for those affected, with Kim Lawton and Tim O'Brien.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1001] Women, Investing & Retirement, Part 1 In part one of Consuelo Mack WealthTrack's two-part series on women, investing and retirement, Morgan Stanley's award-winning financial advisor Ami Forte and GenSpring's Senior Strategist Jewelle Bickford discuss why the traditional financial planning approach doesn't work for women. duration 27:26   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#222H] Ever wanted to bottle your own wine? Ric Edelman tells you what it's going to cost and then answers questions on US Savings Bonds, financial pitfalls for young adults and visits Sesame Street for a discussion of how to teach kids about money with the irrepressible Elmo. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2511H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3127] Topics: Supremes Rule on Gay Marriage; Obama in Africa. Panelists: Michelle Bernard, Author; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week [#5252H] A number of blockbuster decisions were handed down by the Supreme Court this week dealing with same-sex marriage and voting rights. But the justices held off on ruling on the validity of affirmative action in school admissions by sending that case back to the lower courts. < br />In two landmark decisions, the high court struck down part of the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) and refused to reinstate a ban on same-sex marriages in California. The decisions appear to have laid the legal groundwork for future cases challenging state laws banning gay marriage but neither decision addressed whether same-sex marriage is a fundamental right under the US Constitution. While supporters of gay rights are celebrating, opponents vow to continue their fight to preserve traditional marriage.
    Earlier in the week, the sharply divided Supreme Court struck down a key provision of the historic 1965 Voting Rights Act that requires states and local districts with a history of discrimination to get federal approval to change voting laws. In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court ruled the formula to determine which places need monitoring is out of date and ruled that Congress needs to revise the provision.
    And in a decision about affirmative action, the high court questioned whether race should be a determinant in deciding college admissions at the University of Texas. The court sent the case to the lower court for further review saying that school needs to show that there are, "no workable race-neutral alternatives."
    Joining Gwen Ifill to discuss the legal and policy implications as well as the political fallout from this week's Supreme Court decisions: Pete Williams of NBC News, Joan Biskupic of Reuters, Dan Balz of The Washington Post, and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2435H] June 28, 2013 Guest Host: Scott Shafer.
    News Panel:
    GAY MARRIAGE VICTORIES - Gay rights advocates celebrated historic victories this week when the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act and also upheld a lower court ruling finding California's ban on same-sex marriage unconstitutional. The two rulings will have major legal ramifications at both the federal and state level. What do the court's decisions mean and when will gay couples be allowed to legally marry in California? Also, how do the SCOTUS rulings on affirmative action and voting rights impact California?
    PRESIDENT OBAMA'S CLIMATE PLAN - President Obama this week called for sweeping executive action to combat the effects of climate change before a cheering crowd of environmentalists in Washington, D.C. One major proposal is modeled after California's ambitious climate change goals and pushes for a national cap-and-trade bill. Other initiatives include eliminating tax loopholes for big oil and creating policies that address the impact of severe weather.
    POSSIBLE BART STRIKE - Members of BART's two largest unions have voted to authorize a strike which could result in transit chaos for thousands of commuters as early as next Monday. Fears are building that train operators, station agents and maintenance workers could walk off the job if a deal is not reached by Sunday. Negotiations between the union and BART management have broken down over wages, health and retirement benefits, and safety issues.
    Guests: Vik Amar, UC Davis School of Law; Paul Rogers, SJ Mercury News; Michael Cabanatuan, SF Chronicle.
    Please Note: This Week In Northern California will not air the weekend beginning July 5th. It returns Friday 7/12.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#225H] The Faces of America's Hungry * Here in the richest country on earth, 50 million of us - 1 in 6 Americans - go hungry. More than a third of them are children. And yet Congress can't pass a Farm Bill because our representatives continue to fight over how many billions to slash from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, better known as food stamps. The debate is filled with tired cliches about freeloaders undeserving of government help, living large at the expense of honest, hardworking taxpayers. But a new documentary, A Place at the Table, paints a truer picture of America's poor.
    This week Kristi Jacobson, one of the film's directors and producers, and Mariana Chilton, director of the Center for Hunger-Free Communities, join Bill to break these stereotypes apart and share how hunger hits hard at people from every walk of life. The story of American families facing food insecurity is as frustrating as it is heartbreaking, because the truth is as avoidable as it is tragic.
    "If we could think about poverty during childhood as a type of a disease, if we could pay as much attention to poverty for children as we pay attention to infectious disease, we might be able to do something in this country," Chilton explains to Bill.
    * Also, on the program, journalist Greg Kaufmann - who's dedicated himself to the beat of poverty, food and politics - talks about the need to meet and accurately understand Americans in poverty to truly help them. A frequent contributor for The Nation, Kaufmann claims that the poor have been stereotyped and demonized in an effort to justify huge cuts in food stamps and other programs low-income Americans rely on to survive.
    "People are working and they're not getting paid enough to feed their families, pay their utilities, pay for their housing, pay for the healthcare," Kaufmann tells Bill. "50% of the jobs in this country pay less than $34,000 a year. 25% pay less than the poverty line for a family of 4 - which is $23,000 a year. So if you're not paying people enough to pay for the basics, they're going to need help getting food."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 pm
    Inside Washington [#2511H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3127] Topics: Supremes Rule on Gay Marriage; Obama in Africa. Panelists: Michelle Bernard, Author; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2216H] WENDY DAVIS AND THE TEXAS ABORTION BATTLE - Texas State Senator Wendy Davis' rise to women's rights stardom.
    SAME-SEX MARRIAGE RULINGS - What's next and how it affects the future of the LGBT community and the nation.
    FLEXISM - Employers are finding new ways to adapt to their employees' needs.
    Panelists: The Heritage Foundation's Jennifer Marshall, Author and Political Analyst Lara Brown, Red Alert Politics Editor Francesca Chambers, Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC) and Center for American Progress' Advisor for LGBT Policy & Racial Justice Aisha Moodie-Mills (for the gay marriage segment).
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 pm
    LinkAsia [#148] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:30 pm
    QUEST [#602H] Pump It Up: Heart Health Special Report Investigate the number one cause of death in America, heart disease, which kills close to 600,000 people each year - more than die from cancer, car accidents or AIDS. Meet a teenager trying to lower her risk; a heart attack patient and the team that saved her life, and a researcher working to one day rebuild a damaged heart from the inside out. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Need To Know [#326H] JEFF GREENFIELD ANCHORS. On the second of two inauguration specials examining the advocacy group "Common Good's" proposals to end bureaucratic gridlock and get the United States moving forward, Need to Know anchor Jeff Greenfield explores how malpractice lawsuits contribute to rising healthcare costs. Correspondent William Brangham travels to Denmark, where medical disputes are settled by experts without ever going to court. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 pm
    Moyers & Company [#225H] The Faces of America's Hungry * Here in the richest country on earth, 50 million of us - 1 in 6 Americans - go hungry. More than a third of them are children. And yet Congress can't pass a Farm Bill because our representatives continue to fight over how many billions to slash from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, better known as food stamps. The debate is filled with tired cliches about freeloaders undeserving of government help, living large at the expense of honest, hardworking taxpayers. But a new documentary, A Place at the Table, paints a truer picture of America's poor.
    This week Kristi Jacobson, one of the film's directors and producers, and Mariana Chilton, director of the Center for Hunger-Free Communities, join Bill to break these stereotypes apart and share how hunger hits hard at people from every walk of life. The story of American families facing food insecurity is as frustrating as it is heartbreaking, because the truth is as avoidable as it is tragic.
    "If we could think about poverty during childhood as a type of a disease, if we could pay as much attention to poverty for children as we pay attention to infectious disease, we might be able to do something in this country," Chilton explains to Bill.
    * Also, on the program, journalist Greg Kaufmann - who's dedicated himself to the beat of poverty, food and politics - talks about the need to meet and accurately understand Americans in poverty to truly help them. A frequent contributor for The Nation, Kaufmann claims that the poor have been stereotyped and demonized in an effort to justify huge cuts in food stamps and other programs low-income Americans rely on to survive.
    "People are working and they're not getting paid enough to feed their families, pay their utilities, pay for their housing, pay for the healthcare," Kaufmann tells Bill. "50% of the jobs in this country pay less than $34,000 a year. 25% pay less than the poverty line for a family of 4 - which is $23,000 a year. So if you're not paying people enough to pay for the basics, they're going to need help getting food."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5252H] A number of blockbuster decisions were handed down by the Supreme Court this week dealing with same-sex marriage and voting rights. But the justices held off on ruling on the validity of affirmative action in school admissions by sending that case back to the lower courts. < br />In two landmark decisions, the high court struck down part of the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) and refused to reinstate a ban on same-sex marriages in California. The decisions appear to have laid the legal groundwork for future cases challenging state laws banning gay marriage but neither decision addressed whether same-sex marriage is a fundamental right under the US Constitution. While supporters of gay rights are celebrating, opponents vow to continue their fight to preserve traditional marriage.
    Earlier in the week, the sharply divided Supreme Court struck down a key provision of the historic 1965 Voting Rights Act that requires states and local districts with a history of discrimination to get federal approval to change voting laws. In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court ruled the formula to determine which places need monitoring is out of date and ruled that Congress needs to revise the provision.
    And in a decision about affirmative action, the high court questioned whether race should be a determinant in deciding college admissions at the University of Texas. The court sent the case to the lower court for further review saying that school needs to show that there are, "no workable race-neutral alternatives."
    Joining Gwen Ifill to discuss the legal and policy implications as well as the political fallout from this week's Supreme Court decisions: Pete Williams of NBC News, Joan Biskupic of Reuters, Dan Balz of The Washington Post, and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Inside Washington [#2511H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3127] Topics: Supremes Rule on Gay Marriage; Obama in Africa. Panelists: Michelle Bernard, Author; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2435H] June 28, 2013 Guest Host: Scott Shafer.
    News Panel:
    GAY MARRIAGE VICTORIES - Gay rights advocates celebrated historic victories this week when the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act and also upheld a lower court ruling finding California's ban on same-sex marriage unconstitutional. The two rulings will have major legal ramifications at both the federal and state level. What do the court's decisions mean and when will gay couples be allowed to legally marry in California? Also, how do the SCOTUS rulings on affirmative action and voting rights impact California?
    PRESIDENT OBAMA'S CLIMATE PLAN - President Obama this week called for sweeping executive action to combat the effects of climate change before a cheering crowd of environmentalists in Washington, D.C. One major proposal is modeled after California's ambitious climate change goals and pushes for a national cap-and-trade bill. Other initiatives include eliminating tax loopholes for big oil and creating policies that address the impact of severe weather.
    POSSIBLE BART STRIKE - Members of BART's two largest unions have voted to authorize a strike which could result in transit chaos for thousands of commuters as early as next Monday. Fears are building that train operators, station agents and maintenance workers could walk off the job if a deal is not reached by Sunday. Negotiations between the union and BART management have broken down over wages, health and retirement benefits, and safety issues.
    Guests: Vik Amar, UC Davis School of Law; Paul Rogers, SJ Mercury News; Michael Cabanatuan, SF Chronicle.
    Please Note: This Week In Northern California will not air the weekend beginning July 5th. It returns Friday 7/12.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    QUEST [#602H] Pump It Up: Heart Health Special Report Investigate the number one cause of death in America, heart disease, which kills close to 600,000 people each year - more than die from cancer, car accidents or AIDS. Meet a teenager trying to lower her risk; a heart attack patient and the team that saved her life, and a researcher working to one day rebuild a damaged heart from the inside out. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 pm
    Revolutionaries [#205H] Doing Well By Doing Good Can one turn a successful career in technology into a life as a social entrepreneur? Meet Matt Flannery, former programmer at Ti Vo and founder of Kiva, and John Wood, former Microsoft executive and founder of Room to Read. KQED's Dave Iverson moderates an inspiring conversation with the two men, who have found a way to make a difference in the world with their successes in Silicon Valley. duration 53:14   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#225H] The Faces of America's Hungry * Here in the richest country on earth, 50 million of us - 1 in 6 Americans - go hungry. More than a third of them are children. And yet Congress can't pass a Farm Bill because our representatives continue to fight over how many billions to slash from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, better known as food stamps. The debate is filled with tired cliches about freeloaders undeserving of government help, living large at the expense of honest, hardworking taxpayers. But a new documentary, A Place at the Table, paints a truer picture of America's poor.
    This week Kristi Jacobson, one of the film's directors and producers, and Mariana Chilton, director of the Center for Hunger-Free Communities, join Bill to break these stereotypes apart and share how hunger hits hard at people from every walk of life. The story of American families facing food insecurity is as frustrating as it is heartbreaking, because the truth is as avoidable as it is tragic.
    "If we could think about poverty during childhood as a type of a disease, if we could pay as much attention to poverty for children as we pay attention to infectious disease, we might be able to do something in this country," Chilton explains to Bill.
    * Also, on the program, journalist Greg Kaufmann - who's dedicated himself to the beat of poverty, food and politics - talks about the need to meet and accurately understand Americans in poverty to truly help them. A frequent contributor for The Nation, Kaufmann claims that the poor have been stereotyped and demonized in an effort to justify huge cuts in food stamps and other programs low-income Americans rely on to survive.
    "People are working and they're not getting paid enough to feed their families, pay their utilities, pay for their housing, pay for the healthcare," Kaufmann tells Bill. "50% of the jobs in this country pay less than $34,000 a year. 25% pay less than the poverty line for a family of 4 - which is $23,000 a year. So if you're not paying people enough to pay for the basics, they're going to need help getting food."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    America Reframed [#126] Follow The Leader A political coming-of-age documentary about three boys who want to be President. Over three life-changing years, each rethinks his beliefs and discovers who he truly wants to be as an adult. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 pm
    Out of Order Now more than ever, American citizens are discontented and disillusioned with national politics, with approval ratings for Congress consistently ranking low regardless of the party in power. Senior politicians also note the disappearance of the collegiality they once shared with peers of differing political ideologies. As a result, the ability to discuss issues from varying points of view and negotiate solutions, appears to be fading from the American political process.
    Among many topics, this program addresses the decline in civil discourse and the news media's role in it, partisan gridlock, gerrymandering, vanishing commitment to reasonable compromise, the vilification of moderates and declining civic engagement. It relies on interviews with a broad range of political experts and observers from journalists, academics and political strategists to senior elected officials. They include: journalist Bob Schieffer (CBS News), Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA), Sen. Susan Collins (R-MA), Fmr Sen. Evan Bayh (D-IN), Fmr Sen. Alan Simpson (R-WY), Fmr Sen. John Warner (R-VA) .
    duration 27:17   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#605] Ninos De La Memoria This documentary tells the story of the search for hundreds of children who disappeared during the Salvadoran Civil War. Many were survivors of massacres carried out by the US-trained Salvadoran army. Taken away from the massacre sites by soldiers, some grew up in orphanages or were adopted abroad, losing their history and identity. This film weaves together 3 separate yet intertwined journeys in the search for family, identity and justice in El Salvador, and asks the larger question: How can a post-war society right the wrongs of the past? duration 57:16   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Dabbawallas This documentary explores a form of work that has existed in Bombay, India for more than 100 years. Each day 4,000 Dabbawallas (box persons) deliver 100,000 lunches at high levels of reliability. This delivery system functions without any of the trappings of modern day work, such as technology, business procedures and practices, and so on. The program focuses on what people in more-developed countries can learn from workers in less-developed countries, the reliance upon human and social ingenuity for organizing rather than relying on external mechanisms such as technology, and according respect for the seldom-heard voices of disadvantaged populations in India. By Paul Goodman. duration 56:11   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 am
    Aspen Institute Presents [#201] 2013 Overview The second season of The Aspen Institute Presents premieres with an overview of the 2012 Aspen Ideas Festival. Hari Sreenivasan of PBS NewsHour, the host of the first episode, takes us to the best of the 2012 sessions but not before starting off with festival prep and a talk with Walter Isaacson, the President and CEO of The Aspen Institute. Last year's conversations and interviews, which continue to be relevant today, covered issues of corporate values, work-life balance, technology, parenting, the economy's outlook and national service. Featured speakers included Special Master of the 9/11 Victims Compensation Kenneth Feinberg, who is currently overseeing The One Fund; "Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mom" author Amy Chua; retired Admiral Mike Mullen; Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz; economist Lawrence Summers; CEO Marissa Mayer of Yahoo and retired General Stanley McChrystal. One of the most captivating subjects of the festival was on concussions in football, which began with a screening of American Man. The documentary profiles former NFL running back Kevin Turner and his struggles with ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease; the film's conversation continued with a panel discussion. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Aspen Institute Presents [#202] American People and American Politics What does it mean to be an American today? The Aspen Institute Presents: People, American Politics questions the current state of politics as the country's politicians and citizens remain divided on issues, including gun control, immigration and national security. Host Hari Sreenivasan (PBS NewsHour) looks at compelling political sessions at the 2013 Aspen Ideas Festival from citizenship led by writer Eric Liu to the Republican Party with Karl Rove to the 2008 and 2012 elections with Nate Silver and Katie Couric. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#4066] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2935] Tavis talks with Rawn James, Jr., attorney and author of The Double V. The son and grandson of African American vets, James examines the significance of the landmark executive order signed by President Truman integrating the military. Tavis also talks with jazz saxophonist Dave Koz. The multiple Grammy nominee talks about his latest project, the CD, "Dave Koz and Friends Summer Horns." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    LinkAsia [#201] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 4:30 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1643] SUPREME COURT DECISIONS - Tim O'Brien analyzes the important Supreme Court decisions on gay marriage, voting rights and affirmative action that came down earlier this week.
    DECISION REACTION -Managing editor Kim Lawton reports on the widespread religious reaction to the Supreme Court decision on same-sex marriage.
    DECISION ANALYSIS - Host Bob Abernethy discusses the Supreme Court decisions, their import, reaction to them and what it means for those affected, with Kim Lawton and Tim O'Brien.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    America Reframed [#126] Follow The Leader A political coming-of-age documentary about three boys who want to be President. Over three life-changing years, each rethinks his beliefs and discovers who he truly wants to be as an adult. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 6:30 am
    Out of Order Now more than ever, American citizens are discontented and disillusioned with national politics, with approval ratings for Congress consistently ranking low regardless of the party in power. Senior politicians also note the disappearance of the collegiality they once shared with peers of differing political ideologies. As a result, the ability to discuss issues from varying points of view and negotiate solutions, appears to be fading from the American political process.
    Among many topics, this program addresses the decline in civil discourse and the news media's role in it, partisan gridlock, gerrymandering, vanishing commitment to reasonable compromise, the vilification of moderates and declining civic engagement. It relies on interviews with a broad range of political experts and observers from journalists, academics and political strategists to senior elected officials. They include: journalist Bob Schieffer (CBS News), Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA), Sen. Susan Collins (R-MA), Fmr Sen. Evan Bayh (D-IN), Fmr Sen. Alan Simpson (R-WY), Fmr Sen. John Warner (R-VA) .
    duration 27:17   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Global Voices [#605] Ninos De La Memoria This documentary tells the story of the search for hundreds of children who disappeared during the Salvadoran Civil War. Many were survivors of massacres carried out by the US-trained Salvadoran army. Taken away from the massacre sites by soldiers, some grew up in orphanages or were adopted abroad, losing their history and identity. This film weaves together 3 separate yet intertwined journeys in the search for family, identity and justice in El Salvador, and asks the larger question: How can a post-war society right the wrongs of the past? duration 57:16   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    Dabbawallas This documentary explores a form of work that has existed in Bombay, India for more than 100 years. Each day 4,000 Dabbawallas (box persons) deliver 100,000 lunches at high levels of reliability. This delivery system functions without any of the trappings of modern day work, such as technology, business procedures and practices, and so on. The program focuses on what people in more-developed countries can learn from workers in less-developed countries, the reliance upon human and social ingenuity for organizing rather than relying on external mechanisms such as technology, and according respect for the seldom-heard voices of disadvantaged populations in India. By Paul Goodman. duration 56:11   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2935] Tavis talks with Rawn James, Jr., attorney and author of The Double V. The son and grandson of African American vets, James examines the significance of the landmark executive order signed by President Truman integrating the military. Tavis also talks with jazz saxophonist Dave Koz. The multiple Grammy nominee talks about his latest project, the CD, "Dave Koz and Friends Summer Horns." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2934] Tavis talks to Stax Records' soul legend Booker T. about his latest project. The 4-time Grammy winner reflects on his five decades in the music business and demonstrates his immense talent with a preview of his latest project, "Sound the Alarm." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    LinkAsia [#201] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 10:30 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1643] SUPREME COURT DECISIONS - Tim O'Brien analyzes the important Supreme Court decisions on gay marriage, voting rights and affirmative action that came down earlier this week.
    DECISION REACTION -Managing editor Kim Lawton reports on the widespread religious reaction to the Supreme Court decision on same-sex marriage.
    DECISION ANALYSIS - Host Bob Abernethy discusses the Supreme Court decisions, their import, reaction to them and what it means for those affected, with Kim Lawton and Tim O'Brien.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 am
    America Reframed [#126] Follow The Leader A political coming-of-age documentary about three boys who want to be President. Over three life-changing years, each rethinks his beliefs and discovers who he truly wants to be as an adult. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 pm
    Out of Order Now more than ever, American citizens are discontented and disillusioned with national politics, with approval ratings for Congress consistently ranking low regardless of the party in power. Senior politicians also note the disappearance of the collegiality they once shared with peers of differing political ideologies. As a result, the ability to discuss issues from varying points of view and negotiate solutions, appears to be fading from the American political process.
    Among many topics, this program addresses the decline in civil discourse and the news media's role in it, partisan gridlock, gerrymandering, vanishing commitment to reasonable compromise, the vilification of moderates and declining civic engagement. It relies on interviews with a broad range of political experts and observers from journalists, academics and political strategists to senior elected officials. They include: journalist Bob Schieffer (CBS News), Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA), Sen. Susan Collins (R-MA), Fmr Sen. Evan Bayh (D-IN), Fmr Sen. Alan Simpson (R-WY), Fmr Sen. John Warner (R-VA) .
    duration 27:17   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    Global Voices [#605] Ninos De La Memoria This documentary tells the story of the search for hundreds of children who disappeared during the Salvadoran Civil War. Many were survivors of massacres carried out by the US-trained Salvadoran army. Taken away from the massacre sites by soldiers, some grew up in orphanages or were adopted abroad, losing their history and identity. This film weaves together 3 separate yet intertwined journeys in the search for family, identity and justice in El Salvador, and asks the larger question: How can a post-war society right the wrongs of the past? duration 57:16   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#4066] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#9130] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2935] Tavis talks with Rawn James, Jr., attorney and author of The Double V. The son and grandson of African American vets, James examines the significance of the landmark executive order signed by President Truman integrating the military. Tavis also talks with jazz saxophonist Dave Koz. The multiple Grammy nominee talks about his latest project, the CD, "Dave Koz and Friends Summer Horns." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32149Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the quarter starts with a gain. But with earnings season just around the corner, will corporate America determine whether there's more upside ahead? Plus, NBR is answering the economic question on every movie-goers mind - why is the price of theater popcorn so expensive? duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10701] Arizona Wildfire Continues to Rage Out of Control * Europe Reacts to Reports That the US Has Been Spying on Them * Student Loan Interest Rates Double * Egyptian Armed Forces Issue Ultimatum to President Morsi * A Look at the First American Lead Dancer in Moscow's Bolshoi Ballet duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32149Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the quarter starts with a gain. But with earnings season just around the corner, will corporate America determine whether there's more upside ahead? Plus, NBR is answering the economic question on every movie-goers mind - why is the price of theater popcorn so expensive? duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2241] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#4066] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3371] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10701] Arizona Wildfire Continues to Rage Out of Control * Europe Reacts to Reports That the US Has Been Spying on Them * Student Loan Interest Rates Double * Egyptian Armed Forces Issue Ultimatum to President Morsi * A Look at the First American Lead Dancer in Moscow's Bolshoi Ballet duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3371] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#19136] (original broadcast date: 7/01/13)
    * Steven Cook of the Council on Foreign Relations and Naguib Sawiris on the mass protests against Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi
    * a discussion about Ben Bernanke and the Federal Reserve with Jon Hilsenrath of the Wall St. Journal, Mark Gertler of New York University and Alan Blinder of Princeton University
    * composer Marc Neikrug on his latest recording "Healing Ceremony."
    duration 56:47   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3371] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2936] Tavis talks with TransAfrica president Nicole Lee. The official liaison between the Mandela family and the world's media, Lee assesses the president's trip to Africa & his efforts to re-engage with countries there both economically and emotionally. Tavis also talks with the former US ambassador to South Africa James A. Joseph. The only American ambassador to present his credentials to President Nelson Mandela offers his unique perspective on South Africa's transformation. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3371] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#608] The team heads north to Chicago and interview chef Homaru Cantu and go to a White Sox baseball game - a first for this team of Australians. They then drive to Cleveland and interview Terry Stewart, President of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The team then drives east to New York City to visit with tattoo artist Eli Quinters and pianist and tae kwon do champion Elaine Kwon. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3371] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10701] Arizona Wildfire Continues to Rage Out of Control * Europe Reacts to Reports That the US Has Been Spying on Them * Student Loan Interest Rates Double * Egyptian Armed Forces Issue Ultimatum to President Morsi * A Look at the First American Lead Dancer in Moscow's Bolshoi Ballet duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3371] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2241] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10701] Arizona Wildfire Continues to Rage Out of Control * Europe Reacts to Reports That the US Has Been Spying on Them * Student Loan Interest Rates Double * Egyptian Armed Forces Issue Ultimatum to President Morsi * A Look at the First American Lead Dancer in Moscow's Bolshoi Ballet duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32149Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the quarter starts with a gain. But with earnings season just around the corner, will corporate America determine whether there's more upside ahead? Plus, NBR is answering the economic question on every movie-goers mind - why is the price of theater popcorn so expensive? duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2935] Tavis talks with Rawn James, Jr., attorney and author of The Double V. The son and grandson of African American vets, James examines the significance of the landmark executive order signed by President Truman integrating the military. Tavis also talks with jazz saxophonist Dave Koz. The multiple Grammy nominee talks about his latest project, the CD, "Dave Koz and Friends Summer Horns." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Global Voices [#605] Ninos De La Memoria This documentary tells the story of the search for hundreds of children who disappeared during the Salvadoran Civil War. Many were survivors of massacres carried out by the US-trained Salvadoran army. Taken away from the massacre sites by soldiers, some grew up in orphanages or were adopted abroad, losing their history and identity. This film weaves together 3 separate yet intertwined journeys in the search for family, identity and justice in El Salvador, and asks the larger question: How can a post-war society right the wrongs of the past? duration 57:16   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#4067] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2936] Tavis talks with TransAfrica president Nicole Lee. The official liaison between the Mandela family and the world's media, Lee assesses the president's trip to Africa & his efforts to re-engage with countries there both economically and emotionally. Tavis also talks with the former US ambassador to South Africa James A. Joseph. The only American ambassador to present his credentials to President Nelson Mandela offers his unique perspective on South Africa's transformation. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Asia This Week [#313] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    European Journal [#3126] A Special Look at Europe's Newest Eu Member Croatia: The Smallest City in the World: The smallest city in the world, Hum in Istria in northwest Croatia, is about to become a part of the European Union. The medieval town overlooking the Mima Valley is a popular tourist destination. The people of Hum hope that EU membership will generate more income from tourism. Hum only has about 25 permanent residents. They pride themselves on their openness and hospitality. But they do have some concerns about joining the EU and giving up some of their recently gained sovereignty. Croatia: Traces of the Past: Since the founding of the EU, Croatia will become the first member to have experienced protracted war on its own soil in recent history. In the east of the country, in Vukovar, the damage is still visible. And reconciliation between the divided ethnic groups is still a long way off. The Croatian government has recently made small concessions to Serbs in the country. Road signs in communities with a high percentage of Serbs will be in Cyrillic along with Latin letters. Civilian groups in Croatia have consistently pushed for the extradition of war criminals. But Vukovar seems to remain an open wound. And for the most part, Serbs and Croats there avoid each other. Croatia: Welcome to the Club: Croatia will become the 28th member of the EU. And in these times of the Euro crisis, Croatia's delegates heading for the European Parliament in Brussels will be joining a quarrelsome group. Britain has been thinking out loud about leaving the EU. German-French relations are cooler than ever. And German Chancellor Angela Merkel has irked her southern European partners with her austerity measures. Croatiahas selected 12 delegates to the European Parliament, five of them from the governing Social Democrats. They will serve for only a year as all EU citizens elect a new parliament in 2014. Bosnia: Sitting on Packed Suitcases: The boundaries of the European Union move outward again with the accession of Croatia. 1,000 kilometers of EU boundary will now run between Croatia and Bosnia-Herzegovina - and many Bosnian Croats who now hold Croatian passports will automatically be given EU citizenship. Croatia aids its ethnic countrymen in Bosnia to the tune of 10 million euros a year. Many Bosnian Croats have a Croatian passport and are already availing themselves of educational or employment opportunities in Croatia. Many hope they will now be able to move more freely to other EU countries. But that may lead to even more people, even whole villages, emigrating from Bosnia-Herzegovina. Italy: A New Melting Pot : The neighboring country of Italy is eagerly awaiting Croatian membership in the EU. Many people in northeastern Italy have Croatian roots. If the customs borders fall, the region will be better integrated with regions that in former times belonged to Venice. There are many Italians of Croatian descent In the area around Trieste whose families were driven out of Croatia after World War Two. The question of compensation for confiscated Italian property has never been resolved; and now many Italians hope to be able to settle in or open up shop in Croatia. duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 am
    Broadside [#101] Emerging Empires Collide, Part 1 This program employs talented actors in 17th-century settings, large-scale re-enactments, animation and scholarly interviews to capture the drama and intrigue as two nations fight for prosperity abroad and face demands for religious freedom at home. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 6:00 am
    Broadside [#102] Emerging Empires Collide, Part 2 (see description in part 1) duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Aspen Institute Presents [#203] Solving The Economic Puzzle One day the employment rate and stock market are up, and the next they are down. On the third episode of The Aspen Institute Presents, Solving the Economic Puzzle focuses on the creation of jobs in conventional and creative ways in the abstract and not-so-abstract concept of economy. Host Hari Sreenivasan of PBS NewsHour attends the conversation on The Challenge of Building American Jobs with professor Austan Goolsbee, former U.S. Secretary of Labor Elaine L. Chao, "Behind the Kitchen Door" author Saru Jayaraman, editor-in-chief Kevin J. Delaney of Quartz and American Action Forum's president Douglas Holtz-Eakin. Also, Walter Isaacson of The Aspen Institute speaks with Kickstarter founder Perry Chen in Kickstarter and the Economics of Creativity to discuss the project, and its effects on the creative field and "starving artists." duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    Global Voices [#605] Ninos De La Memoria This documentary tells the story of the search for hundreds of children who disappeared during the Salvadoran Civil War. Many were survivors of massacres carried out by the US-trained Salvadoran army. Taken away from the massacre sites by soldiers, some grew up in orphanages or were adopted abroad, losing their history and identity. This film weaves together 3 separate yet intertwined journeys in the search for family, identity and justice in El Salvador, and asks the larger question: How can a post-war society right the wrongs of the past? duration 57:16   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2936] Tavis talks with TransAfrica president Nicole Lee. The official liaison between the Mandela family and the world's media, Lee assesses the president's trip to Africa & his efforts to re-engage with countries there both economically and emotionally. Tavis also talks with the former US ambassador to South Africa James A. Joseph. The only American ambassador to present his credentials to President Nelson Mandela offers his unique perspective on South Africa's transformation. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2935] Tavis talks with Rawn James, Jr., attorney and author of The Double V. The son and grandson of African American vets, James examines the significance of the landmark executive order signed by President Truman integrating the military. Tavis also talks with jazz saxophonist Dave Koz. The multiple Grammy nominee talks about his latest project, the CD, "Dave Koz and Friends Summer Horns." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    Asia This Week [#313] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 am
    European Journal [#3126] A Special Look at Europe's Newest Eu Member Croatia: The Smallest City in the World: The smallest city in the world, Hum in Istria in northwest Croatia, is about to become a part of the European Union. The medieval town overlooking the Mima Valley is a popular tourist destination. The people of Hum hope that EU membership will generate more income from tourism. Hum only has about 25 permanent residents. They pride themselves on their openness and hospitality. But they do have some concerns about joining the EU and giving up some of their recently gained sovereignty. Croatia: Traces of the Past: Since the founding of the EU, Croatia will become the first member to have experienced protracted war on its own soil in recent history. In the east of the country, in Vukovar, the damage is still visible. And reconciliation between the divided ethnic groups is still a long way off. The Croatian government has recently made small concessions to Serbs in the country. Road signs in communities with a high percentage of Serbs will be in Cyrillic along with Latin letters. Civilian groups in Croatia have consistently pushed for the extradition of war criminals. But Vukovar seems to remain an open wound. And for the most part, Serbs and Croats there avoid each other. Croatia: Welcome to the Club: Croatia will become the 28th member of the EU. And in these times of the Euro crisis, Croatia's delegates heading for the European Parliament in Brussels will be joining a quarrelsome group. Britain has been thinking out loud about leaving the EU. German-French relations are cooler than ever. And German Chancellor Angela Merkel has irked her southern European partners with her austerity measures. Croatiahas selected 12 delegates to the European Parliament, five of them from the governing Social Democrats. They will serve for only a year as all EU citizens elect a new parliament in 2014. Bosnia: Sitting on Packed Suitcases: The boundaries of the European Union move outward again with the accession of Croatia. 1,000 kilometers of EU boundary will now run between Croatia and Bosnia-Herzegovina - and many Bosnian Croats who now hold Croatian passports will automatically be given EU citizenship. Croatia aids its ethnic countrymen in Bosnia to the tune of 10 million euros a year. Many Bosnian Croats have a Croatian passport and are already availing themselves of educational or employment opportunities in Croatia. Many hope they will now be able to move more freely to other EU countries. But that may lead to even more people, even whole villages, emigrating from Bosnia-Herzegovina. Italy: A New Melting Pot : The neighboring country of Italy is eagerly awaiting Croatian membership in the EU. Many people in northeastern Italy have Croatian roots. If the customs borders fall, the region will be better integrated with regions that in former times belonged to Venice. There are many Italians of Croatian descent In the area around Trieste whose families were driven out of Croatia after World War Two. The question of compensation for confiscated Italian property has never been resolved; and now many Italians hope to be able to settle in or open up shop in Croatia. duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 am
    Broadside [#101] Emerging Empires Collide, Part 1 This program employs talented actors in 17th-century settings, large-scale re-enactments, animation and scholarly interviews to capture the drama and intrigue as two nations fight for prosperity abroad and face demands for religious freedom at home. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 pm
    Broadside [#102] Emerging Empires Collide, Part 2 (see description in part 1) duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    Aspen Institute Presents [#203] Solving The Economic Puzzle One day the employment rate and stock market are up, and the next they are down. On the third episode of The Aspen Institute Presents, Solving the Economic Puzzle focuses on the creation of jobs in conventional and creative ways in the abstract and not-so-abstract concept of economy. Host Hari Sreenivasan of PBS NewsHour attends the conversation on The Challenge of Building American Jobs with professor Austan Goolsbee, former U.S. Secretary of Labor Elaine L. Chao, "Behind the Kitchen Door" author Saru Jayaraman, editor-in-chief Kevin J. Delaney of Quartz and American Action Forum's president Douglas Holtz-Eakin. Also, Walter Isaacson of The Aspen Institute speaks with Kickstarter founder Perry Chen in Kickstarter and the Economics of Creativity to discuss the project, and its effects on the creative field and "starving artists." duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#4067] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#9131] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2936] Tavis talks with TransAfrica president Nicole Lee. The official liaison between the Mandela family and the world's media, Lee assesses the president's trip to Africa & his efforts to re-engage with countries there both economically and emotionally. Tavis also talks with the former US ambassador to South Africa James A. Joseph. The only American ambassador to present his credentials to President Nelson Mandela offers his unique perspective on South Africa's transformation. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32150] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, from Cairo to Brazil to China and Europe. What does all this instability mean for your money? And, why are buyers snapping up new cars and trucks at a pace not seen since before the recession? duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10702] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32150] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, from Cairo to Brazil to China and Europe. What does all this instability mean for your money? And, why are buyers snapping up new cars and trucks at a pace not seen since before the recession? duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2242] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#4067] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3372] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10702] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3372] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#19137] (original broadcast date: 7/02/13)
    * A discussion about Japan and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe with Richard McGregor of the Financial Times, Kurt Campbell, Chairman and CEO of the Asia Group, Ian Bremmer of the Eurasia Group and Martin Fackler, the Tokyo bureau chief for the New York Times
    * actor Johnny Depp on "The Lone Ranger"
    duration 56:47   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3372] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2937] Tavis talks with Bishop Rance Allen, founder of gospel music innovators The Rance Allen Group. The gospel great recounts the rise to fame of his Grammy-nominated contemporary group and reflects on still going strong with the release of "Amazing Grace". duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3372] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#609] Still in New York City, the team interviews Roger Thomas, a capella musical director and musician. Arriving in Boston, the team visits inventor and futurist Ray Kurzweil before driving on to Portland, Maine, their last stop. In Maine, they interview sailor Bruce Schwab, who is the first American to complete the round-the-world Vendee Globe Race. Wrapping up their roadtrip, the team reflects on 6 weeks of eye-opening and life-changing experiences and prepare to head back to Australia to define their own roads in life. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3372] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10702] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3372] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2242] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10702] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32150] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, from Cairo to Brazil to China and Europe. What does all this instability mean for your money? And, why are buyers snapping up new cars and trucks at a pace not seen since before the recession? duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2936] Tavis talks with TransAfrica president Nicole Lee. The official liaison between the Mandela family and the world's media, Lee assesses the president's trip to Africa & his efforts to re-engage with countries there both economically and emotionally. Tavis also talks with the former US ambassador to South Africa James A. Joseph. The only American ambassador to present his credentials to President Nelson Mandela offers his unique perspective on South Africa's transformation. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Frontline [#2603] The Undertaking Frontline enters the world of Thomas Lynch, a poet and undertaker whose family for three generations has cared for both the living and the dead in a small Michigan town. Through the intimate stories of families coming to terms with grief, mortality, and a funeral's rituals, the film illuminates the heartbreak and beauty in the journey taken between the living and the dead when someone dies. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#4068] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2937] Tavis talks with Bishop Rance Allen, founder of gospel music innovators The Rance Allen Group. The gospel great recounts the rise to fame of his Grammy-nominated contemporary group and reflects on still going strong with the release of "Amazing Grace". duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Asian Voices [#205] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Asia Biz Forecast [#413] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Eating Alabama This documentary is a story about why food matters. In search of a simpler life, a young couple returns home to Alabama where they set out to eat the way their grandparents did - locally and seasonally. But as they navigate the agro-industrial gastronomical complex, they soon realize that nearly everything about the food system has changed since farmers once populated their family histories. And the plan to eat only locally-grown food, in-season, upends their lives. The film is a thoughtful and often funny essay on community, the South and sustainability. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 6:00 am
    Wind Gods This thrilling, action-packed documentary tells the story of the 33rd America's Cup yacht race, in which Oracle Corporation owner Larry Ellison's American yacht USA-17, representing the Golden Gate Yacht Club, defeated the Swiss-owned Alinghi 5 yacht of Italian entrepreneur Ernesto Bertarelli. Beautifully shot with unique footage of the famous race, the film documents Ellison's effort to bring the America's Cup back to the United States after 18 years. It is a powerful celebration of life on the ocean, and the men and women who spend their lives seeking to conquer it. Directed by Peabody-award winner Fritz Mitchell and produced by Skydance Productions, the soaring orchestral score by composer Pinar Toprak received the International Film Music Critics Association Award for Best Documentary Score in 2011. duration 55:40   SRND51 TVG
  • 7:00 am
    Aspen Institute Presents [#204] Reinventing Television Television isn't just television; watch everything from news to comedies to sports and more at the touch of your finger via a television set, computer, tablet or smartphone now and later. The Aspen Institute Presents: Reinventing Television and host Jon Stewart of the BBC bring the best of three Aspen Ideas Festival sessions spotlighting the ever changing medium of television. Moderated by The Atlantic's James Fallows, the panel of Executive Director of International Operations Ehab Al Shihabi of Al Jazeera, lawyer Robert Barnett, MSNBC host Lawrence O'Donnell, Hari Sreenivasan of PBS NewsHour (and one of the hosts of The Aspen Institute Presents) talk about Can TV News Compete? against social media. A technologies, trends and innovations conversation with Twitter's Dick Costolo, former FFC Chairman Julius Genachowski and CEO Michael Lynton of Sony with Jerry Murdock looks to The Future of Your TV. Also, novelist and public radio host Kurt Andersen dissects What Do TV Shows Tell Us about Ourselves? with award-winning writer and producer James L. Brooks (Mary Tyler Moore, Taxi, The Simpsons). duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    Frontline [#2603] The Undertaking Frontline enters the world of Thomas Lynch, a poet and undertaker whose family for three generations has cared for both the living and the dead in a small Michigan town. Through the intimate stories of families coming to terms with grief, mortality, and a funeral's rituals, the film illuminates the heartbreak and beauty in the journey taken between the living and the dead when someone dies. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2937] Tavis talks with Bishop Rance Allen, founder of gospel music innovators The Rance Allen Group. The gospel great recounts the rise to fame of his Grammy-nominated contemporary group and reflects on still going strong with the release of "Amazing Grace". duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2936] Tavis talks with TransAfrica president Nicole Lee. The official liaison between the Mandela family and the world's media, Lee assesses the president's trip to Africa & his efforts to re-engage with countries there both economically and emotionally. Tavis also talks with the former US ambassador to South Africa James A. Joseph. The only American ambassador to present his credentials to President Nelson Mandela offers his unique perspective on South Africa's transformation. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    Asian Voices [#205] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 am
    Asia Biz Forecast [#413] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 am
    Eating Alabama This documentary is a story about why food matters. In search of a simpler life, a young couple returns home to Alabama where they set out to eat the way their grandparents did - locally and seasonally. But as they navigate the agro-industrial gastronomical complex, they soon realize that nearly everything about the food system has changed since farmers once populated their family histories. And the plan to eat only locally-grown food, in-season, upends their lives. The film is a thoughtful and often funny essay on community, the South and sustainability. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 12:00 pm
    Wind Gods This thrilling, action-packed documentary tells the story of the 33rd America's Cup yacht race, in which Oracle Corporation owner Larry Ellison's American yacht USA-17, representing the Golden Gate Yacht Club, defeated the Swiss-owned Alinghi 5 yacht of Italian entrepreneur Ernesto Bertarelli. Beautifully shot with unique footage of the famous race, the film documents Ellison's effort to bring the America's Cup back to the United States after 18 years. It is a powerful celebration of life on the ocean, and the men and women who spend their lives seeking to conquer it. Directed by Peabody-award winner Fritz Mitchell and produced by Skydance Productions, the soaring orchestral score by composer Pinar Toprak received the International Film Music Critics Association Award for Best Documentary Score in 2011. duration 55:40   SRND51 TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Aspen Institute Presents [#204] Reinventing Television Television isn't just television; watch everything from news to comedies to sports and more at the touch of your finger via a television set, computer, tablet or smartphone now and later. The Aspen Institute Presents: Reinventing Television and host Jon Stewart of the BBC bring the best of three Aspen Ideas Festival sessions spotlighting the ever changing medium of television. Moderated by The Atlantic's James Fallows, the panel of Executive Director of International Operations Ehab Al Shihabi of Al Jazeera, lawyer Robert Barnett, MSNBC host Lawrence O'Donnell, Hari Sreenivasan of PBS NewsHour (and one of the hosts of The Aspen Institute Presents) talk about Can TV News Compete? against social media. A technologies, trends and innovations conversation with Twitter's Dick Costolo, former FFC Chairman Julius Genachowski and CEO Michael Lynton of Sony with Jerry Murdock looks to The Future of Your TV. Also, novelist and public radio host Kurt Andersen dissects What Do TV Shows Tell Us about Ourselves? with award-winning writer and producer James L. Brooks (Mary Tyler Moore, Taxi, The Simpsons). duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#4068] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#9132] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2937] Tavis talks with Bishop Rance Allen, founder of gospel music innovators The Rance Allen Group. The gospel great recounts the rise to fame of his Grammy-nominated contemporary group and reflects on still going strong with the release of "Amazing Grace". duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32151] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the big June jobs report - the Federal Reserve watches it closely. NBR will look at what a strong or weak number could mean for the economy, markets and fed policy. Plus, the business community reacts to the delay of a key provision in the Affordable Care Act. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10703] Egyptian Military Ousts President Mohammed Morsi * The Obama Administration Gives Delays Employer Health Insurance Mandate * Speculation About Edward Snowden's Whereabouts Lead to Diplomatic Drama * One Group's Heroic Efforts to Help the Victims of a Deadly Factory Collapse * Murder Trial of Notorious Mob Boss "Whitey" Bulger Continues in Boston duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32151] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the big June jobs report - the Federal Reserve watches it closely. NBR will look at what a strong or weak number could mean for the economy, markets and fed policy. Plus, the business community reacts to the delay of a key provision in the Affordable Care Act. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2243] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#4068] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3373] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10703] Egyptian Military Ousts President Mohammed Morsi * The Obama Administration Gives Delays Employer Health Insurance Mandate * Speculation About Edward Snowden's Whereabouts Lead to Diplomatic Drama * One Group's Heroic Efforts to Help the Victims of a Deadly Factory Collapse * Murder Trial of Notorious Mob Boss "Whitey" Bulger Continues in Boston duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3373] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#19138] (original broadcast date: 7/03/13)
    * Continued coverage of protest in Egypt and the removal of Mohammed Morsi as president with David Ignatius of the Washington Post; David Kirkpatrick, Cairo bureau chief for the New York Times; Ed Husain, Senior Fellow for Middle Eastern Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations; Fouad Ajami, fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution and Naguib Sawiris, chairman of Orascom Telecom and a leading opposition figure.
    * protests in Brazil with Larry Rohter, the former Rio de Janeiro bureau chief for the New York Times and Newsweek, Ruchir Sharma, the author of "Breakout Nations" and head of emerging markets and global macro at Morgan Stanley and Paulo Sotero, director of the Brazil Institute of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.
    duration 56:47   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3373] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2938] Tavis talks with W. Richard West Jr., president and CEO of the Autry National Center of the American West. West explains his mission to tell the compelling story of the American West and the people who created its history and shape the present and future. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3373] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#701H] Meet Team "Tabula Rasa" and follow their first attempts at cold calling, from local restaurants to the White House, hoping to speak with Michelle Obama. They meet each other and their RV for the first time in Southern California, before heading to interview Christian Jacobs, lead singer of The Aquabats, and co-creator, writer, and director of the hugely popular Yo Gabba Gabba pre-school television show. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3373] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10703] Egyptian Military Ousts President Mohammed Morsi * The Obama Administration Gives Delays Employer Health Insurance Mandate * Speculation About Edward Snowden's Whereabouts Lead to Diplomatic Drama * One Group's Heroic Efforts to Help the Victims of a Deadly Factory Collapse * Murder Trial of Notorious Mob Boss "Whitey" Bulger Continues in Boston duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3373] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2243] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10703] Egyptian Military Ousts President Mohammed Morsi * The Obama Administration Gives Delays Employer Health Insurance Mandate * Speculation About Edward Snowden's Whereabouts Lead to Diplomatic Drama * One Group's Heroic Efforts to Help the Victims of a Deadly Factory Collapse * Murder Trial of Notorious Mob Boss "Whitey" Bulger Continues in Boston duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32151] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the big June jobs report - the Federal Reserve watches it closely. NBR will look at what a strong or weak number could mean for the economy, markets and fed policy. Plus, the business community reacts to the delay of a key provision in the Affordable Care Act. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2937] Tavis talks with Bishop Rance Allen, founder of gospel music innovators The Rance Allen Group. The gospel great recounts the rise to fame of his Grammy-nominated contemporary group and reflects on still going strong with the release of "Amazing Grace". duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Forgotten War: The Struggle for North America 250 years ago, three powers clashed in an epic struggle for North America. Often overshadowed by the American Revolution, the French and Indian War (1755-1760) determined which great European empire would control the Ohio River Valley, the gateway to the West, and the crucial highway of rivers and lakes connecting New York and Montreal. This documentary recounts the little-known story of how the Indian nations of the Northeast controlled the outcome of this war. An international panel of experts dig beneath the familiar history and shed new light on this long-ago conflict. The program follows the fates of the Abenaki and Iroquois people, separates fact from the myth of Robert Rogers and his legendary Rangers and chronicles the "massacre" at Fort William Henry, the battles of Fort Ticonderoga and Crown Point, the tragic expulsion of the Acadians and the fall of Quebec and Montreal. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#4069] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2938] Tavis talks with W. Richard West Jr., president and CEO of the Autry National Center of the American West. West explains his mission to tell the compelling story of the American West and the people who created its history and shape the present and future. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Scully/The World Show [#1609] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 4:30 am
    Second Opinion [#901] Grief After a loss, grief is the natural process of recovery. From losing a job to the death of a loved one, it is important to learn how to process feelings in a healthy way. A panel of experts is joined by Terry Congdon, a father whose daughter was tragically killed, as he offers insights into working through the emotions of grief. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Boyhood Shadows "One in six boys is sexually molested by the age of 16." This documentary tells a gripping story that began with Glenn as a young boy under the power of a sexual predator. The narrative chronicles Glenn's struggle as he tries to make sense of this abuse and his life, telling no one. After suffering decades of addiction, Glenn breaks the silence, describing his past... funny, poignant, sad... poignant, sad... finally gaining redemption. Glenn claims he is alive today because he finally spoke out about his abuse, "There is no shame in being a victim!" Today he directs a sober living facility in Los Angeles. duration 59:00   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 6:00 am
    POV [#2602H] Special Flight A dramatic account of the plight of undocumented foreigners at the Frambois detention center in Geneva, Switzerland, and of the wardens who struggle to reconcile humane values with the harsh realities of a strict deportation system. The 25 Frambois inmates featured are among the thousands of asylum seekers and illegal immigrants imprisoned without charge or trial, and facing deportation to their native countries, where they fear repression or even death. The film, made in Switzerland, is an expose of the contradictions between the country's compassionate social policies and the intractability of its immigration laws. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 7:00 am
    Aspen Institute Presents [#205] Privacy, Safety, and the Law Privacy or Safety? The continuing talk of the controversial issue is brought into question in the fifth and final episode of WORLD Channel's second season of The Aspen Institute Presents. The BBC's Jon Stewart hosts Privacy, Safety, and the Law, which weighs the importance of privacy and safety for both the government and citizens of the United States. National security experts, including former U.S. Representative of California Jane Harman, The Aspen Institute's Executive Vice President Elliott Gerson, former U.S. naval Vice Admiral Mike McConnell and national correspondent James Fallows of The Atlantic contribute to the conversation on if We Are Safe? in the nation. Legal commentator Jeffrey Rossen debates law professor Tim Wu over Matter of Debate: Is Privacy Paramount or Should We Live in a Transparent Society?, moderated by Jim Halpert. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    Forgotten War: The Struggle for North America 250 years ago, three powers clashed in an epic struggle for North America. Often overshadowed by the American Revolution, the French and Indian War (1755-1760) determined which great European empire would control the Ohio River Valley, the gateway to the West, and the crucial highway of rivers and lakes connecting New York and Montreal. This documentary recounts the little-known story of how the Indian nations of the Northeast controlled the outcome of this war. An international panel of experts dig beneath the familiar history and shed new light on this long-ago conflict. The program follows the fates of the Abenaki and Iroquois people, separates fact from the myth of Robert Rogers and his legendary Rangers and chronicles the "massacre" at Fort William Henry, the battles of Fort Ticonderoga and Crown Point, the tragic expulsion of the Acadians and the fall of Quebec and Montreal. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2938] Tavis talks with W. Richard West Jr., president and CEO of the Autry National Center of the American West. West explains his mission to tell the compelling story of the American West and the people who created its history and shape the present and future. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2937] Tavis talks with Bishop Rance Allen, founder of gospel music innovators The Rance Allen Group. The gospel great recounts the rise to fame of his Grammy-nominated contemporary group and reflects on still going strong with the release of "Amazing Grace". duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    Scully/The World Show [#1609] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:30 am
    Second Opinion [#901] Grief After a loss, grief is the natural process of recovery. From losing a job to the death of a loved one, it is important to learn how to process feelings in a healthy way. A panel of experts is joined by Terry Congdon, a father whose daughter was tragically killed, as he offers insights into working through the emotions of grief. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 am
    Boyhood Shadows "One in six boys is sexually molested by the age of 16." This documentary tells a gripping story that began with Glenn as a young boy under the power of a sexual predator. The narrative chronicles Glenn's struggle as he tries to make sense of this abuse and his life, telling no one. After suffering decades of addiction, Glenn breaks the silence, describing his past... funny, poignant, sad... poignant, sad... finally gaining redemption. Glenn claims he is alive today because he finally spoke out about his abuse, "There is no shame in being a victim!" Today he directs a sober living facility in Los Angeles. duration 59:00   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 pm
    POV [#2602H] Special Flight A dramatic account of the plight of undocumented foreigners at the Frambois detention center in Geneva, Switzerland, and of the wardens who struggle to reconcile humane values with the harsh realities of a strict deportation system. The 25 Frambois inmates featured are among the thousands of asylum seekers and illegal immigrants imprisoned without charge or trial, and facing deportation to their native countries, where they fear repression or even death. The film, made in Switzerland, is an expose of the contradictions between the country's compassionate social policies and the intractability of its immigration laws. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 1:00 pm
    Aspen Institute Presents [#205] Privacy, Safety, and the Law Privacy or Safety? The continuing talk of the controversial issue is brought into question in the fifth and final episode of WORLD Channel's second season of The Aspen Institute Presents. The BBC's Jon Stewart hosts Privacy, Safety, and the Law, which weighs the importance of privacy and safety for both the government and citizens of the United States. National security experts, including former U.S. Representative of California Jane Harman, The Aspen Institute's Executive Vice President Elliott Gerson, former U.S. naval Vice Admiral Mike McConnell and national correspondent James Fallows of The Atlantic contribute to the conversation on if We Are Safe? in the nation. Legal commentator Jeffrey Rossen debates law professor Tim Wu over Matter of Debate: Is Privacy Paramount or Should We Live in a Transparent Society?, moderated by Jim Halpert. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#4069] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#9133] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2938] Tavis talks with W. Richard West Jr., president and CEO of the Autry National Center of the American West. West explains his mission to tell the compelling story of the American West and the people who created its history and shape the present and future. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32152] Tonight on a special Fourth of July edition of Nightly Business Report, NBR looks ahead to the next three months. NBR will examine some of the top sectors - from housing to the consumer, energy and defense - to see how they may impact the economy and your investments. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10704] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32152] Tonight on a special Fourth of July edition of Nightly Business Report, NBR looks ahead to the next three months. NBR will examine some of the top sectors - from housing to the consumer, energy and defense - to see how they may impact the economy and your investments. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2244] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#4069] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3374] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10704] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3374] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#19139] (original broadcast date: 7/04/13)
    David McCullough, American historian and best-selling author.
    duration 56:47   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3374] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2939] Tavis revisits his conversation with history-making NBA head coach, aka the "Zen Master," Phil Jackson, which took place during the recent playoffs, and who sparks controversy with his new text, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success. (originally broadcast 6/05/13) duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3374] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#702H] Traveling up Highway 101 to San Francisco, the team takes in the iconic sights of the West coast, from sea lions to the Golden Gate Bridge, before stopping to speak with Aleks Zavaleta, Executive Director of Loco Bloco, a community outreach program. In Sebastopol they interview Jay Shafer, designer of Tumbleweed Tiny Homes, sustainable homes as small as 65 square feet, whose home makes the RV seem spacious. Continuing into the Pacific Northwest, the team is invited into the home of Lori Pappas, CEO of Global Team for Local Initiatives, an Ethiopian aid organization. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3374] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10704] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3374] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2244] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10704] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32152] Tonight on a special Fourth of July edition of Nightly Business Report, NBR looks ahead to the next three months. NBR will examine some of the top sectors - from housing to the consumer, energy and defense - to see how they may impact the economy and your investments. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2938] Tavis talks with W. Richard West Jr., president and CEO of the Autry National Center of the American West. West explains his mission to tell the compelling story of the American West and the people who created its history and shape the present and future. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Wind Gods This thrilling, action-packed documentary tells the story of the 33rd America's Cup yacht race, in which Oracle Corporation owner Larry Ellison's American yacht USA-17, representing the Golden Gate Yacht Club, defeated the Swiss-owned Alinghi 5 yacht of Italian entrepreneur Ernesto Bertarelli. Beautifully shot with unique footage of the famous race, the film documents Ellison's effort to bring the America's Cup back to the United States after 18 years. It is a powerful celebration of life on the ocean, and the men and women who spend their lives seeking to conquer it. Directed by Peabody-award winner Fritz Mitchell and produced by Skydance Productions, the soaring orchestral score by composer Pinar Toprak received the International Film Music Critics Association Award for Best Documentary Score in 2011. duration 55:40   SRND51 TVG
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#4070] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2939] Tavis revisits his conversation with history-making NBA head coach, aka the "Zen Master," Phil Jackson, which took place during the recent playoffs, and who sparks controversy with his new text, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success. (originally broadcast 6/05/13) duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 4:00 am
    Well Read [#110] Karl Marlantes, What It Is Like to Go to War Marlantes says our soldiers are well trained to kill, but less well trained to live with it afterward. He writes from personal experience as a decorated Vietnam vet. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Great Decisions In Foreign Policy [#407] The Generals and the Democrat: Myanmar In Transition Controlled by a military junta, the nation of Burma, or Myanmar, has long been isolated as an international pariah state. But a flicker of hope for many Burmese has been Aung San Suu Kyi, who's spent decades defying military leaders in her quest for democracy. Now, the generals have started to implement a series of democratic and economic reforms - which the US and other Western powers have welcomed overwhelmingly. But are Myanmar's military leaders serious about reform? And is Aung San Suu Kyi the one to lead Burma through what could be a rocky transition from international outcast to Asian "tiger?" duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 am
    Nova [#3714] Dogs Decoded Dogs have been domesticated for longer than any other animal on the planet and humans have developed a unique relationship with these furry friends. We treat our pets like a part of the family and we feel that they can understand us in a way other animals cannot. Now, new research is revealing what dog lovers have suspected all along: dogs have an uncanny ability to read and respond to human emotions. What is surprising, however, is new research showing that humans, in turn, respond to dogs with the same hormone responsible for bonding mothers to their babies. How did this incredible relationship between humans and dogs come to be? And how can dogs, so closely related to fearsome wild wolves, behave so differently? It's all in the genes. "Dogs Decoded" investigates new discoveries in genetics that are illuminating the origin of dogs -- with revealing implications for the evolution of human culture as well. NOVA also travels to Siberia, where the mystery of dogs' domestication is being repeated -- in foxes. A 50-year-old breeding program is creating an entirely new kind of creature, a tame fox with some surprising similarities to man's best friend. This film reveals the science behind the remarkable bond between humans and their dogs and spurs new questions about what this could mean for our relationships with other animal species. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 6:00 am
    Secrets of the Dead [#1003] The Silver Pharaoh The royal tomb of Pharaoh Psusennes I is one of the most spectacular of all the ancient Egyptian treasures - even more remarkable than that of Tutankhamen. So why hasn't the world heard about it? What mysteries does it contain? And what does it reveal about ancient Egypt? The tomb was discovered filled with lavish jewels and treasure almost by accident in 1939 by the French archaeologist Pierre Montet while he was excavating in northern Egypt..The royal burial chamber came as a complete surprise no Egyptologist had anticipated a tomb of such grandeur in this area. Unfortunately, the tomb was found on the eve of World War II in Europe and attracted little attention. One of the most startling discoveries inside the tomb was the sarcophagus in which the body was held: It was made of silver with exquisite detail and craftsmanship. No other silver sarcophagus has ever been found and it is now recognized by many Egyptologists as one of the most exquisite artifacts of ancient Egypt ever to be found. The elaborate tribute within the tomb suggested it was the burial site of someone very important but as archaeologists, using the hieroglyphs inside the tomb, pieced together the identity of the pharaoh, they were left to wonder who Psuesennes I was and why he received such grand treatment. The investigation reveals political intrigue, a lost city and a leader who united a country in turmoil and became the Silver Pharaoh. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Secrets of the Dead [#1103] China's Terracotta Warriors The extraordinary story of China's 8,000 terracotta warriors begins two centuries before the birth of Christ. The First Emperor of China was preparing an extravagant tomb for his journey into the afterlife, and decreed that he be protected forever by a monumental army. But how was a terracotta army of this size made in less than two years using the technology of 2200 years ago? Led by archaeologist Agnes Hsu, the investigation shows that the Chinese may have used assembly lines to produce the 8,000-strong terracotta army. After the revelation of what the army really looked like when it was buried, archaeologists use biometric analysis to find out if these clay soldiers were individually modeled on living men. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-V (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    Wind Gods This thrilling, action-packed documentary tells the story of the 33rd America's Cup yacht race, in which Oracle Corporation owner Larry Ellison's American yacht USA-17, representing the Golden Gate Yacht Club, defeated the Swiss-owned Alinghi 5 yacht of Italian entrepreneur Ernesto Bertarelli. Beautifully shot with unique footage of the famous race, the film documents Ellison's effort to bring the America's Cup back to the United States after 18 years. It is a powerful celebration of life on the ocean, and the men and women who spend their lives seeking to conquer it. Directed by Peabody-award winner Fritz Mitchell and produced by Skydance Productions, the soaring orchestral score by composer Pinar Toprak received the International Film Music Critics Association Award for Best Documentary Score in 2011. duration 55:40   SRND51 TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2939] Tavis revisits his conversation with history-making NBA head coach, aka the "Zen Master," Phil Jackson, which took place during the recent playoffs, and who sparks controversy with his new text, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success. (originally broadcast 6/05/13) duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2938] Tavis talks with W. Richard West Jr., president and CEO of the Autry National Center of the American West. West explains his mission to tell the compelling story of the American West and the people who created its history and shape the present and future. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    Well Read [#110] Karl Marlantes, What It Is Like to Go to War Marlantes says our soldiers are well trained to kill, but less well trained to live with it afterward. He writes from personal experience as a decorated Vietnam vet. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 am
    Great Decisions In Foreign Policy [#407] The Generals and the Democrat: Myanmar In Transition Controlled by a military junta, the nation of Burma, or Myanmar, has long been isolated as an international pariah state. But a flicker of hope for many Burmese has been Aung San Suu Kyi, who's spent decades defying military leaders in her quest for democracy. Now, the generals have started to implement a series of democratic and economic reforms - which the US and other Western powers have welcomed overwhelmingly. But are Myanmar's military leaders serious about reform? And is Aung San Suu Kyi the one to lead Burma through what could be a rocky transition from international outcast to Asian "tiger?" duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 am
    Nova [#3714] Dogs Decoded Dogs have been domesticated for longer than any other animal on the planet and humans have developed a unique relationship with these furry friends. We treat our pets like a part of the family and we feel that they can understand us in a way other animals cannot. Now, new research is revealing what dog lovers have suspected all along: dogs have an uncanny ability to read and respond to human emotions. What is surprising, however, is new research showing that humans, in turn, respond to dogs with the same hormone responsible for bonding mothers to their babies. How did this incredible relationship between humans and dogs come to be? And how can dogs, so closely related to fearsome wild wolves, behave so differently? It's all in the genes. "Dogs Decoded" investigates new discoveries in genetics that are illuminating the origin of dogs -- with revealing implications for the evolution of human culture as well. NOVA also travels to Siberia, where the mystery of dogs' domestication is being repeated -- in foxes. A 50-year-old breeding program is creating an entirely new kind of creature, a tame fox with some surprising similarities to man's best friend. This film reveals the science behind the remarkable bond between humans and their dogs and spurs new questions about what this could mean for our relationships with other animal species. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 pm
    Secrets of the Dead [#1003] The Silver Pharaoh The royal tomb of Pharaoh Psusennes I is one of the most spectacular of all the ancient Egyptian treasures - even more remarkable than that of Tutankhamen. So why hasn't the world heard about it? What mysteries does it contain? And what does it reveal about ancient Egypt? The tomb was discovered filled with lavish jewels and treasure almost by accident in 1939 by the French archaeologist Pierre Montet while he was excavating in northern Egypt..The royal burial chamber came as a complete surprise no Egyptologist had anticipated a tomb of such grandeur in this area. Unfortunately, the tomb was found on the eve of World War II in Europe and attracted little attention. One of the most startling discoveries inside the tomb was the sarcophagus in which the body was held: It was made of silver with exquisite detail and craftsmanship. No other silver sarcophagus has ever been found and it is now recognized by many Egyptologists as one of the most exquisite artifacts of ancient Egypt ever to be found. The elaborate tribute within the tomb suggested it was the burial site of someone very important but as archaeologists, using the hieroglyphs inside the tomb, pieced together the identity of the pharaoh, they were left to wonder who Psuesennes I was and why he received such grand treatment. The investigation reveals political intrigue, a lost city and a leader who united a country in turmoil and became the Silver Pharaoh. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    Secrets of the Dead [#1103] China's Terracotta Warriors The extraordinary story of China's 8,000 terracotta warriors begins two centuries before the birth of Christ. The First Emperor of China was preparing an extravagant tomb for his journey into the afterlife, and decreed that he be protected forever by a monumental army. But how was a terracotta army of this size made in less than two years using the technology of 2200 years ago? Led by archaeologist Agnes Hsu, the investigation shows that the Chinese may have used assembly lines to produce the 8,000-strong terracotta army. After the revelation of what the army really looked like when it was buried, archaeologists use biometric analysis to find out if these clay soldiers were individually modeled on living men. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-V (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#4070] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#9134] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2939] Tavis revisits his conversation with history-making NBA head coach, aka the "Zen Master," Phil Jackson, which took place during the recent playoffs, and who sparks controversy with his new text, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success. (originally broadcast 6/05/13) duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32153Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report.. The economy added 195,000 jobs in June. We'll take a look at what the better than expected number means for the economy, the markets and your investments. And, with college costs skyrocketing and wages stagnant, many recent graduates are wondering if their degrees are worth it. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10705H] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32153Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report.. The economy added 195,000 jobs in June. We'll take a look at what the better than expected number means for the economy, the markets and your investments. And, with college costs skyrocketing and wages stagnant, many recent graduates are wondering if their degrees are worth it. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2245] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    BBC Newsnight [#17186Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3375] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10705H] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3375] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#19140] (original broadcast date: 7/05/13)
    * Bob Bowman, Chief Executive Officer of MLB Advanced Media, L.P. (MLB.com/Major League Baseball Advanced Media)
    * Christian Louboutin, French footwear designer whose footwear has incorporated shiny, red-lacquered soles that have become his signature.
    duration 56:47   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3375] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2940] Tavis talks with college professor Temple Grandin about her autism and her work with animal behavior. A leader of the autism advocacy movement, Grandin shares some of her own experiences with the disorder, as detailed in her book, The Autistic Brain. Tavis also talks with Oscar-nominated actress Toni Collette. Winner of several best actress awards for her star turn in United States of Tara, Collette describes her latest film, The Way, Way Back, and her return to series TV. duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3375] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#703H] The team drives into Canada to meet Heather Cameron, prop stylist and story producer, in Vancouver, British Columbia, to discover how she created her own path in life, combining nature, home, beauty, and photography. From there, they travel to Jackson Hole, Wyoming, where they have a chance encounter with cowboy and horse trainer, Grant Golliher of the Diamond Cross Ranch, who challenges them to face their fears and discover more about themselves. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3375] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10705H] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3375] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2245] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10705H] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32153Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report.. The economy added 195,000 jobs in June. We'll take a look at what the better than expected number means for the economy, the markets and your investments. And, with college costs skyrocketing and wages stagnant, many recent graduates are wondering if their degrees are worth it. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2939] Tavis revisits his conversation with history-making NBA head coach, aka the "Zen Master," Phil Jackson, which took place during the recent playoffs, and who sparks controversy with his new text, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success. (originally broadcast 6/05/13) duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 2:00 am
    Eating Alabama This documentary is a story about why food matters. In search of a simpler life, a young couple returns home to Alabama where they set out to eat the way their grandparents did - locally and seasonally. But as they navigate the agro-industrial gastronomical complex, they soon realize that nearly everything about the food system has changed since farmers once populated their family histories. And the plan to eat only locally-grown food, in-season, upends their lives. The film is a thoughtful and often funny essay on community, the South and sustainability. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1644] CHICAGO MUSLIM COMMUNITY BUILDING - In a troubled neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Rami Nashashibi, a University of Chicago Ph.D., started the Inner City Muslim Action Network, IMAN, to provide the quality of life services that make a community a community. Lucky Severson reports on IMAN, the services it provides and its work with other faiths to improve the lives of the people of Chicago Lawn.
    BANGLADESH WORKER JUSTICE - In the wake of a building collapse in Bangladesh that left more than 1000 garment workers dead, Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Dhaka, Bangladesh on that country's dependence on the garment manufacturing industry, the second largest in the world and the price its low-wage workforce pays to maintain the country's powerful garment industry.
    HEARTBEAT - The Jerusalem-based band Heartbeat - whose musicians are both Israelis and Palestinians, and all of whom are between 17 and 21 - was on tour earlier this year in the US. RENW talked with them both about their music and about their absolute conviction that the transformative power of music can lead to mutual understanding and peace.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1002] Women, Investing & Retirement Part, 2 In part two of Consuelo Mack WealthTrack's women, investing and retirement series, award-winning financial advisor Erin Botsford and retirement and social security expert Mary Beth Franklin discuss the kinds of financial products women need to have a secure retirement. duration 27:26   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2217H] EGYPTIAN UPRISING - the increase of sexual assault during Egypt's movement to oust Morsi.
    WOMEN SILENCED IN MOVIES - Why women's role in the film industry is not progressing.
    POVERTY IN THE SUBURBS - Poverty is becoming more prevalent in suburban areas rather than urban and rural areas.
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), President of National Network to End Domestic Violence Kim Gandy, Republican Strategist Rina Shah, Hadley Heath of the Independent Women's Forum.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#205] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Statue of Liberty This 1985 Ken Burns film chronicles the creation and history of the Statue of Liberty and what it represents to all Americans. Narrated by David McCullough, the film traces the development of the monument-- from its conception, to its complicated and often controversial construction, to its final dedication--and offers interviews with a wide range of Americans to explore the meaning of the Statue of Liberty. duration 56:46   TVPG-L
  • 6:00 am
    Mount Rushmore: American Experience High on a granite cliff in South Dakota tower the huge carved faces of four American presidents. Together they constitute the world's largest sculpture. The massive tableau inspires awe and bemusement. How, and when, was it carved? Who possessed the audacity to create such a gargantuan work? The story of Mount Rushmore's creation is as bizarre and wonderful as the monument itself. It is the story of hucksterism and hyperbole, of a massive public works project in the midst of an economic depression. And it is the story of dozens of ordinary Americans who suddenly found themselves suspended high on a cliff face with drills and hammers as a sculptor they considered insane directed them in the creation of what some would call a monstrosity and others a masterpiece. Narrated by Michael Murphy. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#226H] Surviving The New American Economy 22 years ago, Bill Moyers started documenting the story of two ordinary families in Milwaukee, Wisconsin - families whose breadwinners had lost well-paying factory jobs. Relying on the belief that hard work is the key to a good living and better life, the Stanleys and the Neumanns, like millions of others, went about pursuing the American dream. But as they found other jobs, got re-trained, and worked any time and overtime, they still found themselves on a downward slope, working harder and longer for less pay and fewer benefits, facing devastating challenges and difficult choices.
    This week, Moyers revisits his reports on the Stanleys and Neumanns - whose stories Bill updates on the July 9 Frontline report "Two American Families." He also talks with the authors of two important books about how the changing nature of the economy is affecting everyone: Barbara Miner, a public education advocate who's been following the decline of her own Milwaukee hometown for nearly 40 years; and author, activist and playwright Barbara Garson, who's published a number of books about the changing lives of working Americans. Her most recent is Down the Up Escalator: How the 99% Live in the Great Recession.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#149] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2512H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5301H] President Obama is just six months into his second term and for most of that time his ambitious agenda has been overshadowed by a number of unexpected events and controversies. From the attention on gun legislation in the wake of the Newtown school shooting, to the string of controversies involving the IRS, Justice Department and NSA leaker Edward Snowden, the president seems to be facing hurdles and distractions at every turn.
    As the president tries to focus on addressing his key legislative priorities, Washington remains extremely polarized and the partisan divide on Capitol Hill continues. Even the bipartisan immigration reform bill that passed the Senate faces an uphill battle in the House.
    The Washington stalemate isn't going unnoticed by voters. A recent Gallup Poll found nearly 4 in 5 Americans, 78%, disapprove of the way Congress is handling its job, while the President's approval ratings continue to be under 50%.
    With the Congressional midterms just 16 months away, the White House recognizes the clock is ticking and the window for Mr. Obama to advance his priorities could be closing. The same is true for lawmakers up for re-election in 2014 who are aware every vote they cast could help or hurt their chances of reelection.
    The White House is also dealing with foreign policy challenges in Syria and escalating unrest in Egypt while the draw-down of US troops from Afghanistan continues.
    Gwen Ifill examines the successes and challenges for Congress and the Obama administration over the first half of 2013 plus takes a look ahead at the economic outlook for the remainder of the year with: Susan Davis of USA Today, John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News, David Wessel of The Wall Street Journal, and Jeff Zeleny of ABC News.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    Critical Condition: California's Emergency Rooms This documentary focuses on the crisis facing emergency rooms in California, and takes a look at the impact that overcrowded emergency rooms have on doctors, nurses and ultimately patients. duration 26:32   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17186Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2217H] EGYPTIAN UPRISING - the increase of sexual assault during Egypt's movement to oust Morsi.
    WOMEN SILENCED IN MOVIES - Why women's role in the film industry is not progressing.
    POVERTY IN THE SUBURBS - Poverty is becoming more prevalent in suburban areas rather than urban and rural areas.
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), President of National Network to End Domestic Violence Kim Gandy, Republican Strategist Rina Shah, Hadley Heath of the Independent Women's Forum.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3128] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#327H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#226H] Surviving The New American Economy 22 years ago, Bill Moyers started documenting the story of two ordinary families in Milwaukee, Wisconsin - families whose breadwinners had lost well-paying factory jobs. Relying on the belief that hard work is the key to a good living and better life, the Stanleys and the Neumanns, like millions of others, went about pursuing the American dream. But as they found other jobs, got re-trained, and worked any time and overtime, they still found themselves on a downward slope, working harder and longer for less pay and fewer benefits, facing devastating challenges and difficult choices.
    This week, Moyers revisits his reports on the Stanleys and Neumanns - whose stories Bill updates on the July 9 Frontline report "Two American Families." He also talks with the authors of two important books about how the changing nature of the economy is affecting everyone: Barbara Miner, a public education advocate who's been following the decline of her own Milwaukee hometown for nearly 40 years; and author, activist and playwright Barbara Garson, who's published a number of books about the changing lives of working Americans. Her most recent is Down the Up Escalator: How the 99% Live in the Great Recession.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#317H] Illuminating Depression/The Physics of Sailing Learn why depression is more than just "feeling blue" and what makes a sail boat move? The physics of sailing present some mysteries to modern sailors. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#228] duration 25:40   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    POV [#2602H] Special Flight A dramatic account of the plight of undocumented foreigners at the Frambois detention center in Geneva, Switzerland, and of the wardens who struggle to reconcile humane values with the harsh realities of a strict deportation system. The 25 Frambois inmates featured are among the thousands of asylum seekers and illegal immigrants imprisoned without charge or trial, and facing deportation to their native countries, where they fear repression or even death. The film, made in Switzerland, is an expose of the contradictions between the country's compassionate social policies and the intractability of its immigration laws. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 3:00 pm
    Intelligence Squared [#101H] Are Elected Islamists Better Than Dictators? The popular uprisings of the Arab Spring have left a leadership void that Islamist parties have been quick to fill. A longtime supporter of former strongmen like Egypt's Mubarak and Tunisia's Ben Ali, the U. S. now faces the uncomfortable result of Arab democracy-the rise of Islamist parties that are less amenable to the West than their autocratic predecessors. Will the Islamists, who once embraced violence, slowly liberalize as they face the difficulties of state leadership? Or will it mean the growth of anti-Americanism and radicalization in the region? duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 4:00 pm
    Miller Center Forums [#1807] David Cunningham - Klansville, USA: the Rise and Fall of the Civil Rights-Era Ku Klux Klan DAVID CUNNINGHAM is associate professor and chair of sociology at Brandeis University's Social Justice & Social Policy Program. Cunningham has worked with the Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the Mississippi Truth Project. His current research focuses on the causes, consequences, and legacy of racial violence. Cunningham's most recent book, Klansville, U.S.A.: The Rise and Fall of the Civil Rights-Era Ku Klux Klan, is the first substantial history of the civil rights-era Ku Klux Klan's rise and fall. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 pm
    Rajneeshpuram In 1981, Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, a spiritual leader from India, and thousands of his disciples moved to Wasco and Jefferson Counties. On what had been the Big Muddy Ranch, the "sannyasins" set out to build a new city, a utopian community in the desert - - Rajneeshpuram. Thousands of people from around the world gathered here to celebrate life. They worked hard and transformed the landscape. And more than a few hoped to spend the rest of their days at this place. But by 1986, they were gone. duration 58:11   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3128] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5301H] President Obama is just six months into his second term and for most of that time his ambitious agenda has been overshadowed by a number of unexpected events and controversies. From the attention on gun legislation in the wake of the Newtown school shooting, to the string of controversies involving the IRS, Justice Department and NSA leaker Edward Snowden, the president seems to be facing hurdles and distractions at every turn.
    As the president tries to focus on addressing his key legislative priorities, Washington remains extremely polarized and the partisan divide on Capitol Hill continues. Even the bipartisan immigration reform bill that passed the Senate faces an uphill battle in the House.
    The Washington stalemate isn't going unnoticed by voters. A recent Gallup Poll found nearly 4 in 5 Americans, 78%, disapprove of the way Congress is handling its job, while the President's approval ratings continue to be under 50%.
    With the Congressional midterms just 16 months away, the White House recognizes the clock is ticking and the window for Mr. Obama to advance his priorities could be closing. The same is true for lawmakers up for re-election in 2014 who are aware every vote they cast could help or hurt their chances of reelection.
    The White House is also dealing with foreign policy challenges in Syria and escalating unrest in Egypt while the draw-down of US troops from Afghanistan continues.
    Gwen Ifill examines the successes and challenges for Congress and the Obama administration over the first half of 2013 plus takes a look ahead at the economic outlook for the remainder of the year with: Susan Davis of USA Today, John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News, David Wessel of The Wall Street Journal, and Jeff Zeleny of ABC News.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    Critical Condition: California's Emergency Rooms This documentary focuses on the crisis facing emergency rooms in California, and takes a look at the impact that overcrowded emergency rooms have on doctors, nurses and ultimately patients. duration 26:32   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#317H] Illuminating Depression/The Physics of Sailing Learn why depression is more than just "feeling blue" and what makes a sail boat move? The physics of sailing present some mysteries to modern sailors. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1213] Food Hour: Vietnam Megan starts her culinary tour of Vietnam in the Mekong Delta. Her first stop is Ho Chi Minh City where she visits the Pho Binh noodle shop, which also served as a resistance headquarters during the Vietnam War. Next it's off to Hue in central Vietnam where Megan samples the region's "Imperial" cuisine and then travels to Hanoi. She treks further north to Bac Ha, attends a traditional banquet hosted by the Flower H'mong tribe and ends her journey with a seafood feast in the scenic Ha Long Bay. duration 57:04   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2603H] American Eagle Unique to North America, the bald eagle is the continent's most recognizable aerial predator, with a shocking white head, electric yellow beak and penetrating eyes. In the 1960s, this symbol of the United States became an emblem of environmental degradation as the pesticide DDT and other human pressures brought it to the brink of extinction. Following their protection as an endangered species, bald eagles have come roaring back. Photographed by Emmy-winning cinematographer Neil Rettig, this film focuses on the drama of the nest. Even in the best of times, it's a surprisingly tough struggle to maintain a one-ton home and raise chicks until they can hunt on their own. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3714] Dogs Decoded Dogs have been domesticated for longer than any other animal on the planet and humans have developed a unique relationship with these furry friends. We treat our pets like a part of the family and we feel that they can understand us in a way other animals cannot. Now, new research is revealing what dog lovers have suspected all along: dogs have an uncanny ability to read and respond to human emotions. What is surprising, however, is new research showing that humans, in turn, respond to dogs with the same hormone responsible for bonding mothers to their babies. How did this incredible relationship between humans and dogs come to be? And how can dogs, so closely related to fearsome wild wolves, behave so differently? It's all in the genes. "Dogs Decoded" investigates new discoveries in genetics that are illuminating the origin of dogs -- with revealing implications for the evolution of human culture as well. NOVA also travels to Siberia, where the mystery of dogs' domestication is being repeated -- in foxes. A 50-year-old breeding program is creating an entirely new kind of creature, a tame fox with some surprising similarities to man's best friend. This film reveals the science behind the remarkable bond between humans and their dogs and spurs new questions about what this could mean for our relationships with other animal species. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Shelter Me [#102H] Let's Go Home This episode features stories about shelter pets that went from rescued to rescuer.The first story is about our hero firefighters who use shelter dogs for search-and-rescue. These teams have been to the World Trade Center and helped look for survivors in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Rita, Superstorm Sandy and the Joplin tornadoes. When a disaster strikes and people are buried, these search dogs will be the first on the scene to save you. We follow individuals who have adopted shelter dogs and are now volunteering at a hospital. These once-forgotten dogs are helping people heal by bringing comfort to patients and their families, not to mention joy to doctors and nurses. We also show a dramatic rescue of homeless puppies, an innovative spay/neuter clinic and a family adopting a beautiful cat at an animal shelter. duration 58:58   STEREO TVG
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#126] Follow The Leader A political coming-of-age documentary about three boys who want to be President. Over three life-changing years, each rethinks his beliefs and discovers who he truly wants to be as an adult. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Out of Order Now more than ever, American citizens are discontented and disillusioned with national politics, with approval ratings for Congress consistently ranking low regardless of the party in power. Senior politicians also note the disappearance of the collegiality they once shared with peers of differing political ideologies. As a result, the ability to discuss issues from varying points of view and negotiate solutions, appears to be fading from the American political process.
    Among many topics, this program addresses the decline in civil discourse and the news media's role in it, partisan gridlock, gerrymandering, vanishing commitment to reasonable compromise, the vilification of moderates and declining civic engagement. It relies on interviews with a broad range of political experts and observers from journalists, academics and political strategists to senior elected officials. They include: journalist Bob Schieffer (CBS News), Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA), Sen. Susan Collins (R-MA), Fmr Sen. Evan Bayh (D-IN), Fmr Sen. Alan Simpson (R-WY), Fmr Sen. John Warner (R-VA) .
    duration 27:17   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#218] Reading Like A Historian Reading Like A Historian: A detailed look at a cutting-edge history curriculum that turns away from textbooks. We'll join young "Historians in Training" as they examine original documents and engage in lively discussions to discover the complexities of history. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#226H] Surviving The New American Economy 22 years ago, Bill Moyers started documenting the story of two ordinary families in Milwaukee, Wisconsin - families whose breadwinners had lost well-paying factory jobs. Relying on the belief that hard work is the key to a good living and better life, the Stanleys and the Neumanns, like millions of others, went about pursuing the American dream. But as they found other jobs, got re-trained, and worked any time and overtime, they still found themselves on a downward slope, working harder and longer for less pay and fewer benefits, facing devastating challenges and difficult choices.
    This week, Moyers revisits his reports on the Stanleys and Neumanns - whose stories Bill updates on the July 9 Frontline report "Two American Families." He also talks with the authors of two important books about how the changing nature of the economy is affecting everyone: Barbara Miner, a public education advocate who's been following the decline of her own Milwaukee hometown for nearly 40 years; and author, activist and playwright Barbara Garson, who's published a number of books about the changing lives of working Americans. Her most recent is Down the Up Escalator: How the 99% Live in the Great Recession.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5301H] President Obama is just six months into his second term and for most of that time his ambitious agenda has been overshadowed by a number of unexpected events and controversies. From the attention on gun legislation in the wake of the Newtown school shooting, to the string of controversies involving the IRS, Justice Department and NSA leaker Edward Snowden, the president seems to be facing hurdles and distractions at every turn.
    As the president tries to focus on addressing his key legislative priorities, Washington remains extremely polarized and the partisan divide on Capitol Hill continues. Even the bipartisan immigration reform bill that passed the Senate faces an uphill battle in the House.
    The Washington stalemate isn't going unnoticed by voters. A recent Gallup Poll found nearly 4 in 5 Americans, 78%, disapprove of the way Congress is handling its job, while the President's approval ratings continue to be under 50%.
    With the Congressional midterms just 16 months away, the White House recognizes the clock is ticking and the window for Mr. Obama to advance his priorities could be closing. The same is true for lawmakers up for re-election in 2014 who are aware every vote they cast could help or hurt their chances of reelection.
    The White House is also dealing with foreign policy challenges in Syria and escalating unrest in Egypt while the draw-down of US troops from Afghanistan continues.
    Gwen Ifill examines the successes and challenges for Congress and the Obama administration over the first half of 2013 plus takes a look ahead at the economic outlook for the remainder of the year with: Susan Davis of USA Today, John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News, David Wessel of The Wall Street Journal, and Jeff Zeleny of ABC News.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3128] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Need To Know [#327H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2512H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#126] Follow The Leader A political coming-of-age documentary about three boys who want to be President. Over three life-changing years, each rethinks his beliefs and discovers who he truly wants to be as an adult. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    QUEST [#317H] Illuminating Depression/The Physics of Sailing Learn why depression is more than just "feeling blue" and what makes a sail boat move? The physics of sailing present some mysteries to modern sailors. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1644] CHICAGO MUSLIM COMMUNITY BUILDING - In a troubled neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Rami Nashashibi, a University of Chicago Ph.D., started the Inner City Muslim Action Network, IMAN, to provide the quality of life services that make a community a community. Lucky Severson reports on IMAN, the services it provides and its work with other faiths to improve the lives of the people of Chicago Lawn.
    BANGLADESH WORKER JUSTICE - In the wake of a building collapse in Bangladesh that left more than 1000 garment workers dead, Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Dhaka, Bangladesh on that country's dependence on the garment manufacturing industry, the second largest in the world and the price its low-wage workforce pays to maintain the country's powerful garment industry.
    HEARTBEAT - The Jerusalem-based band Heartbeat - whose musicians are both Israelis and Palestinians, and all of whom are between 17 and 21 - was on tour earlier this year in the US. RENW talked with them both about their music and about their absolute conviction that the transformative power of music can lead to mutual understanding and peace.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1002] Women, Investing & Retirement Part, 2 In part two of Consuelo Mack WealthTrack's women, investing and retirement series, award-winning financial advisor Erin Botsford and retirement and social security expert Mary Beth Franklin discuss the kinds of financial products women need to have a secure retirement. duration 27:26   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#223H] Ric Edelman and his staff check out young entrepreneurs at one of Silicon Valley's hot startups, advises a radio caller about the dangers of a sudden windfall and sits down with B. Smith and her husband Dan Gasby for insights into the world of top restaurants. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2512H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3128] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5301H] President Obama is just six months into his second term and for most of that time his ambitious agenda has been overshadowed by a number of unexpected events and controversies. From the attention on gun legislation in the wake of the Newtown school shooting, to the string of controversies involving the IRS, Justice Department and NSA leaker Edward Snowden, the president seems to be facing hurdles and distractions at every turn.
    As the president tries to focus on addressing his key legislative priorities, Washington remains extremely polarized and the partisan divide on Capitol Hill continues. Even the bipartisan immigration reform bill that passed the Senate faces an uphill battle in the House.
    The Washington stalemate isn't going unnoticed by voters. A recent Gallup Poll found nearly 4 in 5 Americans, 78%, disapprove of the way Congress is handling its job, while the President's approval ratings continue to be under 50%.
    With the Congressional midterms just 16 months away, the White House recognizes the clock is ticking and the window for Mr. Obama to advance his priorities could be closing. The same is true for lawmakers up for re-election in 2014 who are aware every vote they cast could help or hurt their chances of reelection.
    The White House is also dealing with foreign policy challenges in Syria and escalating unrest in Egypt while the draw-down of US troops from Afghanistan continues.
    Gwen Ifill examines the successes and challenges for Congress and the Obama administration over the first half of 2013 plus takes a look ahead at the economic outlook for the remainder of the year with: Susan Davis of USA Today, John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News, David Wessel of The Wall Street Journal, and Jeff Zeleny of ABC News.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    Critical Condition: California's Emergency Rooms This documentary focuses on the crisis facing emergency rooms in California, and takes a look at the impact that overcrowded emergency rooms have on doctors, nurses and ultimately patients. duration 26:32   STEREO TVG
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#226H] Surviving The New American Economy 22 years ago, Bill Moyers started documenting the story of two ordinary families in Milwaukee, Wisconsin - families whose breadwinners had lost well-paying factory jobs. Relying on the belief that hard work is the key to a good living and better life, the Stanleys and the Neumanns, like millions of others, went about pursuing the American dream. But as they found other jobs, got re-trained, and worked any time and overtime, they still found themselves on a downward slope, working harder and longer for less pay and fewer benefits, facing devastating challenges and difficult choices.
    This week, Moyers revisits his reports on the Stanleys and Neumanns - whose stories Bill updates on the July 9 Frontline report "Two American Families." He also talks with the authors of two important books about how the changing nature of the economy is affecting everyone: Barbara Miner, a public education advocate who's been following the decline of her own Milwaukee hometown for nearly 40 years; and author, activist and playwright Barbara Garson, who's published a number of books about the changing lives of working Americans. Her most recent is Down the Up Escalator: How the 99% Live in the Great Recession.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 pm
    Inside Washington [#2512H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3128] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2217H] EGYPTIAN UPRISING - the increase of sexual assault during Egypt's movement to oust Morsi.
    WOMEN SILENCED IN MOVIES - Why women's role in the film industry is not progressing.
    POVERTY IN THE SUBURBS - Poverty is becoming more prevalent in suburban areas rather than urban and rural areas.
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), President of National Network to End Domestic Violence Kim Gandy, Republican Strategist Rina Shah, Hadley Heath of the Independent Women's Forum.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 pm
    LinkAsia [#149] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:30 pm
    QUEST [#317H] Illuminating Depression/The Physics of Sailing Learn why depression is more than just "feeling blue" and what makes a sail boat move? The physics of sailing present some mysteries to modern sailors. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Need To Know [#327H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 pm
    Moyers & Company [#226H] Surviving The New American Economy 22 years ago, Bill Moyers started documenting the story of two ordinary families in Milwaukee, Wisconsin - families whose breadwinners had lost well-paying factory jobs. Relying on the belief that hard work is the key to a good living and better life, the Stanleys and the Neumanns, like millions of others, went about pursuing the American dream. But as they found other jobs, got re-trained, and worked any time and overtime, they still found themselves on a downward slope, working harder and longer for less pay and fewer benefits, facing devastating challenges and difficult choices.
    This week, Moyers revisits his reports on the Stanleys and Neumanns - whose stories Bill updates on the July 9 Frontline report "Two American Families." He also talks with the authors of two important books about how the changing nature of the economy is affecting everyone: Barbara Miner, a public education advocate who's been following the decline of her own Milwaukee hometown for nearly 40 years; and author, activist and playwright Barbara Garson, who's published a number of books about the changing lives of working Americans. Her most recent is Down the Up Escalator: How the 99% Live in the Great Recession.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5301H] President Obama is just six months into his second term and for most of that time his ambitious agenda has been overshadowed by a number of unexpected events and controversies. From the attention on gun legislation in the wake of the Newtown school shooting, to the string of controversies involving the IRS, Justice Department and NSA leaker Edward Snowden, the president seems to be facing hurdles and distractions at every turn.
    As the president tries to focus on addressing his key legislative priorities, Washington remains extremely polarized and the partisan divide on Capitol Hill continues. Even the bipartisan immigration reform bill that passed the Senate faces an uphill battle in the House.
    The Washington stalemate isn't going unnoticed by voters. A recent Gallup Poll found nearly 4 in 5 Americans, 78%, disapprove of the way Congress is handling its job, while the President's approval ratings continue to be under 50%.
    With the Congressional midterms just 16 months away, the White House recognizes the clock is ticking and the window for Mr. Obama to advance his priorities could be closing. The same is true for lawmakers up for re-election in 2014 who are aware every vote they cast could help or hurt their chances of reelection.
    The White House is also dealing with foreign policy challenges in Syria and escalating unrest in Egypt while the draw-down of US troops from Afghanistan continues.
    Gwen Ifill examines the successes and challenges for Congress and the Obama administration over the first half of 2013 plus takes a look ahead at the economic outlook for the remainder of the year with: Susan Davis of USA Today, John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News, David Wessel of The Wall Street Journal, and Jeff Zeleny of ABC News.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Inside Washington [#2512H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3128] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:00 pm
    Critical Condition: California's Emergency Rooms This documentary focuses on the crisis facing emergency rooms in California, and takes a look at the impact that overcrowded emergency rooms have on doctors, nurses and ultimately patients. duration 26:32   STEREO TVG
  • 6:30 pm
    QUEST [#317H] Illuminating Depression/The Physics of Sailing Learn why depression is more than just "feeling blue" and what makes a sail boat move? The physics of sailing present some mysteries to modern sailors. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 pm
    Revolutionaries [#206H] The Idea Factory Join author Jon Gertner for a fascinating conversation about Bell Labs, the epicenter of innovation and creativity in the early days of technological research. Founded in the 20s and with 13 Nobel Prize winners in its history, Bell Labs was a citadel of science and scholarship and a hotbed of creative thinking. KQED's Dave Iverson leads Gertner in a discussion about this factory of ideas whose workings have remained largely hidden until now. duration 53:12   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#226H] Surviving The New American Economy 22 years ago, Bill Moyers started documenting the story of two ordinary families in Milwaukee, Wisconsin - families whose breadwinners had lost well-paying factory jobs. Relying on the belief that hard work is the key to a good living and better life, the Stanleys and the Neumanns, like millions of others, went about pursuing the American dream. But as they found other jobs, got re-trained, and worked any time and overtime, they still found themselves on a downward slope, working harder and longer for less pay and fewer benefits, facing devastating challenges and difficult choices.
    This week, Moyers revisits his reports on the Stanleys and Neumanns - whose stories Bill updates on the July 9 Frontline report "Two American Families." He also talks with the authors of two important books about how the changing nature of the economy is affecting everyone: Barbara Miner, a public education advocate who's been following the decline of her own Milwaukee hometown for nearly 40 years; and author, activist and playwright Barbara Garson, who's published a number of books about the changing lives of working Americans. Her most recent is Down the Up Escalator: How the 99% Live in the Great Recession.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    America Reframed [#109] Meat Hooked This film is part the history of butchering, but mostly an entertaining look at the current phenomenon of environmentally conscience twenty and thirtysomethings bringing butchering back as a kind of new green collar job. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Tomlinson Hill In the mid-1800s just outside of Marlin, Texas, a slave plantation named Tomlinson Hill was founded by James K. Tomlinson. The establishment would have long lasting effects on the rural community. TOMLINSON HILL documents how the legacy of slavery in east and central Texas has created a region still divided despite the civil rights changes of the last 60 years. Reporter Chris Tomlinson, a descendant of slave owner James K. Tomlinson, confronts the shame and guilt he feels from his ancestry and digs deeper into the real legacy of the area. He comes across Loreane Tomlinson, a descendant of slaves on Tomlinson Hill, who has returned to her hometown with a vision of civic improvement. Says Tomlinson "After meeting Loreane, I knew I wanted the film to tell the story of my family history as well as her family history. Together, it's the story of America, as far as I'm concerned/" The documentary is a fascinating look at people trying to move on while others idly resist change. Can Marlin survive and transform not only the racial separation that exists, but the deep-rooted socio-economic divide as well? duration 56:33   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#606] Bolinao 52 A group of Vietnamese survivors of a tragic boat accident struggle to find peace years after the incident took place. duration 57:30   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Aspen Institute Presents [#203] Solving The Economic Puzzle One day the employment rate and stock market are up, and the next they are down. On the third episode of The Aspen Institute Presents, Solving the Economic Puzzle focuses on the creation of jobs in conventional and creative ways in the abstract and not-so-abstract concept of economy. Host Hari Sreenivasan of PBS NewsHour attends the conversation on The Challenge of Building American Jobs with professor Austan Goolsbee, former U.S. Secretary of Labor Elaine L. Chao, "Behind the Kitchen Door" author Saru Jayaraman, editor-in-chief Kevin J. Delaney of Quartz and American Action Forum's president Douglas Holtz-Eakin. Also, Walter Isaacson of The Aspen Institute speaks with Kickstarter founder Perry Chen in Kickstarter and the Economics of Creativity to discuss the project, and its effects on the creative field and "starving artists." duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Aspen Institute Presents [#204] Reinventing Television Television isn't just television; watch everything from news to comedies to sports and more at the touch of your finger via a television set, computer, tablet or smartphone now and later. The Aspen Institute Presents: Reinventing Television and host Jon Stewart of the BBC bring the best of three Aspen Ideas Festival sessions spotlighting the ever changing medium of television. Moderated by The Atlantic's James Fallows, the panel of Executive Director of International Operations Ehab Al Shihabi of Al Jazeera, lawyer Robert Barnett, MSNBC host Lawrence O'Donnell, Hari Sreenivasan of PBS NewsHour (and one of the hosts of The Aspen Institute Presents) talk about Can TV News Compete? against social media. A technologies, trends and innovations conversation with Twitter's Dick Costolo, former FFC Chairman Julius Genachowski and CEO Michael Lynton of Sony with Jerry Murdock looks to The Future of Your TV. Also, novelist and public radio host Kurt Andersen dissects What Do TV Shows Tell Us about Ourselves? with award-winning writer and producer James L. Brooks (Mary Tyler Moore, Taxi, The Simpsons). duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Aspen Institute Presents [#205] Privacy, Safety, and the Law Privacy or Safety? The continuing talk of the controversial issue is brought into question in the fifth and final episode of WORLD Channel's second season of The Aspen Institute Presents. The BBC's Jon Stewart hosts Privacy, Safety, and the Law, which weighs the importance of privacy and safety for both the government and citizens of the United States. National security experts, including former U.S. Representative of California Jane Harman, The Aspen Institute's Executive Vice President Elliott Gerson, former U.S. naval Vice Admiral Mike McConnell and national correspondent James Fallows of The Atlantic contribute to the conversation on if We Are Safe? in the nation. Legal commentator Jeffrey Rossen debates law professor Tim Wu over Matter of Debate: Is Privacy Paramount or Should We Live in a Transparent Society?, moderated by Jim Halpert. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#4071] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2940] Tavis talks with college professor Temple Grandin about her autism and her work with animal behavior. A leader of the autism advocacy movement, Grandin shares some of her own experiences with the disorder, as detailed in her book, The Autistic Brain. Tavis also talks with Oscar-nominated actress Toni Collette. Winner of several best actress awards for her star turn in United States of Tara, Collette describes her latest film, The Way, Way Back, and her return to series TV. duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 4:00 am
    LinkAsia [#202] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 4:30 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1644] CHICAGO MUSLIM COMMUNITY BUILDING - In a troubled neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Rami Nashashibi, a University of Chicago Ph.D., started the Inner City Muslim Action Network, IMAN, to provide the quality of life services that make a community a community. Lucky Severson reports on IMAN, the services it provides and its work with other faiths to improve the lives of the people of Chicago Lawn.
    BANGLADESH WORKER JUSTICE - In the wake of a building collapse in Bangladesh that left more than 1000 garment workers dead, Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Dhaka, Bangladesh on that country's dependence on the garment manufacturing industry, the second largest in the world and the price its low-wage workforce pays to maintain the country's powerful garment industry.
    HEARTBEAT - The Jerusalem-based band Heartbeat - whose musicians are both Israelis and Palestinians, and all of whom are between 17 and 21 - was on tour earlier this year in the US. RENW talked with them both about their music and about their absolute conviction that the transformative power of music can lead to mutual understanding and peace.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    America Reframed [#109] Meat Hooked This film is part the history of butchering, but mostly an entertaining look at the current phenomenon of environmentally conscience twenty and thirtysomethings bringing butchering back as a kind of new green collar job. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 6:00 am
    Tomlinson Hill In the mid-1800s just outside of Marlin, Texas, a slave plantation named Tomlinson Hill was founded by James K. Tomlinson. The establishment would have long lasting effects on the rural community. TOMLINSON HILL documents how the legacy of slavery in east and central Texas has created a region still divided despite the civil rights changes of the last 60 years. Reporter Chris Tomlinson, a descendant of slave owner James K. Tomlinson, confronts the shame and guilt he feels from his ancestry and digs deeper into the real legacy of the area. He comes across Loreane Tomlinson, a descendant of slaves on Tomlinson Hill, who has returned to her hometown with a vision of civic improvement. Says Tomlinson "After meeting Loreane, I knew I wanted the film to tell the story of my family history as well as her family history. Together, it's the story of America, as far as I'm concerned/" The documentary is a fascinating look at people trying to move on while others idly resist change. Can Marlin survive and transform not only the racial separation that exists, but the deep-rooted socio-economic divide as well? duration 56:33   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Global Voices [#606] Bolinao 52 A group of Vietnamese survivors of a tragic boat accident struggle to find peace years after the incident took place. duration 57:30   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    Global Voices [#121] The Flute Player/50/Fifty Arn Chorn-Pond's family was slaughtered by the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s, along with 90 percent of Cambodia's musicians and artists. Now living in the U.S., Arn is attempting to transcend the terrors of "Pol Pot time" by rescuing traditional Cambodian music from extinction. "The Flute Player" relates his journey back to a still-uneasy Cambodia to find surviving "master musicians" and to recover his own Cambodian identity. This episode also includes the short film "50/Fifty," a soulful requiem for a family's past. Using old home movies and hand-processed film, Jane Kim pays homage to the memory of her father, who passed away when she was young. "The Flute Player" originally aired as part of PBS' P.O.V. series. duration 56:12   STEREO TVPG
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2940] Tavis talks with college professor Temple Grandin about her autism and her work with animal behavior. A leader of the autism advocacy movement, Grandin shares some of her own experiences with the disorder, as detailed in her book, The Autistic Brain. Tavis also talks with Oscar-nominated actress Toni Collette. Winner of several best actress awards for her star turn in United States of Tara, Collette describes her latest film, The Way, Way Back, and her return to series TV. duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2939] Tavis revisits his conversation with history-making NBA head coach, aka the "Zen Master," Phil Jackson, which took place during the recent playoffs, and who sparks controversy with his new text, Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success. (originally broadcast 6/05/13) duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    LinkAsia [#202] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 10:30 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1644] CHICAGO MUSLIM COMMUNITY BUILDING - In a troubled neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Rami Nashashibi, a University of Chicago Ph.D., started the Inner City Muslim Action Network, IMAN, to provide the quality of life services that make a community a community. Lucky Severson reports on IMAN, the services it provides and its work with other faiths to improve the lives of the people of Chicago Lawn.
    BANGLADESH WORKER JUSTICE - In the wake of a building collapse in Bangladesh that left more than 1000 garment workers dead, Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Dhaka, Bangladesh on that country's dependence on the garment manufacturing industry, the second largest in the world and the price its low-wage workforce pays to maintain the country's powerful garment industry.
    HEARTBEAT - The Jerusalem-based band Heartbeat - whose musicians are both Israelis and Palestinians, and all of whom are between 17 and 21 - was on tour earlier this year in the US. RENW talked with them both about their music and about their absolute conviction that the transformative power of music can lead to mutual understanding and peace.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 am
    America Reframed [#109] Meat Hooked This film is part the history of butchering, but mostly an entertaining look at the current phenomenon of environmentally conscience twenty and thirtysomethings bringing butchering back as a kind of new green collar job. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 pm
    Tomlinson Hill In the mid-1800s just outside of Marlin, Texas, a slave plantation named Tomlinson Hill was founded by James K. Tomlinson. The establishment would have long lasting effects on the rural community. TOMLINSON HILL documents how the legacy of slavery in east and central Texas has created a region still divided despite the civil rights changes of the last 60 years. Reporter Chris Tomlinson, a descendant of slave owner James K. Tomlinson, confronts the shame and guilt he feels from his ancestry and digs deeper into the real legacy of the area. He comes across Loreane Tomlinson, a descendant of slaves on Tomlinson Hill, who has returned to her hometown with a vision of civic improvement. Says Tomlinson "After meeting Loreane, I knew I wanted the film to tell the story of my family history as well as her family history. Together, it's the story of America, as far as I'm concerned/" The documentary is a fascinating look at people trying to move on while others idly resist change. Can Marlin survive and transform not only the racial separation that exists, but the deep-rooted socio-economic divide as well? duration 56:33   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    Global Voices [#606] Bolinao 52 A group of Vietnamese survivors of a tragic boat accident struggle to find peace years after the incident took place. duration 57:30   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#4071] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#9135] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2940] Tavis talks with college professor Temple Grandin about her autism and her work with animal behavior. A leader of the autism advocacy movement, Grandin shares some of her own experiences with the disorder, as detailed in her book, The Autistic Brain. Tavis also talks with Oscar-nominated actress Toni Collette. Winner of several best actress awards for her star turn in United States of Tara, Collette describes her latest film, The Way, Way Back, and her return to series TV. duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32154] Tonight on Nightly Business Report.. Alcoa kicks off earnings season. We'll talk to the CEO about the numbers, outlook and his plans to turn around the slumping stock. And, we'll tell you why three funds may be all you need to have a well-diversified portfolio. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10706] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32154] Tonight on Nightly Business Report.. Alcoa kicks off earnings season. We'll talk to the CEO about the numbers, outlook and his plans to turn around the slumping stock. And, we'll tell you why three funds may be all you need to have a well-diversified portfolio. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2246] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#4071] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3376] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10706] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3376] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#19141] (original broadcast date: 7/08/13)
    an hour with Bill Moyers on his Frontline documentary about the middle class called "Two American Families."
    duration 56:47   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3376] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2941] Tavis talks with Israel's ambassador to the US Michael Oren, who weighs in on the situation in Egypt and its impact on US policy in the Middle East. Tavis also chats with former members of the pioneering hip-hop group, the Sugarhill Gang. Wonder Mike and Master Gee discuss their decades-long battle to reclaim their legacy. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3376] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#704H] In Fort Collins, Colorado, Calvin, Tina, and Vanessa stop to have a pint with Jennifer Orgolini, Sustainability Director, and Bryan Simpson, Media Relations Director, of New Belgium Brewing Company. The team then proceeds to Kansas City to interview Greg Carroll, CEO of the American Jazz Museum. Across town, they are also able to connect with Michelle Dreher, printmaker, owner, and operator of Two Tone Press. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3376] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10706] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3376] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2246] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10706] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32154] Tonight on Nightly Business Report.. Alcoa kicks off earnings season. We'll talk to the CEO about the numbers, outlook and his plans to turn around the slumping stock. And, we'll tell you why three funds may be all you need to have a well-diversified portfolio. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2940] Tavis talks with college professor Temple Grandin about her autism and her work with animal behavior. A leader of the autism advocacy movement, Grandin shares some of her own experiences with the disorder, as detailed in her book, The Autistic Brain. Tavis also talks with Oscar-nominated actress Toni Collette. Winner of several best actress awards for her star turn in United States of Tara, Collette describes her latest film, The Way, Way Back, and her return to series TV. duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 2:00 am
    Global Voices [#606] Bolinao 52 A group of Vietnamese survivors of a tragic boat accident struggle to find peace years after the incident took place. duration 57:30