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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, October 20, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, October 20, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#206] Plagues and Pleasures on the Salton Sea Once known as the California Riviera, the Salton Sea is now called one of America's worst ecological disasters: a fetid, stagnant, salty lake, that coughs up dead fish and birds by the thousands in frequent die-offs that occur. However, amongst the ruins of this man-made mistake, a few remaining eccentrics (a roadside nudist, a religious folk artist, a Hungarian revolutionary, and real estate speculators) struggle to keep a remodeled version of the original Salton Sea dream alive. Accidentally created by an engineering error in 1905, reworked in the 50's as a world class vacation destination for the rich and famous, suddenly abandoned after a series of hurricanes, floods, and fish die-offs, and finally almost saved by Congressman Sonny Bono, the Salton Sea has a bittersweet past. The film shares these people's stories and their difficulties in keeping their unique community alive, as the nearby cities of Los Angeles and San Diego attempt to take the agricultural water run-off that barely sustains the Salton Sea. While covering the historical, economic, political, and environmental issues that face the Sea, this program offers an offbeat portrait of the peculiar and individualistic people who populate its shores. It is an epic western tale of fantastic real estate ventures and failed boomtowns, inner-city gangs fleeing to white small town America, and the subjective notion of success and failure amidst the ruins of the past. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Knee Deep This program follows a culturally diverse group of dedicated senior citizens who are pooling their collective knowledge for a common cause: the environmental health of the Delaware Valley's waterways. The Park Senior Environment Corps is quietly generating scientific data that someday will feed into a global database documenting the long-term health of the world's rivers and streams, and possibly spur changes in the management of water and waste. The documentary also highlights how the volunteer organization prioritized environmental education within their community, particularly with schoolchildren. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#201] The New Teacher Experience The New Teacher Experience: Follow two teachers in Los Angeles, CA for an intimate look at what the experience is really like. Many beginning teachers in America are given keys to their classroom and left to sink or swim in isolation, but, with the support of mentors, these teachers persevere through the trials and tribulations of their first year of teaching. duration 57:59   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#241H] America's Political Breakdown * After a 16-day shutdown, there's finally a deal to raise the debt limit and reopen the government. But the can's just been kicked down the road - another Congressional confrontation over spending cuts, entitlement programs and possible default will take place within a few months. Nonetheless, Martin Wolf, the chief economics commentator of the Financial Times, believes that no matter the rhetoric and flamethrowing, the debt ceiling has to be raised because the alternatives are "simply, unimaginably horrible."
    This week, Wolf - who has been described as "the premier financial and economics writer in the world" - joins Bill Moyers for a discussion of the current DC crisis and its potentially lethal impact on the global economy. Wolf views the debt ceiling as the legislative equivalent of a nuclear bomb the US has aimed at itself. But its deadly fallout could spread everywhere.
    * Bill also speaks with media scholar Sherry Turkle, who says that the Internet and social media have changed not only what we do but also who we are. She's a clinical psychologist and one of the first to study the impact of computers on culture and society. A professor at MIT and director of the university's Initiative on Technology and Self, Turkle has written several important books, her most recent, Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5316H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3143H] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#114] Senator Claire McCaskill of Missouri on the deal that ended the government shutdown; Graydon Carter of Vanity Fair; Mariano Rivera reflects on his career; James Levine, music director of the Metropolitan Opera. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2527H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#206] Plagues and Pleasures on the Salton Sea Once known as the California Riviera, the Salton Sea is now called one of America's worst ecological disasters: a fetid, stagnant, salty lake, that coughs up dead fish and birds by the thousands in frequent die-offs that occur. However, amongst the ruins of this man-made mistake, a few remaining eccentrics (a roadside nudist, a religious folk artist, a Hungarian revolutionary, and real estate speculators) struggle to keep a remodeled version of the original Salton Sea dream alive. Accidentally created by an engineering error in 1905, reworked in the 50's as a world class vacation destination for the rich and famous, suddenly abandoned after a series of hurricanes, floods, and fish die-offs, and finally almost saved by Congressman Sonny Bono, the Salton Sea has a bittersweet past. The film shares these people's stories and their difficulties in keeping their unique community alive, as the nearby cities of Los Angeles and San Diego attempt to take the agricultural water run-off that barely sustains the Salton Sea. While covering the historical, economic, political, and environmental issues that face the Sea, this program offers an offbeat portrait of the peculiar and individualistic people who populate its shores. It is an epic western tale of fantastic real estate ventures and failed boomtowns, inner-city gangs fleeing to white small town America, and the subjective notion of success and failure amidst the ruins of the past. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    QUEST [#702H] Lake Tahoe: Can We Save It? Lake Tahoe's clear, blue waters attract 3 million visitors to California and Nevada each year. But the lake is still paying the price of the rampant development that took place in the 1960s and now faces a new threat in climate change. Meet the small army of scientists and others who toil behind the scenes to turn back the clock to a time when you could see 100 feet down into the lake. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1707] LAWYERS FOR JUSTICE - In much of Asia where poverty is widespread, the rule of law weak and human rights only starting to get traction, lawyers generally represent only the rich and powerful. Lucky Severson reports from Chiang Mai, Thailand on Bruce Lasky, a lawyer from New York who is working with law schools in Southeast Asia to set up pro bono legal clinics to help the poor and disenfranchised there.
    12 YEARS A SLAVE - The powerful movie 12 Years a Slave, based on a true story of a free black man kidnapped and sold into slavery, premieres this weekend. Deborah Potter interviews the film's director, the lead actor and Princeton Theological Seminary professor Yolanda Pierce, on how the Bible was used both to justify slavery and also to inspire slaves and abolitionists to work for freedom.
    CONSERVATIVE JUDAISM CENTENNIAL - A century after its founding, Conservative Judaism still represents a centrist approach to Jewish life, one that is both rooted in tradition and informed by modernity. But it faces challenges as membership declines and leaders look for ways to expand outreach, especially to younger Jews.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1017] Dirty Words of Finance Leverage. Derivatives. Shorting. The three "dirty words" of finance, according to this week's guest, became a regular part of our vocabulary after the 2008 financial crisis, but how can investors get back to "clean" investing principles? Our Financial Thought Leader this week is Cliff Asness, Managing and Founding Principal of AQR Capital Management, a global investment management firm which runs hedge funds, mutual funds, and a diversified collection of investment strategies. In this rare interview, he'll discuss the three legs of his "investment stool" and the tools we can use to diversify our portfolios. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#307H] Ric Edelman has some credit-worthy advice for a woman who is just starting out and has no credit history. How do you know that you are saving the right amount to fund your Golden Years? Listen to what Ric says about that. You may have heard about 3D printing but what is 4D printing, and how can you profit from it? Ric talks with Avi Reichental, a leading 4D printing expert. And change is inevitable, that's just a fact of life, but in The Other Side of Money Jean Edelman explains how change is also good. All that and much more in this edition of The Truth about Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2527H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3143H] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5316H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#101H] BART Unions Strike and a Conversation with Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye
    BART Unions Strike After Negotiations Collapse
    The breakdown of negotiations between BART management and the workers' unions affects commuters, employers, and businesses across the Bay Area. The BART strike and an ongoing labor dispute between AC Transit and its workers raises questions about the role of unions and whether transit workers should even be banned from striking.

    A Conversation With Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye
    In her nearly three years as Chief Justice of the California Supreme Court, Tani Cantil-Sakauye has weathered severe state budget cuts, revolt by a band of unhappy lower court judges and controversy over a bloated statewide computer system she inherited from her predecessor. She sat down with senior correspondent Scott Shafer to talk about crime, punishment, how growing up the daughter of Filipino-Portuguese farmworkers affects her view from the bench and what she learned from her years as a blackjack dealer in Las Vegas.

    Further Report: State Supreme Court Chief Justice Decries 'Two-Tier System'

    Vaccine Refusals at Record High in Marin
    In Marin County, many health experts are alarmed about a growing trend: a rising number of parents who choose to delay or skip vaccines for highly contagious diseases. County public health officials say the number of vaccinated kindergarteners has dipped so low in many schools that it's only a matter of time before a serious measles outbreak occurs.

    Further Report: Health Officials: Marin Parents Opting Out of Vaccines Put Community at Risk

    duration 1:20:00   STEREO
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#241H] America's Political Breakdown * After a 16-day shutdown, there's finally a deal to raise the debt limit and reopen the government. But the can's just been kicked down the road - another Congressional confrontation over spending cuts, entitlement programs and possible default will take place within a few months. Nonetheless, Martin Wolf, the chief economics commentator of the Financial Times, believes that no matter the rhetoric and flamethrowing, the debt ceiling has to be raised because the alternatives are "simply, unimaginably horrible."
    This week, Wolf - who has been described as "the premier financial and economics writer in the world" - joins Bill Moyers for a discussion of the current DC crisis and its potentially lethal impact on the global economy. Wolf views the debt ceiling as the legislative equivalent of a nuclear bomb the US has aimed at itself. But its deadly fallout could spread everywhere.
    * Bill also speaks with media scholar Sherry Turkle, who says that the Internet and social media have changed not only what we do but also who we are. She's a clinical psychologist and one of the first to study the impact of computers on culture and society. A professor at MIT and director of the university's Initiative on Technology and Self, Turkle has written several important books, her most recent, Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    QUEST [#702H] Lake Tahoe: Can We Save It? Lake Tahoe's clear, blue waters attract 3 million visitors to California and Nevada each year. But the lake is still paying the price of the rampant development that took place in the 1960s and now faces a new threat in climate change. Meet the small army of scientists and others who toil behind the scenes to turn back the clock to a time when you could see 100 feet down into the lake. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    History Detectives [#510] Uss Thresher/Pete Gray Cartoon/Manhattan Project Letter * USS Thresher - A contributor in Chicopee, Massachusetts, has a stack of technical drawings and engineering documents he found in his late great-uncle's basement some years ago. A few of the documents bear the numbers and letters SSN-593, an appellation that belonged to the nuclear submarine USS Thresher, an attack class vessel that had been the pride of the U. S. Navy during the Cold War. On April 10, 1963, the Thresher was undergoing deep-sea trials when, along with its nuclear reactor, the vessel and all hands sank 220 miles off the coast of Massachusetts. Gwen Wright travels to New York, New Jersey and Massachusetts to explore one of the most traumatic events in U.S. Naval history and to determine just how the contributor's great-uncle could've come into possession of documents linked to one of the most secret weapons in the U.S. Cold War arsenal.
    * Pete Gray Cartoon - A comic book collector in Brooklyn, New York, owns several storyboards from a cartoon comic strip dating to the immediate post-World War II period. The strip relates the story of Pete Gray, the first one-armed major league baseball player, who later became an icon for disabled WWII veterans. The contributor is curious to learn the identity of the mystery cartoonist. Because many artists from the golden age of cartoons - the late 1930s through the 50s - often moonlighted in advertising or more "respectable" trades, their identities were often undisclosed. Elyse Luray heads to Baltimore's Camden Yards and to comics hot spots in New York City to examine how cartoon artists helped reframe popular culture in the mid-20th century.
    * Manhattan Project Letter - A contributor in New York City has a scrapbook of typed and handwritten documents connected with the top-secret Manhattan Project, which developed the United States' first nuclear bombs during World War II. The most intriguing item is a letter dated just after the war. It's a plea for reduced secrecy regarding nuclear affairs in the scientific community once hostilities ended. Did the scientists' letter help persuade President Harry S. Truman to change policy in the post-war era? Host Wes Cowan leads HD to New York City to track down the authors of the documents and to explore the delicate balance between science, military power and democracy.
    duration 56:03   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1219] Globe Trekker Food Hour: Lebanon The rich soil and varied history of Lebanon have resulted in a world-class cuisine. Merrilees Parker travels to the capital of Beirut and then in to the countryside of Lebanon to learn more about its people, their culture and their cuisine. duration 56:05   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Nature [#3101] Saving Otter 501 On a typical late summer day a baby sea otter washes up on the beach in Monterey, California - hungry, lost, injured. It's a tragic event, but not surprising. California sea otters are struggling. For decades marine biologist Karl Mayer and his small staff have worked unceasingly - one otter at a time - to bring this "keystone" species back from the brink of extinction so it can play its important role in the local marine environment. But the effort has stalled, and no one knows why.
    This is the story of the Monterey Bay Aquarium's 501st attempt to save an orphan otter. From her discovery as a stranded newborn pup crying on the beach through her rehabilitation in secret roof tanks atop the Aquarium, we follow as Otter 501 learns how to dive, hunt, eat, and fend for herself in the wild, where survival is a long shot at best.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    Nova [#4018#] Making Stuff Faster In this mini-series, New York Times' technology correspondent and best-selling author David Pogue takes a wild ride through the cutting-edge science that is powering a next wave of technological innovation. With his humor and zest for discovery, Pogue meets the scientists and engineers who are plunging to the bottom of the temperature scale, finding design inspiration in nature, and breaking every speed limit to make tomorrow's "stuff" colder, faster, wilder and safer. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 5:00 pm
    Raw to Ready [#101#] Komatsu To extract precious metals found beneath the earth requires a massive 232-ton, two-story-tall dump truck with a load capacity of 320 tons - a giant earth-mover like the Komatsu 930-E. This amazing engineering achievement is made possible by five essential raw ingredients: coal, chromium, mineral oil, latex rubber and sulphuric acid, an electron superhighway that generates massive power. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#114H] Included: a report from Hawaii, where a battle has erupted in Kauai between residents who claim they are getting sick and large companies developing genetically modified seeds. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#101H] BART Unions Strike and a Conversation with Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye
    BART Unions Strike After Negotiations Collapse
    The breakdown of negotiations between BART management and the workers' unions affects commuters, employers, and businesses across the Bay Area. The BART strike and an ongoing labor dispute between AC Transit and its workers raises questions about the role of unions and whether transit workers should even be banned from striking.

    A Conversation With Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye
    In her nearly three years as Chief Justice of the California Supreme Court, Tani Cantil-Sakauye has weathered severe state budget cuts, revolt by a band of unhappy lower court judges and controversy over a bloated statewide computer system she inherited from her predecessor. She sat down with senior correspondent Scott Shafer to talk about crime, punishment, how growing up the daughter of Filipino-Portuguese farmworkers affects her view from the bench and what she learned from her years as a blackjack dealer in Las Vegas.

    Further Report: State Supreme Court Chief Justice Decries 'Two-Tier System'

    Vaccine Refusals at Record High in Marin
    In Marin County, many health experts are alarmed about a growing trend: a rising number of parents who choose to delay or skip vaccines for highly contagious diseases. County public health officials say the number of vaccinated kindergarteners has dipped so low in many schools that it's only a matter of time before a serious measles outbreak occurs.

    Further Report: Health Officials: Marin Parents Opting Out of Vaccines Put Community at Risk

    duration 1:20:00   STEREO
  • 7:00 pm
    Aspen Institute Presents [#204] Reinventing Television Television isn't just television; watch everything from news to comedies to sports and more at the touch of your finger via a television set, computer, tablet or smartphone now and later. The Aspen Institute Presents: Reinventing Television and host Jon Stewart of the BBC bring the best of three Aspen Ideas Festival sessions spotlighting the ever changing medium of television. Moderated by The Atlantic's James Fallows, the panel of Executive Director of International Operations Ehab Al Shihabi of Al Jazeera, lawyer Robert Barnett, MSNBC host Lawrence O'Donnell, Hari Sreenivasan of PBS NewsHour (and one of the hosts of The Aspen Institute Presents) talk about Can TV News Compete? against social media. A technologies, trends and innovations conversation with Twitter's Dick Costolo, former FFC Chairman Julius Genachowski and CEO Michael Lynton of Sony with Jerry Murdock looks to The Future of Your TV. Also, novelist and public radio host Kurt Andersen dissects What Do TV Shows Tell Us about Ourselves? with award-winning writer and producer James L. Brooks (Mary Tyler Moore, Taxi, The Simpsons). duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#241H] America's Political Breakdown * After a 16-day shutdown, there's finally a deal to raise the debt limit and reopen the government. But the can's just been kicked down the road - another Congressional confrontation over spending cuts, entitlement programs and possible default will take place within a few months. Nonetheless, Martin Wolf, the chief economics commentator of the Financial Times, believes that no matter the rhetoric and flamethrowing, the debt ceiling has to be raised because the alternatives are "simply, unimaginably horrible."
    This week, Wolf - who has been described as "the premier financial and economics writer in the world" - joins Bill Moyers for a discussion of the current DC crisis and its potentially lethal impact on the global economy. Wolf views the debt ceiling as the legislative equivalent of a nuclear bomb the US has aimed at itself. But its deadly fallout could spread everywhere.
    * Bill also speaks with media scholar Sherry Turkle, who says that the Internet and social media have changed not only what we do but also who we are. She's a clinical psychologist and one of the first to study the impact of computers on culture and society. A professor at MIT and director of the university's Initiative on Technology and Self, Turkle has written several important books, her most recent, Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    America Reframed [#206] Plagues and Pleasures on the Salton Sea Once known as the California Riviera, the Salton Sea is now called one of America's worst ecological disasters: a fetid, stagnant, salty lake, that coughs up dead fish and birds by the thousands in frequent die-offs that occur. However, amongst the ruins of this man-made mistake, a few remaining eccentrics (a roadside nudist, a religious folk artist, a Hungarian revolutionary, and real estate speculators) struggle to keep a remodeled version of the original Salton Sea dream alive. Accidentally created by an engineering error in 1905, reworked in the 50's as a world class vacation destination for the rich and famous, suddenly abandoned after a series of hurricanes, floods, and fish die-offs, and finally almost saved by Congressman Sonny Bono, the Salton Sea has a bittersweet past. The film shares these people's stories and their difficulties in keeping their unique community alive, as the nearby cities of Los Angeles and San Diego attempt to take the agricultural water run-off that barely sustains the Salton Sea. While covering the historical, economic, political, and environmental issues that face the Sea, this program offers an offbeat portrait of the peculiar and individualistic people who populate its shores. It is an epic western tale of fantastic real estate ventures and failed boomtowns, inner-city gangs fleeing to white small town America, and the subjective notion of success and failure amidst the ruins of the past. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 pm
    QUEST [#702H] Lake Tahoe: Can We Save It? Lake Tahoe's clear, blue waters attract 3 million visitors to California and Nevada each year. But the lake is still paying the price of the rampant development that took place in the 1960s and now faces a new threat in climate change. Meet the small army of scientists and others who toil behind the scenes to turn back the clock to a time when you could see 100 feet down into the lake. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#603] When Hari Got Married Hari, a 30-year-old taxi driver in the Indian Himalayas, is getting married to a girl he has never met but has fallen in love with over the mobile phone. duration 53:53   STEREO
  • 12:00 am
    Global Voices [#303] China Blue duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
Sunday, October 20, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

    • KQED DT9s Over the Air: beginning Wed 7/09

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) The PSIP Info part of our Over the Air (OTA) signal for KQED DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3 dropped out of our overall signal early Wednesday 7/09. Once PSIP was restored most OTA receivers moved our signal back to the correct channel locations. However, for some viewers, it appears as if they have lost […]

    • KQED FM 88.1 translator off air Tues 6/03

      The Martinez translator for KQED-FM will be off the air all day Tuesday June 3rd. We are rebuilding the 25 year old site with all new antennas and cabling. This should only affect people listening on 88.1MHz in the Martinez/Benicia area.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too